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@@ -128,22 +128,22 @@ knowledge base should contact:
<p><hw>Dab"bling*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a dabbling manner.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dab"chick`</hw> <pr>(d<acr/b"ch<icr/k`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[For <ets>dabchick</ets>. See <er>Dap</er>, <er>Dip</er>, cf. <er>Dipchick</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small water bird (<spn>Podilymbus podiceps</spn>), allied to the grebes, remarkable for its quickness in diving; -- called also <altname>dapchick</altname>, <altname>dobchick</altname>, <altname>dipchick</altname>, <altname>didapper</altname>, <altname>dobber</altname>, <altname>devil-diver</altname>, <altname>hell-diver</altname>, and <altname>pied-billed grebe</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da*boi"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large and highly venomous Asiatic viper (<spn>Daboia xanthica</spn>).</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da*boi"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large and highly venomous Asiatic viper (<spn>Daboia xanthica</spn>).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dab"ster</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Dab</er> an expert.]</ety> <def>One who is skilled; a master of his business; a proficient; an adept.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ Sometimes improperly used for <xex>dabbler</xex>; as, \'bdI am but a <xex>dabster</xex> with gentle art\'b8.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da`ca"po</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., from [the] head or beginning.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>From the beginning; a direction to return to, and end with, the first strain; -- indicated by the letters <it>D. C.</it> Also, the strain so repeated.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da`ca"po</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., from [the] head or beginning.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>From the beginning; a direction to return to, and end with, the first strain; -- indicated by the letters <it>D. C.</it> Also, the strain so repeated.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dace</hw> <pr>(d<amac/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Written also <ets>dare</ets>, <ets>dart</ets>, fr. F. <ets>dard</ets> dase, dart, of German origin. <ets>Dace</ets> is for an older <ets>darce</ets>, fr. an OF. nom. <ets>darz</ets>. See <er>Dart</er> a javelin.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small European cyprinoid fish (<spn>Leuciscus leuciscus</spn>, formerly <spn>Squalius leuciscus</spn> or <spn>Leuciscus vulgaris</spn>); -- called also <altname>dare</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ In America the name is given to several related fishes of the genera <gen>Squalius</gen>, <gen>Minnilus</gen>, etc. The black-nosed dace is <spn>Rhinichthys atronasus</spn> the horned dace is <spn>Semotilus corporalis</spn>. For red dace, see <er>Redfin</er>.</note><br/
@@ -153,13 +153,13 @@ knowledge base should contact:
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dacelo</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dacha</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Russian.]</ety> <def>a Russian country house, especially a cottage used in the summer.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dachs"hund`</hw> <pr>(d<aum/ks"h<udd/nt`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G., from <ets>dachs</ets> badger + <ets>hund</ets> dog.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of a breed of small dogs with short crooked legs, and long body; -- called also <altname>badger dog</altname>. There are two kinds, the rough-haired and the smooth-haired.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dachs"hund`</hw> <pr>(d<aum/ks"h<udd/nt`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G., from <ets>dachs</ets> badger + <ets>hund</ets> dog.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of a breed of small dogs with short crooked legs, and long body; -- called also <altname>badger dog</altname>. There are two kinds, the rough-haired and the smooth-haired.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Dacia or the Dacians.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native of ancient Dacia.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dacninae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family comprising the honeycreepers.</def><br/
@@ -230,13 +230,13 @@ knowledge base should contact:
<p><hw>Dac*tyl"i*o*man`cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dakty`lios</grk> + <ets>-mancy</ets>.]</ety> <def>Divination by means of finger rings.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dac"tyl*ist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A writer of dactylic verse.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dac`tyl*i"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger + <ets>-itis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An inflammatory affection of the fingers.</def> <rj><au>Gross.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dac`tyl*i"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger + <ets>-itis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An inflammatory affection of the fingers.</def> <rj><au>Gross.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dac`tyl*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <def>The art of communicating ideas by certain movements and positions of the fingers; -- a method of conversing practiced by the deaf and dumb.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ There are two different manual alphabets, the <xex>one-hand</xex> alphabet (which was perfected by Abb\'82 de l'Ep\'82e, who died in 1789), and the <xex>two-hand</xex> alphabet. The latter was probably based on the manual alphabet published by George Dalgarus of Aberdeen, in 1680. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</note><br/
@@ -252,13 +252,13 @@ knowledge base should contact:
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dactyloscopidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family of Atlantic fishes comprising the <er>sand stargazers</er>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <gen>Dactyloscopidae</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dac`ty*lo*the"ca</hw> <pr>(d<acr/k`t<icr/*l<osl/*th<emac/"k<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger, toe + <grk>qh`kh</grk> case, box.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The scaly covering of the toes, as in birds.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dac`ty*lo*the"ca</hw> <pr>(d<acr/k`t<icr/*l<osl/*th<emac/"k<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger, toe + <grk>qh`kh</grk> case, box.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The scaly covering of the toes, as in birds.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dac`tyl*o*zo"oid</hw> <pr>(d<acr/k`t<icr/*l<osl/*z<omac/"oid)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>da`ktylos</grk> finger + E. <ets>zooid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A kind of zooid of Siphonophora which has an elongated or even vermiform body, with one tentacle, but no mouth. See <er>Siphonophora</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dad</hw> <pr>(d<acr/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. of Celtic origin; cf. Ir. <ets>daid</ets>, Gael. <ets>daidein</ets>, W. <ets>tad</ets>, OL. <ets>tata</ets>, Gr. <grk>ta`ta</grk>, <grk>te`tta</grk>, Skr. <ets>t\'beta</ets>.]</ety> <def>Father; -- a word sometimes used by children.</def><br/
@@ -451,13 +451,13 @@ Was <qex>daggled</qex> by the dashing spray.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></r
<p><hw>Dag"lock`</hw> <pr>(-l<ocr/k`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Dag</ets> a loose end + <ets>lock</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dirty or clotted lock of wool on a sheep; a taglock.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da"go</hw> <pr>(d<amac/"g<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dagos</plw> <pr>(-g<omac/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Cf. Sp. <ets>Diego</ets>, E. <ets>James</ets>.]</ety> <def>A nickname given to a person of Spanish (or, by extension, Portuguese or Italian) descent.</def> <mark>[U. S.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da*go"ba</hw> <pr>(d<adot/*g<omac/"b<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Singhalese <ets>d\'begoba</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dome-shaped structure built over relics of Buddha or some Buddhist saint.</def> <mark>[East Indies]</mark><br/
+<p><hw>Da*go"ba</hw> <pr>(d<adot/*g<omac/"b<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Singhalese <ets>d\'begoba</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dome-shaped structure built over relics of Buddha or some Buddhist saint.</def> <mark>[East Indies]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da"gon</hw> <pr>(d<amac/"g<ocr/n)</pr>, <ety>[Heb. <ets>D\'begon</ets>, fr. <ets>dag</ets> a fish: cf. Gr. <grk>Dagw`n</grk>.]</ety> <def>The national god of the Philistines, represented with the face and hands and upper part of a man, and the tail of a fish.</def> <rj><au>W. Smith.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>This day a solemn feast the people hold<br/
@@ -492,13 +492,13 @@ To <qex>Dagon</qex>, their sea idol.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Da*guerre"o*ty`per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Da*guerre"o*ty`pist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who takes daguerreotypes.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da*guerre"o*ty`py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or process of producing pictures by method of Daguerre.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da`ha*be"ah</hw> <pr>(d<aum/`h<adot/*b<emac/"<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar.]</ety> <def>A Nile boat constructed on the model of a floating house, having large lateen sails.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da`ha*be"ah</hw> <pr>(d<aum/`h<adot/*b<emac/"<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar.]</ety> <def>A Nile boat constructed on the model of a floating house, having large lateen sails.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dah"lia</hw> <pr>(d<aum/l"y<adot/ <i>or</i> d<amac/l"y<adot/; 277, 106)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dahlias</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Named after Andrew <etsep>Dahl</etsep> a Swedish botanist.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants native to Mexico and Central America, of the order Composit\'91; also, any plant or flower of the genus. The numerous varieties of cultivated dahlias bear conspicuous flowers which differ in color.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dah"lin</hw> <pr>(d<aum/"l<icr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Dahlia</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A variety of starch extracted from the dahlia; -- called also <altname>inulin</altname>. See <er>Inulin</er>.</def><br/
@@ -650,13 +650,13 @@ She, I'll swear, hath corns.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>daiquiri</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an alcoholic beverage containing rum and lime or lemon juice, usually mixed with a fruit juice or fruit extract and often blended with crushed ice; <as>as, a strawberry <ex>daiquiri</ex></as>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> rum cocktail.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da"\'8b*ra</hw> <pr>(d<aum/"<esl/*r<aum/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Turk. <ets>daire</ets> circuit, department, fr. Ar. <ets>da\'8brah</ets> circle.]</ety> <def>Any of several valuable estates of the Egyptian khedive or his family. The most important are the <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Sa"ni*eh</b></ecol> <pr>(s<aum/"n<icr/*<ecr/)</pr>, or <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Sa"ni*yeh</b></ecol>, and the <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Khas"sa</b></ecol>, administered by the khedive's European bondholders, and known collectively as <ecol><b>the Daira</b></ecol>, or the <ecol><b>Daira estates</b></ecol>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da"\'8b*ra</hw> <pr>(d<aum/"<esl/*r<aum/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Turk. <ets>daire</ets> circuit, department, fr. Ar. <ets>da\'8brah</ets> circle.]</ety> <def>Any of several valuable estates of the Egyptian khedive or his family. The most important are the <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Sa"ni*eh</b></ecol> <pr>(s<aum/"n<icr/*<ecr/)</pr>, or <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Sa"ni*yeh</b></ecol>, and the <ecol><b>Da"i*ra Khas"sa</b></ecol>, administered by the khedive's European bondholders, and known collectively as <ecol><b>the Daira</b></ecol>, or the <ecol><b>Daira estates</b></ecol>.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dai"ry</hw> <pr>(d<amac/"r<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dairies</plw> <pr>(-r<icr/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>deierie</ets>, from <ets>deie</ets>, <ets>daie</ets>, maid; of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. <ets>deigja</ets> maid, dairymaid, Sw. <ets>deja</ets>, orig., a baking maid, fr. Icel. <ets>deig</ets>. <root/66. See <er>Dough</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The place, room, or house where milk is kept, and converted into butter or cheese.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>What stores my <qex>dairies</qex> and my folds contain.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -730,13 +730,13 @@ She, I'll swear, hath corns.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Da*ko"ta group`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A subdivision at the base of the cretaceous formation in Western North America; -- so named from the region where the strata were first studied.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da*ko"tas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl</pos>.; <sing>sing. <singw>Dacota</singw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></sing>. <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>An extensive race or stock of Indians, including many tribes, mostly dwelling west of the Mississippi River; -- also, in part, called <altname>Sioux</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Dacotahs</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dal</hw> <pr>(d<aum/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind.]</ety> <def>Split pulse, esp. of <spn>Cajanus Indicus</spn>.</def> <mark>[East Indies]</mark><br/
+<p><hw>Dal</hw> <pr>(d<aum/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind.]</ety> <def>Split pulse, esp. of <spn>Cajanus Indicus</spn>.</def> <mark>[East Indies]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dalbergia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a large genus of tropical trees having pinnate leaves and paniculate flowers and cultivated commercially for their dramatically grained and colored timbers.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dalbergia</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -817,16 +817,16 @@ The flattery and the strife!</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dal"ly</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To delay unnecessarily; to while away.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q><qex>Dallying</qex> off the time with often skirmishes.</q> <rj><qau>Knolles.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dal*ma"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <etsep>Dalman</etsep>, the geologist.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of trilobites, of many species, common in the Upper Silurian and Devonian rocks.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dal*ma"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <etsep>Dalman</etsep>, the geologist.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of trilobites, of many species, common in the Upper Silurian and Devonian rocks.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dal`ma*ni"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Dalmania</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dal`ma*ni"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Dalmania</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dal*ma"tian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Dalmatia.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Dalmatian dog</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a carriage dog, shaped like a pointer, and having black or bluish spots on a white ground; the coach dog.</cd></cs></p>
@@ -838,13 +838,13 @@ The flattery and the strife!</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dalo</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a herb of the Pacific islands (<spn>Colocasia esculenta</spn>) grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> taro, taro plant, dasheen, <spn>Colocasia esculenta</spn>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dal` se"gno</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., from the sign.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A direction to go back to the sign <?/ and repeat from thence to the close. See <er>Segno</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dal` se"gno</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., from the sign.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A direction to go back to the sign <?/ and repeat from thence to the close. See <er>Segno</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dalton</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def><person>John Dalton</person>, scientist, born 1766, died 1844.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> John Dalton.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -1206,18 +1206,18 @@ Who doats, yet doubts, suspects, yet strongly loves.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></r
<p><hw>Damn"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>That damns; damnable; <as>as, damning evidence of guilt</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Damn"ing*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tendency to bring damnation.</def> \'bdThe damningness of them [sins].\'b8 <rj><au>Hammond.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>dam"num</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(law)</fld> <def>Harm; detriment, either to character or property.</def><br/
+<p><hw>dam"num</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(law)</fld> <def>Harm; detriment, either to character or property.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 367 --></p>
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dam"o*sel</hw> <pr>(d<acr/m"<osl/*z<ecr/l)</pr>, <hw>Dam`o*sel"la</hw> <pr>(-z<ecr/l"l<adot/)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Da`moi`selle"</hw> <pr>(d<adot/`mw<aum/`z<ecr/l")</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Damsel</er>.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dam"o*sel</hw> <pr>(d<acr/m"<osl/*z<ecr/l)</pr>, <hw>Dam`o*sel"la</hw> <pr>(-z<ecr/l"l<adot/)</pr>, <hw>Da`moi`selle"</hw> <pr>(d<adot/`mw<aum/`z<ecr/l")</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Damsel</er>.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dam"our*ite</hw> <pr>(d<acr/m"<oocr/*<imac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ater the French chemist <etsep>Damour</etsep>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A kind of Muscovite, or potash mica, containing water.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Damp</hw> <pr>(d<acr/mp)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Akin to LG., D., & Dan. <ets>damp</ets> vapor, steam, fog, G. <ets>dampf</ets>, Icel. <ets>dampi</ets>, Sw. <ets>damb</ets> dust, and to MNG. <ets>dimpfen</ets> to smoke, imp. <ets>dampf</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Moisture; humidity; fog; fogginess; vapor.</def><br/
@@ -1465,13 +1465,13 @@ For of that art she couth the olde <qex>dance</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Anger or vexation; rage.</def> <mark>[Low]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dan"der</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Dandle</er>.]</ety> <def>To wander about; to saunter; to talk incoherently.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dan"di</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets><dsdot/<amac/n<dsdot/i</ets>, fr. <ets><dsdot/<amac/n<dsdot/</ets> an oar.]</ety> <def>A boatman; an oarsman.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
+<p><hw>Dan"di</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets><dsdot/<amac/n<dsdot/i</ets>, fr. <ets><dsdot/<amac/n<dsdot/</ets> an oar.]</ety> <def>A boatman; an oarsman.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dan"die</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of a breed of small terriers; -- called also <altname>Dandie Dinmont</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- Illustr. of dandie dinmont --></p>
@@ -1723,13 +1723,13 @@ are well inclined to pull down the present establishment.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dan"ne*brog</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The ancient battle standard of Denmark, bearing figures of cross and crown.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Order of Dannebrog</b></col>, <cd>an ancient Danish order of knighthood.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dan`seuse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>danser</ets> to dance.]</ety> <def>A professional female dancer; a woman who dances at a public exhibition as in a ballet.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dan`seuse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>danser</ets> to dance.]</ety> <def>A professional female dancer; a woman who dances at a public exhibition as in a ballet.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dansk</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Dan.]</ety> <def>Danish.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dansk"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A Dane.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
@@ -1762,22 +1762,22 @@ are well inclined to pull down the present establishment.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>A nymph of Diana, fabled to have been changed into a laurel tree.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Daph"ne*tin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A colorless crystalline substance, <chform>C9H6O4</chform>, extracted from daphnin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Daph"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of the genus <gen>Daphnia</gen>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Daph"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of the genus <gen>Daphnia</gen>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Daph"nin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>daphnine</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A dark green bitter resin extracted from the mezereon (<spn>Daphne mezereum</spn>) and regarded as the essential principle of the plant.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A white, crystalline, bitter substance, regarded as a glucoside, and extracted from <spn>Daphne mezereum</spn> and <spn>Daphne alpina</spn>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Daph"no*man`cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <ets><grk>da`fnh</grk></ets> the laurel + <ets>-mancy</ets>.]</ety> <def>Divination by means of the laurel.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dap"i*fer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., <ets>daps</ets> a feast + <ets>ferre</ets> to bear.]</ety> <def>One who brings meat to the table; hence, in some countries, the official title of the grand master or steward of the king's or a nobleman's household.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dap"i*fer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., <ets>daps</ets> a feast + <ets>ferre</ets> to bear.]</ety> <def>One who brings meat to the table; hence, in some countries, the official title of the grand master or steward of the king's or a nobleman's household.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dap"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>daper</ets>; prob. fr. D. <ets>dapper</ets> brave, valiant; akin to G. <ets>tapfer</ets> brave, OHG. <ets>taphar</ets> heavy, weighty, OSlav. <ets>dobr<ucr/</ets> good, Russ. <ets>dobrui</ets>. Cf. <er>Deft</er>.]</ety> <def>Little and active; spruce; trim; smart; neat in dress or appearance; lively.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>He wondered how so many provinces could be held in subjection by such a <qex>dapper</qex> little man.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -2233,13 +2233,13 @@ To a broad gate, all built of beaten gold.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>And can do naught but wail her <qex>darling's</qex> loss.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dar"ling</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dearly beloved; regarded with especial kindness and tenderness; favorite.</def> \'bdSome <xex>darling</xex> science.\'b8 <au>I. Watts.</au> \'bd<xex>Darling</xex> sin.\'b8 <au>Macaulay.</au><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dar`ling*to"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after Dr. William <etsep>Darlington</etsep>, a botanist of West Chester, Penn.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of California pitcher plants consisting of a single species. The long tubular leaves are hooded at the top, and frequently contain many insects drowned in the secretion of the leaves.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dar`ling*to"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after Dr. William <etsep>Darlington</etsep>, a botanist of West Chester, Penn.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of California pitcher plants consisting of a single species. The long tubular leaves are hooded at the top, and frequently contain many insects drowned in the secretion of the leaves.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Darmera</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus consisting of one species.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Darmera</gen>, Peltiphyllum, genus <gen>Peltiphyllum</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -2270,13 +2270,13 @@ To a broad gate, all built of beaten gold.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Darn"er</hw> <pr>(d<acr/rn"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who mends by darning.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dar"nex</hw> <pr>(d<acr/r"n<ecr/ks)</pr>, <hw>Dar"nic</hw> <pr>(d<acr/r"n<icr/k)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Dornick</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da*roo"</hw> <pr>(d<adot/*r<oomac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The Egyptian sycamore (<spn>Ficus Sycamorus</spn>). See <er>Sycamore</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da*roo"</hw> <pr>(d<adot/*r<oomac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The Egyptian sycamore (<spn>Ficus Sycamorus</spn>). See <er>Sycamore</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Darr</hw> <pr>(d<acr/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European black tern.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dar"raign</hw>, <hw>Dar"rain</hw>, }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>deraisnier</ets> to explain, defend, to maintain in legal action by proof and reasonings, LL. <ets>derationare</ets>; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>rationare</ets> to discourse, contend in law, fr. L. <ets>ratio</ets> reason, in LL., legal cause. Cf. <er>Arraign</er>, and see <er>Reason</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To make ready to fight; to array.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -2354,13 +2354,13 @@ Scarce wounds the hearing while it stabs the heart.</q> <rj><qau>Hannan More.</q
<p><hw>Dar*to"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the dartos.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dar"toid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Dartos</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Like the dartos; dartoic; <as>as, <ex>dartoid</ex> tissue</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dar"tos</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <ets><?/</ets> flayed.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A thin layer of peculiar contractile tissue directly beneath the skin of the scrotum.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dar"tos</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <ets><?/</ets> flayed.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A thin layer of peculiar contractile tissue directly beneath the skin of the scrotum.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dar"trous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>dartreux</ets>. See <er>Dartars</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Relating to, or partaking of the nature of, the disease called tetter; herpetic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Dartrous diathesis</b></col>, <cd>A morbid condition of the system predisposing to the development of certain skin diseases, such as eczema, psoriasis, and pityriasis. Also called <altname>rheumic diathesis</altname>, and <altname>herpetism</altname>.</cd> <rj><au>Piffard.</au></rj></cs><br/
@@ -2569,13 +2569,13 @@ And down the rough cascade all <qex>dashing</qex> fall.</q> <rj><qau>Thomson.</q
<p><hw>Da*sym"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dasy`s</grk> rough, thick + <ets>-meter</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An instrument for testing the density of gases, consisting of a thin glass globe, which is weighed in the gas or gases, and then in an atmosphere of known density.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Das`y*p\'91"dal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Dasyp\'91dic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Das`y*p\'91"des</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dasy`s</grk> hairy, shaggy + <ets><?/</ets>, <ets><?/</ets>, a child.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Those birds whose young are covered with down when hatched.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Das`y*p\'91"des</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dasy`s</grk> hairy, shaggy + <ets><?/</ets>, <ets><?/</ets>, a child.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Those birds whose young are covered with down when hatched.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Das`y*p\'91"dic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the Dasyp\'91des; ptilop\'91dic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dasyproctidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family including the agoutis and pacas.</def><br/
@@ -2603,13 +2603,13 @@ And down the rough cascade all <qex>dashing</qex> fall.</q> <rj><qau>Thomson.</q
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dasyurus</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>DAT</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[acronym, from <ets>D</ets>igital <ets>A</ets>udio<ets>T</ets>ape.]</ety> <def>digital audiotape, a digitally encoded tape recording of sound; -- in contrast to the usual analog audio tape.</def> <mark>[acronym]</mark> <br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>pl</ets>. of <ets>datum</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>See <er>Datum</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>pl</ets>. of <ets>datum</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>See <er>Datum</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem; <as>as, the historical <ex>data</ex> show that the budget deficit is only a small factor in determining interest rates</as>.</def> <note>The term in this sense is used especially in reference to experimental observations collected in the course of a controlled scientific investigation.</note><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Computers)</fld> <def>information, most commonly in the form of a series of binary digits, stored on a physical storage medium for manipulation by a computer program. It is contrasted with the <contr>program</contr> which is a series of instructions used by the central processing unit of a computer to manipulate the <ex>data</ex>. In some conputers <ex>data</ex> and execuatble programs are stored in separate locations.</def><br/
@@ -2623,13 +2623,13 @@ And down the rough cascade all <qex>dashing</qex> fall.</q> <rj><qau>Thomson.</q
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dat"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>That may be dated; having a known or ascertainable date.</def> \'bd<xex>Datable</xex> almost to a year.\'b8 <rj><au>The Century.</au></rj><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> dateable.</syn>
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da*ta"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. L. <ets>datum</ets> given.]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>Formerly, a part of the Roman chancery; now, a separate office from which are sent graces or favors, cognizable <xex>in foro externo</xex>, such as appointments to benefices. The name is derived from the word <xex>datum</xex>, given or dated (with the indications of the time and place of granting the gift or favor).</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da*ta"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. L. <ets>datum</ets> given.]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>Formerly, a part of the Roman chancery; now, a separate office from which are sent graces or favors, cognizable <xex>in foro externo</xex>, such as appointments to benefices. The name is derived from the word <xex>datum</xex>, given or dated (with the indications of the time and place of granting the gift or favor).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da"ta*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>datarius</ets>. See <er>Dataria</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>An officer in the pope's court, having charge of the Dataria.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The office or employment of a datary.</def><br/
@@ -2754,13 +2754,13 @@ The field of motion, and the hour of rest.</q> <rj><qau>Akenside.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Datril</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an analgesic derived from acetanolide; also used as an antipyretic; Datril and Tylenol are trademarks of brands of acetaminophen tablets. See <er>acetaminophen</er>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> acetaminophen, Tylenol.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Data</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See 2d <er>Date</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Something given or admitted; a fact or principle granted; that upon which an inference or an argument is based; -- used chiefly in the plural.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Data</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See 2d <er>Date</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Something given or admitted; a fact or principle granted; that upon which an inference or an argument is based; -- used chiefly in the plural.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Any writer, therefore, who . . . furnishes us with <qex>data</qex> sufficient to determine the time in which he wrote.</q> <rj><qau>Priestley.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a single piece of information; a fact; especially a piece of information obtained by observation or experiment; -- used mostly in the plural.</def><br/
@@ -2772,13 +2772,13 @@ The field of motion, and the hour of rest.</q> <rj><qau>Akenside.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Surveying)</fld> <def>a point, line, or level surface used as a reference in measuring elevations.</def> <au>RHUD</au><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Datum line</b></col> <fld>(Surv.)</fld>, <cd>the horizontal or base line, from which the heights of points are reckoned or measured, as in the plan of a railway, etc.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Da*tu"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.; cf. Skr. <ets>dhatt<umac/ra</ets>, Per. & Ar. <ets>tat<umac/ra</ets>, <ets>Tat<umac/la</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of solanaceous plants, with large funnel-shaped flowers and a four-celled, capsular fruit.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Da*tu"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.; cf. Skr. <ets>dhatt<umac/ra</ets>, Per. & Ar. <ets>tat<umac/ra</ets>, <ets>Tat<umac/la</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of solanaceous plants, with large funnel-shaped flowers and a four-celled, capsular fruit.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ The commonest species are the thorn apple (<spn>D. stramonium</spn>), with a prickly capsule (see <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>capsule</er>), white flowers and green stem, and <spn>Datura tatula</spn>, with a purplish tinge of the stem and flowers. Both are narcotic and dangerously poisonous.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Da*tu"rine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Datura</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Atropine; -- called also <altname>daturia</altname> and <altname>daturina</altname>.</def><br/
@@ -2954,13 +2954,13 @@ I am very sincerely your very affectionate, humble servant.</q> <rj><qau>Smollet
<p><hw>Dau"phin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>dauphin</ets>, prop., a dolphin, from L. <ets>delphinus</ets>. See <er>Dolphin</er>. The name was given, for some reason unexplained, to Guigo, count of Vienne, in the 12th century, and was borne by succeeding counts of Vienne. In 1349, Dauphiny was bequeathed to Philippe de Valois, king of France, on condition that the heir of the crown should always hold the title of <ets>Dauphin</ets> de Viennois.]</ety> <def>The title of the eldest son of the king of France, and heir to the crown. Since the revolution of 1830, the title has been discontinued.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dau"phin*ess</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Dau"phine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The title of the wife of the dauphin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dauw</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The striped quagga, or Burchell's zebra, of South Africa (<spn>Asinus Burchellii</spn>); -- called also <altname>peechi</altname>, or <altname>peetsi</altname>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dauw</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The striped quagga, or Burchell's zebra, of South Africa (<spn>Asinus Burchellii</spn>); -- called also <altname>peechi</altname>, or <altname>peetsi</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>davallia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>any fern of the genus <gen>Davallia</gen>; they have scaly creeping rhizomes.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Davalliaceae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>one of a number of families into which Polypodiaceae has been subdivided in some classification systems; includes genera <gen>Araiostegia</gen>; <gen>Davallia</gen>; <gen>Davallodes</gen>; <gen>Gymnogrammitis</gen>; <gen>Humata</gen>; <gen>Leucostegia</gen>; <gen>Scyphularia</gen>; <gen>Trogostolon</gen>.</def><br/
@@ -3043,13 +3043,13 @@ The whole assembly of his fellow <qex>daws</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Waller.</qau></rj
<p><hw>Dawe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Day</er>.]</ety> <def>Day.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Daw"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a daw.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dawk</hw> <pr>(d<add/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Dak</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dawk</hw> <pr>(d<add/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Dak</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dawk</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Prov. E. <ets>dauk</ets> to cut or pierce with a jerk; cf. OE. <ets>dalk</ets> a dimple. Cf. Ir. <ets>tolch</ets>, <ets>tollachd</ets>, <ets>tolladh</ets>, a hole, crevice, <ets>toll</ets> to bore, pierce, W. <ets>tyllu</ets>.]</ety> <def>To cut or mark with an incision; to gash.</def> <rj><au>Moxon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dawk</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A hollow, crack, or cut, in timber.</def> <rj><au>Moxon.</au></rj><br/
@@ -4437,13 +4437,13 @@ Fatigued and sick.</q> <rj><qau>Cowley.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*bel"late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>debellatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>debellare</ets> to subdue; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>bellum</ets> war.]</ety> <def>To subdue; to conquer in war.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Speed.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deb`el*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>debellatio</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of conquering or subduing.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De be"ne es"se</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Of well being; of formal sufficiency for the time; conditionally; provisionally.</def> <rj><au>Abbott.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>De be"ne es"se</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Of well being; of formal sufficiency for the time; conditionally; provisionally.</def> <rj><au>Abbott.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ben"ture</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>debentur</ets> they are due, fr. <ets>debere</ets> to owe; cf. F. <ets>debentur</ets>. So called because these receipts began with the words <ets>Debentur mihi</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A writing acknowledging a debt; a writing or certificate signed by a public officer, as evidence of a debt due to some person; the sum thus due.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A customhouse certificate entitling an exporter of imported goods to a drawback of duties paid on their importation.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
@@ -4520,13 +4520,13 @@ Fatigued and sick.</q> <rj><qau>Cowley.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De`bi*tu`mi*ni*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of depriving of bitumen.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De`bi*tu"mi*nize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To deprive of bitumen.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`blai"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>The cavity from which the earth for parapets, etc. (remblai), is taken.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`blai"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>The cavity from which the earth for parapets, etc. (remblai), is taken.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deb`o*nair"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>debonere</ets>, OF. <ets>de bon aire</ets>, <ets>debonaire</ets>, of good descent or lineage, excellent, debonair, F. <ets>d\'82bonnaire</ets> debonair; <ets>de</ets> of (L. <ets>de</ets>) + <ets>bon</ets> good (L. <ets>bonus</ets>) + <ets>aire</ets>. See <er>Air</er>, and <er>Bounty</er>, and cf. <er>Bonair</er>.]</ety> <def>Characterized by courteousness, affability, or gentleness; of good appearance and manners; graceful; complaisant.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Was never prince so meek and <qex>debonair</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -4553,31 +4553,31 @@ Fatigued and sick.</q> <rj><qau>Cowley.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>Battalions <qex>debouching</qex> on the plain.</q> <rj><qau>Prescott.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Geog.)</fld> <def>To issue; -- said of a stream passing from a gorge out into an open valley or a plain.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`bou`ch\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A place for exit; an outlet; hence, a market for goods.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`bou`ch\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A place for exit; an outlet; hence, a market for goods.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The <qex>d\'82bouch\'82s</qex> were ordered widened to afford easy egress.</q> <rj><qau>The Century.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`bou`chure"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>The outward opening of a river, of a valley, or of a strait.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`bou`chure"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>The outward opening of a river, of a valley, or of a strait.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*brief"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v.</pos> <def>to interrogate (a person) who has recently experienced an event, to obtain information about that experience; -- used especially of military pilots or diplomatic agents who have just returned from a mission.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*bride"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v.</pos> <def>to remove (e. g., dead tissue) surgically from a wound.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*bride"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>the surgical excision of dead, contaminated, or damaged tissue, and foreign matter, especially from a wound.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`bris"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>dis</ets>) + <ets>briser</ets> to break, shatter; perh. of Celtic origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>Broken and detached fragments, taken collectively; especially, fragments detached from a rock or mountain, and piled up at the base.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`bris"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>dis</ets>) + <ets>briser</ets> to break, shatter; perh. of Celtic origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>Broken and detached fragments, taken collectively; especially, fragments detached from a rock or mountain, and piled up at the base.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Rubbish, especially such as results from the destruction of anything; remains; ruins.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*bruised"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>debruisier</ets> to shatter, break. Cf. <er>Bruise</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>Surmounted by an ordinary; <as>as, a lion is <ex>debruised</ex> when a bend or other ordinary is placed over it, as in the cut</as>.</def><br/
@@ -4638,24 +4638,24 @@ And thankfully rest <qex>debtor</qex> for the first.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></r
<p><hw>De*burse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>de</ets> + L. <ets>bursa</ets> purse.]</ety> <def>To disburse.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ludlow.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De"bu*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the inventor, <ets>Debus</ets>, a French optician + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Opt.)</fld> <def>A modification of the kaleidoscope; -- used to reflect images so as to form beautiful designs.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`but"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82but</ets>, prop., the first cast or throw at play, fr. <ets>but</ets> aim, mark. See <er>Butt</er> an end.]</ety> <def>A beginning or first attempt; hence, a first appearance before the public, as of an actor or public speaker.</def></p>
+<p><hw>D\'82`but"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82but</ets>, prop., the first cast or throw at play, fr. <ets>but</ets> aim, mark. See <er>Butt</er> an end.]</ety> <def>A beginning or first attempt; hence, a first appearance before the public, as of an actor or public speaker.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>D\'82`bu`tant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; fem. <hw>D\'82`bu`tante"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>. <ety>[F., p. pr. of <ets>d\'82buter</ets> to have the first throw, to make one's <ets>d\'82but</ets>. See <er>D\'82but</er>.]</ety> <def>A person who makes his (or her) first appearance before the public.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>D\'82`bu`tant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; fem. <hw>D\'82`bu`tante"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>. <ety>[F., p. pr. of <ets>d\'82buter</ets> to have the first throw, to make one's <ets>d\'82but</ets>. See <er>D\'82but</er>.]</ety> <def>A person who makes his (or her) first appearance before the public.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>D\'82`bu`tante"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>fem. n.</pos> <def>A young woman making her first appearance in society, especially one who is one of the honorees at a debutante cotillion. See <er>cotillion</er>{4}.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec"a-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <pos>pref.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Ten</er>.]</ety> <def>A prefix, from Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk>, signifying <it>ten</it>;</def> <specif>specifically</specif> <fld>(Metric System)</fld>, <def>a prefix signifying the weight or measure that is <sig>ten times</sig> the principal unit.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cac`e*ra"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <grk>ke`ras</grk> a horn.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cephalopoda which includes the squids, cuttlefishes, and others having ten arms or tentacles; -- called also <altname>Decapoda</altname>. <altsp>[Written also <asp>Decacera</asp>.]</altsp> See <er>Dibranchiata</er>.</def></p>
+<p><hw>De*cac`e*ra"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <grk>ke`ras</grk> a horn.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cephalopoda which includes the squids, cuttlefishes, and others having ten arms or tentacles; -- called also <altname>Decapoda</altname>. <altsp>[Written also <asp>Decacera</asp>.]</altsp> See <er>Dibranchiata</er>.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dec"a*chord</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dec`a*chor"don</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>deka`chordos</grk> tenstringed; <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <grk>chordh`</grk> a string.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An ancient Greek musical instrument of ten strings, resembling the harp.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Something consisting of ten parts.</def> <rj><au>W. Watson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -4698,13 +4698,13 @@ And thankfully rest <qex>debtor</qex> for the first.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></r
<p><hw>De*cag"o*nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to a decagon; having ten sides.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dec"a*gram</hw>, <hw>Dec"a*gramme</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82cagramme</ets>; Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + F. <ets>gramme</ets>. See <er>Gram</er>.]</ety> <def>A weight of the metric system; ten grams, equal to about 154.32 grains avoirdupois.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dec`a*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <?/ a woman, a female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants characterized by having ten styles.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Dec`a*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <?/ a woman, a female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants characterized by having ten styles.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dec`a*gyn"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dec*cag"y*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82cagyne</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the Decagynia; having ten styles.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec`a*he"dral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having ten sides.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -4754,24 +4754,24 @@ And thankfully rest <qex>debtor</qex> for the first.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></r
<p><q>His rectorial as well as <qex>decanal</qex> residence.</q> <rj><qau>Churton.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Decanal side</b></col>, <cd>the side of the choir on which the dean's tall is placed.</cd> -- <col><b>Decanal stall</b></col>, <cd>the stall allotted to the dean in the choir, on the right or south side of the chancel.</cd> <rj><au>Shipley.</au></rj></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*can"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <?/, <?/, a man.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants characterized by having ten stamens.</def></p>
+<p><hw>De*can"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <?/, <?/, a man.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants characterized by having ten stamens.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>De*can"dri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>De*can"drous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82candre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the Decandria; having ten stamens.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec"ane</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Deca-</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A liquid hydrocarbon, <chform>C10H22</chform>, of the paraffin series, including several isomeric modifications.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec*an"gu*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>deca-</ets> + <ets>angular</ets>.]</ety> <def>Having ten angles.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*ca"ni</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L., lit., of the dean.]</ety> <def>Used of the side of the choir on which the dean's stall is placed; decanal; -- correlative to <contr>cantoris</contr>; <as>as, the decanal, or <ex>decani</ex>, side</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*ca"ni</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L., lit., of the dean.]</ety> <def>Used of the side of the choir on which the dean's stall is placed; decanal; -- correlative to <contr>cantoris</contr>; <as>as, the decanal, or <ex>decani</ex>, side</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Decanted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Decanting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82canter</ets> (cf. It. <ets>decantare</ets>), prop., to pour off from the edge of a vessel; pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>de</ets>) + OF. <ets>cant</ets> (It. <ets>canto</ets>) edge, border, end. See <er>Cant</er> an edge.]</ety> <def>To pour off gently, as liquor, so as not to disturb the sediment; or to pour from one vessel into another; <as>as, to <ex>decant</ex> wine</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*can"tate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To decant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
@@ -4804,13 +4804,13 @@ And thankfully rest <qex>debtor</qex> for the first.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></r
<p><hw>Dec"a*pod</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/k"<adot/*p<ocr/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82capode</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A crustacean with ten feet or legs, as a crab; one of the <ord>Decapoda</ord>. Also used adjectively, <as>as a <ex>decapod</ex> crustacean</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 375 --></p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cap"o*da</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*k<acr/p"<osl/*d<adot/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <grk>poy`s</grk>, <grk>podo`s</grk>, foot.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The order of <class>Crustacea</class> which includes the shrimps, lobsters, crabs, etc.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*cap"o*da</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*k<acr/p"<osl/*d<adot/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk> ten + <grk>poy`s</grk>, <grk>podo`s</grk>, foot.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The order of <class>Crustacea</class> which includes the shrimps, lobsters, crabs, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ They have a carapace, covering and uniting the somites of the head and thorax and inclosing a gill chamber on each side, and usually have five (rarely six) pairs of legs. They are divided into two principal groups: Brachyura and Macrura. Some writers recognize a third (Anomura) intermediate between the others.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of the dibranchiate cephalopods including the cuttlefishes and squids. See <er>Decacera</er>.</def></p>
@@ -5148,13 +5148,13 @@ From all her words and actions.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*cen"ni*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Decennary</er>.]</ety> <def>Consisting of ten years; happening every ten years; <as>as, a <ex>decennial</ex> period; <ex>decennial</ex> games.</as></def> <rj><au>Hallam.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cen"ni*al</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tenth year or tenth anniversary.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cen"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Decenniums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Decennia</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>A period of ten years.</def> \'bdThe present <xex>decennium</xex>.\'b8 <au>Hallam.</au> \'bdThe last <xex>decennium</xex> of Chaucer's life.\'b8 <rj><au>A. W. Ward.</au></rj></p>
+<p><hw>De*cen"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Decenniums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Decennia</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>A period of ten years.</def> \'bdThe present <xex>decennium</xex>.\'b8 <au>Hallam.</au> \'bdThe last <xex>decennium</xex> of Chaucer's life.\'b8 <rj><au>A. W. Ward.</au></rj></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>De*cen"no*val</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>De*cen"no*va*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decem</ets> ten + <ets>novem</ets> nine.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to the number nineteen; of nineteen years.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Holder.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de"cent</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"s<eit/nt)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decens</ets>, <ets>decentis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>decere</ets> to be fitting or becoming; akin to <ets>decus</ets> glory, honor, ornament, Gr. <grk>dokei^n</grk> to seem good, to seem, think; cf. Skr. <ets>d<amac/<cced/</ets> to grant, to give; and perh. akin to E. <ets>attire</ets>, <ets>tire</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82cent</ets>. Cf. <er>Decorate</er>, <er>Decorum</er>, <er>Deign</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Suitable in words, behavior, dress, or ceremony; becoming; fit; decorous; proper; seemly; <as>as, <ex>decent</ex> conduct; <ex>decent</ex> language</as>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -5335,16 +5335,16 @@ Betwixt ourselves let us <qex>decide</qex> it then.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj
<p><hw>Dec"i*dence</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decidens</ets> falling off.]</ety> <def>A falling off.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cid"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who decides.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cid"u*a</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>deciduus</ets>. See <er>Deciduous</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The inner layer of the wall of the uterus, which envelops the embryo, forms a part of the placenta, and is discharged with it.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*cid"u*a</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>deciduus</ets>. See <er>Deciduous</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The inner layer of the wall of the uterus, which envelops the embryo, forms a part of the placenta, and is discharged with it.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cid`u*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of Mammalia in which a decidua is thrown off with, or after, the fetus, as in the human species.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*cid`u*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of Mammalia in which a decidua is thrown off with, or after, the fetus, as in the human species.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cid"u*ate</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Possessed of, or characterized by, a decidua.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec`i*du"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Deciduousness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -5422,13 +5422,13 @@ Betwixt ourselves let us <qex>decide</qex> it then.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The destruction of any large proportion, as of people by pestilence or war.</def> <rj><au>Milman.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec"i*ma`tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. LL. <ets>decimator</ets>.]</ety> <def>One who decimates.</def> <rj><au>South.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`cime"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A French coin, the tenth part of a franc, equal to about two cents.</def></p>
+<p><hw>D\'82`cime"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A French coin, the tenth part of a franc, equal to about two cents.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dec"i*me`ter</hw>, <hw>Dec"i*me`tre</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82cim\'8atre</ets>; pref. <ets>d\'82ci-</ets> tenth (fr. L. <ets>decimus</ets>) + <ets>m\'8atre</ets>. See <er>Meter</er>.]</ety> <def>A measure of length in the metric system; one tenth of a meter, equal to 3.937 inches.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec`i*mo*sex"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prop., in sixteenth; fr. L. <ets>decimus</ets> tenth + <ets>sextus</ets> sixth.]</ety> <def>A book consisting of sheets, each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of book; -- usually written 16mo or 16<deg/.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -5827,13 +5827,13 @@ And then come smiling, and <qex>declare</qex> for fate.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qa
<p><hw>De*clar"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who makes known or proclaims; that which exhibits.</def> <rj><au>Udall.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*class"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Declassed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Declassing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82classer</ets>.]</ety> <def>To remove from a class; to separate or degrade from one's class.</def> <rj><au>North Am. Rev.</au></rj><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>d\'82class\'82</hw> <pr>(d<asl/`kl<acr/`s<amac/", d<asl/`kl<aum/`s<amac/")</pr> <pos>adj.</pos> <ety>[F. Cf. F. <ets>d\'82classer</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>reduced or fallen in status, social position, class or rank; fallen from a high status or rank to a lower one.</def><br/
+<p><hw>d\'82class\'82</hw> <pr>(d<asl/`kl<acr/`s<amac/", d<asl/`kl<aum/`s<amac/")</pr> <pos>adj.</pos> <ety>[F. Cf. F. <ets>d\'82classer</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>reduced or fallen in status, social position, class or rank; fallen from a high status or rank to a lower one.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>of inferior grade, rank, status, or prestige.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>declassification</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>reduction by the government of restrictions on a classified document or weapon.</def><br/
@@ -6116,19 +6116,19 @@ His weary wagon to the western vale.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De`col*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decollatio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82collation</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of beheading or state of one beheaded; -- especially used of the execution of St. John the Baptist.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A painting representing the beheading of a saint or martyr, esp. of St. John the Baptist.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`col`le*tage"</hw> <pr>(d<amac/`k<osl/`l'*t<adot/zh)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>D\'82collet\'82</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Costume)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The upper border or part of a low-cut (i.e., d\'82collet\'82) dress.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`col`le*tage"</hw> <pr>(d<amac/`k<osl/`l'*t<adot/zh)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>D\'82collet\'82</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Costume)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The upper border or part of a low-cut (i.e., d\'82collet\'82) dress.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>the exposed upper parts of the breasts of a woman wearing a low-cut dress.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`col`le*t\'82"</hw> <pr>(d<asl/`k<ocr/l`l<eit/*t<asl/")</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., p. p. of <ets>d\'82colleter</ets> to bare the neck and shoulders; <ets>d\'82-</ets> + <ets>collet</ets> collar, fr. L. <ets>collum</ets> neck.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Leaving the neck and shoulders uncovered; cut low in the neck, or low-necked, as a dress.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`col`le*t\'82"</hw> <pr>(d<asl/`k<ocr/l`l<eit/*t<asl/")</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., p. p. of <ets>d\'82colleter</ets> to bare the neck and shoulders; <ets>d\'82-</ets> + <ets>collet</ets> collar, fr. L. <ets>collum</ets> neck.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Leaving the neck and shoulders uncovered; cut low in the neck, or low-necked, as a dress.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Wearing a d\'82collet\'82 gown.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*col"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Beheading.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -6551,13 +6551,13 @@ Mine, both in heaven and earth to do thy will.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>De*crep"it*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Decrepitude.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Barrow.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*crep"i*tude</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82cr\'82pitude</ets>.]</ety> <def>The broken state produced by decay and the infirmities of age; infirm old age.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De`cres*cen"do</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>With decreasing volume of sound; -- a direction to performers, either written upon the staff (abbreviated <xex>Dec</xex>., or <xex>Decresc</xex>.), or indicated by the sign.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De`cres*cen"do</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>With decreasing volume of sound; -- a direction to performers, either written upon the staff (abbreviated <xex>Dec</xex>., or <xex>Decresc</xex>.), or indicated by the sign.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cres"cent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decrescens</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>decrescere</ets>. See <er>Decrease</er>.]</ety> <def>Becoming less by gradual diminution; decreasing; <as>as, a <ex>decrescent</ex> moon</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*cres"cent</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>A crescent with the horns directed towards the sinister.</def> <rj><au>Cussans.</au></rj><br/
@@ -6634,16 +6634,16 @@ Mine, both in heaven and earth to do thy will.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> decode, decipher[WE1].</syn><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec`u*ba"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From L. <ets>decubare</ets>; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>cubare</ets>. See <er>Decumbent</er>.]</ety> <def>Act of lying down; decumbence.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Evelyn.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*cu"bi*tus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>cubare</ets>, to lie down: cf. F. <ets>d\'82cubitus</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An attitude assumed in lying down; <as>as, the dorsal <ex>decubitus</ex></as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*cu"bi*tus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>cubare</ets>, to lie down: cf. F. <ets>d\'82cubitus</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An attitude assumed in lying down; <as>as, the dorsal <ex>decubitus</ex></as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>D\'82`cu`lasse`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> Also, sometimes, Anglicized <hw>Dec`u*lass"ment</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</mhw> <fld>(Ordnance)</fld> <def>An accidental blowing off of, or other serious damage to, the breechblock of a gun; also, a removal of the breechblock for the purpose of disabling the gun.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>D\'82`cu`lasse`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> Also, sometimes, Anglicized <hw>Dec`u*lass"ment</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</mhw> <fld>(Ordnance)</fld> <def>An accidental blowing off of, or other serious damage to, the breechblock of a gun; also, a removal of the breechblock for the purpose of disabling the gun.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dec"u*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>decumanus</ets> of the tenth, and by metonymy, large, fr. <ets>decem</ets> ten.]</ety> <def>Large; chief; -- applied to an extraordinary billow, supposed by some to be every tenth in order. <mark>[R.]</mark> Also used substantively.</def> \'bdSuch <xex>decuman</xex> billows.\'b8 <au>Gauden.</au> \'bdThe baffled <xex>decuman</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Lowell.</au></rj></p>
<p><hw>decumary</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a woody climber of southeastern US (<spn>Decumaria barbara</spn>) having white flowers in compound terminal clusters.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> <spn>Decumaria barbata</spn>, <spn>Decumaria barbara</spn>.</syn><br/
@@ -6747,13 +6747,13 @@ Mine, both in heaven and earth to do thy will.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>De*dal"ian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>See <er>D\'91dalian</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Ded"a*lous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>See <er>D\'91dalous</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*dans"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Court Tennis)</fld> <def>A division, at one end of a tennis court, for spectators.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*dans"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Court Tennis)</fld> <def>A division, at one end of a tennis court, for spectators.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dede</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dead.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*dec"o*rate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dedecoratus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dedecorare</ets> to disgrace. See <er>Decorate</er>.]</ety> <def>To bring to shame; to disgrace.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
@@ -6829,13 +6829,13 @@ Mine, both in heaven and earth to do thy will.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Ded"i*ca*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82dicatoire</ets>.]</ety> <def>Constituting or serving as a dedication; complimental.</def> \'bdAn epistle <xex>dedicatory</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Ded"i*ca*to*ry</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Dedication.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ded"i*mus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dedimus</ets> we have given, fr. <ets>dare</ets> to give. So called because the writ began, <ets>Dedimus potestatem</ets>, etc.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A writ to commission private persons to do some act in place of a judge, as to examine a witness, etc.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Ded"i*mus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dedimus</ets> we have given, fr. <ets>dare</ets> to give. So called because the writ began, <ets>Dedimus potestatem</ets>, etc.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A writ to commission private persons to do some act in place of a judge, as to examine a witness, etc.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*di"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>deditio</ets>, fr. <ets>dedere</ets> to give away, surrender; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>dare</ets> to give.]</ety> <def>The act of yielding; surrender.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir M. Hale.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Ded"o*lent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dedolens</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>dedolere</ets> to give over grieving; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>dolere</ets> to grieve.]</ety> <def>Feeling no compunction; apathetic.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Hallywell.</au></rj><br/
@@ -6957,13 +6957,13 @@ From any use that pleased him.</q> <rj><qau>Mrs. Browning.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>Notions and ideas . . . used in a <qex>deductive</qex> process.</q> <rj><qau>Whewell.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*duct"ive*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By deduction; by way of inference; by consequence.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*duc"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a guide. See <er>Deduce</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The pilot whale or blackfish.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*duc"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a guide. See <er>Deduce</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The pilot whale or blackfish.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*duit"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82duit</ets>. Cf. <er>Deduct</er>.]</ety> <def>Delight; pleasure.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*du`pli*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>duplication</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The division of that which is morphologically one organ into two or more, as the division of an organ of a plant into a pair or cluster.</def><br/
@@ -7366,19 +7366,19 @@ Is the king's ship in the <qex>deep</qex> nook.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br
<p><hw>de-escalate</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>to reduce in intensity (a crisis or a war).</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de-escalation</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a reduction in intensity (of a crisis or a war).</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*e"sis</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*<emac/"s<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`hsis</grk> supplication.]</ety> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>An invocation of, or address to, the Supreme Being.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*e"sis</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*<emac/"s<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`hsis</grk> supplication.]</ety> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>An invocation of, or address to, the Supreme Being.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De"ess</hw> <pr>(d<esl/"<ecr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82esse</ets>, fem. of <ets>dieu</ets> god.]</ety> <def>A goddess.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Croft.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Deev</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Hind. & Pers. Myth.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dev</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Deev</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Hind. & Pers. Myth.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dev</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*face"</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*f<amac/s")</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Defaced</conjf> <pr>(d<esl/*f<amac/st")</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Defacing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>defacen</ets> to disfigure, efface, OF. <ets>desfacier</ets>; L. <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>facies</ets> face. See <er>Face</er>, and cf. <er>Efface</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To destroy or mar the face or external appearance of; to disfigure; to injure, spoil, or mar, by effacing or obliterating important features or portions of; <as>as, to <ex>deface</ex> a monument; to <ex>deface</ex> an edifice; to <ex>deface</ex> writing; to <ex>deface</ex> a note, deed, or bond; to <ex>deface</ex> a record.</as></def> \'bdThis high face <xex>defaced</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Emerson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>So by false learning is good sense <qex>defaced</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -7405,13 +7405,13 @@ Is the king's ship in the <qex>deep</qex> nook.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which mars or disfigures.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*fa"cer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, defaces or disfigures.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De` fac"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>Actually; in fact; in reality; <as>as, a king <ex>de facto</ex>, -- distinguished from a king <ex>de jure</ex>, or by right</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De` fac"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>Actually; in fact; in reality; <as>as, a king <ex>de facto</ex>, -- distinguished from a king <ex>de jure</ex>, or by right</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*fail"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82faillir</ets> to fail; pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>de</ets>) + <ets>faillir</ets>. See <er>Fail</er>, and cf. <er>Default</er>.]</ety> <def>To cause to fail.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*fail"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82faillance</ets>.]</ety> <def>Failure; miscarriage.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
@@ -8684,13 +8684,13 @@ Should look so near upon her foul <qex>deformities</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</
<p><q>I <qex>defy</qex> the enemies of our constitution to show the contrary.</q> <rj><qau>Burke.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de*fy"</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*f<imac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A challenge.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>d\'82`ga`g\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., p. p. of <ets>d\'82gager</ets> to disengage. See <er>De-</er>, 1st Gage, and cf. <er>Disgage</er>.]</ety> <def>Unconstrained; easy; free.</def> <rj><au>Vanbrugh.</au></rj></p>
+<p><hw>d\'82`ga`g\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., p. p. of <ets>d\'82gager</ets> to disengage. See <er>De-</er>, 1st Gage, and cf. <er>Disgage</er>.]</ety> <def>Unconstrained; easy; free.</def> <rj><au>Vanbrugh.</au></rj></p>
<p><q>A graceful and <qex>d\'82gag\'82</qex> manner.</q> <rj><qau>Poe.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de*gar"nish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>degarnished</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>degarnishing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82garnir</ets>; pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets>, <ets>des-</ets> (L. <ets>dis-</ets>) + <ets>garnir</ets> to furnish. See <er>Garnish</er>, and cf. <er>Disgarnish</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To strip or deprive of entirely, as of furniture, ornaments, etc.; to disgarnish; <as>as, to <ex>degarnish</ex> a house, etc.</as></def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -8924,13 +8924,13 @@ Should look so near upon her foul <qex>deformities</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</
<p><hw>de*grad"ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>causing humiliation or degradation; <as>as, a <ex>degrading</ex> surrender</as>.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de*grad"ing*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a degrading manner.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>D\'82`gras"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Deg"ras</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.; cf. F. <ets>gras</ets>, a. & n., fat.]</ety> <def>A semisolid emulsion produced by the treatment of certain skins with oxidized fish oil, which extracts their soluble albuminoids. It was formerly solely a by-product of chamois leather manufacture, but is now made for its own sake, being valuable as a dressing for hides.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>D\'82`gras"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Deg"ras</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.; cf. F. <ets>gras</ets>, a. & n., fat.]</ety> <def>A semisolid emulsion produced by the treatment of certain skins with oxidized fish oil, which extracts their soluble albuminoids. It was formerly solely a by-product of chamois leather manufacture, but is now made for its own sake, being valuable as a dressing for hides.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deg`ra*va"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>degravare</ets>, <ets>degravatum</ets>, to make heavy. See <er>Grave</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>The act of making heavy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*grease"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To remove grease or fatty matter from, as wool or silk.</def><br/
@@ -8998,13 +8998,13 @@ Should look so near upon her foul <qex>deformities</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</
<p><hw>degressive</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>going down by steps.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>gradually decreasing in rate on sums below a certain amount.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De"gu</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South American rodent (<spn>Octodon Cumingii</spn>), of the family <fam>Octodontid\'91</fam>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De"gu</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South American rodent (<spn>Octodon Cumingii</spn>), of the family <fam>Octodontid\'91</fam>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*gum"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Degummed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Degumming</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To deprive of, or free from, gum; <as>as, to <ex>degum</ex> ramie</as>.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*gust"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>degustare</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82guster</ets>. See <er>Gust</er> to taste.]</ety> <def>To taste.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
@@ -9031,16 +9031,16 @@ Should look so near upon her foul <qex>deformities</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</
<p><hw>De*hon`es*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dehonestatio</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dishonoring; disgracing.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Gauden.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*horn"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dehorned</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dehorning</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To deprive of horns; to prevent the growth of the horns of (cattle) by burning their ends soon after they start. See <er>Dishorn</er>.</def> \'bd<xex>Dehorning</xex> cattle.\'b8 <rj><au>Farm Journal (1886).</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*hors"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <ety>[F., outside.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Out of; without; foreign to; out of the agreement, record, will, or other instrument.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*hors"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <ety>[F., outside.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Out of; without; foreign to; out of the agreement, record, will, or other instrument.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*hors"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>All sorts of outworks in general, at a distance from the main works; any advanced works for protection or cover.</def> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>De*hors"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>All sorts of outworks in general, at a distance from the main works; any advanced works for protection or cover.</def> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*hort"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dehorted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dehorting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>dehortari</ets>; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>hortari</ets> to urge, exhort.]</ety> <def>To urge to abstain or refrain; to dissuade.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The apostles vehemently <qex>dehort</qex> us from unbelief.</q> <rj><qau>Bp. Ward.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -9197,22 +9197,22 @@ Those craven ranks to see.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Deil</hw> <pr>(d<emac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Devil; -- spelt also <asp>deel</asp>.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Deil's buckie</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Buckie</er>.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dei*noc"e*ras</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinoceras</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dei*noc"e*ras</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinoceras</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dei*nor"nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinornis</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dei*nor"nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinornis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dei"no*saur</hw> <pr>(d<imac/"n<osl/*s<add/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinosaur</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dei"no*saur</hw> <pr>(d<imac/"n<osl/*s<add/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinosaur</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dei`no*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(d<imac/`n<osl/*th<emac/"r<icr/*<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinotherium</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dei`no*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(d<imac/`n<osl/*th<emac/"r<icr/*<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dinotherium</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*in"te*grate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>deintegrare</ets> to impair; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>integrare</ets> to make whole.]</ety> <def>To disintegrate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dein"te*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dein"te*vous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Rare; excellent; costly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -9321,13 +9321,13 @@ Of Egypt.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>Nor think, to die <qex>dejects</qex> my lofty mind.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ject"</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dejectus</ets>, p. p.]</ety> <def>Dejected.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*jec"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., neut. pl. from L. <ets>dejectus</ets>, p. p.]</ety> <def>Excrements; <as>as, the <ex>dejecta</ex> of the sick</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*jec"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., neut. pl. from L. <ets>dejectus</ets>, p. p.]</ety> <def>Excrements; <as>as, the <ex>dejecta</ex> of the sick</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ject"ed</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Cast down; afflicted; low-spirited; sad; <as>as, a <ex>dejected</ex> look or countenance</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>De*ject"ed*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>De*ject"ed*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ject"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who casts down, or dejects.</def><br/
@@ -9374,22 +9374,22 @@ Our frailty can sustain, thy tidings bring.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dej"er*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dejeratus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dejerare</ets> to swear; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>jurare</ets> to swear.]</ety> <def>To swear solemnly; to take an oath.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dej`er*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dejeratio</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of swearing solemnly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`jeu`n\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A d\'82jeuner.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`jeu`n\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A d\'82jeuner.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Take a <qex>d\'82jeun\'82</qex> of muskadel and eggs.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`jeu`ner"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82jeuner</ets> breakfast, as a verb, to breakfast. Cf. <er>Dinner</er>.]</ety> <def>A breakfast; sometimes, also, a lunch or collation.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`jeu`ner"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82jeuner</ets> breakfast, as a verb, to breakfast. Cf. <er>Dinner</er>.]</ety> <def>A breakfast; sometimes, also, a lunch or collation.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De` ju"re</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>By right; of right; by law; -- often opposed to <contr>de facto</contr>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De` ju"re</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>By right; of right; by law; -- often opposed to <contr>de facto</contr>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dek"a-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Metric System)</fld> <def>A prefix signifying <sig>ten</sig>. See <er>Deca-</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dek"a*brist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A <er>Decembrist</er>.</def><br/
@@ -9548,13 +9548,13 @@ The huddling brook to hear his madrigal.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*lay"ing*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By delays.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Tennyson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*lay"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Hindrance.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Gower.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del` cred"er*e</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., of belief or trust.]</ety> <fld>(Mercantile Law)</fld> <def>An agreement by which an agent or factor, in consideration of an additional premium or commission (called a <xex>del credere</xex> commission), engages, when he sells goods on credit, to insure, warrant, or guarantee to his principal the solvency of the purchaser, the engagement of the factor being to pay the debt himself if it is not punctually discharged by the buyer when it becomes due.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del` cred"er*e</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., of belief or trust.]</ety> <fld>(Mercantile Law)</fld> <def>An agreement by which an agent or factor, in consideration of an additional premium or commission (called a <xex>del credere</xex> commission), engages, when he sells goods on credit, to insure, warrant, or guarantee to his principal the solvency of the purchaser, the engagement of the factor being to pay the debt himself if it is not punctually discharged by the buyer when it becomes due.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De"le</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>imperative sing.</pos> <mord>of L. <xex>delere</xex> to destroy</mord>. <ety>[Cf. <er>Delete</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>Erase; remove; -- a direction to cancel something which has been put in type; usually expressed by a peculiar form of <xex>d</xex>, thus: <dele/.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De"le</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Deled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Deleing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[From the preceding word.]</ety> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>To erase; to cancel; to delete; to mark for omission.</def><br/
@@ -9581,13 +9581,13 @@ The huddling brook to hear his madrigal.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*lec"tate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delectatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>delectare</ets>. See <er>Delight</er>.]</ety> <def>To delight; to charm.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De`lec*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delectatio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82lectation</ets>.]</ety> <def>Great pleasure; delight.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*lec"tus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., selection, from <ets>deligere</ets>, <ets>delectum</ets>, to select.]</ety> <def>A name given to an elementary book for learners of Latin or Greek.</def> <rj><au>G. Eliot.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>De*lec"tus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., selection, from <ets>deligere</ets>, <ets>delectum</ets>, to select.]</ety> <def>A name given to an elementary book for learners of Latin or Greek.</def> <rj><au>G. Eliot.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del`e*ga*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Delegate</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of delegating, or state of being delegated; deputed power.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>By way of <qex>delegacy</qex> or grand commission.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Raleigh.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -9636,13 +9636,13 @@ The huddling brook to hear his madrigal.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Rom. Law)</fld> <def>A kind of novation by which a debtor, to be liberated from his creditor, gives him a third person, who becomes obliged in his stead to the creditor, or to the person appointed by him.</def> <rj><au>Pothier.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del"e*ga*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delegatorius</ets> pert. to an assignment.]</ety> <def>Holding a delegated position.</def> <rj><au>Nash.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*len"da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>delere</ets> to destroy.]</ety> <def>Things to be erased or blotted out.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*len"da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>delere</ets> to destroy.]</ety> <def>Things to be erased or blotted out.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del`e*nif"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delenificus</ets>; <ets>delenire</ets> to soothe + <ets>facere</ets> to make. See <er>Lenient</er>.]</ety> <def>Assuaging pain.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*lete"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Deleted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Deleting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>deletus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>delere</ets> to destroy. Cf. 1st <er>Dele</er>.]</ety> <def>To blot out; to erase; to expunge; to dele; to omit.</def><br/
@@ -10163,13 +10163,13 @@ Smiles with gay fruits or with <qex>delightful</qex> green.</q> <rj><qau>Addison
<p><hw>De*liq"ui*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>deliquia</ets> a flowing off, a gutter, <ets>deliquium</ets> a flowing down, fr. <ets>deliquare</ets>. See <er>Deliquate</er>.]</ety> <def>To melt and become liquid by absorbing water from the air; to deliquesce.</def> <rj><au>Fourcroy.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*liq`ui*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of deliquiating.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*liq"ui*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Deliquiate</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A melting or dissolution in the air, or in a moist place; a liquid condition; <as>as, a salt falls into a <ex>deliquium</ex></as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><-- the result of deliquescence --><br/
+<p><hw>De*liq"ui*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Deliquiate</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A melting or dissolution in the air, or in a moist place; a liquid condition; <as>as, a salt falls into a <ex>deliquium</ex></as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><-- the result of deliquescence --><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A sinking away; a swooning.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A melting or maudlin mood.</def> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
@@ -10410,28 +10410,28 @@ And carry it sweetly and <qex>deliverly</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></r
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A young woman; a wench.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Sweet doxies and <qex>dells</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del"la Crus"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A shortened form of <xex>Accademia della Crusca</xex>, an academy in Florence, Italy, founded in the 16th century, especially for conserving the purity of the Italian language.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del"la Crus"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A shortened form of <xex>Accademia della Crusca</xex>, an academy in Florence, Italy, founded in the 16th century, especially for conserving the purity of the Italian language.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ The Accademia della Crusca (literally, <xex>academy of the bran</xex> or <xex>chaff</xex>) was so called in allusion to its chief object of bolting or purifying the national language.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del`la*crus"can</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to the Accademia della Crusca in Florence.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>The Dellacruscan School</b></col>, <cd>a name given in satire to a class of affected English writers, most of whom lived in Florence, about <sc>a. d.</sc> 1785.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De"loo</hw> <pr>(d<asl/"l<omac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The duykerbok.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De"loo</hw> <pr>(d<asl/"l<omac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The duykerbok.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*loul"</hw> <pr>(d<asl/*l<oomac/l")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. of Arabic or Bedouin origin.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A special breed of the dromedary used for rapid traveling; the swift camel; -- called also <altname>herire</altname>, and <altname>maharik</altname>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*loul"</hw> <pr>(d<asl/*l<oomac/l")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. of Arabic or Bedouin origin.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A special breed of the dromedary used for rapid traveling; the swift camel; -- called also <altname>herire</altname>, and <altname>maharik</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Delph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Delftware.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Five nothings in five plates of <qex>delph</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -10469,16 +10469,16 @@ And carry it sweetly and <qex>deliverly</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></r
<p><hw>Del"phi*nine</hw> <pr>(?; 104)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>delphinine</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A poisonous alkaloid extracted from the stavesacre (<spn>Delphinium staphisagria</spn>), as a colorless amorphous powder.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del"phi*noid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delphinus</ets> a dolphin + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or resembling, the dolphin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del`phi*noi"de*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cetacea which comprises the dolphins, porpoises, and related forms.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del`phi*noi"de*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cetacea which comprises the dolphins, porpoises, and related forms.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del*phi"nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a dolphin, fr. Gr. <grk>delfi`s</grk>, <grk>delfi`n</grk>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of Cetacea, including the dolphin. See <er>Dolphin</er>, 1.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del*phi"nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a dolphin, fr. Gr. <grk>delfi`s</grk>, <grk>delfi`n</grk>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of Cetacea, including the dolphin. See <er>Dolphin</er>, 1.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>The Dolphin, a constellation near the equator and east of Aquila.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><mhw><hw>Del*sarte"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <it>or</it> <hw>Delsarte system</hw></mhw>. <def>A system of calisthenics patterned on the theories of <person>Fran<cced/ois <etsep>Delsarte</etsep></person> (1811 -- 71), a French teacher of dramatic and musical expression.</def><br/
@@ -10502,22 +10502,22 @@ And carry it sweetly and <qex>deliverly</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></r
<p><hw>Del`ta*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Delta</ets> + L. <ets>facere</ets> to make.]</ety> <def>The formation of a delta or of deltas.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del*ta"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Relating to, or like, a delta.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del*thy"ris</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`lta</grk> the name of the letter <DELTA/ + <grk>thy`ra</grk> door.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A name formerly given to certain Silurian brachiopod shells of the genus <er>Spirifer</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del*thy"ris</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`lta</grk> the name of the letter <DELTA/ + <grk>thy`ra</grk> door.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A name formerly given to certain Silurian brachiopod shells of the genus <er>Spirifer</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Delthyris limestone</b></col> <fld>(Geol.)</fld>, <cd>one of the divisions of the Upper Silurian rocks in New York.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Deltaic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Del*tid"i*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`lta</grk>, the letter <DELTA/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The triangular space under the beak of many brachiopod shells.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Del*tid"i*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`lta</grk>, the letter <DELTA/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The triangular space under the beak of many brachiopod shells.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del`to*he"dron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>de`lta</grk>, the letter <DELTA/ + <grk>'e`dra</grk> seat, base.]</ety> <fld>(Crystallog.)</fld> <def>A solid bounded by twelve quadrilateral faces. It is a hemihedral form of the isometric system, allied to the tetrahedron.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Del"toid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>deltoeidh`s</grk> delta- shaped; <grk>de`lta</grk> the name of the letter <DELTA/ + <grk>e'i^dos</grk> form: cf. F. <ets>delto\'8bde</ets>. See <er>Delta</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Shaped like the Greek <DELTA/ (delta); delta-shaped; triangular.</def><br/
@@ -10582,13 +10582,13 @@ With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>At length corruption, like a general flood . . . <br/
Shall <qex>deluge</qex> all.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*lun"dung</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An East Indian carnivorous mammal (<spn>Prionodon gracilis</spn>), resembling the civets, but without scent pouches. It is handsomely spotted.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*lun"dung</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An East Indian carnivorous mammal (<spn>Prionodon gracilis</spn>), resembling the civets, but without scent pouches. It is handsomely spotted.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*lu"sion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>delusio</ets>, fr. <ets>deludere</ets>. See <er>Delude</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of deluding; deception; a misleading of the mind.</def> <rj><au>Pope.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The state of being deluded or misled.</def><br/
@@ -10897,13 +10897,13 @@ How narrow our <qex>demeans</qex> are.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de*ment"ed*ness</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>mental deterioration of organic or functional origin.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> dementia.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*men"ti*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>demens</ets>. See <er>Dement</er>.]</ety> <def>Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*men"ti*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>demens</ets>. See <er>Dement</er>.]</ety> <def>Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*meph"i*tize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Demephitized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Demephitizing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>m\'82phitiser</ets> to infect with <ets>mephitis</ets>.]</ety> <def>To purify from mephitic or foul air.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>De*meph`i*ti*za"tion</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*merge"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>demergere</ets>.]</ety> <def>To plunge down into; to sink; to immerse.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
@@ -11055,13 +11055,13 @@ How narrow our <qex>demeans</qex> are.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dem`i*re*lief"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dem`i*re*lie"vo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>Half relief. See <er>Demi-rilievo</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dem"i*rep`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Contr. fr. <ets>demi-reputation</ets>.]</ety> <def>A woman of doubtful reputation or suspected character; an adventuress.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>De Quincey.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dem"i-ri*lie"vo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>demi-</ets> + It. <ets>rilievo</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Half relief; sculpture in relief of which the figures project from the background by one half their full roundness.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A work of sculpture of the above character. See <er>Alto-rilievo</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dem"i-ri*lie"vo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>demi-</ets> + It. <ets>rilievo</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Half relief; sculpture in relief of which the figures project from the background by one half their full roundness.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A work of sculpture of the above character. See <er>Alto-rilievo</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*mis`a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>The state of being demisable.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*mis"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Demise</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Capable of being leased; <as>as, a <ex>demisable</ex> estate</as>.</def><br/
@@ -11158,13 +11158,13 @@ And abject thrall.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*mit"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82mettre</ets> to remove, <ets>se d\'82mettre</ets> to resign; <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>dis-</ets>) + <ets>mettre</ets> to put, fr. L. <ets>mittere</ets> to send. Cf. <er>Dismiss</er>.]</ety> <def>To lay down or relinquish an office, membership, authority, or the like; to resign, as from a Masonic lodge; -- generally used with an implication that the act is voluntary.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*mit"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of demitting; also, a letter, certificate, or the like, certifying that a person has (honorably) demitted, as from a Masonic lodge.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*mi"-tasse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., half cup.]</ety> <def>A small cup for, or of, black coffee.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*mi"-tasse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., half cup.]</ety> <def>A small cup for, or of, black coffee.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dem"i*tint`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>That part of a painting, engraving, or the like, which is neither in full darkness nor full light.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The shade itself; neither the darkest nor the lightest in a composition. Also called <xex>half tint</xex>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dem"i*tone`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Semitone.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -11276,13 +11276,13 @@ Of <qex>Demogorgon</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>demographic</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to demography; <as>as, <ex>demographic</ex> surveys</as>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>de*mog"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(d<esl/*m<ocr/g"r<adot/f<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dh^mos</grk> the people + <ets>-graphy</ets>.]</ety> <def>The study of vital statistics, such as births, deaths, marriages, mortality, health, etc., in populations and subgroups of populations.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dem`o*graph"ic</wf>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De`moi`selle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Damsel</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A young lady; a damsel; a lady's maid.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De`moi`selle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Damsel</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A young lady; a damsel; a lady's maid.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The Numidian crane (<spn>Anthropoides virgo</spn>); -- so called on account of the grace and symmetry of its form and movements.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A beautiful, small dragon fly of the genus <gen>Agrion</gen>.</def><br/
@@ -11775,13 +11775,13 @@ At last he whispers, \'bdDo; and we go snacks.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj>
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Denali national park.</syn><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*nar"co*tize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To deprive of narcotine; <as>as, to <ex>denarcotize</ex> opium</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>De*nar`co*ti*za"tion</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*na"ri*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Denarii</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See 2d <er>Denier</er>.]</ety> <def>A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the \'bdpenny\'b8 of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally <xex>ten</xex> of the pieces called <part>as</part>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*na"ri*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Denarii</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See 2d <er>Denier</er>.]</ety> <def>A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the \'bdpenny\'b8 of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally <xex>ten</xex> of the pieces called <part>as</part>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"a*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>denarius</ets>. See 2d <er>Denier</er>.]</ety> <def>Containing ten; tenfold; proceeding by tens; <as>as, the <ex>denary</ex>, or decimal, scale</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"a*ry</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The number ten; a division into ten.</def><br/
@@ -11868,13 +11868,13 @@ At last he whispers, \'bdDo; and we go snacks.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj>
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dendroaspis</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>a genus of African snakes comprising the mambas.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> <gen>Dendraspis</gen>, genus <gen>Dendroaspis</gen>, genus <gen>Dendroaspis</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den`dro*c<oe/"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ndron</grk> tree + <grk>koi^los</grk> hollow.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of the Turbellaria in which the digestive cavity gives off lateral branches, which are often divided into smaller branchlets.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Den`dro*c<oe/"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ndron</grk> tree + <grk>koi^los</grk> hollow.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of the Turbellaria in which the digestive cavity gives off lateral branches, which are often divided into smaller branchlets.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Den"droid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Den*droid"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ treelike; <grk>de`ndron</grk> tree + <grk>e'i^dos</grk> form: cf. F. <ets>dendro\'8bde</ets>.]</ety> <def>Resembling a shrub or tree in form; treelike; branching.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> arboreal, arboreous, arborescent, arboresque, arboriform, dendriform, treelike, tree-shaped.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dendrolagus</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>a genus comprising the tree wallabies.</def><br/
@@ -11945,13 +11945,13 @@ At last he whispers, \'bdDo; and we go snacks.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj>
<p><hw>De*ni"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Denial.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>E. Hall.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ni"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who denies; <as>as, a <ex>denier</ex> of a fact, or of the faith, or of Christ</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>denier</ets>, fr. L. <ets>denarius</ets> a Roman silver coin orig. equiv. to ten asses, later, a copper, fr. <ets>deni</ets> ten by ten, fr. the root of <ets>decem</ets> ten; akin to E. <ets>ten</ets>. See <er>Ten</er>, and cf. <er>Denary</er>, <er>Dinar</er>.]</ety> <def>A small copper coin of insignificant value.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>denier</ets>, fr. L. <ets>denarius</ets> a Roman silver coin orig. equiv. to ten asses, later, a copper, fr. <ets>deni</ets> ten by ten, fr. the root of <ets>decem</ets> ten; akin to E. <ets>ten</ets>. See <er>Ten</er>, and cf. <er>Denary</er>, <er>Dinar</er>.]</ety> <def>A small copper coin of insignificant value.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>My dukedom to a beggarly <qex>denier</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"i*grate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>denigrare</ets>; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>nigrare</ets> to blacken, <ets>niger</ets> black.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To blacken thoroughly; to make very black.</def> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
@@ -12168,13 +12168,13 @@ Natives, or <qex>denizens</qex>, of blest abodes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj
<p><note><hand/ A word found in some editions of Shakespeare.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*not"ive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Serving to denote.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'82`noue`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82nouement</ets>, fr. <ets>d\'82nouer</ets> to untie; pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>dis-</ets>) + <ets>nouer</ets> to tie, fr. L. <ets>nodus</ets> knot, perh. for <ets>gnodus</ets> and akin to E. <ets>knot</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The unraveling or discovery of a plot; the catastrophe, especially of a drama or a romance.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'82`noue`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82nouement</ets>, fr. <ets>d\'82nouer</ets> to untie; pref. <ets>d\'82-</ets> (L. <ets>dis-</ets>) + <ets>nouer</ets> to tie, fr. L. <ets>nodus</ets> knot, perh. for <ets>gnodus</ets> and akin to E. <ets>knot</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The unraveling or discovery of a plot; the catastrophe, especially of a drama or a romance.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The solution of a mystery; issue; outcome.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 391 --></p>
@@ -12294,13 +12294,13 @@ Natives, or <qex>denizens</qex>, of blest abodes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A marine mollusk of the genus <gen>Dentalium</gen>, with a curved conical shell resembling a tooth. See <er>Dentalium</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"tal*ism</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/n"t<ait/l*<icr/z'm)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being formed by the aid of the teeth.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den*ta"li*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of marine mollusks belonging to the <class>Scaphopoda</class>, having a tubular conical shell.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Den*ta"li*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of marine mollusks belonging to the <class>Scaphopoda</class>, having a tubular conical shell.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dentaria</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus usually included in genus <gen>Cardamine</gen>; in some classifications considered a separate genus.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dentaria</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -12330,22 +12330,22 @@ Natives, or <qex>denizens</qex>, of blest abodes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj
<p><hw>Dent"ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Dent</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>Indented; impressed with little hollows.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dent"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Dentil</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den*telle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Bookbinding)</fld> <def>An ornamental tooling like lace.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Den*telle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Bookbinding)</fld> <def>An ornamental tooling like lace.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den*tel"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[It., sing. <ets>dentello</ets>, prop., little tooth, dim. of <ets>dente</ets> tooth, L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>. Cf. <er>Dentil</er>.]</ety> <def>Modillions.</def> <rj><au>Spectator.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Den*tel"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[It., sing. <ets>dentello</ets>, prop., little tooth, dim. of <ets>dente</ets> tooth, L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>. Cf. <er>Dentil</er>.]</ety> <def>Modillions.</def> <rj><au>Spectator.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den"tex</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., cf. L. <ets>dentix</ets> a sort of sea fish.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An edible European marine fish (<spn>Sparus dentex</spn>, or <spn>Dentex vulgaris</spn>) of the family <fam>Percid\'91</fam>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Den"tex</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., cf. L. <ets>dentix</ets> a sort of sea fish.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An edible European marine fish (<spn>Sparus dentex</spn>, or <spn>Dentex vulgaris</spn>) of the family <fam>Percid\'91</fam>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den`ti*ce"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth + <ets>cetus</ets>, pl. <ets>cete</ets>, whale, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cetacea in which the teeth are developed, including the sperm whale, dolphins, etc.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Den`ti*ce"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth + <ets>cetus</ets>, pl. <ets>cete</ets>, whale, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Cetacea in which the teeth are developed, including the sperm whale, dolphins, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"ti*cle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>denticulus</ets> a little tooth, dim. of <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth. See <er>Dental</er>, and cf. <er>Dentelli</er>.]</ety> <def>A small tooth or projecting point.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Den*tic"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Den*tic"u*la`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>denticulatus</ets>, fr. <ets>denticulus</ets>. See <er>Denticle</er>.]</ety> <def>Furnished with denticles; notched into little toothlike projections; <as>as, a <ex>denticulate</ex> leaf of calyx</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Den*tic"u*late*ly</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -12404,13 +12404,13 @@ Natives, or <qex>denizens</qex>, of blest abodes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj
<p><hw>Den"tine</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/n"t<icr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dentine</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The dense calcified substance of which teeth are largely composed. It contains less animal matter than bone, and in the teeth of man is situated beneath the enamel.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den"ti*phone</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/n"t<icr/*f<omac/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth + Gr. <grk>fwnh`</grk> sound.]</ety> <def>An instrument which, placed against the teeth, conveys sound to the auditory nerve; an audiphone.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Den`ti*ros"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dentirostres</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth + <ets>rostrum</ets> bill, beak: cf. F. <ets>dentirostre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A dentirostral bird.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Den`ti*ros"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dentirostres</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dens</ets>, <ets>dentis</ets>, tooth + <ets>rostrum</ets> bill, beak: cf. F. <ets>dentirostre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A dentirostral bird.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den`ti*ros"tral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having a toothed bill; -- applied to a group of passerine birds, having the bill notched, and feeding chiefly on insects, as the shrikes and vireos. See <xex>Illust.</xex> (<xex>N</xex>) under <er>Beak</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Den`ti*ros"trate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dentirostral.</def><br/
@@ -13550,13 +13550,13 @@ Your oath, my lord, is vain and frivolous.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One with whom something is deposited; a depositary.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>I am the sole <qex>depository</qex> of my own secret, and it shall perish with me.</q> <rj><qau>Junius.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*pos"i*tum</hw> <pr>(-t<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>Deposit.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*pos"i*tum</hw> <pr>(-t<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>Deposit.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*pos"i*ture</hw> <pr>(-t<usl/r; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of depositing; deposition.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De"pot</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"p<osl/; <it>French</it> d<asl/*p<omac/"; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82p\'93t</ets>, OF. <ets>depost</ets>, fr. L. <ets>depositum</ets> a deposit. See <er>Deposit</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A place of deposit for the storing of goods; a warehouse; a storehouse.</def><br/
@@ -14155,13 +14155,13 @@ That should <qex>deracinate</qex> such savagery.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>De*ran"ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who deranges.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ray"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>derroi</ets>, <ets>desroi</ets>, <ets>desrei</ets>; pref. <ets>des-</ets> (L. <ets>dis-</ets>) + <ets>roi</ets>, <ets>rei</ets>, <ets>rai</ets>, order. See <er>Array</er>.]</ety> <def>Disorder; merriment.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der"bi*o</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large European food fish (<spn>Lichia glauca</spn>).</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der"bi*o</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large European food fish (<spn>Lichia glauca</spn>).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der"by</hw> <pr>(?; <it>usually</it> ? <it>in Eng.</it>; 85)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A race for three-old horses, run annually at Epsom (near London), for the Derby stakes. It was instituted by the 12th Earl of Derby, in 1780.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Derby Day</b></col>, <cd>the day of the annual race for the Derby stakes, -- Wednesday of the week before Whitsuntide.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -14256,13 +14256,13 @@ And Laughter holding both his sides.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj></p>
<p><hw>De*rid"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who derides, or laughs at, another in contempt; a mocker; a scoffer.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*rid"ing*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By way of derision or mockery.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De ri`gueur"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F. See 2d <er>Rigor</er>.]</ety> <def>According to strictness (of etiquette, rule, or the like); obligatory; strictly required.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De ri`gueur"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F. See 2d <er>Rigor</er>.]</ety> <def>According to strictness (of etiquette, rule, or the like); obligatory; strictly required.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*ri"sion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>derisio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82rision</ets>. See <er>Deride</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of deriding, or the state of being derided; mockery; scornful or contemptuous treatment which holds one up to ridicule.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh; the Lord shall have them in <qex>derision</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Ps. ii. 4.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -14438,25 +14438,25 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><hw>Derm</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>de`rma</grk>, <grk>-atos</grk>, skin, fr. <?/ to skin, flay: cf. F. <ets>derme</ets>. See <er>Tear</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The integument of animal; the skin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dermis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Derm</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dermis</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Derm</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dermis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dermacentor</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus comprising vectors of important diseases of man and animals.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dermacentor</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Derm"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Derm</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to the integument or skin of animals; dermic; <as>as, the <ex>dermal</ex> secretions</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the dermis or true skin.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Der*map"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Der*map"ter*an</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dermoptera</er>, <er>Dermopteran</er>.</def></p>
+<p><mhw><hw>Der*map"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Der*map"ter*an</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dermoptera</er>, <er>Dermopteran</er>.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Der*mat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Der"ma*tine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, fr. <?/ skin.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the skin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der`ma*ti"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`rma</grk>, <grk>-atos</grk>, skin + <ets>-itis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Inflammation of the skin.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -14485,13 +14485,13 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><hw>Der`ma*to*path"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>de`rma</grk>, <grk>-atos</grk>, skin + <grk>pa`qos</grk> suffering.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to skin diseases, or their cure.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der*mat"o*phyte</hw> <pr>(d<etil/r*m<acr/t"<osl/*f<imac/t <it>or</it> d<etil/r"m<adot/*t<osl/*f<imac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>de`rma</grk>, <grk>-atos</grk>, skin + <grk>fyto`n</grk> plant.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A fungus infecting and parasitic on the skin, especially one which causes disease; <as>as, ringworm is caused by a <ex>dermatophyte</ex></as>.</def></p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der*mes"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dermhsth`s</grk>; <grk>de`rma</grk> skin + root of <?/ to eat.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of coleopterous insects, the larv\'91 of which feed animal substances. They are very destructive to dries meats, skins, woolens, and furs. The most common species is <spn>Dermestes lardarius</spn>, known as the <stype>bacon beetle</stype>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der*mes"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dermhsth`s</grk>; <grk>de`rma</grk> skin + root of <?/ to eat.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of coleopterous insects, the larv\'91 of which feed animal substances. They are very destructive to dries meats, skins, woolens, and furs. The most common species is <spn>Dermestes lardarius</spn>, known as the <stype>bacon beetle</stype>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der*mes"toid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Dermestes</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to or resembling the genus Dermestes.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The carpet beetle, called the buffalo moth, is a <qex>dermestoid</qex> beetle.</q> <rj><qau>Pop. Sci. Monthly.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -14506,16 +14506,16 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><q>Underneath each nail the deep or <qex>dermic</qex> layer of the integument is peculiarly modified.</q> <rj><qau>Huxley.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Dermic remedies</b></col> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>such as act through the skin.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der"mis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Derm</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The deep sensitive layer of the skin beneath the scarfskin or epidermis; -- called also <altname>true skin</altname>, <altname>derm</altname>, <altname>derma</altname>, <altname>corium</altname>, <altname>cutis</altname>, and <altname>enderon</altname>. See <er>Skin</er>, and <xex>Illust.</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der"mis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Derm</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The deep sensitive layer of the skin beneath the scarfskin or epidermis; -- called also <altname>true skin</altname>, <altname>derm</altname>, <altname>derma</altname>, <altname>corium</altname>, <altname>cutis</altname>, and <altname>enderon</altname>. See <er>Skin</er>, and <xex>Illust.</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der`mo*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of nudibranch mollusks without special gills.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der`mo*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of nudibranch mollusks without special gills.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der`mo*bran"chi*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Derm</ets> + <ets>branchiate</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the skin modified to serve as a gill.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der`mo*h\'91"mal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or in relation with, both dermal and h\'91mal structures; <as>as, the <ex>dermoh\'91mal</ex> spines or ventral fin rays of fishes</as>.</def><br/
@@ -14533,13 +14533,13 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><hw>Der`mo*path"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Dermatopathic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der"mo*phyte</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A dermatophyte.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der*mop"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ wing.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of insects which includes the earwigs (<fam>Forticulid\'91</fam>).</def><-- now usu. <ord>Dermaptera</ord> --><br/
+<p><hw>Der*mop"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ wing.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of insects which includes the earwigs (<fam>Forticulid\'91</fam>).</def><-- now usu. <ord>Dermaptera</ord> --><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of lemuroid mammals having a parachutelike web of skin between the fore and hind legs, of which the colugo (<gen>Galeopithecus</gen>) is the type. See <er>Colugo</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of Mammalia; the <er>Chiroptera</er>.</def></p>
@@ -14547,22 +14547,22 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><altsp>[Written also <asp>Dermaptera</asp>, and <asp>Dermatoptera</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der*mop"ter*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An insect which has the anterior pair of wings coriaceous, and does not use them in flight, as the earwig.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der*mop"te*ri</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Dermopterygii</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der*mop"te*ri</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Dermopterygii</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der*mop`te*ryg"i*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ wing, fin, dim. of <?/ wing.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of fishlike animals including the Marsipobranchiata and Leptocardia.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der*mop`te*ryg"i*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ wing, fin, dim. of <?/ wing.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of fishlike animals including the Marsipobranchiata and Leptocardia.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der`mo*skel"e*ton</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Derm</ets> + <ets>skeleton</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Exoskeleton</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der`mos*to"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ bone.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Ossification of the dermis.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der`mos*to"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <?/ skin + <?/ bone.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Ossification of the dermis.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dern</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <def>A gatepost or doorpost.</def> <mark>[Local Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>C. Kingsley.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dern</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Dearn</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Hidden; concealed; secret.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdYe must be full <xex>dern</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
@@ -14577,13 +14577,13 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><q>He at length escaped them by <qex>derning</qex> himself in a foxearth.</q> <rj><qau>H. Miller.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dern"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Secret; hence, lonely; sad; mournful.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd<xex>Dernful</xex> noise.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der`nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., from OF. <ets>darrein</ets>, <ets>derrain</ets>. See <er>Darrein</er>.]</ety> <def>Last; final.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Der`nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F., from OF. <ets>darrein</ets>, <ets>derrain</ets>. See <er>Darrein</er>.]</ety> <def>Last; final.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Dernier ressort</b></col> <pr>(<?/)</pr> <ety>[F.]</ety>, <cd>last resort or expedient.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dern"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>Secretly; grievously; mournfully.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
@@ -14663,13 +14663,13 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><q>His language was severely censured by some of his brother peers as <qex>derogatory</qex> to their other.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Derogatory clause in a testament</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>a sentence of secret character inserted by the testator alone, of which he reserves the knowledge to himself, with a condition that no will he may make thereafter shall be valid, unless this clause is inserted word for word; -- a precaution to guard against later wills extorted by violence, or obtained by suggestion.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der`o*tre"ma*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ros</grk> skin + <?/, <?/, hole.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The tribe of aquatic Amphibia which includes Amphiuma, Menopoma, etc. They have permanent gill openings, but no external gills; -- called also <fam>Cryptobranchiata</fam>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Derotrema</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Der`o*tre"ma*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>de`ros</grk> skin + <?/, <?/, hole.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The tribe of aquatic Amphibia which includes Amphiuma, Menopoma, etc. They have permanent gill openings, but no external gills; -- called also <fam>Cryptobranchiata</fam>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Derotrema</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der"re</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dearer.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Der"rick</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Orig., a gallows, from a hangman named <ets>Derrick</ets>. The name is of Dutch origin; D. <ets>Diederik</ets>, <ets>Dierryk</ets>, prop. meaning, chief of the people; cf. AS. <ets>pe\'a2dric</ets>, E. <ets>Theodoric</ets>, G. <ets>Dietrich</ets>. See <er>Dutch</er>, and <er>Rich</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A mast, spar, or tall frame, supported at the top by stays or guys, and usually pivoted at the base, with suitable tackle for hoisting heavy weights, such as stones in building.</def><br/
@@ -14693,13 +14693,13 @@ And to his mates thus in <qex>derision</qex> called.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau><
<p><hw>Der"rin*ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the American inventor.]</ety> <def>A kind of short-barreled pocket pistol, of very large caliber, often carrying a half-ounce ball.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Derth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Dearth; scarcity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Der`tro*the"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ beak + <?/ box, case.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The horny covering of the end of the bill of birds.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Der`tro*the"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ beak + <?/ box, case.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The horny covering of the end of the bill of birds.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Der"vish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Der"vise</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Der"vis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Per. <ets>derw<emac/sch</ets>, fr. OPer. <ets>derew</ets> to beg, ask alms: cf. F. <ets>derviche</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A Turkish or Persian monk, especially one who professes extreme poverty and leads an austere life.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of the fanatical followers of the Mahdi, in the Sudan, in the 1880's.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
@@ -15272,13 +15272,13 @@ So well <qex>deserved</qex> me.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*sic"ca*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Desiccative.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*sid"er*a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Desirable.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdGood and <xex>desiderable</xex> things.\'b8 <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*sid`e*ra"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>See <er>Desideratum</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De*sid`e*ra"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>See <er>Desideratum</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*sid"er*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Desiderated</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Desiderating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>desideratus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>desiderare</ets> to desire, miss. See <er>Desire</er>, and cf. <er>Desideratum</er>.]</ety> <def>To desire; to feel the want of; to lack; to miss; to want.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Pray have the goodness to point out one word missing that ought to have been there -- please to insert a <qex>desiderated</qex> stanza. You can not.</q> <rj><qau>Prof. Wilson.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -15296,13 +15296,13 @@ So well <qex>deserved</qex> me.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*sid"er*a*tive</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An object of desire.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*sid`e*ra"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Desiderata</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>desideratus</ets>, p. p. See <er>Desiderate</er>.]</ety> <def>Anything desired; that of which the lack is felt; a want generally felt and acknowledge.</def></p>
+<p><hw>De*sid`e*ra"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Desiderata</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>desideratus</ets>, p. p. See <er>Desiderate</er>.]</ety> <def>Anything desired; that of which the lack is felt; a want generally felt and acknowledge.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>De*sid"i*ose`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>De*sid"i*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>desidiosus</ets>, fr. <ets>desidia</ets> a sitting idle, fr. <ets>desid<?/re</ets> to sit idle; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>sed<?/re</ets> to sit.]</ety> <def>Idle; lazy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*sid"i*ous*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state or quality of being desidiose, or indolent.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>N. Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -15661,13 +15661,13 @@ And toil'st in vain).</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Des"mid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Des*mid"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>desmo`s</grk> chain + <grk>e'i^dos</grk> form.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A microscopic plant of the family <fam>Desmidi\'91</fam>, a group of unicellular alg\'91 in which the species have a greenish color, and the cells generally appear as if they consisted of two coalescing halves.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Des"mine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>de`smh</grk>, <grk>desmo`s</grk>, bundle, fr. <grk>dei^n</grk> to bind.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Stilbite</er>. It commonly occurs in bundles or tufts of crystals.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Des`mo*bac*te"ri*a</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/s`m<osl/*b<acr/k*t<emac/"r<icr/*<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>desmo`s</grk> bond + E. <ets>bacteria</ets>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Microbacteria</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Des`mo*bac*te"ri*a</hw> <pr>(d<ecr/s`m<osl/*b<acr/k*t<emac/"r<icr/*<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>desmo`s</grk> bond + E. <ets>bacteria</ets>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Microbacteria</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Desmodontidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family comprisng the true vampire bats.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Desmodontidae</fam>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -15684,16 +15684,16 @@ And toil'st in vain).</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Des"moid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>desmo`s</grk> ligament + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Resembling, or having the characteristics of, a ligament; ligamentous.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Des*mol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>desmo`s</grk> ligament + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <def>The science which treats of the ligaments.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Des`mo*my*a"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ bond + <?/ muscle.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Tunicata which includes the Salp\'91. See <er>Salpa</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Des`mo*my*a"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ bond + <?/ muscle.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Tunicata which includes the Salp\'91. See <er>Salpa</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Des"o*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>desolatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>desolare</ets> to leave alone, forsake; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>solare</ets> to make lonely, <ets>solus</ets> alone. See <er>Sole</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Destitute or deprived of inhabitants; deserted; uninhabited; hence, gloomy; <as>as, a <ex>desolate</ex> isle; a <ex>desolate</ex> wilderness; a <ex>desolate</ex> house.</as></def><br/
+<p><hw>Des"o*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>desolatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>desolare</ets> to leave alone, forsake; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>solare</ets> to make lonely, <ets>solus</ets> alone. See <er>Sole</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Destitute or deprived of inhabitants; deserted; uninhabited; hence, gloomy; <as>as, a <ex>desolate</ex> isle; a <ex>desolate</ex> wilderness; a <ex>desolate</ex> house.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>I will make Jerusalem . . . a den of dragons, and I will make the cities of Judah <qex>desolate</qex>, without an inhabitant.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. ix. 11.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>And the silvery marish flowers that throng<br/
@@ -17284,13 +17284,13 @@ That <qex>detriment</qex>, if such it be.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dette"les</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Free from debt.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De`tu*mes"cence</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>detumescere</ets> to cease swelling; <ets>de</ets> + <ets>tumescere</ets>, <ets>tumere</ets>, to swell.]</ety> <def>Diminution of swelling; subsidence of anything swollen.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cudworth.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De"tur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>detur</ets> let it be given.]</ety> <def>A present of books given to a meritorious undergraduate student as a prize.</def> <mark>[Harvard Univ., U. S.]</mark><br/
+<p><hw>De"tur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>detur</ets> let it be given.]</ety> <def>A present of books given to a meritorious undergraduate student as a prize.</def> <mark>[Harvard Univ., U. S.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*turb"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>deturbare</ets>.]</ety> <def>To throw down.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*tur"bate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>deturbatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>deturbare</ets>, fr. L. <ets>deturbare</ets> to thrust down.]</ety> <def>To evict; to remove.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Foxe.</au></rj><br/
@@ -17336,13 +17336,13 @@ That <qex>detriment</qex>, if such it be.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Deu`ter*on"o*mist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The writer of Deuteronomy.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deu`ter*on"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/ second + <?/ law: cf. L. <ets>Deuteronomium</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bibl.)</fld> <def>The fifth book of the Pentateuch, containing the second giving of the law by Moses.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Deu`ter*o*pa*thi"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Deu`ter*op"a*thy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>deuteropathia</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ second + <?/ suffering, fr. <?/, <?/, to suffer: cf. F. <ets>deut\'82ropathie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A sympathetic affection of any part of the body, as headache from an overloaded stomach.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Deu`ter*o*pa*thi"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Deu`ter*op"a*thy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>deuteropathia</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ second + <?/ suffering, fr. <?/, <?/, to suffer: cf. F. <ets>deut\'82ropathie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A sympathetic affection of any part of the body, as headache from an overloaded stomach.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deu`ter*o*path"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to deuteropathy; of the nature of deuteropathy.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deu`ter*os"co*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ second + <ets>-scopy</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Second sight.</def><br/
@@ -17374,18 +17374,18 @@ That <qex>detriment</qex>, if such it be.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Deu`to*sul"phu*ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>deuto-</ets> + <ets>sulphuret</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A disulphide.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deu*tox"ide</hw> <pr>(?; 104)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>deut-</ets> + <ets>oxide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A compound containing in the molecule two atoms of oxygen united with some other element or radical; -- usually called <altname>dioxide</altname>, or less frequently, <altname>binoxide</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Deut"zi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <person>Jan <etsep>Deutz</etsep></person> of Holland.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of shrubs with pretty white flowers, much cultivated.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Deut"zi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <person>Jan <etsep>Deutz</etsep></person> of Holland.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of shrubs with pretty white flowers, much cultivated.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Dev</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> \'d8<hw>De"va</hw> (<?/)</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>d<?/va</ets>. Cf. <er>Deity</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Hind. Myth.)</fld> <def>A god; a deity; a divine being; an idol; a king.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>Dev</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>De"va</hw> (<?/)</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>d<?/va</ets>. Cf. <er>Deity</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Hind. Myth.)</fld> <def>A god; a deity; a divine being; an idol; a king.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De`va*na"ga*ri</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>d<emac/van\'begar\'c6</ets>; <ets>d<emac/va</ets> god + <ets>nagara</ets> city, <it>i. e.</it>, divine city.]</ety> <def>The script or characters in which Sanskrit and Hindi are written.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De`va*na"ga*ri</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>d<emac/van\'begar\'c6</ets>; <ets>d<emac/va</ets> god + <ets>nagara</ets> city, <it>i. e.</it>, divine city.]</ety> <def>The script or characters in which Sanskrit and Hindi are written.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vap`o*ra"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The change of vapor into water, as in the formation of rain.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vast"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>d\'82vaster</ets>. See <er>Devastate</er>.]</ety> <def>To devastate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bolingbroke.</au></rj><br/
@@ -17423,16 +17423,16 @@ And half the business of destruction done.</q> <rj><qau>Goldsmith.</qau></rj><br
<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Desolation; ravage; waste; havoc; destruction; ruin; overthrow.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dev"as*ta`tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>One who, or that which, devastates.</def> <rj><au>Emerson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dev`as*ta"vit</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., he has wasted.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Waste or misapplication of the assets of a deceased person by an executor or an administrator.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dev`as*ta"vit</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., he has wasted.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Waste or misapplication of the assets of a deceased person by an executor or an administrator.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De"va*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind., fr. Skr. <ets>d<?/va</ets> god.]</ety> <fld>(Hind. Myth.)</fld> <def>A deity; a divine being; a good spirit; an idol.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>dewata</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>De"va*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind., fr. Skr. <ets>d<?/va</ets> god.]</ety> <fld>(Hind. Myth.)</fld> <def>A deity; a divine being; a good spirit; an idol.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>dewata</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Deve</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Deaf</er>.]</ety> <def>Deaf.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dev"el*in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European swift.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
@@ -17568,13 +17568,13 @@ That life <qex>develops</qex> from within.</q> <rj><qau>Mrs. Browning.</qau></rj
<p><hw>De*vex"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Devexity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>May (Lucan).</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vex"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>devexitas</ets>, fr. <ets>devexus</ets>. See <er>Devex</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>A bending downward; a sloping; incurvation downward; declivity.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Davies (Wit's Pilgr.)</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De"vi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><def>; <xex>fem</xex>. of <er>Deva</er>. A goddess.</def><br/
+<p><hw>De"vi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><def>; <xex>fem</xex>. of <er>Deva</er>. A goddess.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>deviance</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>an aberrant state or condition.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> aberrance, aberrancy, aberration.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -17930,13 +17930,13 @@ They are which fortunes do by vows <qex>devise</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau
<p><hw>De*void"</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Devoid</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Void; empty; vacant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Destitute; not in possession; -- with <xex>of</xex>; <as>as, <ex>devoid</ex> of sense; <ex>devoid</ex> of pity or of pride.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*voir"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>debere</ets> to owe. See <er>Due</er>.]</ety> <def>Duty; service owed; hence, due act of civility or respect; -- now usually in the plural; <as>as, they paid their <ex>devoirs</ex> to the ladies</as>.</def> \'bdDo now your <xex>devoid</xex>, young knights!\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>De*voir"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>debere</ets> to owe. See <er>Due</er>.]</ety> <def>Duty; service owed; hence, due act of civility or respect; -- now usually in the plural; <as>as, they paid their <ex>devoirs</ex> to the ladies</as>.</def> \'bdDo now your <xex>devoid</xex>, young knights!\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dev"o*lute</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>devolutus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>devolvere</ets>. See <er>Devolve</er>.]</ety> <def>To devolve.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Foxe.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dev`o*lu"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>devolutio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>d\'82volution</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of rolling down.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -18081,13 +18081,13 @@ Tumbled together into rude chaos.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>De*vo`tion*al"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The practice of a devotionalist.</def> <rj><au>A. H. Clough.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vo"tion*al*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a devotional manner; toward devotion.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>De*vo"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <def>A devotee.</def> <rj><au>Dr. J. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>De*vo"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <def>A devotee.</def> <rj><au>Dr. J. Scott.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vo"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>A worshiper; one given to devotion.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>De*vour"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Devoured</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Devouring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>d\'82vorer</ets>, fr. L. <ets>devorare</ets>; <ets>de</ets> + <ets>vorare</ets> to eat greedily, swallow up. See <er>Voracious</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To eat up with greediness; to consume ravenously; to feast upon like a wild beast or a glutton; to prey upon.</def><br/
@@ -18437,24 +18437,24 @@ Went and watered all the ground.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dharma</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Hinduism)</fld> <def>the basic principles of the cosmos; also: an ancient sage in Hindu mythology worshipped as a god by some lower castes;.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dhaulagiri</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>a mountain in Nepal, 26,810 feet high.</def> <mark>[proper name]</mark><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dhole</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A fierce, wild dog (<spn>Canis Dukhunensis</spn>), found in the mountains of India. It is remarkable for its propensity to hunt the tiger and other wild animals in packs.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dhole</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A fierce, wild dog (<spn>Canis Dukhunensis</spn>), found in the mountains of India. It is remarkable for its propensity to hunt the tiger and other wild animals in packs.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dho"ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A Ceylonese boat. See <er>Doni</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dho"ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A Ceylonese boat. See <er>Doni</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 405 --></p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Dhoor"ra</hw>, \'d8<hw>Dhour"ra</hw>, <it>or</it> <hw>Dhur"ra</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Indian millet. See <er>Durra</er>.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>Dhoor"ra</hw>, <hw>Dhour"ra</hw>, <it>or</it> <hw>Dhur"ra</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Indian millet. See <er>Durra</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dhow</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>d\'beo</ets>?]</ety> <def>A coasting vessel of Arabia, East Africa, and the Indian Ocean. It has generally but one mast and a lateen sail.</def> <altsp>[Also written <asp>dow</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Dhow</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>d\'beo</ets>?]</ety> <def>A coasting vessel of Arabia, East Africa, and the Indian Ocean. It has generally but one mast and a lateen sail.</def> <altsp>[Also written <asp>dow</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[Gr. <grk>di`s-</grk> twice; akin to <?/ two, L. <ets>bis</ets> twice. See <er>Two</er>, and cf. <er>Bi-</er>, <er>Dia-</er>. The L. pref. <ets>dis-</ets> sometimes assumes the form <ets>di</ets>-. See <er>Dis-</er>.]</ety> <def>A prefix, signifying <sig>twofold</sig>, <sig>double</sig>, <sig>twice</sig></def>; <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>denoting <sig>two</sig> atoms, radicals, groups, or equivalents, as the case may be. See <er>Bi-</er>, 2.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di"a-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di-</hw> }</mhw>. <ety>[Gr. <grk>dia`</grk> through; orig., dividing into two parts; akin to <?/ two. See <er>Two</er>, and cf. 1st <er>Di-</er>.]</ety> <def>A prefix denoting <sig>through</sig>; also, <sig>between</sig>, <sig>apart</sig>, <sig>asunder</sig>, <sig>across</sig>. Before a vowel <ex>dia-</ex> becomes <altname>di-</altname>; <as>as, <ex>di</ex>actinic; <ex>di</ex>electric, etc.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -18479,13 +18479,13 @@ Went and watered all the ground.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*bet"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*bet"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to diabetes; <as>as, <ex>diabetic</ex> or <ex>diabetical</ex> treatment</as>.</def> <rj><au>Quian.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Diabetic sugar</b></col>. <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <cd>Same as <er>Dextrose</er>.</cd></cs></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Dia`ble*rie"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*ab"le*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>diablerie</ets>, fr. <ets>diable</ets> devil, L. <ets>diabolus</ets>. See <er>Devil</er>.]</ety> <def>Devilry; sorcery or incantation; a diabolical deed; mischief.</def></p>
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dia`ble*rie"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*ab"le*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>diablerie</ets>, fr. <ets>diable</ets> devil, L. <ets>diabolus</ets>. See <er>Devil</er>.]</ety> <def>Devilry; sorcery or incantation; a diabolical deed; mischief.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*bol"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*bol"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diabolicus</ets>, Gr. <?/ devilish, slanderous: cf. F. <ets>diabolique</ets>. See <er>Devil</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to the devil; resembling, or appropriate, or appropriate to, the devil; befitting hell or satan; devilish; infernal; impious; <as>as, a <ex>diabolic</ex> or <ex>diabolical</ex> temper or act; the <ex>diabolical</ex> expression on his face; fires lit up a <ex>diabolic</ex> scene</as>.</def> \'bd<xex>Diabolic</xex> power.\'b8 <au>Milton.</au> \'bdThe <xex>diabolical</xex> institution.\'b8 <au>Motley.</au><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> devilish, mephistophelian, mephistophelean.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>showing a wicked cunning or ingenuity; <as>as, the cold calculation and <ex>diabolic</ex> art of some statesmen</as>.</def><br/
@@ -18521,31 +18521,31 @@ Went and watered all the ground.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di`a*caus"tic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>That which burns by refraction, as a double convex lens, or the sun's rays concentrated by such a lens, sometimes used as a cautery.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>A curved formed by the consecutive intersections of rays of light refracted through a lens.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Di*ach"y*lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Di*ach"y*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>diachylum</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ very juicy; <grk>dia`</grk> thoroughly + <?/ juice.]</ety> <fld>(Med. & Chem.)</fld> <def>A plaster originally composed of the juices of several plants (whence its name), but now made of an oxide of lead and oil, and consisting essentially of glycerin mixed with lead salts of the fat acids.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*ach"y*lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*ach"y*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>diachylum</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ very juicy; <grk>dia`</grk> thoroughly + <?/ juice.]</ety> <fld>(Med. & Chem.)</fld> <def>A plaster originally composed of the juices of several plants (whence its name), but now made of an oxide of lead and oil, and consisting essentially of glycerin mixed with lead salts of the fat acids.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ac"id</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>acid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Divalent; -- said of a base or radical as capable of saturating two acid monad radicals or a dibasic acid. Cf. <er>Dibasic</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, and <er>Biacid</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*co"di*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <?/ <?/ from poppy heads; <grk>dia`</grk> through, from + <?/ head, a poppy head.]</ety> <def>A sirup made of poppies.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*co"di*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <?/ <?/ from poppy heads; <grk>dia`</grk> through, from + <?/ head, a poppy head.]</ety> <def>A sirup made of poppies.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ac"o*nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>diaconalis</ets>: cf. F. <ets>diaconal</ets>. Cf. <er>Deacon</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a deacon.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ac"o*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diaconatus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>diaconat</ets>.]</ety> <def>The office of a deacon; deaconship; also, a body or board of deacons.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ac"o*nate</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Governed by deacons.</def> \'bd<xex>Diaconate</xex> church.\'b8 <rj><au>T. Goodwin.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*ac"o*pe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ a cutting in two; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Tmesis.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*ac"o*pe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ a cutting in two; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Tmesis.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*cous"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>acoustic</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to the science or doctrine of refracted sounds.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*cous"tics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>diacoustique</ets>.]</ety> <def>That branch of natural philosophy which treats of the properties of sound as affected by passing through different mediums; -- called also <altname>diaphonics</altname>. See the Note under <er>Acoustics</er>.</def></p>
@@ -18556,13 +18556,13 @@ Went and watered all the ground.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>A glance at this typography will reveal great difficulties, which <qex>diacritical</qex> marks necessarily throw in the way of both printer and writer.</q> <rj><qau>A. J. Ellis.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`ac*tin"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>actinic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>Capable of transmitting the chemical or actinic rays of light; <as>as, <ex>diactinic</ex> media</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*del"phi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ brother.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants whose stamens are united into two bodies or bundles by their filaments.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Di`a*del"phi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ brother.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants whose stamens are united into two bodies or bundles by their filaments.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*del"phi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*del"phous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>diadelphe</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the class Diadelphia; having the stamens united into two bodies by their filaments (said of a plant or flower); grouped into two bundles or sets by coalescence of the filaments (said of stamens).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*dem</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>diad\'8ame</ets>, L. <ets>diadema</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to bind round; <grk>dia`</grk> through, across + <?/ to bind; cf. Skr. <ets>d\'be</ets> to bind.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Originally, an ornamental head band or fillet, worn by Eastern monarchs as a badge of royalty; hence (later), also, a crown, in general.</def> \'bdThe regal <xex>diadem</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -18794,13 +18794,13 @@ The universal <qex>dialect</qex> of the world.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A method of surveying, especially in mines, in which the bearings of the courses, or the angles which they make with each other, are determined by means of the circumferentor.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"al*ist</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A maker of dials; one skilled in dialing.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*al"la*ge</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ interchange, change, fr. <?/ to interchange.]</ety> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>A figure by which arguments are placed in various points of view, and then turned to one point.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Di*al"la*ge</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ interchange, change, fr. <?/ to interchange.]</ety> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>A figure by which arguments are placed in various points of view, and then turned to one point.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"al*lage</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ change, alluding to the change and inequality of luster between the natural joints of the mineral.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A dark green or bronze-colored laminated variety of pyroxene, common in certain igneous rocks.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"al*lel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ crossing.]</ety> <def>Meeting and intersecting, as lines; not parallel; -- opposed to <contr>parallel</contr>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ash.</au></rj><br/
@@ -18847,13 +18847,13 @@ The universal <qex>dialect</qex> of the world.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br
<p><q>And <qex>dialogued</qex> for him what he would say.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`al*y*pet"al*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to loose + <?/ leaf.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having separate petals; polypetalous.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*al"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dialyses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., separation, fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to part asunder, dissolve; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to loose.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Di\'91resis. See <er>Di\'91resis</er>, 1.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*al"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dialyses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., separation, fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to part asunder, dissolve; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to loose.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Di\'91resis. See <er>Di\'91resis</er>, 1.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Asyndeton</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Debility.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A solution of continuity; division; separation of parts.</def><br/
@@ -19026,22 +19026,22 @@ The universal <qex>dialect</qex> of the world.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br
<p><q>And chaste <qex>Diana</qex> haunts the forest shade.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Diana monkey</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a handsome, white-bearded monkey of West Africa (<spn>Cercopithecus Diana</spn>).</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*an"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/, <?/, a man, a male.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having two stamens.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*an"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/, <?/, a man, a male.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having two stamens.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*an"dri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Diandrous.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*an"drous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>diandre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the class Diandria; having two stamens.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*a"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>Diana</ets>; either as the name of the Roman goddess, or from its use in OE. as a name of silver.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Columbium</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+<p><hw>Di*a"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>Diana</ets>; either as the name of the Roman goddess, or from its use in OE. as a name of silver.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Columbium</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*no*et"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to revolve in the mind.]</ety> <fld>(Metaph.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the discursive faculty, its acts or products.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>I would employ . . . <qex>dianoetic</qex> to denote the operation of the discursive, elaborative, or comparative faculty.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Hamilton.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -19082,24 +19082,24 @@ The <qex>diapason</qex> closing full in man.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A standard of pitch; a tuning fork; <as>as, the French normal <ex>diapason</ex></as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>One of certain stops in the organ, so called because they extend through the scale of the instrument. They are of several kinds, as <stype>open diapason</stype>, <stype>stopped diapason</stype>, <stype>double diapason</stype>, and the like.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*pe*de"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a leaping or oozing through, fr. <?/ to leap through; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to leap.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The passage of the corpuscular elements of the blood from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, without rupture of the walls of the blood vessels.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*pe*de"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a leaping or oozing through, fr. <?/ to leap through; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to leap.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The passage of the corpuscular elements of the blood from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, without rupture of the walls of the blood vessels.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Diapensiaceae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family of northern temperate low evergreen plants; in some classifications placed in its own order <ord>Diapensiales</ord>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Diapensiaceae</fam>, diapensia family.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Diapensiales</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an order of plants, used in some classifications as coextensive with the family <altname><fam>Diapensiaceae</fam></altname>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> order <ord>Diapensiales</ord>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*pen"te</hw> <pr>(-p<ecr/n"t<esl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <grk>dia`pente</grk> a fifth; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <grk>pe`nte</grk> five: cf. F. <ets>diapente</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>The interval of the fifth.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*pen"te</hw> <pr>(-p<ecr/n"t<esl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <grk>dia`pente</grk> a fifth; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <grk>pe`nte</grk> five: cf. F. <ets>diapente</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>The interval of the fifth.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A composition of five ingredients.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*per</hw> <pr>(d<imac/"<adot/*p<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>diaspre</ets>, <ets>diapre</ets>, <ets>diaspe</ets>, sort of figured cloth, It. <ets>diaspro</ets> jasper, <ets>diaspo</ets> figured cloth, from L. <ets>jaspis</ets> a green-colored precious stone. See <er>Jasper</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Any textile fabric (esp. linen or cotton toweling) woven in diaper pattern. See 2.</def><br/
@@ -19174,13 +19174,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*phon"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*phon"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ sound, tone.]</ety> <def>Diacoustic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*phon"ics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The doctrine of refracted sound; diacoustics.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*pho*re"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to carry through, to throw off by perspiration; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to carry.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Perspiration, or an increase of perspiration.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Di`a*pho*re"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to carry through, to throw off by perspiration; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to carry.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Perspiration, or an increase of perspiration.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*pho*ret"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*pho*ret"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diaphoreticus</ets>, Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>diaphor\'82tique</ets>. See <er>Diaphoresis</er>.]</ety> <def>Having the power to increase perspiration.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*pho*ret"ic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A medicine or agent which promotes perspiration.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -19224,13 +19224,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di`ap*no"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ outlet for the wind, exhalation, fr. <?/ to blow through; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to blow, breathe: cf. F. <ets>diapno\'8bque</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Slightly increasing an insensible perspiration; mildly diaphoretic.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A gentle diaphoretic.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ap`o*phys"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to a diapophysis.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*poph"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dia-</er>, and <er>Apophysis</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The dorsal transverse, or tubercular, process of a vertebra. See <er>Vertebra</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*poph"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dia-</er>, and <er>Apophysis</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The dorsal transverse, or tubercular, process of a vertebra. See <er>Vertebra</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"arch*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ to rule.]</ety> <def>A form of government in which the supreme power is vested in two persons.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*a"ri*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*a"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Diary</er>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to a diary; daily.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -19244,22 +19244,22 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`ar*rhet"ic</hw>, <hw>Di`ar*rh\'d2t"ic</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Producing diarrhea, or a purging.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`ar*thro"di*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Relating to diarthrosis, or movable articulations.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`ar*thro"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to joint, articulate; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to fasten by a joint, <grk>'a`rqron</grk> joint.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A form of articulation which admits of considerable motion; a complete joint; abarticulation. See <er>Articulation</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`ar*thro"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to joint, articulate; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to fasten by a joint, <grk>'a`rqron</grk> joint.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A form of articulation which admits of considerable motion; a complete joint; abarticulation. See <er>Articulation</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*ry</hw> <pr>(d<imac/"<adot/*r<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Diaries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>diarium</ets>, fr. <ets>dies</ets> day. See <er>Deity</er>.]</ety> <def>A register of daily events or transactions; a daily record; a journal; a blank book dated for the record of daily memoranda; <as>as, a <ex>diary</ex> of the weather; a physician's <ex>diary</ex>.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*ry</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>lasting for one day; <as>as, a <ex>diary</ex> fever</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd<xex>Diary</xex> ague.\'b8 <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*as"po*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/. See <er>Diaspore</er>.]</ety> <def>Lit., \'bdDispersion.\'b8 -- applied collectively: (<it>a</it>) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen. Cf. <au>James i. 1</au>. (<it>b</it>) By extension, to Christians isolated from their own communion, as among the Moravians to those living, usually as missionaries, outside of the parent congregation.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*as"po*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/. See <er>Diaspore</er>.]</ety> <def>Lit., \'bdDispersion.\'b8 -- applied collectively: (<it>a</it>) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen. Cf. <au>James i. 1</au>. (<it>b</it>) By extension, to Christians isolated from their own communion, as among the Moravians to those living, usually as missionaries, outside of the parent congregation.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*spore</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From Gr. <?/ a scattering; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to sow, scatter like seed: cf. F. <ets>diaspore</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A hydrate of alumina, often occurring in white lamellar masses with brilliant pearly luster; -- so named on account of its decrepitating when heated before the blowpipe.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*stase</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ separation, fr. <?/, <?/ to stand apart; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/, <?/, to stand, set: cf. F. <ets>diastase</ets>. Cf. <er>Diastasis</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>A soluble enzyme, capable of converting starch and dextrin into sugar.</def><br/
@@ -19268,43 +19268,43 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><note><hand/ The name is more particularly applied to that enzyme formed during the germination of grain, as in the malting of barley; but it is also occasionally used to designate the amylolytic enzyme contained in animal fluids, as in the saliva.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*sta"sic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or consisting of, diastase; <as>as, <ex>diastasic</ex> ferment</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*as"ta*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Diastase</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A forcible separation of bones without fracture.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*as"ta*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Diastase</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A forcible separation of bones without fracture.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*stat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ separative. See <er>Diastase</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>Relating to diastase; having the properties of diastase; effecting the conversion of starch into sugar.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The influence of acids and alkalies on the <qex>diastatic</qex> action of saliva.</q> <rj><qau>Lauder Brunton.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*stem</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diastema</ets>, Gr. <?/, fr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>diast\'8ame</ets>.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Intervening space; interval.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>An interval.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*ste"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Diastem</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A vacant space, or gap, esp. between teeth in a jaw.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*ste"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Diastem</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A vacant space, or gap, esp. between teeth in a jaw.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*as"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ star.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A double star; -- applied to the nucleus of a cell, when, during cell division, the loops of the nuclear network separate into two groups, preparatory to the formation of two daughter nuclei. See <er>Karyokinesis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*as"to*le</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to put asunder, to separate; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to set, to place.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The rhythmical expansion or dilatation of the heart and arteries; -- correlative to <contr>systole</contr>, or contraction.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*as"to*le</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to put asunder, to separate; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to set, to place.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The rhythmical expansion or dilatation of the heart and arteries; -- correlative to <contr>systole</contr>, or contraction.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>A figure by which a syllable naturally short is made long.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`as*tol"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to diastole.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*style</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diastylus</ets>, Gr. <?/; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ pillar, column: cf. F. <ets>diastyle</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>See under <er>Intercolumniation</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*tes"sa*ron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ (sc. <?/); <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/, gen. of <?/ four (sc. <?/.).]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>The interval of a fourth.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`a*tes"sa*ron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ (sc. <?/); <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/, gen. of <?/ four (sc. <?/.).]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>The interval of a fourth.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Theol.)</fld> <def>A continuous narrative arranged from the first four books of the New Testament.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>An electuary compounded of four medicines.</def><br/
@@ -19327,13 +19327,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di`a*ther*mom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ warm + <ets>-meter</ets>. See <er>Diathermal</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An instrument for examining the thermal resistance or heat-conducting power of liquids.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*ther"mous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Diathermal</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*ath"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to place separately, arrange; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to place, put.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Bodily condition or constitution, esp. a morbid habit which predisposes to a particular disease, or class of diseases.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*ath"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to place separately, arrange; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to place, put.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Bodily condition or constitution, esp. a morbid habit which predisposes to a particular disease, or class of diseases.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`a*thet"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or dependent on, a diathesis or special constitution of the body; <as>as, <ex>diathetic</ex> disease</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"a*tom</hw> <pr>(d<imac/`<adot/*t<ocr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dia`tomos</grk> cut in two. See <er>Diatomous</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>One of the <fam>Diatomace\'91</fam>, a family of minute unicellular Alg\'91 having a siliceous covering of great delicacy, each individual multiplying by spontaneous division. By some authors diatoms are called <altname>Bacillari\'91</altname>, but this word is not in general use.</def><br/
@@ -19376,13 +19376,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>The ephemeral <qex>diatribe</qex> of a faction.</q> <rj><qau>John Morley.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*at"ri*bist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who makes a diatribe or diatribes.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`a*try"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ hole.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An extinct eocene bird from New Mexico, larger than the ostrich.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Di`a*try"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ hole.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An extinct eocene bird from New Mexico, larger than the ostrich.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di`a*zeuc"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`a*zeu"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ disjunctive, fr. <?/ to disjoin; <grk>dia`</grk> through, asunder + <?/ to join, yoke.]</ety> <fld>(Anc. Mus.)</fld> <def>Disjoining two fourths; <as>as, the <ex>diazeutic</ex> tone, which, like that from F to G in modern music, lay between two fourths, and, being joined to either, made a fifth</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*az"o-</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>. <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>azo-</ets>]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A combining form (also used adjectively), meaning <xex>pertaining to</xex>, or <xex>derived from</xex>, a series of compounds containing a radical of <sig>two nitrogen atoms</sig>, united usually to an aromatic radical; <as>as, <ex>diazo-</ex>benzene, <chform>C6H5.N2.OH</chform></as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -19444,13 +19444,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dibranchia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>comprising all living cephalopods except the family Nautilidae: the orders Octopoda (octopuses) and Decapoda (squids and cuttlefish).</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Dibranchiata, subclass ta, Dibranchia, subclass Dibranchia.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ gills.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of cephalopods which includes those with two gills, an apparatus for emitting an inky fluid, and either eight or ten cephalic arms bearing suckers or hooks, as the octopi and squids. See <er>Cephalopoda</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ gills.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of cephalopods which includes those with two gills, an apparatus for emitting an inky fluid, and either eight or ten cephalic arms bearing suckers or hooks, as the octopi and squids. See <er>Cephalopoda</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*bran"chi*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having two gills.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the Dibranchiata.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 408 --></p>
@@ -19508,13 +19508,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To ornament with squares, diamonds, or cubes.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dice"box`</hw> <pr>(d<imac/s"b<ocr/ks`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A box from which dice are thrown in gaming.</def> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*cen"tra</hw> <pr>(d<isl/*s<ecr/n"tr<adot/)</pr>, <pos>Prop. n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <grk>ke`ntron</grk> spur.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the <stype>Dutchman's breeches</stype>, and the more showy <stype>Bleeding heart</stype> (<spn>Dicentra spectabilis</spn>).</def> <altsp>[Corruptly written <asp>dielytra</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Di*cen"tra</hw> <pr>(d<isl/*s<ecr/n"tr<adot/)</pr>, <pos>Prop. n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <grk>ke`ntron</grk> spur.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the <stype>Dutchman's breeches</stype>, and the more showy <stype>Bleeding heart</stype> (<spn>Dicentra spectabilis</spn>).</def> <altsp>[Corruptly written <asp>dielytra</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>di*ceph"a*lous</hw> <pr>(d<isl/*s<ecr/f"<adot/*l<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dike`falos</grk>; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <grk>kefalh`</grk> head.]</ety> <def>Having two heads on one body; double-headed.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"cer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A player at dice; a dice player; a gamester.</def><br/
@@ -19740,22 +19740,22 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di*crot"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ = <?/ to knock, beat.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to dicrotism; <as>as, a <ex>dicrotic</ex> pulse</as>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to the second expansion of the artery in the dicrotic pulse; <as>as, the <ex>dicrotic</ex> wave</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"cro*tism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>A condition in which there are two beats or waves of the arterial pulse to each beat of the heart.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dic"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>See <er>Dictum</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dic"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>See <er>Dictum</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dic"ta*graph</hw> <pr>(d<icr/k"t<adot/*gr<adot/f)</pr>. <def>Var. of <er>Dictograph</er>.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dic*ta"men</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. <ets>dictare</ets> to dictate.]</ety> <def>A dictation or dictate.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Falkland.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dic*ta"men</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. <ets>dictare</ets> to dictate.]</ety> <def>A dictation or dictate.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Falkland.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dic*tam"nus</hw> <pr>(d<icr/k*t<acr/m"n<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Dittany</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A suffrutescent herb, <spn>Dictamnus Fraxinella</spn> (the only species), with strong perfume and showy flowers. The volatile oil of the leaves is highly inflammable.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dic*tam"nus</hw> <pr>(d<icr/k*t<acr/m"n<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Dittany</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A suffrutescent herb, <spn>Dictamnus Fraxinella</spn> (the only species), with strong perfume and showy flowers. The volatile oil of the leaves is highly inflammable.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dic"ta*phone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Dicta</ets>te + <ets>-phone</ets>, as in <ets>telephone</ets>.]</ety> <def>A form of phonographic recorder and reproducer adapted for use in dictation, as in business.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dic"tate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dictated</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dictating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>dictatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dictare</ets>, freq. of <ets>dicere</ets> to say. See <er>Diction</er>, and cf. <er>Dight</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; <as>as, to <ex>dictate</ex> a letter to an amanuensis</as>.</def><br/
@@ -19871,13 +19871,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><note><hand/ The makers of this instrument spell it <xex>dictograph</xex>.</note><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dictostylium</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>any slime mold of the genus Dictostylium.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dic"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> L. <plw>Dicta</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, E. <plw>Dictums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., neuter of <ets>dictus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dicere</ets> to say. See <er>Diction</er>, and cf. <er>Ditto</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; an apothegm.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dic"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> L. <plw>Dicta</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, E. <plw>Dictums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., neuter of <ets>dictus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dicere</ets> to say. See <er>Diction</er>, and cf. <er>Ditto</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; an apothegm.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>A class of critical <qex>dicta</qex> everywhere current.</q> <rj><qau>M. Arnold.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A judicial opinion expressed by judges on points that do not necessarily arise in the case, and are not involved in it.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(French Law)</fld> <def>The report of a judgment made by one of the judges who has given it.</def> <au>Bouvier.</au> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>An arbitrament or award.</def><br/
@@ -19886,13 +19886,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dic*ty"o*gen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ a net + <ets>-gen</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant with net-veined leaves, and monocotyledonous embryos, belonging to the class <class>Dictyogen\'91</class>, proposed by Lindley for the orders <ord>Dioscoreace\'91</ord>, <ord>Smilace\'91</ord>, <ord>Trilliace\'91</ord>, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*cy"a*nide</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>cyan</ets>ogen.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A compound of a binary type containing two cyanogen groups or radicals; -- called also <altname>bicyanide</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`cy*e"ma*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ an embryo.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of worms parasitic in cephalopods. They are remarkable for the extreme simplicity of their structure. The embryo exists in two forms.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`cy*e"ma*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ an embryo.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of worms parasitic in cephalopods. They are remarkable for the extreme simplicity of their structure. The embryo exists in two forms.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`cy*e"mid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like or belonging to the Dicyemata.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the <ord>Dicyemata</ord>.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 409 --></p>
@@ -19954,13 +19954,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Did"dler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A cheat.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Jeremy Diddler</b></col>, <cd>a character in a play by <person>James Kenney</person>, entitled \'bdRaising the wind.\'b8 The name is applied to any needy, tricky, constant borrower; a confidence man.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*del"phi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ matrix, uterus.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The subclass of Mammalia which includes the marsupials. See <er>Marsupialia</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*del"phi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ matrix, uterus.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The subclass of Mammalia which includes the marsupials. See <er>Marsupialia</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*del"phi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or relating to the Didelphia.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the Didelphia.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*del"phic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the uterus double; of or pertaining to the Didelphia.</def><br/
@@ -19975,25 +19975,25 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di*del"phous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Didelphic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*del"phyc</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Didelphic</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*del"phys</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Didelphia</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Formerly, any marsupial; but the term is now restricted to an American genus which includes the opossums, of which there are many species. See <er>Opossum</er>. <altsp>[Written also <asp>Didelphis</asp>.]</altsp> See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def> <rj><au>Cuvier.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Di*del"phys</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Didelphia</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Formerly, any marsupial; but the term is now restricted to an American genus which includes the opossums, of which there are many species. See <er>Opossum</er>. <altsp>[Written also <asp>Didelphis</asp>.]</altsp> See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def> <rj><au>Cuvier.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"dine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like or pertaining to the genus <gen>Didus</gen>, or the dodo.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di"do</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Didos</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>A shrewd trick; an antic; a caper.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>To cut a dido</b></col>, <cd>to play a trick; to cut a caper; -- perhaps so called from the trick of Dido, who having bought so much land as a hide would cover, is said to have cut it into thin strips long enough to inclose a spot for a citadel.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*do"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. So called in allusion to the classical story of Dido and the bull's hide.]</ety> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>The curve which on a given surface and with a given perimeter contains the greatest area.</def> <rj><au>Tait.</au></rj></p>
+<p><hw>Di*do"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. So called in allusion to the classical story of Dido and the bull's hide.]</ety> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>The curve which on a given surface and with a given perimeter contains the greatest area.</def> <rj><au>Tait.</au></rj></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di"drachm</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*drach"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ a drachm.]</ety> <def>A two-drachma piece; an ancient Greek silver coin, worth nearly forty cents.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Didst</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <def>the <pos>2d pers. sing. imp.</pos> of <er>Do</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -20010,16 +20010,16 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di*dym"i*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ twin.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare metallic substance usually associated with the metal cerium; -- hence its name. It was formerly supposed to be an element, but has since been found to consist of two simpler elementary substances, neodymium and praseodymium. See <er>Neodymium</er>, and <er>Praseodymium</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Did"y*mous</hw> <pr>(d<icr/d"<icr/*m<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di`dymos</grk> twofold, twin.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Growing in pairs or twins.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Did`y*na"mi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ power.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having four stamens disposed in pairs of unequal length.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Did`y*na"mi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ power.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having four stamens disposed in pairs of unequal length.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Did`y*na"mi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Didynamous.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Did`y*na"mi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Didynamous.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*dyn"a*mous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Didynamia; containing four stamens disposed in pairs of unequal length.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Die</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Died</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>deyen</ets>, <ets>dien</ets>, of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. <ets>deyja</ets>; akin to Dan. <ets>d\'94e</ets>, Sw. <ets>d\'94</ets>, Goth. <ets>diwan</ets> (cf. Goth. <ets>afd<?/jan</ets> to harass), OFries. <ets>d<?/ia</ets> to kill, OS. <ets>doian</ets> to die, OHG. <ets>touwen</ets>, OSlav. <ets>daviti</ets> to choke, Lith. <ets>dovyti</ets> to torment. Cf. <er>Dead</er>, <er>Death</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To pass from an animate to a lifeless state; to cease to live; to suffer a total and irreparable loss of action of the vital functions; to become dead; to expire; to perish; -- said of animals and vegetables; often with <xex>of</xex>, <xex>by</xex>, <xex>with</xex>, <xex>from</xex>, and rarely <xex>for</xex>, before the cause or occasion of death; <as>as, to <ex>die</ex> of disease or hardships; to <ex>die</ex> by fire or the sword; to <ex>die</ex> with horror at the thought.</as></def><br/
@@ -20110,13 +20110,13 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dieffenbachia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus of evergreen perennial herbs of tropical America with lush foliage and poisonous sap; often cultivated as houseplants.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dieffenbachia</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`e*ge"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to narrate; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to lead.]</ety> <def>A narrative or history; a recital or relation.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`e*ge"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to narrate; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to lead.]</ety> <def>A narrative or history; a recital or relation.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>die"hard`</hw> <pr>(d<imac/"h<aum/rd`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>one who stubbornly adheres to traditional and outdated views.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> traditionalist.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -20127,19 +20127,19 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> never-say-die.</syn>
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`e*lec"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dia-</ets> + <ets>electric</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>Any substance or medium that transmits the electric force by a process different from conduction, as in the phenomena of induction; a nonconductor, separating a body electrified by induction, from the electrifying body.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*el"y*tra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dicentra</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*el"y*tra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dicentra</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`en*ceph"a*lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dia-</er>, and <er>Encephalon</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The interbrain or thalamencephalon; -- sometimes abbreviated to <abbr>dien</abbr>. See <er>Thalamencephalon</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`en*ceph"a*lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dia-</er>, and <er>Encephalon</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The interbrain or thalamencephalon; -- sometimes abbreviated to <abbr>dien</abbr>. See <er>Thalamencephalon</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*er"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Di\'91resis</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*er"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Di\'91resis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Diervilla</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>small genus of low deciduous shrubs; the bush honeysuckles.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Diervilla</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -20153,26 +20153,26 @@ With in wrought flowers.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Die"sink`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An engraver of dies for stamping coins, medals, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Die"sink`ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The process of engraving dies.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"es I"r\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>Day of wrath; -- the name and beginning of a famous medi\'91val Latin hymn on the Last Judgment.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"es I"r\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>Day of wrath; -- the name and beginning of a famous medi\'91val Latin hymn on the Last Judgment.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dieses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to let go through, dissolve; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to let go, send.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small interval, less than any in actual practice, but used in the mathematical calculation of intervals.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dieses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to let go through, dissolve; <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to let go, send.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small interval, less than any in actual practice, but used in the mathematical calculation of intervals.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>The mark <Dagger/; -- called also <altname>double dagger</altname>. It is used in printing to indicate a cross reference or footnote</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> double obelisk.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"es ju*rid"i*cus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dies juridici</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A court day.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"es ju*rid"i*cus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dies juridici</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A court day.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"es non"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L. <ets>dies non juridicus</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A day on which courts are not held, as Sunday or any legal holiday.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"es non"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L. <ets>dies non juridicus</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A day on which courts are not held, as Sunday or any legal holiday.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Die"stock`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A stock to hold the dies used for cutting screws.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><mhw><hw>diestrous</hw> <hw>diestrual</hw></mhw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>in a period of sexual inactivity; -- of animals that have several estrous cycles in one breeding season.</def><br/
@@ -20796,13 +20796,13 @@ His good to worlds and ages infinite.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dig"a*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ a second marriage; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ marriage. Cf. <er>Bigamy</er>.]</ety> <def>Act, or state, of being twice married; deuterogamy.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*gas"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ belly: cf. F. <ets>digastrique</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Having two bellies; biventral; -- applied to muscles which are fleshy at each end and have a tendon in the middle, and esp. to the muscle which pulls down the lower jaw.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Pertaining to the digastric muscle of the lower jaw; <as>as, the <ex>digastric</ex> nerves</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*ge"ne*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ race, offspring.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of Trematoda in which alternate generations occur, the immediate young not resembling their parents.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*ge"ne*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ race, offspring.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of Trematoda in which alternate generations occur, the immediate young not resembling their parents.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>genesis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The faculty of multiplying in two ways; -- by ova fecundated by spermatic fluid, and asexually, as by buds. See <er>Parthenogenesis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dig"e*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>-genous</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Sexually reproductive.</def><br/
@@ -21244,13 +21244,13 @@ That it will live engraven in my face.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> diggings, domiciliation, lodgings, pad.</syn><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Digue</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Dike</er>.]</ety> <def>A bank; a dike.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir W. Temple.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ a woman, a female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants having two styles.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Di*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ a woman, a female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants having two styles.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*gyn"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dig"y*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>digyne</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Digynia; having two styles.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*he"dral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ a seat, bottom, base, fr. <?/ to sit. Cf. <er>Diedral</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having two plane faces; <as>as, the <ex>dihedral</ex> summit of a crystal</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -21291,13 +21291,13 @@ That it will live engraven in my face.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Di*ju"di*cate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dijudicated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dijucating</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>dijudicatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>dijudicare</ets> to decide; <ets>di- = dis-</ets> + <ets>judicare</ets> to judge.]</ety> <def>To make a judicial decision; to decide; to determine.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Hales.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ju`di*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dijudicatio</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of dijudicating; judgment.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"ka</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native West African name.]</ety> <def>A kind of food, made from the almondlike seeds of the <spn>Irvingia Barteri</spn>, much used by natives of the west coast of Africa; -- called also <altname>dika bread</altname>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"ka</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native West African name.]</ety> <def>A kind of food, made from the almondlike seeds of the <spn>Irvingia Barteri</spn>, much used by natives of the west coast of Africa; -- called also <altname>dika bread</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dike</hw> <pr>(d<imac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>dic</ets>, <ets>dike</ets>, <ets>diche</ets>, ditch, AS. <ets>d<imac/c</ets> dike, ditch; akin to D. <ets>dijk</ets> dike, G. <ets>deich</ets>, and prob. <ets>teich</ets> pond, Icel. <ets>d<imac/ki</ets> dike, ditch, Dan. <ets>dige</ets>; perh. akin to Gr. <grk>tei^chos</grk> (for <grk>qei^chos</grk>) wall, and even E. <ets>dough</ets>; or perh. to Gr. <grk>ti^fos</grk> pool, marsh. Cf. <er>Ditch</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A ditch; a channel for water made by digging.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Little channels or <qex>dikes</qex> cut to every bed.</q> <rj><qau>Ray.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -21397,13 +21397,13 @@ Shut out the turbulent tides.</q> <rj><qau>Longfellow.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The act of dilating; expansion; an enlarging on al<?/ sides; the state of being dilated; dilation.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A dilation or enlargement of a canal or other organ.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dil`a*ta"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Cf. L. <ets>dilatator</ets> a propagator.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A muscle which dilates any part; a dilator.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dil`a*ta"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Cf. L. <ets>dilatator</ets> a propagator.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A muscle which dilates any part; a dilator.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*late"</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dilated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dilating</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>dilatare</ets>; either fr. <ets>di-</ets> = <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>latus</ets> wide, not the same word as <ets>latus</ets>, used as p. p. of <ets>ferre</ets> to bear (see <er>Latitude</er>); or fr. <ets>dilatus</ets>, used as p. p. of <ets>differre</ets> to separate (see <er>Delay</er>, <er>Tolerate</er>, <er>Differ</er>, and cf. <er>Dilatory</er>): cf. F. <ets>dilater</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To expand; to distend; to enlarge or extend in all directions; to swell; -- opposed to <ant>contract</ant>; <as>as, the air <ex>dilates</ex> the lungs; air is <ex>dilated</ex> by increase of heat.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To enlarge upon; to relate at large; to tell copiously or diffusely.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -21529,13 +21529,13 @@ To act with infamy, or quit the place.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dil`et*tant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A dilettante.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Though few art lovers can be connoisseurs, many are <qex>dilettants</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Fairholt.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dil`et*tan"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dilettanti</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[It., prop. p. pr. of <ets>dillettare</ets> to take delight in, fr. L. <ets>delectare</ets> to delight. See <er>Delight</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>An admirer or lover of the fine arts; popularly, an amateur; especially, one who follows an art or a branch of knowledge, desultorily, or for amusement only.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dil`et*tan"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dilettanti</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[It., prop. p. pr. of <ets>dillettare</ets> to take delight in, fr. L. <ets>delectare</ets> to delight. See <er>Delight</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>An admirer or lover of the fine arts; popularly, an amateur; especially, one who follows an art or a branch of knowledge, desultorily, or for amusement only.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 413 --></p>
<p><q>The true poet is not an eccentric creature, not a mere artist living only for art, not a dreamer or a <qex>dilettante</qex>, sipping the nectar of existence, while he keeps aloof from its deeper interests.</q> <rj><qau>J. C. Shairp.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -21577,13 +21577,13 @@ To do unto the fest\'82 reverence.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj></p>
But for the end it works to.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q><qex>Diligence</qex> and accuracy are the only merits which an historical writer ascribe to himself.</q> <rj><qau>Gibbon.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`li*gence"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A four-wheeled public stagecoach, used in France.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`li*gence"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A four-wheeled public stagecoach, used in France.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dil"i*gen*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diligentia</ets>.]</ety> <def>Diligence; care; persevering endeavor.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dil"i*gent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>diligent</ets>, L. <ets>diligens</ets>, <ets>-entis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>diligere</ets>, <ets>dilectum</ets>, to esteem highly, prefer; <ets>di- = dis-</ets> + <ets>legere</ets> to choose. See <er>Legend</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Prosecuted with careful attention and effort; careful; painstaking; not careless or negligent.</def><br/
@@ -21823,13 +21823,13 @@ Through words and things, a <qex>dim</qex> and perilous way.</q> <rj><qau>Wordsw
<p><hw>Di*men"sive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Without dimensions; marking dimensions or the limits.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Who can draw the soul's <qex>dimensive</qex> lines?</q> <rj><qau>Sir J. Davies.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dim"e*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ part.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A division of Coleoptera, having two joints to the tarsi.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A division of the Hemiptera, including the aphids.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dim"e*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ part.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A division of Coleoptera, having two joints to the tarsi.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A division of the Hemiptera, including the aphids.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dim"er*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Dimera.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dim"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ part.]</ety> <def>Composed of, or having, two parts of each kind.</def><br/
@@ -22073,13 +22073,13 @@ Breaks into <qex>dimples</qex> small and bright.</q> <rj><qau>Wordsworth.</qau><
<p><hw>Dim"-sight`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having dim sight; lacking perception.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dim"-sight`ed*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms></p>
<p><hw>dim-witted</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>mentally retarded; relatively slow in mental function.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> half-witted, simple, simple-minded.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Dim"y*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dim`y*a"ri*a</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ + <?/ to close.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of lamellibranchiate mollusks having an anterior and posterior adductor muscle, as the common clam. See <er>Bivalve</er>.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>Dim"y*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dim`y*a"ri*a</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ + <?/ to close.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of lamellibranchiate mollusks having an anterior and posterior adductor muscle, as the common clam. See <er>Bivalve</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dim`y*a"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like or pertaining to the Dimya.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the Dimya.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dim"y*a*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Dimyarian</er>.</def><br/
@@ -22238,13 +22238,13 @@ Breaks into <qex>dimples</qex> small and bright.</q> <rj><qau>Wordsworth.</qau><
A <qex>dingthrift</qex> and a knave?</q> <rj><qau>Drant.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Din"gy</hw> <pr>(d<icr/n"j<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Dingier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Dingiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[Prob. fr. <ets>dung</ets>. Cf. <er>Dungy</er>.]</ety> <def>Soiled; sullied; of a dark or dusky color; dark brown; dirty.</def> \'bdScraps of <xex>dingy</xex> paper.\'b8 <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*nich"thys</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ fish.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of large extinct Devonian ganoid fishes. In some parts of Ohio remains of the Dinichthys are abundant, indicating animals twenty feet in length.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*nich"thys</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ fish.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of large extinct Devonian ganoid fishes. In some parts of Ohio remains of the Dinichthys are abundant, indicating animals twenty feet in length.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Din"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & a.</pos> <def>from <er>Dine</er>, <pos>a.</pos></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ Used either adjectively or as the first part of a compound; as, <xex>dining</xex> hall or <xex>dining</xex>-hall, <xex>dining</xex> room, <xex>dining</xex> table, etc.</note><br/
@@ -22306,13 +22306,13 @@ A <qex>dingthrift</qex> and a knave?</q> <rj><qau>Drant.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dinnertime</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>the time when people eat dinner, usually the time for the evening meal.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> suppertime.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*noc"e*ras</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/, <?/, horn.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; -- called also <altname><gen>Uintatherium</gen></altname>. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*noc"e*ras</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/, <?/, horn.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; -- called also <altname><gen>Uintatherium</gen></altname>. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ They were herbivorous, and remarkable for three pairs of hornlike protuberances on the skull. The males were armed with a pair of powerful canine tusks.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dinocerata</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a small order of primitive ungulates of the Paleocene and Eocene.</def><br/
@@ -22323,20 +22323,20 @@ A <qex>dingthrift</qex> and a knave?</q> <rj><qau>Drant.</qau></rj><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> order <ord>Dinoflagellata</ord>, Cilioflagellata, order <ord>Cilioflagellata</ord>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dinoflagellate</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a member of the <ord>Dinoflagellata</ord>, chiefly marine protozoa having two flagella. The dinoflagellates form a chief constituent of plankton.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*nor"nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ bird.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of extinct, ostrichlike birds of gigantic size, which formerly inhabited New Zealand. See <er>Moa</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Deinornis</asp>.]</altsp></p>
+<p><hw>Di*nor"nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ bird.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of extinct, ostrichlike birds of gigantic size, which formerly inhabited New Zealand. See <er>Moa</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Deinornis</asp>.]</altsp></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di"no*saur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`no*sau"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ lizard.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>One of the Dinosauria.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>deinosaur</asp>, and <asp>deinosaurian</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`no*sau"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ lizard.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An order of extinct mesozoic reptiles, mostly of large size (whence the name). Notwithstanding their size, they present birdlike characters in the skeleton, esp. in the pelvis and hind limbs. Some walked on their three-toed hind feet, thus producing the large \'bdbird tracks,\'b8 so-called, of mesozoic sandstones; others were five-toed and quadrupedal. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Compsognathus</er>, also <xex>Illustration</xex> of <xex>Dinosaur</xex> in Appendix.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Di`no*sau"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ terrible + <?/ lizard.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An order of extinct mesozoic reptiles, mostly of large size (whence the name). Notwithstanding their size, they present birdlike characters in the skeleton, esp. in the pelvis and hind limbs. Some walked on their three-toed hind feet, thus producing the large \'bdbird tracks,\'b8 so-called, of mesozoic sandstones; others were five-toed and quadrupedal. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Compsognathus</er>, also <xex>Illustration</xex> of <xex>Dinosaur</xex> in Appendix.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di"no*there</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Di`no*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dinotherium</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>deino`s</grk> terrible + <grk>qhri`on</grk> beast.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A large extinct proboscidean mammal from the miocene beds of Europe and Asia. It is remarkable for a pair of tusks directed downward from the decurved apex of the lower jaw.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di"no*there</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di`no*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dinotherium</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>deino`s</grk> terrible + <grk>qhri`on</grk> beast.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A large extinct proboscidean mammal from the miocene beds of Europe and Asia. It is remarkable for a pair of tusks directed downward from the decurved apex of the lower jaw.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Din*ox"ide</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Dioxide</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Din"some</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of din.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Burns.</au></rj><br/
@@ -22391,13 +22391,13 @@ That he moved the massy stone at length.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Di"o*dont</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like or pertaining to the genus Diodon.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A fish of the genus Diodon, or an allied genus.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 415 --></p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*\'d2"ci*a</hw> <pr>(d<isl/*<emac/"sh<icr/*<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di</grk> = <grk>di`s</grk> twice + <grk>o'i^kos</grk> a house.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having the stamens and pistils on different plants.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*\'d2"ci*a</hw> <pr>(d<isl/*<emac/"sh<icr/*<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di</grk> = <grk>di`s</grk> twice + <grk>o'i^kos</grk> a house.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants having the stamens and pistils on different plants.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A subclass of gastropod mollusks in which the sexes are separate. It includes most of the large marine species, like the conchs, cones, and cowries.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*\'d2"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*\'d2"cious</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Having the sexes in two separate individuals; -- applied to plants in which the female flowers occur on one individual and the male flowers on another of the same species, and to animals in which the ovum is produced by one individual and the sperm cell by another; -- opposed to <contr>mon\'d2cious</contr>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -22424,19 +22424,19 @@ That he moved the massy stone at length.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><b
<p><cs><col><b>Diogenes' crab</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a species of terrestrial hermit crabs (<spn>Cenobita Diogenes</spn>), abundant in the West Indies and often destructive to crops.</cd> -- <col><b>Diogenes' tub</b></col>, <cd>the tub which the philosopher Diogenes is said to have carried about with him as his house, in which he lived.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*oi"cous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>See <er>Di\'d2cious</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*om`e*de"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of large sea birds, including the albatross. See <er>Albatross</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*om`e*de"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of large sea birds, including the albatross. See <er>Albatross</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`o*n\'91"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a name of Aphrodite.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>An insectivorous plant. See <er>Venus's flytrap</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`o*n\'91"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a name of Aphrodite.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>An insectivorous plant. See <er>Venus's flytrap</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`o*ny"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Antiq.)</fld> <def>Any of the festivals held in honor of the Olympian god Dionysus. They correspond to the Roman Bacchanalia; the greater Dionysia were held at Athens in March or April, and were celebrated with elaborate performances of both tragedies and comedies.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`o*ny"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Antiq.)</fld> <def>Any of the festivals held in honor of the Olympian god Dionysus. They correspond to the Roman Bacchanalia; the greater Dionysia were held at Athens in March or April, and were celebrated with elaborate performances of both tragedies and comedies.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`o*ny"si*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Dionysus or to the Dionysia; Bacchic; <as>as, a <ex>Dionysiac</ex> festival; the <ex>Dionysiac</ex> theater at Athens</as>.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`o*ny"sian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Relating to Dionysius, a monk of the 6th century; <as>as, the <ex>Dionysian</ex>, or Christian, era</as>.</def><br/
@@ -22453,16 +22453,16 @@ That he moved the massy stone at length.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Di*op"side</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ a sight, fr. the root of <?/ I shall see: cf. F. <ets>diopside</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A crystallized variety of pyroxene, of a clear, grayish green color; mussite.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*op"tase</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ = <grk>dia`</grk> through + <?/ to see: cf. F. <ets>dioptase</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A hydrous silicate of copper, occurring in emerald-green crystals.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*op"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Di*op"tra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dioptra</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/. See 2d <er>Dioptric</er>.]</ety> <def>An optical instrument, invented by Hipparchus, for taking altitudes, leveling, etc.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*op"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*op"tra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dioptra</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/. See 2d <er>Dioptric</er>.]</ety> <def>An optical instrument, invented by Hipparchus, for taking altitudes, leveling, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*op"tre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See 2d <er>Dioptric</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Optics)</fld> <def>A unit employed by oculists in numbering glasses according to the metric system; a refractive power equal to that of a glass whose principal focal distance is one meter.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*op"tre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See 2d <er>Dioptric</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Optics)</fld> <def>A unit employed by oculists in numbering glasses according to the metric system; a refractive power equal to that of a glass whose principal focal distance is one meter.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*op"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Optics)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the dioptre, or to the metric system of numbering glasses.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A dioptre. See <er>Dioptre</er>.</def></def2></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*op"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Di*op"tric*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ belonging to the use of the <?/; <?/ = <grk>dia`</grk> through + the root of <?/ I shall see: cf. F. <ets>dioptrique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to dioptrics; assisting vision by means of the refraction of light; refractive; <as>as, the <ex>dioptric</ex> system; a <ex>dioptric</ex> glass or telescope.</as></def> \'bd<xex>Dioptrical</xex> principles.\'b8 <rj><au>Nichol.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -22497,20 +22497,20 @@ That he moved the massy stone at length.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Di`o*rit"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Containing diorite.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`or*thot"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/ = <?/ + <?/ to set straight.]</ety> <def>Relating to the correcting or straightening out of something; corrective.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`os*co"re*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <person><etsep>Dioscorides</etsep></person> the Greek physician.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants, the roots of which are eaten as <prod>yams</prod>. See <er>Yam</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`os*co"re*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <person><etsep>Dioscorides</etsep></person> the Greek physician.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants, the roots of which are eaten as <prod>yams</prod>. See <er>Yam</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dioscoreaceae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a natural family of tuberous plants including the yams.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Dioscoreaceae</fam>, yam family.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*o"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ two-handled; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/, <?/, ear, handle.]</ety> <fld>(Rom. Antiq.)</fld> <def>A vase or drinking cup having two handles or ears.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*o"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/ two-handled; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/, <?/, ear, handle.]</ety> <fld>(Rom. Antiq.)</fld> <def>A vase or drinking cup having two handles or ears.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ox"ide</hw> <pr>(?; 104)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>oxide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>An oxide containing two atoms of oxygen in each molecule; binoxide.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>An oxide containing but one atom or equivalent of oxygen to two of a metal; a suboxide.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Carbon dioxide</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Carbonic acid</cref>, under <er>Carbonic</er>.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -22696,16 +22696,16 @@ That he moved the massy stone at length.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Dip`lo*blas"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ doublet + <ets>-blast</ets> + <ets>-ic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Characterizing the ovum when it has two primary germinal layers.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`lo*car"di*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ double + E. <ets>cardiac</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Having the heart completely divided or double, one side systemic, the other pulmonary.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip`lo*coc"cus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Diplococci</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>diplo`os</grk> twofold + <grk>ko`kkos</grk> grain, seed.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A form of micrococcus in which cocci are united in a binary manner. See <er>Micrococcus</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip`lo*coc"cus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Diplococci</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>diplo`os</grk> twofold + <grk>ko`kkos</grk> grain, seed.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A form of micrococcus in which cocci are united in a binary manner. See <er>Micrococcus</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip"lo*\'89</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ fold, fr. <?/ twofold, double.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The soft, spongy, or cancellated substance between the plates of the skull.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip"lo*\'89</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ fold, fr. <?/ twofold, double.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The soft, spongy, or cancellated substance between the plates of the skull.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`lo*et"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Diploic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`lo*gen"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ double + the root of <?/ to produce.]</ety> <def>Partaking of the nature of two bodies; producing two substances.</def> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
@@ -22771,39 +22771,39 @@ B: Oh, how I wish your parents had felt the same way!</q> <rj><qau></qau></rj></
<p><hw>Di*plo"ma*tist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>diplomatiste</ets> a student of diplomatics.]</ety> <def>A person employed in, or skilled in, diplomacy; a diplomat.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>In ability, Avaux had no superior among the numerous able <qex>diplomatists</qex> whom his country then possessed.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Di*plo"pi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dip"lo*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>diplopia</ets>, from Gr. <?/ double + the root of <?/ sight: cf. F. <ets>diplopie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The act or state of seeing double.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Di*plo"pi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dip"lo*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>diplopia</ets>, from Gr. <?/ double + the root of <?/ sight: cf. F. <ets>diplopie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The act or state of seeing double.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ In <xex>crossed</xex> or <xex>heteronymous diplopia</xex> the image seen by the right eye is upon the left hand, and that seen by the left eye is upon the right hand. In <xex>homonymous diplopia</xex> the image seen by the right eye is on the right side, that by the left eye on the left side. In <xex>vertical diplopia</xex> one image stands above the other.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 416 --></p>
<p><hw>Dip"lo*pod</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Diplopoda.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*plop"o*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ double + <ets>-poda</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of myriapods having two pairs of legs on each segment; the Chilognatha.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*plop"o*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ double + <ets>-poda</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of myriapods having two pairs of legs on each segment; the Chilognatha.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`lo*stem"o*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ double + <?/ the warp, a thread.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having twice as many stamens as petals, as the geranium.</def> <rj><au>R. Brown.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`lo*stem"o*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The condition of being diplostemonous.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>diplotene</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Cell biol.)</fld> <def>the fourth stage of the prophase of meiosis, when the paired chromosomes being to separate. This stage follows the <contr>pachytene</contr>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip*neu"mo*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ lung.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of spiders having only two lunglike organs.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Dipneumones</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Dip*neu"mo*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ = <?/ lung.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of spiders having only two lunglike organs.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Dipneumones</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip"no*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ <?/ with two breathing apertures; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ breath.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of ganoid fishes, including the living genera <gen>Ceratodus</gen> and <gen>Lepidosiren</gen>, which present the closest approximation to the Amphibia. The air bladder acts as a lung, and the nostrils open inside the mouth. See <er>Ceratodus</er>, and <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip"no*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ <?/ with two breathing apertures; <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ breath.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of ganoid fishes, including the living genera <gen>Ceratodus</gen> and <gen>Lepidosiren</gen>, which present the closest approximation to the Amphibia. The air bladder acts as a lung, and the nostrils open inside the mouth. See <er>Ceratodus</er>, and <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dipodomys</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus of rodents of the family <fam>Heteromyidae</fam>, comprising the genus of kangaroo rats which live in arid regions of Mexico and the western U. S.</def> <note>An Australian rodent of the genus <gen>Notomys</gen> is also referred to as a <er>kangaroo rat</er>, as is the potoroo. See <er>kangaroo rat</er></note><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dipodomys</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
@@ -22860,13 +22860,13 @@ B: Oh, how I wish your parents had felt the same way!</q> <rj><qau></qau></rj></
<p><hw>Di`pro*par"gyl</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prefix <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>propargyl</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A pungent, mobile, volatile liquid, <chform>C6H6</chform>, produced artificially from certain allyl derivatives. Though isomeric with benzine, it is very different in its chemical relations. Called also <altname>dipropinyl</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*pro"pyl</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>di-</ets> + <ets>propyl</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>One of the hexane paraffins, found in petroleum, consisting of two propyl radicals. See <er>Hexane</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*pro"to*don</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ first + <grk>'odoy`s</grk>, <grk>'odo`ntos</grk>, tooth.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An extinct Quaternary marsupial from Australia, about as large as the hippopotamus; -- so named because of its two large front teeth. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*pro"to*don</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ first + <grk>'odoy`s</grk>, <grk>'odo`ntos</grk>, tooth.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An extinct Quaternary marsupial from Australia, about as large as the hippopotamus; -- so named because of its two large front teeth. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip"sas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ thirst.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A serpent whose bite was fabled to produce intense thirst.</def> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of harmless colubrine snakes.</def><br/
@@ -22890,31 +22890,31 @@ B: Oh, how I wish your parents had felt the same way!</q> <rj><qau></qau></rj></
<p><hw>Dip`so*ma"ni*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who has an irrepressible desire for alcoholic drinks.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip`so*ma*ni"a*cal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to dipsomania.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip*so"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ thirst.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Excessive thirst produced by disease.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip*so"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ thirst.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Excessive thirst produced by disease.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dipstick</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a graduated rod dipped into a container to indicate the fluid level; <as>as, to check the oil level in a car with a <ex>dipstick</ex></as>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ with two wings, <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ feather, wing: cf. F. <ets>dipt\'8are</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An extensive order of insects having only two functional wings and two balancers, as the house fly, mosquito, etc. They have a suctorial proboscis, often including two pairs of sharp organs (mandibles and maxill\'91) with which they pierce the skin of animals. They undergo a complete metamorphosis, their larv\'91 (called maggots) being usually without feet.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip"te*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ with two wings, <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <?/ feather, wing: cf. F. <ets>dipt\'8are</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An extensive order of insects having only two functional wings and two balancers, as the house fly, mosquito, etc. They have a suctorial proboscis, often including two pairs of sharp organs (mandibles and maxill\'91) with which they pierce the skin of animals. They undergo a complete metamorphosis, their larv\'91 (called maggots) being usually without feet.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip"ter*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having two wings only; belonging to the order Diptera.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Arch.)</fld> <def>Having a double row of columns on each on the flanks, as well as in front and rear; -- said of a temple.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip"ter*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An insect of the order Diptera.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dip`te*ro*car"pus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ with two wings + <?/ fruit.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of trees found in the East Indies, some species of which produce a fragrant resin, other species wood oil. The fruit has two long wings.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dip`te*ro*car"pus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ with two wings + <?/ fruit.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of trees found in the East Indies, some species of which produce a fragrant resin, other species wood oil. The fruit has two long wings.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dip"ter*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having two wings, as certain insects; belonging to the order Diptera.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having two wings; two-winged.</def><br/
@@ -23412,13 +23412,13 @@ To sing my <qex>dirige</qex> with great devotion.</q> <rj><qau>Lamentation of Ma
<p><note><hand/ Walker's rule of pronouncing this prefix is, that the <xex>s</xex> ought always to be pronounced like <xex>z</xex>, when the next syllable is accented and begins with \'bda flat mute [<xex>b</xex>, <xex>d</xex>, <xex>v</xex>, <xex>g</xex>, <xex>z</xex>], a liquid [<xex>l</xex>, <xex>m</xex>, <xex>n</xex>, <xex>r</xex>], or a vowel; as, <xex>disable</xex>, <xex>disease</xex>, <xex>disorder</xex>, <xex>disuse</xex>, <xex>disband</xex>, <xex>disdain</xex>, <xex>disgrace</xex>, <xex>disvalue</xex>, <xex>disjoin</xex>, <xex>dislike</xex>, <xex>dislodge</xex>, <xex>dismay</xex>, <xex>dismember</xex>, <xex>dismiss</xex>, <xex>dismount</xex>, <xex>disnatured</xex>, <xex>disrank</xex>, <xex>disrelish</xex>, <xex>disrobe</xex>.\'b8 Dr. Webster's example in disapproving of Walker's rule and pronouncing <xex>dis-</xex>as <xex>diz</xex> in only one (<xex>disease</xex>) of the above words, is followed by recent ortho\'89pists. See <er>Disable</er>, <er>Disgrace</er>, and the other words, beginning with <xex>dis</xex>-, in this Dictionary.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A prefix from Gr. <grk>di`s-</grk> twice. See <er>Di-</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>The god Pluto, god of the underworld; also called <altname>Dis Pater</altname>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>The god Pluto, god of the underworld; also called <altname>Dis Pater</altname>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dis</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[shortened from <ets>dis</ets>respect.]</ety> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>dissed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>dissing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>to treat in a disrespectful manner; to insult, disparage or belittle.</def> <mark>[slang]</mark><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>disa</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>any orchid of the genus <gen>Disa</gen>, a genus of beautiful orchids with dark green leaves and usually hooded flowers; -- they are much prized as emblematic flowers in their native regions.</def><br/
@@ -24575,13 +24575,13 @@ Hath paid his ransom now and full <qex>discharge</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qa
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dis`ci*flo"ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dis`ci*flo"rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Disk</er>, and <er>Floral</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Bearing the stamens on a discoid outgrowth of the receptacle; -- said of a subclass of plants. Cf. <er>Calycifloral</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis"ci*form</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Discoid.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis*ci"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>discus</ets> disk, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of Branchiopoda, having a disklike shell, attached by one valve, which is perforated by the peduncle.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis*ci"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>discus</ets> disk, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of Branchiopoda, having a disklike shell, attached by one valve, which is perforated by the peduncle.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*cinct</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>discinctus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>discingere</ets> to ungird; <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>cingere</ets> to gird.]</ety> <def>Ungirded; loosely dressed.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*cind"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>discindere</ets>; <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>scindere</ets> to cut, split.]</ety> <def>To part; to divide.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
@@ -24845,22 +24845,22 @@ Our friendship 's an end.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj></p>
<p><q>To <qex>discoast</qex> from the plain and simple way of speech.</q> <rj><qau>Barrow.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis`co*blas"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ disk + <?/ to grow.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Applied to a form of egg cleavage seen in osseous fishes, which occurs only in a small disk that separates from the rest of the egg.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis*cob"o*lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Discoboli</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/; <?/ a discu + <?/ to throw.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A thrower of the discus.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis*cob"o*lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Discoboli</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/; <?/ a discu + <?/ to throw.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A thrower of the discus.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ The <xex>Discobolus</xex> of Myron was a famous statue of antiquity, and several copies or imitations of it have been preserved.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis`co*dac"tyl</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Discodactylia</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the tree frogs.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis`co*dac*tyl"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ disk + <?/ finger.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis`co*dac*tyl"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ disk + <?/ finger.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis`co*dac"tyl*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having sucking disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis`co*her"ent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Incoherent.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -25349,13 +25349,13 @@ Above a twelvemonth.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dis`con*ven"ience</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Unsuitableness; incongruity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis`con*ven"ient</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Not convenient or congruous; unsuitable; ill-adapted.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Reynolds.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis*coph"o*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ disk + <ets><?/</ets> to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of acalephs or jellyfishes, including most of the large disklike species.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dis*coph"o*rous</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
+<p><hw>Dis*coph"o*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ disk + <ets><?/</ets> to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of acalephs or jellyfishes, including most of the large disklike species.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dis*coph"o*rous</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis"cord`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>discord</ets>, <ets>descord</ets>, OF. <ets>discorde</ets>, <ets>descorde</ets>, F. <ets>discorde</ets>, from L. <ets>discordia</ets>, fr. <ets>discors</ets>, <ets>-cordis</ets>, discordant, disagreeable; <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>cor</ets>, <ets>cordis</ets>, heart; cf. F. <ets>discord</ets>, <ets>n.</ets>, and OF. <ets>descorder</ets>, <ets>discorder</ets>, F. <ets>discorder</ets>, to discord, L. <ets>discordare</ets>, from <ets>discors</ets>. See <er>Heart</er>, and cf. <er>Discord</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth <qex>discord</qex> among brethren.</q> <rj><qau>Prov. vi. 19.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -28069,13 +28069,13 @@ And tear his helpless breast, o'erwhelmed with wild <qex>dismay</qex>.</q> <rj><
<p><hw>Dis*may"ed*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A state of being dismayed; dejection of courage; dispiritedness.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*may"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Terrifying.</def> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Disme</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. See <er>Dime</er>.]</ety> <def>A tenth; a tenth part; a tithe.</def> <rj><au>Ayliffe.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Disme</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. See <er>Dime</er>.]</ety> <def>A tenth; a tenth part; a tithe.</def> <rj><au>Ayliffe.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*mem"ber</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dismembered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dismembering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OF. <ets>desmembrer</ets>, F. <ets>d\'82membrer</ets>; pref. <ets>des-</ets> (L. <ets>dis</ets>) + OF. & F. <ets>membre</ets> limb. See <er>Member</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To tear limb from limb; to dilacerate; to disjoin member from member; to tear or cut in pieces; to break up.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Fowls obscene <qex>dismembered</qex> his remains.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -31667,13 +31667,13 @@ Than of his outward show.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dis*tin"guish*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Observation of difference; distinction.</def> <rj><au>Graunt.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*ti"tle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To deprive of title or right.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis"to*ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <grk>sto`ma</grk> mouth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of parasitic, trematode worms, having two suckers for attaching themselves to the part they infest. See 1st <er>Fluke</er>, 2.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis"to*ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>di-</grk> = <grk>di`s-</grk> twice + <grk>sto`ma</grk> mouth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of parasitic, trematode worms, having two suckers for attaching themselves to the part they infest. See 1st <er>Fluke</er>, 2.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*tort"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>distortus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>distorquere</ets> to twist, distort; <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>torquere</ets> to twist. See <er>Torsion</er>.]</ety> <def>Distorted; misshapen.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Her face was ugly and her mouth <qex>distort</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -31844,13 +31844,13 @@ Beguiled all species.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dis*train"or</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who distrains; the party distraining goods or chattels.</def> <rj><au>Blackstone.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*traint"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>destrainte</ets> distress, force.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>The act or proceeding of seizing personal property by distress.</def> <rj><au>Abbott.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis`trait"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Distract</er>.]</ety> <def>Absent-minded; lost in thought; abstracted.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis`trait"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Distract</er>.]</ety> <def>Absent-minded; lost in thought; abstracted.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*traught"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. p. & a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>distract</ets>, <ets>distrauht</ets>. See <er>Distract</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Torn asunder; separated.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdHis greedy throat . . . <xex>distraught</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Distracted; perplexed.</def> \'bd<xex>Distraught</xex> twixt fear and pity.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
@@ -32098,13 +32098,13 @@ Which are the most <qex>distraught</qex> and full of pain.</q> <rj><qau>Mrs. Bro
<p><q>A smile . . . breaks out with the brightest <qex>distriction</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Collier.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis"trict*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>Strictly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Foxe.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dis*trin"gas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., that you distrain, fr. <ets>distringere</ets>. See <er>Distrain</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A writ commanding the sheriff to distrain a person by his goods or chattels, to compel a compliance with something required of him.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dis*trin"gas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., that you distrain, fr. <ets>distringere</ets>. See <er>Distrain</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A writ commanding the sheriff to distrain a person by his goods or chattels, to compel a compliance with something required of him.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dis*trou"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dis-</ets> (intens.) + <ets>trouble</ets>.]</ety> <def>To trouble.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dis*trust"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Distrusted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Distrusting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. <er>Mistrust</er>.]</ety> <def>To feel absence of trust in; not to confide in or rely upon; to deem of questionable sufficiency or reality; to doubt; to be suspicious of; to mistrust.</def><br/
@@ -32506,13 +32506,13 @@ His inmost counsels from their destined aim.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj></p>
<p><hw>Dit"ty-box`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small box to hold a sailor's thread, needless, comb, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*u"re*ide</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Di-</ets> + <ets>ureide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>One of a series of complex nitrogenous substances regarded as containing two molecules of urea or their radicals, as uric acid or allantoin. Cf. <er>Ureide</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`u*re"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Diuretic</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Free excretion of urine.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di`u*re"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Diuretic</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Free excretion of urine.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`u*ret"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diureticus</ets>, Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to make water; <?/ through + <?/ to make water, fr. <?/ urine: cf. F. <ets>diur\'82tique</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Tending to increase the secretion and discharge of urine.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A medicine with diuretic properties.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Diuretic salt</b></col> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>potassium acetate; -- so called because of its diuretic properties.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -32521,13 +32521,13 @@ His inmost counsels from their destined aim.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj></p>
<p><hw>Di`u*ret"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Diuretic.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`u*ret"ic*al*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being diuretical; diuretic property.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*ur"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>diurnus</ets> belonging to the day.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of Lepidoptera, including the butterflies; -- so called because they fly only in the daytime.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*ur"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>diurnus</ets> belonging to the day.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of Lepidoptera, including the butterflies; -- so called because they fly only in the daytime.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*ur"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diurnalis</ets>, fr. <ets>dies</ets> day. See <er>Deity</er>, and cf. <er>Journal</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Relating to the daytime; belonging to the period of daylight, distinguished from the night; -- opposed to <ant>nocturnal</ant>; <as>as, <ex>diurnal</ex> heat; <ex>diurnal</ex> hours.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Daily; recurring every day; performed in a day; going through its changes in a day; constituting the measure of a day; <as>as, a <ex>diurnal</ex> fever; a <ex>diurnal</ex> task; <ex>diurnal</ex> aberration, or <ex>diurnal</ex> parallax; the <ex>diurnal</ex> revolution of the earth.</as></def><br/
@@ -32575,13 +32575,13 @@ Their fiery torcher his <qex>diurnal</qex> ring.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Di`u*tur"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diuturnus</ets>, fr. <ets>diu</ets> a long time, by day; akin to <ets>dies</ets> day.]</ety> <def>Of long continuance; lasting.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`u*tur"ni*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>diuturnitas</ets>.]</ety> <def>Long duration; lastingness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"va</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"v<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>It. pl.</it> <plw>Dive</plw> <pr>(d<emac/"v<amac/)</pr></plu>. <ety>[It., prop. fem. of <ets>divo</ets> divine, L. <ets>divus</ets>.]</ety> <def>A prima donna.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"va</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"v<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>It. pl.</it> <plw>Dive</plw> <pr>(d<emac/"v<amac/)</pr></plu>. <ety>[It., prop. fem. of <ets>divo</ets> divine, L. <ets>divus</ets>.]</ety> <def>A prima donna.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di`va*ga"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>divagari</ets> to wander about; <ets>di-</ets> = <ets>dis-</ets> + <ets>vagari</ets> to stroll about: cf. F. <ets>divagation</ets>. See <er>Vagary</er>.]</ety> <def>A wandering about or going astray; digression.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Let us be set down at Queen's Crawley without further <qex>divagation</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Thackeray.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -32927,28 +32927,28 @@ Their fiery torcher his <qex>diurnal</qex> ring.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><b
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A diverticulum.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Div`er*tic"u*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to a diverticulum.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Div`er*tic"u*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Diverticula</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See <er>Diverticle</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A blind tube branching out of a longer one.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Div`er*tic"u*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Diverticula</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See <er>Diverticle</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A blind tube branching out of a longer one.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di*ver`ti*men"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>-ti</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A light and pleasing composition.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di*ver`ti*men"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>-ti</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A light and pleasing composition.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vert"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Amusing; entertaining.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Di*vert"ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Di*vert"ing*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vert"ise</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>divertir</ets>, p. pr. <ets>divertissant</ets>.]</ety> <def>To divert; to entertain.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vert"ise*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. the next word.]</ety> <def>Diversion; amusement; recreation.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di`ver`tisse`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A short ballet, or other entertainment, between the acts of a play.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Di`ver`tisse`ment"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A short ballet, or other entertainment, between the acts of a play.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vert"ive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Divert</er>.]</ety> <def>Tending to divert; diverting; amusing; interesting.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Things of a pleasant and <qex>divertive</qex> nature.</q> <rj><qau>Rogers.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -33122,13 +33122,13 @@ Their fiery torcher his <qex>diurnal</qex> ring.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><b
<p><cs><col><b>Dividing engine</b></col>, <cd>a machine for graduating circles (as for astronomical instruments) or bars (as for scales); also, for spacing off and cutting teeth in wheels.</cd> -- <col><b>Dividing sinker</b></col>. <fld>(Knitting Mach.)</fld>. <cd>See under <er>Sinker</er>.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vid"ing*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By division.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Di"vi-di"vi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A small tree of tropical America (<spn>C\'91salpinia coriaria</spn>), whose legumes contain a large proportion of tannic and gallic acid, and are used by tanners and dyers.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Di"vi-di"vi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A small tree of tropical America (<spn>C\'91salpinia coriaria</spn>), whose legumes contain a large proportion of tannic and gallic acid, and are used by tanners and dyers.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vid"u*al</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Dividuous</er>.]</ety> <def>Divided, shared, or participated in, in common with others.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Di*vid"u*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By dividing.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
@@ -33645,26 +33645,26 @@ That <qex>dizen</qex> Nature's carnival.</q> <rj><qau>Emerson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>If the jangling of thy bells had not <qex>dizzied</qex> thy understanding.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj></p>
<p><hw>DJ</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"j<amac/`)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <def>same as <er>disc jockey</er>.</def> <mark>[acronym, capitalized]</mark> <br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Djer*eed"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <it>or</it> <hw>Djer*rid"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>djerid</ets>, fr. Ar. See <er>Jereed</er>.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A blunt javelin used in military games in Moslem countries.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A game played with it.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jereed</asp>, <asp>jerrid</asp>, etc.]</altsp><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>Djer*eed"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <it>or</it> <hw>Djer*rid"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>djerid</ets>, fr. Ar. See <er>Jereed</er>.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A blunt javelin used in military games in Moslem countries.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A game played with it.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jereed</asp>, <asp>jerrid</asp>, etc.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>DJIA</hw> <pr>(d<emac/"j<amac/*<imac/`<amac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Finance)</fld> <def>The <er>Dow Jones Industrial Average</er>.</def> <mark>[acronym]</mark> <br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> DJI, DJIA, Dow, Dow Jones, Dow-Jones Average.</syn>
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Djiboutian</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>Of or relating to <country>Djibouti</country> or its people or culture; <as>as, <ex>Djiboutian</ex> landscape; <ex>Djiboutian</ex> merchants</as>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Djiboutian</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of <country>Djibouti</country>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>djin"nee</hw> <hw>djin"ni</hw>, <hw>djin"ny</hw></mhw> <pr>(j<icr/n"n<emac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>djinn</plw> <pr>(j<icr/n)</pr> or <plw>djinns</plw> <pr>(j<icr/nz)</pr>.</plu> <def>A spirit believed by Muslims to inhabit the earth and influence mankind by appearing in the form of humans or animals. Same as <er>djinni</er> and <er>Jinnee</er>. See <er>Jinnee</er>, <er>Jinn</er>.</def><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>djin"nee</hw> <hw>djin"ni</hw>, <hw>djin"ny</hw></mhw> <pr>(j<icr/n"n<emac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>djinn</plw> <pr>(j<icr/n)</pr> or <plw>djinns</plw> <pr>(j<icr/nz)</pr>.</plu> <def>A spirit believed by Muslims to inhabit the earth and influence mankind by appearing in the form of humans or animals. Same as <er>djinni</er> and <er>Jinnee</er>. See <er>Jinnee</er>, <er>Jinn</er>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genie, jinn, jinni, jinnee, djinn, djinni.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dkg</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>ten grams.</def> <mark>[abbr.]</mark><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> dekagram, decagram, dag.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -33837,13 +33837,13 @@ As the light <qex>does</qex> the shadow.</q> <rj><qau> Longfellow.</qau></rj></p
<p><q>A great deal of <qex>do</qex>, and a great deal of trouble.</q> <rj><qau> Selden.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A cheat; a swindle.</def> <mark>[Slang, Eng.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"ab</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <ety>[Pers. & Hind. <ets>do\'beb</ets>, prop., two waters.]</ety> <def>A tongue or tract of land included between two rivers; <as>as, the <ex>doab</ex> between the Ganges and the Jumna</as>.</def> <mark>[India]</mark> <rj><au>Am. Cyc.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Do"ab</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <ety>[Pers. & Hind. <ets>do\'beb</ets>, prop., two waters.]</ety> <def>A tongue or tract of land included between two rivers; <as>as, the <ex>doab</ex> between the Ganges and the Jumna</as>.</def> <mark>[India]</mark> <rj><au>Am. Cyc.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being done.</def> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"-all`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>General manager; factotum.</def><br/
@@ -33885,25 +33885,25 @@ As the light <qex>does</qex> the shadow.</q> <rj><qau> Longfellow.</qau></rj></p
<p><hw>Dob"ule</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European dace.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"cent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>docens</ets>, <ets>-entis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>docere</ets> to teach.]</ety> <def>Serving to instruct; teaching.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*ce"t\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. <?/ to appear.]</ety> <fld>(Eccl. Hist.)</fld> <def>Ancient heretics who held that Christ's body was merely a phantom or appearance.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*ce"t\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. <?/ to appear.]</ety> <fld>(Eccl. Hist.)</fld> <def>Ancient heretics who held that Christ's body was merely a phantom or appearance.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do*cet"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, held by, or like, the Docet\'91.</def> \'bd<xex>Docetic</xex> Gnosticism.\'b8 <rj><au> Plumptre.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Doc"e*tism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Eccl. Hist.)</fld> <def>The doctrine of the Docet\'91.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Doch"mi*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Pros.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or containing, the dochmius.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Doch"mi*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Pros.)</fld> <def>A foot of five syllables (usually <?/ -- -<?/ -).</def></p>
+<p><hw>Doch"mi*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Pros.)</fld> <def>A foot of five syllables (usually <?/ -- -<?/ -).</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Doc`i*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Doc"i*ble*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>docibilitas</ets>.]</ety> <def>Aptness for being taught; teachableness; docility.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>To persons of <qex>docibility</qex>, the real character may be easily taught in a few days.</q> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -34035,13 +34035,13 @@ As the light <qex>does</qex> the shadow.</q> <rj><qau> Longfellow.</qau></rj></p
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> stevedore, loader, longshoreman, docker, dockhand, dock worker, lumper.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dock"yard`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A yard or storage place for all sorts of naval stores and timber for shipbuilding.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Doc`o*glos"sa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a beam + <?/ the tongue.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of gastropods, including the true limpets, and having the teeth on the odontophore or lingual ribbon.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Doc`o*glos"sa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a beam + <?/ the tongue.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of gastropods, including the true limpets, and having the teeth on the odontophore or lingual ribbon.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doc"quet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Docket</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doc"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>doctur</ets>, L. <ets>doctor</ets>, teacher, fr. <ets>docere</ets> to teach. See <er>Docile</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A teacher; one skilled in a profession, or branch of knowledge; a learned man.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
@@ -34113,13 +34113,13 @@ Will seize the <qex>doctor</qex> too.</q> <rj><qau> Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Doc"tress</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A female doctor.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Doc"tri*na*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of the nature of, or constituting, doctrine.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir P. Sidney.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Doc`tri*naire"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Doctrine</er>.]</ety> <def>One who would apply to political or other practical concerns the abstract doctrines or the theories of his own philosophical system; a propounder of a new set of opinions; a dogmatic theorist. Used also adjectively; <as>as, <ex>doctrinaire</ex> notions</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Doc`tri*naire"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Doctrine</er>.]</ety> <def>One who would apply to political or other practical concerns the abstract doctrines or the theories of his own philosophical system; a propounder of a new set of opinions; a dogmatic theorist. Used also adjectively; <as>as, <ex>doctrinaire</ex> notions</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ In french history, the <xex>Doctrinaires</xex> were a constitutionalist party which originated after the restoration of the Bourbons, and represented the interests of liberalism and progress. After the Revolution of July, 1830, when they came into power, they assumed a conservative position in antagonism with the republicans and radicals.</note> <rj><au>Am. Cyc.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doc"tri*nal</hw> <pr>(d<ocr/k"tr<icr/*n<ait/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>doctrinalis</ets>, fr. L. <ets>doctrina</ets>: cf. F. <ets>doctrinal</ets>. See <er>Doctrine</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to, or containing, doctrine or something taught and to be believed; <as>as, a <ex>doctrinal</ex> observation</as>.</def> \'bd<xex>Doctrinal</xex> clauses.\'b8 <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
@@ -34237,13 +34237,13 @@ By <qex>doctrines</qex> fashioned to the varying hour.</q> <rj><qau> Goldsmith.<
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> doddering, shaking, tottering, tottery.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do*dec"a*gon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ twelve + <?/ angle: cf. F. <ets>dod\'82cagone</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>A figure or polygon bounded by twelve sides and containing twelve angles.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*dec`a*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ twelve + <?/ woman, female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants having twelve styles.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Do*dec`a*gyn"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ twelve + <?/ woman, female.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an order of plants having twelve styles.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Do*dec`a*gyn"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Do`de*cag"y*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Dodecagynia; having twelve styles.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do*dec`a*he"dral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or like, a dodecahedion; consisting of twelve equal sides.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -34254,13 +34254,13 @@ By <qex>doctrines</qex> fashioned to the varying hour.</q> <rj><qau> Goldsmith.<
<p><hw>Do*dec`a*he"dron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/ twelve + <?/ seat, bottom, base: cf. F. <ets>dod\'82ca\'8adre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Geom. & Crystallog.)</fld> <def>A solid having twelve faces.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ The <xex>regular dodecahedron</xex> is bounded by twelve equal and regular pentagons; the pyritohedron (see <er>Pyritohedron</er>) is related to it; the <xex>rhombic dodecahedron</xex> is bounded by twelve equal rhombic faces.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do`de*can"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ twelve + <?/, <?/, man, male.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants including all that have any number of stamens between twelve and nineteen.</def></p>
+<p><hw>Do`de*can"dri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ twelve + <?/, <?/, man, male.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Linn\'91an class of plants including all that have any number of stamens between twelve and nineteen.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Do`de*can"dri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Do`de*can"drous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Dodecandria; having twelve stamens, or from twelve to nineteen.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"de*cane</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ twelve.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Any one of a group of thick oily hydrocarbons, <chform>C12H26</chform>, of the paraffin series.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -34346,13 +34346,13 @@ By <qex>doctrines</qex> fashioned to the varying hour.</q> <rj><qau> Goldsmith.<
<p><hw>Doe, John</hw>. <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>The fictitious lessee acting as plaintiff in the common-law action of ejectment, the fictitious defendant being usually denominated <contr>Richard Roe</contr>. Hence, a fictitious name for a party, real or fictitious, to any action or proceeding.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>D\'d2g"lic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or obtained from, the d\'d2gling; <as>as, <ex>d\'d2glic</ex> acid <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, an oily substance resembling oleic acid.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>D\'d2g"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name in Faroe Islands.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The beaked whale (<spn>Bal\'91noptera rostrata</spn>), from which d\'d2gling oil is obtained.</def><br/
+<p><hw>D\'d2g"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name in Faroe Islands.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The beaked whale (<spn>Bal\'91noptera rostrata</spn>), from which d\'d2gling oil is obtained.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Do</er>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who does; one who performs or executes; one who is wont and ready to act; an actor; an agent.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The <qex>doers</qex> of the law shall be justified.</q> <rj><qau> Rom. ii. 13.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -34791,23 +34791,23 @@ He dons a surcoat which he <qex>doffs</qex> at morn.</q> <rj><qau> Emerson.</qau
<p><hw>do-it-yourselfer</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a person who often makes objects typically made by professionals, or performs repairs typically performed by professionals, though not having professional training in the relevant art. The term is used mostly to refer to activities related to maintaining a home.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dok`i*mas"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Docimastic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"ko</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Lepidosiren</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do"ko</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Lepidosiren</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*la"bra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>dolare</ets> to hew.]</ety> <def>A rude ancient ax or hatchet, seen in museums.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*la"bra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>dolare</ets> to hew.]</ety> <def>A rude ancient ax or hatchet, seen in museums.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do*lab"ri*form</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dolabra</ets> a mattock + <ets>-form</ets>.]</ety> <def>Shaped like the head of an ax or hatchet, as some leaves, and also certain organs of some shellfish.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Dol"ce</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dol`ce*men"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[It., fr. L. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet, soft.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Softly; sweetly; with soft, smooth, and delicate execution.</def></p>
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dol"ce</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dol`ce*men"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[It., fr. L. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet, soft.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Softly; sweetly; with soft, smooth, and delicate execution.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>\'d8<hw>Dol*ci"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> \'d8<hw>Dul*ci"no</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. It. <ets>dolcigno</ets> sweetish.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small bassoon, formerly much used.</def> <rj><au>Simmonds.</au></rj><br/
+<p><mhw><hw>Dol*ci"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Dul*ci"no</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. It. <ets>dolcigno</ets> sweetish.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small bassoon, formerly much used.</def> <rj><au>Simmonds.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dol"drums</hw> <pr>(d<ocr/l"dr<ucr/mz)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Gael. <ets>doltrum</ets> grief, vexation?]</ety> <def>A part of the ocean near the equator, abounding in calms, squalls, and light, baffling winds, which sometimes prevent all progress for weeks; -- so called by sailors.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>To be in the doldrums</b></col>, <cd>to be in a state of listlessness ennui, or tedium.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -34873,13 +34873,13 @@ They stood prepared to see the manna fall.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Dole"ful*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Dole"ful*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"lent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dolens</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>dolere</ets>: cf. F. <ets>dolent</ets>. See <er>Dole</er> sorrow.]</ety> <def>Sorrowful.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ford.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*len"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Plaintively. See <er>Doloroso</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*len"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Plaintively. See <er>Doloroso</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dol"er*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dolero`s</grk> deceptive, because it was easily confounded with diorite.]</ety> <fld>(Petrography)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A dark, crystalline, igneous rock, chiefly pyroxene with labradorite.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Coarse-grained basalt.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>Diabase.</def> <sd>(d)</sd> <def>Any dark, igneous rock composed chiefly of silicates of iron and magnesium with some feldspar.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dol`er*it"ic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dol`er*it"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of the nature of dolerite; <as>as, much lava is <ex>doleritic</ex> lava</as>.</def> <rj><au>Dana.</au></rj><br/
@@ -34903,22 +34903,22 @@ They stood prepared to see the manna fall.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Doliolidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family of oceanic tunicates.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Doliolidae</fam>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*li"o*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>doliolum</ets> a small cask.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of freeswimming oceanic tunicates, allied to <gen>Salpa</gen>, and having alternate generations.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*li"o*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>doliolum</ets> a small cask.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of freeswimming oceanic tunicates, allied to <gen>Salpa</gen>, and having alternate generations.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"-lit`tle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who performs little though professing much.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Great talkers are commonly <qex>dolittles</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Bp. Richardson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"li*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. large jar.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of large univalve mollusks, including the partridge shell and tun shells.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do"li*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. large jar.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of large univalve mollusks, including the partridge shell and tun shells.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doll</hw> <pr>(d<ocr/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[A contraction of <ets>Dorothy</ets>; or less prob. an abbreviation of <ets>idol</ets>; or cf. OD. <ets>dol</ets> a whipping top, D. <ets>dollen</ets> to rave, and E. <ets>dull</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a small, usually flexible figure representing a human being, especially a toy baby for a little girl; a child's puppet.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>an attractive woman or girl.</def> <mark>[slang]</mark><br/
@@ -35030,13 +35030,13 @@ They stood prepared to see the manna fall.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dol`or*if"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dolor</ets> pain + <ets>-ferous</ets>.]</ety> <def>Producing pain.</def> <rj><au>Whitaker.</au></rj></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dol`or*if"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dol`or*if"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>dolorificus</ets>; L. <ets>dolor</ets> pain + <ets>facere</ets> to make.]</ety> <def>Causing pain or grief.</def> <rj><au>Arbuthnot.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do`lo*ro"so</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Plaintive; pathetic; -- used adverbially as a musical direction.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do`lo*ro"so</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & adv.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Plaintive; pathetic; -- used adverbially as a musical direction.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dol"or*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dolorosus</ets>, from <ets>dolor</ets>: cf. F. <ets>douloureux</ets>. See <er>Dolor</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Full of grief; sad; sorrowful; doleful; dismal; <as>as, a <ex>dolorous</ex> object; <ex>dolorous</ex> discourses.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>You take me in too <qex>dolorous</qex> a sense;<br/
@@ -35100,13 +35100,13 @@ I spake to you for your comfort.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>dolt</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To behave foolishly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dolt"ish</hw> <pr>(d<omac/lt"<icr/sh)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Doltlike; dull in intellect; stupid; blockish; <as>as, a <ex>doltish</ex> clown</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Dolt"ish*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Dolt"ish*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., deceit; akin to Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Evil intent, embracing both malice and fraud. See <er>Culpa</er>.</def> <rj><au>Wharton.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Do"lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., deceit; akin to Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Evil intent, embracing both malice and fraud. See <er>Culpa</er>.</def> <rj><au>Wharton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dolv"en</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. p.</pos> <def>of <er>Delve</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Rom. of R.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>-dom</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>. <def>A suffix denoting</def>: <sd>(a)</sd> <def><xex>Jurisdiction</xex> or <xex>property and jurisdiction</xex>, <xex>dominion</xex>, as in king<xex>dom</xex> earl<xex>dom</xex>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def><xex>State</xex>, <xex>condition</xex>, or <xex>quality of being</xex>, as in wis<xex>dom</xex>, free<xex>dom</xex>.</def> <note>It is from the same root as <xex>doom</xex> meaning <xex>authority</xex> and <xex>judgment</xex>. <xex><?/</xex>. See <er>Doom</er>.</note><br/
@@ -35341,13 +35341,13 @@ I spake to you for your comfort.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dom"i*fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>domus + -fy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>domifier</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astrol.)</fld> <def>To divide, as the heavens, into twelve houses. See <er>House</er>, in astrological sense.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To tame; to domesticate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dom"i*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., lady. See <er>Dame</er>.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>Lady; a lady; -- a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj></p>
+<p><hw>Dom"i*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., lady. See <er>Dame</er>.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>Lady; a lady; -- a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dom"i*nance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dom"i*nan*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>Predominance; ascendency; authority.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dom"i*nant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dominans</ets>, <ets>-antis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>dominari</ets>: cf. F. <ets>dominant</ets>. See <er>Dominate</er>.]</ety> <def>Ruling; governing; prevailing; controlling; predominant; <as>as, the <ex>dominant</ex> party, church, spirit, power</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -35543,13 +35543,13 @@ And hers to <qex>domineer</qex> at home.</q> <rj><qau>Prior.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dom"i*no the"o*ry</hw>. <def>A political theory current in the 1960's, according to which the conversion of one country in South Asia to communism will start a sequential process causing all Asian countries to convert to Communism.</def> <note>The apparent assumption was that an Asian country politically aligned with the West was as politically unstable as a domino standing on edge. It was used by some as a justification for American involvement in the Vietnam war, 1964-1972.</note><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dom"i*no whist</hw>. <def>A game of cards in which the suits are played in sequence, beginning with a 5 or 9, the player who gets rid of his cards first being the winner.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dom"i*nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Domini</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., master. See <er>Dame</er>.]</ety> <def>Master; sir; -- a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor.</def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dom"i*nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Domini</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., master. See <er>Dame</er>.]</ety> <def>Master; sir; -- a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor.</def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dom"i*ta*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>domitare</ets> to tame, fr. <ets>domare</ets>.]</ety> <def>That can be tamed.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir M. Hale.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"mite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A grayish variety of trachyte; -- so called from the Puy-de-<xex>D\'93me</xex> in Auvergne, France, where it is found.</def><br/
@@ -35571,13 +35571,13 @@ And hers to <qex>domineer</qex> at home.</q> <rj><qau>Prior.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>At night, or in the rain,<br/
He <qex>dons</qex> a surcoat which he doffs at morn.</q> <rj><qau>Emerson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"\'a4a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>do\'a4a</ets>. See <er>Duenna</er>.]</ety> <def>Lady; mistress; madam; -- a title of respect used in Spain, prefixed to the Christian name of a lady.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do"\'a4a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>do\'a4a</ets>. See <er>Duenna</er>.]</ety> <def>Lady; mistress; madam; -- a title of respect used in Spain, prefixed to the Christian name of a lady.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"na*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>donabilis</ets>, fr. <ets>donare</ets> to donate.]</ety> <def>Capable of being donated or given.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Donar</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>the Teutonic god of thunder; counterpart of Norse Thor.</def><br/
@@ -35634,25 +35634,25 @@ On the bless'd lovers.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Eccl. Law)</fld> <def>A benefice conferred on a person by the founder or patron, without either presentation or institution by the ordinary, or induction by his orders. See the Note under <er>Benefice</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 3.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Don"a*tive</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Vested or vesting by donation; <as>as, a <ex>donative</ex> advowson</as>.</def> <rj><au>Blackstone.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*na"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. Cf. <er>Donor</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who makes a gift; a donor; a giver.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*na"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. Cf. <er>Donor</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who makes a gift; a donor; a giver.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Don"a*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Scots Law)</fld> <def>A donee of the crown; one the whom, upon certain condition, escheated property is made over.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"-naught`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Do</ets> + <ets>naught</ets>.]</ety> <def>A lazy, good-for-nothing fellow.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"nax</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., reed, also a sea fish, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A canelike grass of southern Europe (<spn>Arundo Donax</spn>), used for fishing rods, etc.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do"nax</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., reed, also a sea fish, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A canelike grass of southern Europe (<spn>Arundo Donax</spn>), used for fishing rods, etc.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Don*cel"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp., lit., a maid. Cf. <er>Damsel</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A handsome fish of Florida and the West Indies (<spn>Platyglossus radiatus</spn>). The name is applied also to the ladyfish (<spn>Harpe rufa</spn>) of the same region.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Don*cel"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp., lit., a maid. Cf. <er>Damsel</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A handsome fish of Florida and the West Indies (<spn>Platyglossus radiatus</spn>). The name is applied also to the ladyfish (<spn>Harpe rufa</spn>) of the same region.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Done</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <def><pos>p. p.</pos> from <er>Do</er>, and formerly the <pos>infinitive.</pos></def> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Performed; executed; finished.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>It is done or agreed; let it be a match or bargain; -- used elliptically.</def><br/
@@ -35714,13 +35714,13 @@ On the bless'd lovers.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Don"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>donna</ets>, L. <ets>domina</ets>. See <er>Don</er>, <er>Dame</er>.]</ety> <def>A lady; madam; mistress; -- the title given a lady in Italy.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Don"nat</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Corrupted from <ets>do-naught</ets>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Do-naught</er>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Don`n\'82e"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>donner</ets> to give.]</ety> <def>Lit., given; hence, in a literary work, as a drama or tale, that which is assumed as to characters, situation, etc., as a basis for the plot or story.</def> <rj><au>W. E. Henley.</au></rj></p>
+<p><hw>Don`n\'82e"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>donner</ets> to give.]</ety> <def>Lit., given; hence, in a literary work, as a drama or tale, that which is assumed as to characters, situation, etc., as a basis for the plot or story.</def> <rj><au>W. E. Henley.</au></rj></p>
<p><q>That favorite romance <qex>donn\'82e</qex> of the heir kept out of his own.</q> <rj><qau>Saintsbury.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Donnian</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to <person>John Donne</person>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Donnean.</syn><br/
@@ -35925,13 +35925,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Door"case`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The surrounding frame into which a door shuts.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Door"cheek`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The jamb or sidepiece of a door.</def> <rj><au>Ex. xii. 22 (Douay version).</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Door"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>Durg\'be</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>A Hindoo divinity, the consort of Siva, represented with ten arms.</def> <mark>[Written also Durga.]</mark> <rj><au>Malcom.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Door"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr. <ets>Durg\'be</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>A Hindoo divinity, the consort of Siva, represented with ten arms.</def> <mark>[Written also Durga.]</mark> <rj><au>Malcom.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Door"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The frame of a door.</def> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Door"keep`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who guards the entrance of a house or apartment; a porter; a janitor.</def><br/
@@ -36048,13 +36048,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>revealing stupidity; <as>as, a <ex>dopey</ex> answer</as>.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> anserine, dopey, fool(prenominal), foolish, goosey, goosy, gooselike.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dop"pel*g\'84ng`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G.]</ety> <def>A spiritual or ghostly double or counterpart; esp., an apparitional double of a living person; a cowalker.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dop"pel*g\'84ng`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G.]</ety> <def>A spiritual or ghostly double or counterpart; esp., an apparitional double of a living person; a cowalker.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dop"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>dooper</ets>.]</ety> <altsp>[Written also <asp>doper</asp>.]</altsp> <def>An Anabaptist or Baptist.</def> <mark>[Contemptuous]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dop"pler*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after the physicist and mathematician Christian <etsep>Doppler</etsep>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A brownish black native hydrocarbon occurring in elastic or jellylike masses.</def><br/
@@ -36123,13 +36123,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dor"ic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The Doric dialect.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dor"i*cism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A Doric phrase or idiom.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do"ris</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Doris</ets>, the daughter of Oceanus, and wife of Nereus, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of nudibranchiate mollusks having a wreath of branchi\'91 on the back.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do"ris</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Doris</ets>, the daughter of Oceanus, and wife of Nereus, Gr. <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of nudibranchiate mollusks having a wreath of branchi\'91 on the back.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"rism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/.]</ety> <def>A Doric phrase or idiom.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dork</hw> <pr>(d<ocir/rk)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a person who is stupid, socially inept, or ridiculous; -- always used disparagingly.</def> <mark>[slang.]</mark> <br/
@@ -36257,13 +36257,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Dorsal</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dor"ser</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Dosser</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>dor`si*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from L. <ets>dorsum</ets> back + <ets>branchiae</ets> gills.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of ch\'91topod annelids in which the branchi\'91 are along the back, on each side, or on the parapodia. [See <xex>Illusts</xex>. under <er>Annelida</er> and <er>Ch\'91topoda</er>.]</def><br/
+<p><hw>dor`si*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from L. <ets>dorsum</ets> back + <ets>branchiae</ets> gills.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of ch\'91topod annelids in which the branchi\'91 are along the back, on each side, or on the parapodia. [See <xex>Illusts</xex>. under <er>Annelida</er> and <er>Ch\'91topoda</er>.]</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dor`si*bran"chi*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having branchi\'91 along the back; belonging to the Dorsibranchiata.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the Dorsibranchiata.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dor*sif"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>,. <ety>[<ets>Dorsum</ets> + <ets>-ferous</ets>; cf. F. <ets>dorsif\'8are</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Bearing, or producing, on the back; -- applied to ferns which produce seeds on the back of the leaf, and to certain Batrachia, the ova of which become attached to the skin of the back of the parent, where they develop; dorsiparous.</def><br/
@@ -36281,13 +36281,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dorsoventral</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dor`so*ven"tral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>dorsum</ets> + <ets>ventral</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>From the dorsal to the ventral side of an animal; <as>as, the <ex>dorsoventral</ex> axis</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dor"sum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The ridge of a hill.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dor"sum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The ridge of a hill.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The back or dorsal region of an animal; the upper side of an appendage or part; <as>as, the <ex>dorsum</ex> of the tongue</as>.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dor"tour</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dor"ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>dortoir</ets>, fr. L. <ets>dormitorium</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dormitory.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -36298,22 +36298,22 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The American wall-eyed perch; -- called also <altname>dor\'82</altname>. See <er>Pike perch</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"ry</hw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dories</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>A small, strong, flat-bottomed rowboat, with sharp prow and flaring sides.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*ryph"o*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Doryphoros</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of plant-eating beetles, including the potato beetle. See <er>Potato beetle</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*ryph"o*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Doryphoros</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of plant-eating beetles, including the potato beetle. See <er>Potato beetle</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Do*ryph"o*ros</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, lit., spear bearing; <?/ a spear + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <def>A spear bearer; a statue of a man holding a spear or in the attitude of a spear bearer. Several important sculptures of this subject existed in antiquity, copies of which remain to us.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Do*ryph"o*ros</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, lit., spear bearing; <?/ a spear + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <def>A spear bearer; a statue of a man holding a spear or in the attitude of a spear bearer. Several important sculptures of this subject existed in antiquity, copies of which remain to us.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dos`-\'85-dos"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Back to back; <as>as, to sit <ex>dos-\'85-dos</ex> in a dogcart; to dance <ex>dos-\'85-dos</ex>, or so that two dancers move forward and pass back to back</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dos`-\'85-dos"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Back to back; <as>as, to sit <ex>dos-\'85-dos</ex> in a dogcart; to dance <ex>dos-\'85-dos</ex>, or so that two dancers move forward and pass back to back</as>.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dos`-\'85-dos"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A sofa, open carriage, or the like, so constructed that the occupants sit back to back.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dos`-\'85-dos"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A sofa, open carriage, or the like, so constructed that the occupants sit back to back.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dos"age</hw> <pr>(d<omac/s"<asl/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dosage</ets>. See <er>Dose</er>, <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The administration of medicine in doses; specif., a scheme or system of grading doses of medicine according to age, etc.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The process of adding some ingredient, as to wine, to give flavor, character, or strength.</def><br/
@@ -36401,13 +36401,13 @@ That fast was locked.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>To hire a ripper's mare, and buy new <qex>dossers</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A hanging tapestry; a dorsal.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dos`sier"</hw> <pr>(d<osl/s`sy<asl/"; <it>E.</it> d<ocr/s"s<icr/*<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., back of a thing, bulging bundle of papers, fr. <ets>dos</ets> back.]</ety> <def>A bundle containing the papers in reference to some matter.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dos`sier"</hw> <pr>(d<osl/s`sy<asl/"; <it>E.</it> d<ocr/s"s<icr/*<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., back of a thing, bulging bundle of papers, fr. <ets>dos</ets> back.]</ety> <def>A bundle containing the papers in reference to some matter.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dos"sil</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>dosil</ets> faucet of a barrel, OF. <ets>dosil</ets>, <ets>duisil</ets>, spigot, LL. <ets>diciculus</ets>, <ets>ducillus</ets>, fr. L. <ets>ducere</ets> to lead, draw. See <er>Duct</er>, <er>Duke</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A small ovoid or cylindrical roil or pledget of lint, for keeping a sore, wound, etc., open; a tent.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Printing)</fld> <def>A roll of cloth for wiping off the face of a copperplate, leaving the ink in the engraved lines.</def><br/
@@ -36589,16 +36589,16 @@ Of arms imagined in your lonely cell.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><sn>2.</sn> <ety>[Perh. a different word; cf. <er>Totty</er>.]</ety> <def>Unsteady in gait; hence, feeble; half-witted.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Do"ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Dottard</er>.]</ety> <def>Half-rotten; <as>as, <ex>doty</ex> timber</as>.</def> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou`ane"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A customhouse.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dou`ane"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A customhouse.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou`a"nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>An officer of the French customs.</def> <altsp>[Anglicized form <asp>douaneer</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Dou`a"nier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>An officer of the French customs.</def> <altsp>[Anglicized form <asp>douaneer</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"ar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. Ar. <ets>d<?/\'ber</ets>.]</ety> <def>A village composed of Arab tents arranged in streets.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"ay Bi"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[From <ets>Douay</ets>, or <ets>Douai</ets>, a town in France.]</ety> <def>A translation of the Scriptures into the English language for the use of English-speaking Roman Catholics; -- done from the Latin Vulgate by English scholars resident in France. The New Testament portion was published at Rheims, <sc>A. D.</sc> 1582, the Old Testament at Douai, <sc>A. D.</sc> 1609-10. Various revised editions have since been published.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Doway Bible</asp>. Called also the <asp>Rheims and Douay version</asp>.]</altsp><br/
@@ -36822,13 +36822,13 @@ Of plagues.</q> <rj><qau>Marston.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dou"ble-dyed`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dyed twice; thoroughly or intensely colored; hence; firmly fixed in opinions or habits; <as>as, a <ex>double-dyed</ex> villain</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"ble-end"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A vessel capable of moving in either direction, having bow and rudder at each end.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Railroad)</fld> <def>A locomotive with pilot at each end.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou"ble-en*ten"dre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>double</ets> double + <ets>entendre</ets> to mean. This is a barbarous compound of French words. The true French equivalent is <ets>double entente</ets>.]</ety> <def>A word or expression admitting of a double interpretation, one of which is often obscure or indelicate.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dou"ble-en*ten"dre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>double</ets> double + <ets>entendre</ets> to mean. This is a barbarous compound of French words. The true French equivalent is <ets>double entente</ets>.]</ety> <def>A word or expression admitting of a double interpretation, one of which is often obscure or indelicate.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"ble-eyed`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having a deceitful look.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdDeceitful meanings is <xex>double-eyed</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"ble*gang`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G. <ets>doppelg\'84nger</ets>; <ets>doppel</ets> double + <ets>g\'84nger</ets> walker.]</ety> <def>An apparition or double of a living person; a doppelg\'84nger.</def></p>
@@ -37001,13 +37001,13 @@ Of plagues.</q> <rj><qau>Marston.</qau></rj><br/
<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Doubling a cape</b></col>, <col><b>promontory</b></col></mcol>, <cd>etc. <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, sailing around or passing beyond a cape, promontory, etc.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Doub*loon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>doublon</ets>, Sp. <ets>doblon</ets>. See <er>Double</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, and cf. <er>Dupion</er>.]</ety> <def>A Spanish gold coin, no longer issued, varying in value at different times from over fifteen dollars to about five. See <er>Doblon</er> in Sup.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou`blure"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bookbinding)</fld> <def>The lining of a book cover, esp. one of unusual sort, as of tooled leather, painted vellum, rich brocade, or the like.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dou`blure"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bookbinding)</fld> <def>The lining of a book cover, esp. one of unusual sort, as of tooled leather, painted vellum, rich brocade, or the like.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>The reflexed margin of the trilobite carapace.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dou"bly</hw> <pr>(d<ucr/b"l<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>In twice the quantity; to twice the degree; <as>as, <ex>doubly</ex> wise or good; to be <ex>doubly</ex> sensible of an obligation.</as></def> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
@@ -37213,13 +37213,13 @@ And bosomed with her.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dou"cet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dow"set</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>doucet</ets> sweet, dim. of <ets>doux</ets>. See <er>Douce</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A custard.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A dowcet, or deep's testicle.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou`ceur"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>doux</ets> sweet. See <er>Douce</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Gentleness and sweetness of manner; agreeableness.</def> <rj><au>Chesterfield.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dou`ceur"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>doux</ets> sweet. See <er>Douce</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Gentleness and sweetness of manner; agreeableness.</def> <rj><au>Chesterfield.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A gift for service done or to be done; an honorarium; a present; sometimes, a bribe.</def> <rj><au>Burke.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Douche</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. It. <ets>doccia</ets>, fr. <ets>docciare</ets> to flow, pour, fr. an assumed LL. <ets>ductiare</ets>, fr. L. <ets>ducere</ets>, <ets>ductum</ets>, to lead, conduct (water). See <er>Duct</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A jet or current of water or vapor directed upon some part of the body to benefit it medicinally; a douche bath.</def><br/
@@ -37310,13 +37310,13 @@ And bosomed with her.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj></p>
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><mhw><hw>Dou"ra</hw>, <hw>dourah</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>sorghums of dry regions of Asia and North Africa; A kind of millet. See <er>Durra</er>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> durra, doura, dourah, Egyptian corn, Indian millet, Guinea corn.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dou`rou*cou"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small, nocturnal, South American monkey of the genus <gen>Aotus</gen> (formerly <spn>Nyctipithecus trivirgatus</spn>), with large owl-like eyes; hence, the common name <altname>owl monkey</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Durukuli</asp> and <asp>dourikuli</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Dou`rou*cou"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small, nocturnal, South American monkey of the genus <gen>Aotus</gen> (formerly <spn>Nyctipithecus trivirgatus</spn>), with large owl-like eyes; hence, the common name <altname>owl monkey</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Durukuli</asp> and <asp>dourikuli</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source> ]</p>
<p><hw>Douse</hw> <pr>(dous)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Doused</conjf> <pr>(doust)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dousing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. <er>Dowse</er>, and OD. <ets>donsen</ets> to strike with the fist on the back, Sw. <ets>dunsa</ets> to fall down violently and noisily; perh. akin to E. <ets>din</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To plunge suddenly into water; to duck; to immerse; to dowse.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Stillingfleet.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To strike or lower in haste; to slacken suddenly; <as>as, <ex>douse</ex> the topsail</as>.</def><br/
@@ -38003,13 +38003,13 @@ That drove the sand along he took his way.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><q>David breaks forth into these triumphant praises and <qex>doxologies</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dox"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Doxies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[See <er>Duck</er> a pet.]</ety> <def>A loose wench; a disreputable sweetheart.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Doy`en"</hw> <pr>(dw<aum/`y<aum/N")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Dean</er>.]</ety> <def>Lit., a dean; the senior member of a body or group; <as>as, the <ex>doyen</ex> of French physicians</as>.</def> \'bdThis <xex>doyen</xex> of newspapers.\'b8 <rj><au>A. R. Colquhoun.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Doy`en"</hw> <pr>(dw<aum/`y<aum/N")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Dean</er>.]</ety> <def>Lit., a dean; the senior member of a body or group; <as>as, the <ex>doyen</ex> of French physicians</as>.</def> \'bdThis <xex>doyen</xex> of newspapers.\'b8 <rj><au>A. R. Colquhoun.</au></rj><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doy`enne"</hw> <pos>n. f.</pos> <def>a female doyen.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><hw>doyley</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a small round piece of linen place under a dish or bowl; same as <er>doily</er>.</def><br/
@@ -38120,13 +38120,13 @@ That drove the sand along he took his way.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Drab"bler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A piece of canvas fastened by lacing to the bonnet of a sail, to give it a greater depth, or more drop.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drab"ble-tail`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A draggle-tail; a slattern.</def> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dra*c\'91"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ she-dragon.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of liliaceous plants with woody stems and funnel-shaped flowers.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dra*c\'91"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ she-dragon.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of liliaceous plants with woody stems and funnel-shaped flowers.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ <xex>Drac\'91na Draco</xex>, the source of the dragon's blood of the Canaries, forms a tree, sometimes of gigantic size.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dra"canth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of gum; -- called also <altname>gum tragacanth</altname>, or <altname>tragacanth</altname>. See <er>Tragacanth</er>.</def><br/
@@ -38135,28 +38135,28 @@ That drove the sand along he took his way.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Drachm</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Drachma</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A drachma.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Dram</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Drach"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Drachmas</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Drachm\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/. See <er>Dram</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A silver coin among the ancient Greeks, having a different value in different States and at different periods. The average value of the Attic drachma is computed to have been about 19 cents (U. S. currency, ca. 1913).</def><br/
+<p><hw>Drach"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Drachmas</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Drachm\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/. See <er>Dram</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A silver coin among the ancient Greeks, having a different value in different States and at different periods. The average value of the Attic drachma is computed to have been about 19 cents (U. S. currency, ca. 1913).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A gold and silver coin of modern Greece worth 19.3 cents.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Among the ancient Greeks, a weight of about 66.5 grains; among the modern Greeks, a weight equal to a gram.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Drach"me</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>See <er>Drachma</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Drach"me</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>See <er>Drachma</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dra"cin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dracine</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>See <er>Draconin</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dra"co</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Dragon</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>The Dragon, a northern constellation within which is the north pole of the ecliptic.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dra"co</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. See <er>Dragon</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>The Dragon, a northern constellation within which is the north pole of the ecliptic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A luminous exhalation from marshy grounds.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of lizards. See <er>Dragon</er>, 6.</def><br/
@@ -38181,13 +38181,13 @@ That drove the sand along he took his way.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dra*con"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From L. <ets>draco</ets> dragon, in allusion to the terms <ets>dragon's head</ets> and <ets>dragon's tail</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>Belonging to that space of time in which the moon performs one revolution, from ascending node to ascending node. See <cref>Dragon's head</cref>, under <er>Dragon</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd<xex>Dracontic</xex> month.\'b8 <rj><au>Crabb.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dra*con"tine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>draco</ets> dragon.]</ety> <def>Belonging to a dragon.</def> <rj><au>Southey.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dra*cun"cu*lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dracunculi</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., dim. of <ets>draco</ets> dragon.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A fish; the dragonet.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The Guinea worm (<spn>Filaria medinensis</spn>).</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dra*cun"cu*lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dracunculi</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., dim. of <ets>draco</ets> dragon.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A fish; the dragonet.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The Guinea worm (<spn>Filaria medinensis</spn>).</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drad</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. p. & a.</pos> <def>Dreaded.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drad"de</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>imp.</pos> <def>of <er>Dread</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
@@ -38430,13 +38430,13 @@ That, like a wounded snake, <qex>drags</qex> its slow length along.</q> <rj><qau
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>silver-coated candy bead for decorating cakes.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>sugar-coated nut or fruit piece.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dra`g\'82es"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[F. See 3d <er>Dredge</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Pharmacy)</fld> <def>Sugar-coated medicines.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dra`g\'82es"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[F. See 3d <er>Dredge</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Pharmacy)</fld> <def>Sugar-coated medicines.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dragging</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>painfully or tediously slow and boring; <as>as, the <ex>dragging</ex> minutes</as>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drag"gle</hw> <pr>(dr<acr/g"g'l)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Draggled</conjf> <pr>(dr<acr/g"g'ld)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Draggling</conjf> <pr>(dr<acr/g"gl<icr/ng)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Freq. of <ets>drag</ets>. <root/73. Cf. <er>Drawl</er>.]</ety> <def>To wet and soil by dragging on the ground, mud, or wet grass; to drabble; to trail.</def> <rj><au>Gray.</au></rj><br/
@@ -38632,13 +38632,13 @@ Filled the capacious deep and formed the main.</q> <rj><qau>Roscommon.</qau></rj
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>drain"board`</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a board beside a kitchen sink having a surface inclined so as to drain into the sink.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> draining board.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Draine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The missel thrush.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Draine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The missel thrush.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>drained</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>having lost much energy or emotion from vigorous activity; -- of people; <as>as, the day's events left her completely <ex>drained</ex> of strength</as>.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>having resources completely depleted.</def><br/
@@ -38777,13 +38777,13 @@ Time's noblest offspring is the last.</q> <rj><qau>Berkeley.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dramatisation</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>same as <er>dramatization</er>.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> dramatization.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dram"a*tis per*so"n\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>The actors in a drama or play.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dram"a*tis per*so"n\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>The actors in a drama or play.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dram"a*tist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dramatiste</ets>.]</ety> <def>The author of a dramatic composition; a writer of plays.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dram"a*ti`za*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being dramatized.</def><br/
@@ -38819,13 +38819,13 @@ Time's noblest offspring is the last.</q> <rj><qau>Berkeley.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Drank</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>imp.</pos> <def>of <er>Drink</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drank</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. 3d <er>Drake</er>.]</ety> <def>Wild oats, or darnel grass. See <er>Drake</er> a plant.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Drap` d'\'82*t\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F., clot of summer.]</ety> <def>A thin woolen fabric, twilled like merino.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Drap` d'\'82*t\'82"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F., clot of summer.]</ety> <def>A thin woolen fabric, twilled like merino.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drape</hw> <pr>(dr<amac/p)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Draped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Draping</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>draper</ets>, fr. <ets>drap</ets> cloth. See 3d <er>Drab</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To cover or adorn with drapery or folds of cloth, or as with drapery; <as>as, to <ex>drape</ex> a bust, a building, etc.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>The whole people were <qex>draped</qex> professionally.</q> <rj><qau>De Quincey.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -39780,13 +39780,13 @@ And <qex>dreamt</qex> the future fight</q>. <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dreg"gish</hw> <pr>(dr<ecr/g"g<icr/sh)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Foul with lees; feculent.</def> <rj><au>Harvey.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dreg"gy</hw> <pr>(dr<ecr/g"g<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Containing dregs or lees; muddy; foul; feculent.</def> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Drei"bund`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G., fr. <ets>drei</ets> three + <ets>bund</ets> league.]</ety> <def>A triple alliance; specif., the alliance of Germany, Austria, and Italy, formed in 1882.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Drei"bund`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G., fr. <ets>drei</ets> three + <ets>bund</ets> league.]</ety> <def>A triple alliance; specif., the alliance of Germany, Austria, and Italy, formed in 1882.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><mhw><hw>dreidel</hw>, <hw>dreidl</hw></mhw> <pr>(dr<amac/d"'l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a toy shaped somewhat like a top, but having four flat sides, each marked with one of the Hebrew letters <xex>nun</xex>, <xex>gimel</xex>, <xex>he</xex>, or <xex>shin</xex>. It is spun like a top, and the letter showing when it stops spinning determines the outcome of a game of chance.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a game of chance played with a dreidel{1}, most commonly by children at Hannukah.</def><br/
@@ -39795,13 +39795,13 @@ And <qex>dreamt</qex> the future fight</q>. <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Drein</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To drain.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Congreve.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drein"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <wordforms><pos>imp.</pos>, <hw>Dreint</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>,</wordforms> <def><pos>p. p.</pos> of <er>Drench</er> to drown.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dreis"se*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <ets>Dreyssen</ets>, a Belgian physician.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of bivalve shells of which one species (<spn>Dreissena polymorpha</spn>) is often so abundant as to be very troublesome in the fresh waters of Europe.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dreis"se*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <ets>Dreyssen</ets>, a Belgian physician.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of bivalve shells of which one species (<spn>Dreissena polymorpha</spn>) is often so abundant as to be very troublesome in the fresh waters of Europe.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drench</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Drenched</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Drenching</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>drencan</ets> to give to drink, to drench, the causal of <ets>drincan</ets> to drink; akin to D. <ets>drenken</ets>, Sw. <ets>dr\'84nka</ets>, G. <ets>tr\'84nken</ets>. See <er>Drink</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To cause to drink; especially, to dose by force; to put a potion down the throat of, as of a horse; hence. to purge violently by physic.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>As \'bdto fell,\'b8 is \'bdto make to fall,\'b8 and \'bdto lay,\'b8 to make to lie.\'b8 so \'bdto <qex>drench</qex>,\'b8 is \'bdto make to drink.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Trench.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -40381,13 +40381,13 @@ Caught and reflected the flame, as shields of armies the sunshine.</q> <rj><qau>
<p><hw>Drill"stock`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A contrivance for holding and turning a drill.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dri"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>See <er>Dryly</er>.</def> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dri"mys</hw> <pr>(dr<imac/"m<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>drimy`s</grk> sharp, acrid.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of magnoliaceous trees. <spn>Drimys aromatica</spn> furnishes Winter's bark.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dri"mys</hw> <pr>(dr<imac/"m<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>drimy`s</grk> sharp, acrid.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of magnoliaceous trees. <spn>Drimys aromatica</spn> furnishes Winter's bark.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drink</hw> <pr>(dr<icr/<nsm/k)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp.</pos> <conjf>Drank</conjf> <pr>(dr<acr/<nsm/k)</pr>, formerly <conjf>Drunk</conjf> <pr>(dr<ucr/<nsm/k)</pr>; & <pos>p. p.</pos> <conjf>Drunk</conjf>, <conjf>Drunken</conjf> <pr>(-'n)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Drinking</conjf>. <xex>Drunken</xex> is now rarely used, except as a verbal adj. in sense of <xex>habitually intoxicated</xex>; the form <xex>drank</xex>, not infrequently used as a p. p., is not so analogical.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>drincan</ets>; akin to OS. <ets>drinkan</ets>, D. <ets>drinken</ets>, G. <ets>trinken</ets>, Icel. <ets>drekka</ets>, Sw. <ets>dricka</ets>, Dan. <ets>drikke</ets>, Goth. <ets>drigkan</ets>. Cf. <er>Drench</er>, <er>Drunken</er>, <er>Drown</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; <as>as, to <ex>drink</ex> from a spring</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Gird thyself, and serve me, till have eaten and <qex>drunken</qex>; and afterward thou shalt eat and <qex>drink</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Luke xvii. 8.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -40849,13 +40849,13 @@ And in a little while our lips are dumb.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><cs><col><b>\'d8Droit d'aubaine</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Aubaine</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Droits of the Admiralty</b></col> <fld>(Eng. Law)</fld>, <cd>rights or perquisites of the Admiralty, arising from seizure of an enemy's ships in port on the breaking out of war, or those coming into port in ignorance of hostilities existing, or from such ships as are taken by noncommissioned captors; also, the proceeds of wrecks, and derelict property at sea. The <xex>droits of admiralty</xex> are now paid into the Exchequer for the public benefit.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Droi"tu*ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>relating to the mere right of property, as distinguished from the right of possession; <as>as, <ex>droitural</ex> actions</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Droitzsch"ka</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Drosky</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Droitzsch"ka</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Drosky</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Droll</hw> <pr>(dr<omac/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Droller</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Drollest</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</amorph> <ety>[F. <ets>dr\'93le</ets>; cf. G. & D. <ets>drollig</ets>, LG. <ets>drullig</ets>, D. <ets>drol</ets> a thick and short person, a droll, Sw. <ets>troll</ets> a magical appearance, demon, <ets>trolla</ets> to use magic arts, enchant, Dan. <ets>trold</ets> elf, imp, Icel. <ets>tr\'94ll</ets> giant, magician, evil spirit, monster. If this is the origin, cf. <er>Trull</er>.]</ety> <def>Queer, and fitted to provoke laughter; ludicrous from oddity; amusing and strange.</def></p>
<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Comic; comical; farcical; diverting; humorous; ridiculous; queer; odd; waggish; facetious; merry; laughable; ludicrous. -- <er>Droll</er>, <er>Laughable</er>, <er>Comical</er>. <xex>Laughable</xex> is the generic term, denoting anything exciting laughter or worthy of laughter; <xex>comical</xex> denotes something of the kind exhibited in <xex>comedies</xex>, something humorous of the kind exhibited in <xex>comedies</xex>, something, as it were, dramatically <xex>humorous</xex>; <xex>droll</xex> stands lower on the scale, having reference to persons or things which excite laughter by their buffoonery or oddity. A <xex>laughable</xex> incident; a <xex>comical</xex> adventure; a <xex>droll</xex> story.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -40905,13 +40905,13 @@ And in a little while our lips are dumb.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Droll"ist</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A droll.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Glanvill.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dro`m\'91*og"na*thous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dromaius</ets> emu + Gr. <grk>gna`qos</grk> jaw.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the structure of the palate like that of the ostrich and emu.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Drom`a*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>droma`s</grk> running + <grk>qhri`on</grk> beast. See <er>Dromedary</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A small extinct triassic mammal from North Carolina, the earliest yet found in America.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Drom`a*the"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>droma`s</grk> running + <grk>qhri`on</grk> beast. See <er>Dromedary</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A small extinct triassic mammal from North Carolina, the earliest yet found in America.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drome</hw> <pr>(dr<omac/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. Gr. <grk>droma`s</grk> running. See <er>Dromedary</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The crab plover (<spn>Dromas ardeola</spn>), a peculiar North African bird, allied to the oyster catcher.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drome</hw> <pr>(dr<omac/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Short for <er>A<eum/rodrome</er>.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark></p>
@@ -41257,13 +41257,13 @@ And wets the little plants that lowly dwell.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br
<p><hw>Drop"worm`</hw> <pr>(dr<ocr/p"w<ucir/rm`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The larva of any geometrid moth, which drops from trees by means of a thread of silk, as the <stype>cankerworm</stype> or <stype>inchworm</stype>. See <er>inchworm</er> and <er>geometrid</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Drop"wort`</hw> <pr>(dr<ocr/p"w<ucir/rt`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>An Old World species of <gen>Spir\'91a</gen> (<spn>Spir\'91a filipendula</spn>), with finely cut leaves.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dros"e*ra</hw> <pr>(dr<ocr/s"<esl/*r<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>drosero`s</grk> dewy.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of low perennial or biennial plants, the leaves of which are beset with gland-tipped bristles. See <er>Sundew</er>.</def> <rj><au>Gray.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dros"e*ra</hw> <pr>(dr<ocr/s"<esl/*r<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>drosero`s</grk> dewy.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of low perennial or biennial plants, the leaves of which are beset with gland-tipped bristles. See <er>Sundew</er>.</def> <rj><au>Gray.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Droseraceae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a natural family of carnivorous herbs and shrubs.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Droseraceae</fam>, sundew family.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -41962,16 +41962,16 @@ With hatefullest disrelish writhed their jaws.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dryadella</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a genus of plants comprising tropical American species usually placed in the genus <gen>Masdevallia</gen>; they are very dwarf plants having short tufted and usually unifoliate stems with usually solitary flowers.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Dryadella</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dry*an"dra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <etsep>J. Dryander</etsep>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of shrubs growing in Australia, having beautiful, hard, dry, evergreen leaves.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dry*an"dra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. Named after <etsep>J. Dryander</etsep>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of shrubs growing in Australia, having beautiful, hard, dry, evergreen leaves.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dry"as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dryades</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See <er>Dryad</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Myth.)</fld> <def>A dryad.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dry"as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dryades</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See <er>Dryad</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Myth.)</fld> <def>A dryad.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dry"-beat`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To beat severely.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dry"-boned`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having dry bones, or bones without flesh.</def><br/
@@ -42029,13 +42029,13 @@ With hatefullest disrelish writhed their jaws.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Dry" nurse`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A nurse who attends and feeds a child by hand; -- in distinction from a <contr>wet nurse</contr>, who suckles it.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><mhw><hw>Dry"nurse`</hw>, <hw>dry"-nurse`</hw></mhw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To feed, attend, and bring up without breastfeeding it.</def> <rj><au>Hudibras.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dry`o*bal"a*nops</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>dry^s</grk> oak + <grk>ba`lanos</grk> acorn + <grk>'o`psis</grk> appearance. The fruit remotely resembles an acorn in its cup.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The genus to which belongs the single species <spn>Dryobalanops Camphora</spn>, a lofty resinous tree of Borneo and Sumatra, yielding Borneo camphor and camphor oil.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dry`o*bal"a*nops</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>dry^s</grk> oak + <grk>ba`lanos</grk> acorn + <grk>'o`psis</grk> appearance. The fruit remotely resembles an acorn in its cup.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The genus to which belongs the single species <spn>Dryobalanops Camphora</spn>, a lofty resinous tree of Borneo and Sumatra, yielding Borneo camphor and camphor oil.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>drypis</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a spiny-leaved perennial herb of southern Europe having terminal clusters of small flowers.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dry"-rub`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Dry-rubbed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Dry-rubbing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To rub and cleanse without wetting.</def> <rj><au>Dodsley.</au></rj><br/
@@ -42207,13 +42207,13 @@ With hatefullest disrelish writhed their jaws.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><hw>Du`bi*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dubitatio</ets>.]</ety> <def>Act of doubting; doubt.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Scott.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"bi*ta*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dubitativus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>dubitatif</ets>.]</ety> <def>Tending to doubt; doubtful.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> -- <wordforms><wf>Du"bi*ta*tive*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> <mark>[R.]</mark></wordforms> <rj><au>. Eliot.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*bois"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Duboisine</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*bois"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Duboisine</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*bois"ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An alkaloid obtained from the leaves of an Australian tree (<spn>Duboisia myoporoides</spn>), and regarded as identical with hyoscyamine. It produces dilation of the pupil of the eye.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"cal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>ducal</ets>. See <er>Duke</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a duke.</def><br/
@@ -42231,19 +42231,19 @@ With hatefullest disrelish writhed their jaws.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><b
<p><note><hand/ The gold ducat is generally of the value of nine shillings and four pence sterling, or somewhat more that two dollars. The silver ducat is of about half this value.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duc`a*toon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. or Sp. <ets>ducaton</ets>, fr. <ets>ducat</ets>.]</ety> <def>A silver coin of several countries of Europe, and of different values.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du"ces te"cum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L., bring with thee.]</ety> <def>A judicial process commanding a person to appear in court and bring with him some piece of evidence or other thing to be produced to the court.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du"ces te"cum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L., bring with thee.]</ety> <def>A judicial process commanding a person to appear in court and bring with him some piece of evidence or other thing to be produced to the court.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duch"ess</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>duchesse</ets>, fr. <ets>duc</ets> duke.]</ety> <def>The wife or widow of a duke; also, a lady who has the sovereignty of a duchy in her own right.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du`chesse" d'An`gou`l\'88me"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A variety of pear of large size and excellent flavor.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du`chesse" d'An`gou`l\'88me"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A variety of pear of large size and excellent flavor.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du`chesse" lace</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A beautiful variety of Brussels pillow lace made originally in Belgium and resembling Honiton guipure. It is worked with fine thread in large sprays, usually of the primrose pattern, with much raised work.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duch"y</hw> <pr>(d<ucr/ch"<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Duchies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>duch\'82</ets>, OF. <ets>duch\'82e</ets>, (assumed) LL. <ets>ducitas</ets>, fr. L. <ets>dux</ets>. See <er>Duke</er>.]</ety> <def>The territory or dominions of a duke; a dukedom.</def><br/
@@ -42544,16 +42544,16 @@ Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><
<p><hw>Du"el*ist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>duelliste</ets>.]</ety> <def>One who fights in single combat.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>duellist</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>A <qex>duelist</qex> . . . always values himself upon his courage, his sense of honor, his fidelity and friendship.</q> <rj><qau>Hume.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*e"lo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. See <er>Duel</er>.]</ety> <def>A duel; also, the rules of dueling.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Du*e"lo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. See <er>Duel</er>.]</ety> <def>A duel; also, the rules of dueling.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*e"\'a4a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp.]</ety> <def>See <er>Do\'a4a</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*e"\'a4a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp.]</ety> <def>See <er>Do\'a4a</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- p. 460 --></p>
<p><hw>Due"ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Quality of being due; debt; what is due or becoming.</def> <rj><au>T. Goodwin.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -42567,16 +42567,16 @@ Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any old woman who is employed to guard a younger one; a governess.</def> <rj><au>Arbuthnot.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*et"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<er>Duetto</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A composition for two performers, whether vocal or instrumental.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du`et*ti"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It ., dim. fr. <ets>duetto</ets> a duet.]</ety> <def>A duet of short extent and concise form.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du`et*ti"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It ., dim. fr. <ets>duetto</ets> a duet.]</ety> <def>A duet of short extent and concise form.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*et"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., fr. It & L. <ets>duo</ets> two. See <er>Two</er>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Duet</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*et"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., fr. It & L. <ets>duo</ets> two. See <er>Two</er>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Duet</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duff</hw> <pr>(d<ucr/f)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From OE. <ets>dagh</ets>. <root/67. See <er>Dough</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Dough or paste.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A stiff flour pudding, boiled in a bag; -- a term used especially by seamen; <as>as, plum <ex>duff</ex></as>.</def><br/
@@ -42726,13 +42726,13 @@ Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Sweet to the ear; melodious; harmonious.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Their dainty lays and <qex>dulcet</qex> melody.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dul`ci*an"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A sweet-toned stop of an organ.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dul`ci*an"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A sweet-toned stop of an organ.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dul`ci*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dulcification</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of dulcifying or sweetening.</def> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dul"ci*fied</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Sweetened; mollified.</def><br/
@@ -42765,13 +42765,13 @@ Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><
<p><q>I must ever have some <qex>Dulcinea</qex> in my head.</q> <rj><qau>Sterne.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dul"ci*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Dulceness</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dul*ci"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dolcino</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dul*ci"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dolcino</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dul"cite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>dulcite</ets>, fr. L. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A white, sugarlike substance, <chform>C6H8.(OH)2</chform>, occurring naturally in a manna from Madagascar, and in certain plants, and produced artificially by the reduction of galactose and lactose or milk sugar.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dul"ci*tude</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dulcitudo</ets>, fr. <ets>dulcis</ets> sweet.</ety> <def>Sweetness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
@@ -42783,13 +42783,13 @@ Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><
<p><hw>Dul`co*ra"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>dulcoratio</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of sweetening.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"ledge</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>One of the dowels joining the ends of the fellies which form the circle of the wheel of a gun carriage.</def> <rj><au>Wilhelm.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*li"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. Gr. <?/ servitude, fr. <?/ slave.]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>An inferior kind of veneration or worship, given to the angels and saints as the servants of God.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*li"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL., fr. Gr. <?/ servitude, fr. <?/ slave.]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>An inferior kind of veneration or worship, given to the angels and saints as the servants of God.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dull</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Duller</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Dullest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>dol</ets> foolish; akin to <ets>gedwelan</ets> to err, D. <ets>dol</ets> mad, <ets>dwalen</ets> to wander, err, G. <ets>toll</ets> mad, Goth. <ets>dwals</ets> foolish, stupid, cf. Gr. <?/ turbid, troubled, Skr. <ets>dhvr</ets> to cause to fall. Cf. <er>Dolt</er>, <er>Dwale</er>, <er>Dwell</er>, <er>Fraud</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Slow of understanding; wanting readiness of apprehension; stupid; doltish; blockish.</def> \'bd<xex>Dull</xex> at classical learning.\'b8 <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>She is not bred so <qex>dull</qex> but she can learn.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -43396,22 +43396,22 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Du`o*de"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>duod\'82nal</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the duodenum; <as>as, <ex>duodenal</ex> digestion</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du`o*den"a*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duodenarius</ets>, fr. <ets>duodeni</ets> twelve each: cf. F. <ets>duod\'82naire</ets>.]</ety> <def>Containing twelve; twelvefold; increasing by twelves; duodecimal.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du`o*de"num</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. <ets>duodeni</ets> twelve each: cf. F. <ets>duodenum</ets>. So called because its length is about twelve fingers' breadth.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The part of the small intestines between the stomach and the jejunum. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <xex>Digestive apparatus</xex>, under <er>Digestive</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du`o*de"num</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. <ets>duodeni</ets> twelve each: cf. F. <ets>duodenum</ets>. So called because its length is about twelve fingers' breadth.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The part of the small intestines between the stomach and the jejunum. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <xex>Digestive apparatus</xex>, under <er>Digestive</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"o*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Photo-engraving)</fld> <def>A picture printed from two half-tone plates made with the screen set at different angles, and usually printed in two shades of the same color or in black and one tint.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du`o*lit"er*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duo</ets> two + E. <ets>literal</ets>.]</ety> <def>Consisting of two letters only; biliteral.</def> <rj><au>Stuart.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Duo"mo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. See <er>Done</er>.]</ety> <def>A cathedral. See <er>Dome</er>, 2.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Duo"mo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. See <er>Done</er>.]</ety> <def>A cathedral. See <er>Dome</er>, 2.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Of tower or <qex>duomo</qex>, sunny sweet.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"o*tone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>tone</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Photoengraving)</fld> <def>Any picture printed in two shades of the same color, as duotypes and duographs are usually printed.</def><br/
@@ -43447,13 +43447,13 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Du"ple</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duplus</ets>. See <er>Double</er>.]</ety> <def>Double.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Duple ratio</b></col> <fld>(Math.)</fld>, <cd>that in which the antecedent term is double the consequent, as of 2 to 1, 8 to 4, etc.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du"plex</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>plicare</ets> to fold. See <er>Two</er>, and <er>Complex</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Double; twofold.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du"plex</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>plicare</ets> to fold. See <er>Two</er>, and <er>Complex</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Double; twofold.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Computers)</fld> <def>organized so that data may be transmitted in two opposite directions over the same channel; -- of communications channels, such as data transfer lines between computers.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Duplex escapement</b></col>, <cd>a peculiar kind of watch escapement, in which the scape-wheel has two sets of teeth. See <er>Escapement</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Duplex lathe</b></col>, <cd>one for turning off, screwing, and surfacing, by means of two cutting tools, on opposite sides of the piece operated upon.</cd> -- <col><b>Duplex pumping engine</b></col>, <cd>a steam pump in which two steam cylinders are placed side by side, one operating the valves of the other.</cd> -- <col><b>Duplex querela</b></col> <ety>[L., double complaint]</ety> <fld>(Eccl. Law)</fld>, <cd>a complaint in the nature of an appeal from the ordinary to his immediate superior, as from a bishop to an archbishop.</cd> <au>Mozley & W.</au> -- <col><b>Duplex telegraphy</b></col>, <cd>a system of telegraphy for sending two messages over the same wire simultaneously.</cd> -- <col><b>Duplex watch</b></col>, <cd>one with a duplex escapement.</cd> -- <col><b>half duplex</b></col> <fld>(Computers)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>arranged so that the information may be transmitted in both directions, but only in one direction at a time; -- of communications channels between computers; contrasted with <cref>full duplex(a)</cref>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>arranged so that the information transmitted to the remote computer also appears on the local terminal; -- of communications channels between computers; contrasted with <cref>full duplex(b)</cref>.</cd> -- <col><b>full duplex</b></col>, <fld>(Computers)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>arranged so that the information may be transmitted in both directions simultaneously; -- of communications channels between computers; contrasted with <cref>half duplex(a)</cref>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>arranged so that the information transmitted to the remote computer does not appear on the local terminal; -- of communications channels between computers; contrasted with <cref>half duplex(b)</cref>.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -43543,16 +43543,16 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Double dealing; dissimulation; deceit; guile; deception; falsehood.</syn><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dup"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See 2d <er>Dubber</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[G., fr. L. <ets>durus</ets> hard, firm, vigorous.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Major; in the major mode; <as>as, C <ex>dur</ex>, that is, C major</as>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[G., fr. L. <ets>durus</ets> hard, firm, vigorous.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Major; in the major mode; <as>as, C <ex>dur</ex>, that is, C major</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Short form for <er>Dura mater</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Short form for <er>Dura mater</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du`ra*bil"i*ty</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>durabilitas</ets>.]</ety> <def>The state or quality of being durable; the power of uninterrupted or long continuance in any condition; the power of resisting agents or influences which tend to cause changes, decay, or dissolution; lastingness.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>A Gothic cathedral raises ideas of grandeur in our minds by the size, its height, . . . its antiquity, and its <qex>durability</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Blair.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -43581,16 +43581,16 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Du"ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the dura, or dura mater.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duralumin</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[a trademark.]</ety> <def>an aluminum-based alloy which is both light and strong, containing 4 per cent of copper and 0.5 per cent of magnesium and smaller amounts of iron, manganese, and silicon. It hardens with aging at room temperature.</def><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du"ra ma"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L., lit., hard mother. The membrane was called <ets>mater</ets>, or mother, because it was formerly thought to give rise to every membrane of the body.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The tough, fibrous membrane, which lines the cavity of the skull and spinal column, and surrounds the brain and spinal cord; -- frequently abbreviated to <abbr>dura</abbr>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du"ra ma"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L., lit., hard mother. The membrane was called <ets>mater</ets>, or mother, because it was formerly thought to give rise to every membrane of the body.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The tough, fibrous membrane, which lines the cavity of the skull and spinal column, and surrounds the brain and spinal cord; -- frequently abbreviated to <abbr>dura</abbr>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*ra"men</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., hardness, a hardened, <it>i. e.</it>, ligneous, vine branch, fr. <ets>durare</ets> to harden. See <er>Dure</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The heartwood of an exogenous tree.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*ra"men</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., hardness, a hardened, <it>i. e.</it>, ligneous, vine branch, fr. <ets>durare</ets> to harden. See <er>Dure</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The heartwood of an exogenous tree.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dur"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>durance</ets> duration, fr. L. <ets>durans</ets>, <ets>-antis</ets>, p. pr. <ets>durare</ets> to endure, last. See <er>Dure</er>, and cf. <er>Durant</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Continuance; duration. See <er>Endurance</er>.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Of how short <qex>durance</qex> was this new-made state!</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -43613,13 +43613,13 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dur"an*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Duration.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dr. H. More.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dur"ant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>durant</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>durer</ets> to last. Cf. <er>Durance</er>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Durance</er>, 3.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*ran"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <ety>[L., abl. case of the p. pr. of <ets>durare</ets> to last.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>During; <as>as, <ex>durante vita</ex>, during life; <ex>durante bene placito</ex>, during pleasure.</as></def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*ran"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <ety>[L., abl. case of the p. pr. of <ets>durare</ets> to last.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>During; <as>as, <ex>durante vita</ex>, during life; <ex>durante bene placito</ex>, during pleasure.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*ra"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>duration</ets>. See <er>Dure</er>.]</ety> <def>The state or quality of lasting; continuance in time; the portion of time during which anything exists.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>It was proposed that the <qex>duration</qex> of Parliament should be limited.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -43670,24 +43670,24 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Du*ress"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To subject to duress.</def> \'bdThe party <xex>duressed</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*ress"or</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who subjects another to duress</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dur"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Doorga</er>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dur"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Doorga</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dur"ham</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One or a breed of short-horned cattle, originating in the county of Durham, England. The Durham cattle are noted for their beef-producing quality.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Du"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Du"ri*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The fruit of the durio. It is oval or globular, and eight or ten inches long. It has a hard prickly rind, containing a soft, cream-colored pulp, of a most delicious flavor and a very offensive odor. The seeds are roasted and eaten like chestnuts.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dur"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <ety>[Orig., p. pr. of <ets>dure</ets>.]</ety> <def>In the time of; as long as the action or existence of; <as>as, <ex>during</ex> life; <ex>during</ex> the space of a year.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du"ri*o</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Malay <ets>d<?/ri</ets> thorn.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A fruit tree (<spn>Durio zibethinus</spn>, the only species known) of the Indian Archipelago. It bears the <prod>durian</prod>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du"ri*o</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Malay <ets>d<?/ri</ets> thorn.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A fruit tree (<spn>Durio zibethinus</spn>, the only species known) of the Indian Archipelago. It bears the <prod>durian</prod>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du"ri*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duritas</ets>, fr. <ets>durus</ets> hard.]</ety> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Hardness; firmness.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Harshness; cruelty.</def> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
@@ -43702,13 +43702,13 @@ Falls on the moor the brief November day.</q> <rj><qau>Keble.</qau></rj><br/
<p><hw>Dur"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>dhorra</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A kind of millet, cultivated throughout Asia, and introduced into the south of Europe; a variety of <spn>Sorghum vulgare</spn>; -- called also <altname>Indian millet</altname>, and <altname>Guinea corn</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>dhoorra</asp>, <asp>dhurra</asp>, <asp>doura</asp>, etc.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Durst</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>imp.</pos> <def>of <er>Dare</er>. See <er>Dare</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du`ru*ku"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small, nocturnal, South American monkey of the genus <gen>Aotus</gen> (formerly <spn>Nyctipthecus trivirgatus</spn>). The <altname>owl monkey</altname>. See <er>douroucouli</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>douroucouli</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<p><hw>Du`ru*ku"li</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small, nocturnal, South American monkey of the genus <gen>Aotus</gen> (formerly <spn>Nyctipthecus trivirgatus</spn>). The <altname>owl monkey</altname>. See <er>douroucouli</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>douroucouli</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*ryl"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, allied to, or derived from, durene; <as>as, <ex>durylic</ex> acid</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Duse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A demon or spirit. See <er>Deuce</er>.</def><br/
@@ -44012,34 +44012,34 @@ The way to <qex>dusty</qex> death.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><note><hand/ An impost on land or other real estate, and on the stock of farmers, is not called a <xex>duty</xex>, but a <xex>direct tax</xex>. <mark>[U.S.]</mark></note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Ad valorem duty</b></col>, <cd>a duty which is graded according to the cost, or market value, of the article taxed. See <er>Ad valorem</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Specific duty</b></col>, <cd>a duty of a specific sum assessed on an article without reference to its value or market.</cd> -- <col><b>On duty</b></col>, <cd>actually engaged in the performance of one's assigned task.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Du*um"vir</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Duumvirs</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Duumviri</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>vir</ets> man.]</ety> <fld>(Rom. Antiq.)</fld> <def>One of two Roman officers or magistrates united in the same public functions.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Du*um"vir</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Duumvirs</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Duumviri</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>duo</ets> two + <ets>vir</ets> man.]</ety> <fld>(Rom. Antiq.)</fld> <def>One of two Roman officers or magistrates united in the same public functions.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*um"vi*ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duumviralis</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or belonging to the duumviri or the duumvirate.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*um"vi*rate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>duumviratus</ets>, fr. <ets>duumvir</ets>.]</ety> <def>The union of two men in the same office; or the office, dignity, or government of two men thus associated, as in ancient Rome.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dux</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., leader.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The scholastic name for the theme or subject of a fugue, the answer being called the <xex>comes</xex>, or companion.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dux</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., leader.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The scholastic name for the theme or subject of a fugue, the answer being called the <xex>comes</xex>, or companion.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Duy"ker*bok</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>duiker</ets> diver + <ets>bok</ets> a buck, lit., diver buck. So named from its habit of diving suddenly into the bush.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South African antelope (<spn>Cephalous mergens</spn>); -- called also <altname>impoon</altname>, and <altname>deloo</altname>.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Duy"ker*bok</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>duiker</ets> diver + <ets>bok</ets> a buck, lit., diver buck. So named from its habit of diving suddenly into the bush.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South African antelope (<spn>Cephalous mergens</spn>); -- called also <altname>impoon</altname>, and <altname>deloo</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Du*young"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Dugong</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>D" valve`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A kind of slide valve. See <cref>Slide valve</cref>, under <er>Slide</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dver"gr</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dvergar</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[See <er>Dwarf</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Scand. Myth.)</fld> <def>A dwarf supposed to dwell in rocks and hills and to be skillful in working metals.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dver"gr</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Dvergar</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[See <er>Dwarf</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Scand. Myth.)</fld> <def>A dwarf supposed to dwell in rocks and hills and to be skillful in working metals.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dwale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>dwale</ets>, <ets>dwole</ets>, deception, deadly nightshade, AS. <ets>dwala</ets>, <ets>dwola</ets>, error, doubt; akin to E. <ets>dull</ets>. See <er>Dull</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The deadly nightshade (<spn>Atropa Belladonna</spn>), having stupefying qualities.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>The tincture sable or black when blazoned according to the fantastic system in which plants are substituted for the tinctures.</def><br/
@@ -44206,13 +44206,13 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><cs><col><b>Dyadic arithmetic</b></col>, <cd>the same as <cref>binary arithmetic</cref>.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dy"aks</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos>; <sing>sing. <singw>Dyak</singw>.</sing> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>The aboriginal and most numerous inhabitants of Borneo. They are partially civilized, but retain many barbarous practices.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dy"as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dyas</ets> the number two.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A name applied in Germany to the Permian formation, there consisting of two principal groups.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dy"as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dyas</ets> the number two.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A name applied in Germany to the Permian formation, there consisting of two principal groups.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dyaus</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Hinduism)</fld> <def>the Hindu god of the sky.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Dyaus-pitar.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -44412,13 +44412,13 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dy"nast</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dynastes</ets>, Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to be able or strong: cf. F. <ets>dynaste</ets>. See <er>Dynamic</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A ruler; a governor; a prince.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A dynasty; a government.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dy*nas"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dynast</er>.]</ety> <def>A tyrant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+<p><hw>Dy*nas"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Dynast</er>.]</ety> <def>A tyrant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dy*nas"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ of a dynast, fr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>dunastique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or relating to a dynasty or line of kings.</def> <rj><au>Motley.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dy*nas"tic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dynastic.</def><br/
@@ -44438,16 +44438,16 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dyne</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Formed fr. Gr. <?/ power. See <er>Dynamic</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>The unit of force, in the C. G. S. (Centimeter Gram Second) system of physical units; that is, the force which, acting on a gram for a second, generates a velocity of a centimeter per second.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>An inseparable prefix, fr. the Greek <grk>dys-</grk> hard, ill, and signifying <sig>ill</sig>, <sig>bad</sig>, <sig>hard</sig>, <sig>difficult</sig>, and the like; cf. the prefixes, Skr. <xex>dus-</xex>, Goth. <xex>tuz-</xex>, OHG. <xex>zur-</xex>, G. <xex>zer-</xex>, AS. <xex>to-</xex>, Icel. <xex>tor-</xex>, Ir. <xex>do-</xex>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys`\'91s*the"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, bad + <?/ to perceive, to feel.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Impairment of any of the senses, esp. of touch.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys`\'91s*the"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, bad + <?/ to perceive, to feel.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Impairment of any of the senses, esp. of touch.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys*cra"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dyscrasia</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>dyskrasi`a</grk>; <grk>dys-</grk> bad + <grk>kra^sis</grk> mixture, fr. <grk>keranny`nai</grk> to mix: cf. F. <ets>dycrasie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An ill habit or state of the constitution; -- formerly regarded as dependent on a morbid condition of the blood and humors.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys*cra"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dyscrasia</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>dyskrasi`a</grk>; <grk>dys-</grk> bad + <grk>kra^sis</grk> mixture, fr. <grk>keranny`nai</grk> to mix: cf. F. <ets>dycrasie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An ill habit or state of the constitution; -- formerly regarded as dependent on a morbid condition of the blood and humors.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"cra*site</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ bad + <?/ compound.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A mineral consisting of antimony and silver.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"cra*sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Discrasies</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>Dycrasia.</def><br/
@@ -44471,13 +44471,13 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> nonadaptive.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys`ge*nes"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Not procreating or breeding freely; <as>as, one race may be <ex>dysgenesic</ex> with respect to another</as>.</def> <rj><au>Darwin.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys*gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dys-</ets> + <ets>genesis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A condition of not generating or breeding freely; infertility; a form of homogenesis in which the hybrids are sterile among themselves, but are fertile with members of either parent race.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys*gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dys-</ets> + <ets>genesis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A condition of not generating or breeding freely; infertility; a form of homogenesis in which the hybrids are sterile among themselves, but are fertile with members of either parent race.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>dysgenic</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to dysgenics.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> cacogenic.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
@@ -44514,13 +44514,13 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dys"lu*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ to loose, dissolve.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A variety of the zinc spinel or gahnite.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"ly*sin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ a loosing.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>A resinous substance formed in the decomposition of cholic acid of bile; -- so called because it is difficult to solve.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys*men`or*rhe"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ month + <?/ to flow.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult and painful menstruation.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys*men`or*rhe"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ month + <?/ to flow.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult and painful menstruation.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"no*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, bad + <?/ law.]</ety> <def>Bad legislation; the enactment of bad laws.</def> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"o*dile</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ ill smell, from <?/ ill-smelling; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, bad + <?/ to smell.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>An impure earthy or coaly bitumen, which emits a highly fetid odor when burning.</def></p>
@@ -44532,21 +44532,21 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dys*pep"tic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A person afflicted with dyspepsia.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys*pep"tone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dys-</ets> + <ets>peptone</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>An insoluble albuminous body formed from casein and other proteid substances by the action of gastric juice.</def> <rj><au>Meissner.</au></rj></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Dys*pha"gi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"pha*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dysphagia</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ to eat.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficulty in swallowing.</def></p>
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dys*pha"gi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"pha*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dysphagia</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ to eat.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficulty in swallowing.</def></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Dys*pho"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"pho*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dysphonia</ets>, Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ sound, voice: cf. F. <ets>dysphonie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A difficulty in producing vocal sounds; enfeebled or depraved voice.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dys*pho"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"pho*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>dysphonia</ets>, Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/ sound, voice: cf. F. <ets>dysphonie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A difficulty in producing vocal sounds; enfeebled or depraved voice.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys*pho"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ hard to bear; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear: cf. F. <ets>dysphorie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Impatience under affliction; morbid restlessness; dissatisfaction; the fidgets.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys*pho"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ hard to bear; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear: cf. F. <ets>dysphorie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Impatience under affliction; morbid restlessness; dissatisfaction; the fidgets.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dysp*n\'d2"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ short of breath; pref. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/, <?/, breathing, <?/ to blow, breathe: cf. F. <ets>dyspn\'82e</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficulty of breathing.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dysp*n\'d2"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ short of breath; pref. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <?/, <?/, breathing, <?/ to blow, breathe: cf. F. <ets>dyspn\'82e</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficulty of breathing.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dysp*no"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Affected with shortness of breath; relating to dyspn\'d2a.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys*pro"si*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>dyspro`sitos</grk> hard to get at.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An element of the rare earth-group. Symbol <it>Dy</it>; at. wt., 162.5.</def><br/
@@ -44555,21 +44555,21 @@ are said to have <qex>dwindled</qex> into factious clubs.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</q
<p><hw>Dys*te`le*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pref. <ets>dys-</ets> + <ets>teleology</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The doctrine of purposelessness; a term applied by Haeckel to that branch of physiology which treats of rudimentary organs, in view of their being useless to the life of the organism.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>To the doctrine of <qex>dysteleology</qex>, or the denial of final causes, a proof of the real existence of such a thing as instinct must necessarily be fatal.</q> <rj><qau>Word (Dynamic Sociology).</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Dys*to"ci*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <grk>to`kos</grk> delivery.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult delivery pr parturition.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Dys*to"ci*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <grk>to`kos</grk> delivery.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult delivery pr parturition.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys"tome</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk> ill, hard + <grk>tomo`s</grk> cutting, <grk>diate`mnein</grk> to cut.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Cleaving with difficulty.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ Datolite was called <xex>dystome spar</xex> by Mohs.</note></p>
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Dys*u"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"u*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dysuria</ets>, Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> + <?/ urine: cf. F. <ets>dysurie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult or painful discharge of urine.</def><br/
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dys*u"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dys"u*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>dysuria</ets>, Gr. <?/; <grk>dys-</grk> + <?/ urine: cf. F. <ets>dysurie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Difficult or painful discharge of urine.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Dys*u"ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>dys-</grk>: cf. F. <ets>dysurique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to, or afflicted with, dysury.</def></p>
<p><mhw>{ <hw>Dze"ren</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Dze"ron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The Chinese yellow antelope (<spn>Procapra gutturosa</spn>), a remarkably swift-footed animal, inhabiting the deserts of Central Asia, Tibet, and China.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>

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