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-rw-r--r--README32
1 files changed, 13 insertions, 19 deletions
diff --git a/README b/README
index 94ec8d9..7de1140 100644
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -45,13 +45,13 @@ alter the default installation paths. For example, to install to the
Please refer to the INSTALL document in this directory for a
discussion of available options to configure and their effect.
After installing the package, copy the file src/ping903.conf to
/etc/ping903.conf and edit it to your liking. This file contains
configuration settings that control the behavior of the server daemon
-and, to a certain extent, that of a query tool. The file contains
+and, to a certain extent, that of the query tool. The file contains
short annotations before each statement to help you navigate through
it. You will find a detailed discussion of the configuration file in
the manpage ping903.conf(5). What follows is a short outline, intended
for quick start.
At the very beginning you can leave most settings at their default
@@ -83,15 +83,15 @@ You are not required to keep all your IP addresses in a single file.
If necessary, you can scatter them among several files and name each
of them in a separate ip-list statement.
IP addresses listed in ip-list files form the "immutable" IP list,
called so because it cannot be altered while the program is running.
The REST API allows the user to add any number of IP addresses at
-runtime as well as remove any of IP addresses added this way. These
-addresses form the "mutable" IP list. Mutable IP list is preserved
-across program restarts.
+runtime as well as to remove any of IP addresses added this way.
+These addresses form the "mutable" IP list. Mutable IP list is
+preserved across program restarts.
This means that actually the immutable IP list is optional. You may
choose to keep monitored addresses in an external storage (an SQL
database, for example) and load them dynamically after the daemon
has started. A working example program for adding IP addresses from
a MySQL database is shipped in the examples directory. A full-fledged
@@ -99,14 +99,14 @@ client package able to add or delete keywords at runtime, both
individually or in batches and providing another features is available
from <http://git.gnu.org.ua/cgit/ping903/mangemanche.git>.
Normally, the ip-list file should contain IP addresses of the hosts to
monitor. It is OK, however, to use symbolic DNS names, too. If a
hostname resolves to a single A record, such usage is equivalent to
-placing that IP in the ip-list. However, if the hostnames resolves to
-multiple IPs, only first one will be used.
+placing that IP in the ip-list. However, if it resolves to multiple IPs,
+only the first one will be used.
By default, the server will wake up each minute and send 10 echo
requests within 1 second intervals to each registered IP. If the
number of collected replies is less than 7, the IP will be declared as
dead ("alive": false, in the returned JSON). Otherwise it is
considered alive ("alive": true).
@@ -145,15 +145,15 @@ and in the syslog channel "daemon"). To verify if the daemon is
operational, run
curl http://localhost:8080/config
This should return the running configuration.
-Within the next 'probe-interval' seconds the server will collect
-enough statistics to answer your queries. You can request information
-about any particular IP from your ip-list by running
+Within the first 'probe-interval' seconds after startup, the daemon will
+collect enough statistics to answer your queries. You can request
+information about any particular IP from your ip-list by running
ping903q IP
This will return the current status of the IP, e.g.
$ ping903q 203.0.113.1
@@ -178,17 +178,17 @@ To check the current status of all hosts, run
$ ping903q -a
Note, that depending on your settings the output can be huge.
Please refer to ping903q(1), for a detailed discussion of the tool.
-* System start-up sequence
+* Startup scripts
-To configure ping903 to start automatically at the system start-up,
-see the "rc" subdirectory. It contains start up scripts for various
-flavors of GNU/Linux distributions.
+The package includes startup scripts for several major GNU/Linux
+distributions. Please refer to rc/README for instructions on
+adding ping903 to the operating system startup and shutdown sequences.
* Nagios external check
The ping903q tool can be used as a Nagios external check program. The
following snippet illustrates the simple Nagios configuration that
makes use of it:
@@ -206,18 +206,12 @@ makes use of it:
service_description Server status
check_command check_ping903!200.0,20%!600.0,60%
check_interval 5
retry_interval 1
}
-* Startup scripts
-
-The package includes startup scripts for several major GNU/Linux
-distributions. Please refer to rc/README for instructions on
-adding ping903 to the operating system startup and shutdown sequences.
-
* Installation from a git clone
If you are building from a clone of the Git repository, you will need
GNU autotools to bootstrap the package first. Run
./bootstrap

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