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authorSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org>2020-02-16 23:12:36 +0200
committerSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org>2020-02-16 23:12:36 +0200
commit0af947c35520bea53c43b79cbbcd1f4a44b65952 (patch)
tree6ca31a3de1739bf411776aa52a345a8b8bec7efc
parenta744738cb14e7d0c9cb5d4ea6d64247db5a8822c (diff)
downloadping903-0af947c35520bea53c43b79cbbcd1f4a44b65952.tar.gz
ping903-0af947c35520bea53c43b79cbbcd1f4a44b65952.tar.bz2
Change some wording
-rw-r--r--README42
1 files changed, 21 insertions, 21 deletions
diff --git a/README b/README
index b80f596..a478c99 100644
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -8,19 +8,19 @@ remote hosts using ICMP ECHO packets. The system is built using the
client-server architecture. The main component (ping903) is a daemon
that sits in memory and wakes up periodically to send certain number
of ICMP echo packets to a preconfigured number of hosts and to collect
-replies. The round-trip statistics it collects is made available via
+replies. The resulting round-trip statistics is made available via
REST API.
The daemon reads its settings from a plain text configuration file.
-Most settings have sensible defaults, the only thing that the user
-must supply is a list of IP addresses to monitor. This list is
-referred to in this document as "ip-list".
+Most settings have sensible defaults, so that the only thing that the
+user must supply to get started is a list of IP addresses to monitor.
+This list is referred to in this document as "ip-list".
A simple command line client utility (ping903q) allows the user to
communicate with the daemon, obtaining the needed information about
each host in particular, or all monitored hosts at once. This utility
can operate in several modes. In particular, it can be used as
-Nagios external check tool, instead of the standard check_ping tool.
+Nagios external check tool, instead of the standard check_ping utility.
* Installation
@@ -49,10 +49,10 @@ After installing the package, copy the file src/ping903.conf to
/etc/ping903.conf and edit it to your liking. This file contains
configuration settings that control the behavior of the server daemon
and, to a certain extent, that of a query tool. The file contains
-short annotations before each statement to help you navigate in it.
-You will find a detailed discussion of the configuration file in the
-manpage ping903.conf(5). What follows is a short outline intended
-for quick start:
+short annotations before each statement to help you navigate through
+it. You will find a detailed discussion of the configuration file in
+the manpage ping903.conf(5). What follows is a short outline intended
+for quick start.
At the very beginning you can leave most settings at their default
values. The only statement that you must provide in your
@@ -67,12 +67,12 @@ Comments are introduced by a hash sign (#) appearing as the first
non-whitespace character on a line.
You are not required to keep all your IP addresses in a single file.
-If necessary, you can scatter them among several files and list each
+If necessary, you can scatter them among several files and name each
of them in a separate ip-list statement.
Normally, the ip-list file should contain IP addresses of the hosts to
monitor. It is OK, however, to use symbolic DNS names, too. If a
-hostname resolves to a single A record such usage is equivalent to
+hostname resolves to a single A record, such usage is equivalent to
placing that IP in the ip-list. However, if the hostnames resolves to
multiple IPs, only first one will be used.
@@ -112,15 +112,15 @@ Refer to hosts_access(3) for details.
When you have configured the daemon, start it. Just run ping903.
Check if there are no errors (on the standard error and in the
-syslog channel "daemon"). To verify if it is operational, run
+syslog channel "daemon"). To verify if the daemon is operational, run
curl http://localhost:8080/config
This should return the running configuration.
-Within next probe-interval seconds the server will collect enough
-statistics to answer your queries. You can request information about
-any particular IP from your ip-list by running
+Within the next 'probe-interval' seconds the server will collect
+enough statistics to answer your queries. You can request information
+about any particular IP from your ip-list by running
ping903q IP
@@ -144,13 +144,13 @@ You can check the current status of all hosts by running
without arguments. Note, that depending on your settings the output
can be huge.
-
+
Please refer to ping903q(1), for a detailed discussion of the tool.
* Nagios external check
The ping903q tool can be used as a Nagios external check program. The
-following snipped illustrates the simple Nagios configuration that
+following snippet illustrates the simple Nagios configuration that
makes use of it:
# Define the check_ping903 command
@@ -195,9 +195,9 @@ character string and must coincide exactly with the IP or hostname as
it was supplied in configuration. In particular, if a host was
specified by its symbolic DNS name in the configuration, exactly that
name must be used in URL to obtain statistics for that host. If you
-wish to use IP, see the </ip> or </match> endpoints, discussed below.
+wish to use IP, see the "/ip" or "/match" endpoints, discussed below.
-On success a JSON object is returned. The following keys are defined
+On success, a JSON object is returned. The following keys are defined
in that object:
- "name": string
@@ -208,10 +208,10 @@ ip-list.
- "validity": boolean
Status of this record. If false, the data has not been collected yet
-or the host is unreachable. More detailed information is available in
+or the host is unreachable. A more detailed information is available in
the "status" member (see below). If "validity" is false, only the
following keys are warranted to be present in the object: "name",
-"validity", "status", and "xmit-timestamp". If it is true, full
+"validity", "status", and "xmit-timestamp". If it is true, the full
statistics is available as described below.
- "status": string

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