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authorSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-19 11:43:40 +0200
committerSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-19 11:43:40 +0200
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+<p><-- Begin file 7 of 26: Letter G (Version 0.46)
+
+ This file is part 7 of the GNU version of
+ The Collaborative International Dictionary of English
+ Also referred to as GCIDE
+ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
+
+GCIDE is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
+any later version.
+
+GCIDE is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+along with this copy of GCIDE; see the file COPYING. If not, write
+to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
+Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
+ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
+
+ This dictionary was derived from the
+ Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
+ Version published 1913
+ by the C. & G. Merriam Co.
+ Springfield, Mass.
+ Under the direction of
+ Noah Porter, D.D., LL.D.
+
+ and from
+ WordNet, a semantic network created by
+ the Cognitive Science Department
+ of Princeton University
+ under the direction of
+ Prof. George Miller
+
+ and is being updated and supplemented by
+ an open coalition of volunteer collaborators from
+ around the world.
+
+ This electronic dictionary is the starting point for an
+ongoing project to develop a modern on-line comprehensive encyclopedic
+dictionary, by the efforts of all individuals willing to help build a
+large and freely available knowledge base. Contributions of data,
+time, and effort are requested from any person willing to assist creation
+of a comprehensive and organized knowledge base for free access on the
+internet. Anyone willing to assist in any way in constructing such a
+knowledge base should contact:
+
+ Patrick Cassidy pc@worldsoul.org
+ 735 Belvidere Ave. Office: (908)668-5252
+ Plainfield, NJ 07062
+ (908) 561-3416
+
+ Last edit March 19, 2002.
+
+ --></p>
+
+<p><centered><point26>G.</point26></centered><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>G</hw> <pr>(j<emac/)</pr> <sn>1.</sn> <def>G is the seventh letter of the English alphabet, and a vocal consonant. It has two sounds; one simple, as in <xex>gave</xex>, <xex>go</xex>, <xex>gull</xex>; the other compound (like that of <it>j</it>), as in <xex>gem</xex>, <xex>gin</xex>, <xex>dingy</xex>. See <xex>Guide to Pronunciation</xex>, <sect/<sect/ 231-6, 155, 176, 178, 179, 196, 211, 246.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note>The form of G is from the Latin, in the alphabet which it first appeared as a modified form of C. The name is also from the Latin, and probably comes to us through the French. Etymologically it is most closely related to a <xex>c</xex> hard, <xex>k y</xex>, and <xex>w</xex>; as in <xex>c</xex>orn, <xex>g</xex>rain, <xex>k</xex>ernel; <xex>k</xex>in L. <xex>g</xex>enus, Gr. <?/; E. <xex>g</xex>arden, <xex>y</xex>ard; dra<xex>g</xex>, dra<xex>w</xex>; also to <xex>ch</xex> and <xex>h</xex>; as in <xex>g</xex>et, pre<xex>h</xex>ensile; <xex>g</xex>uest, <xex>h</xex>ost (an army); <xex>g</xex>all, <xex>ch</xex>oler; <xex>g</xex>ust, <xex>ch</xex>oose. See <er>C</er>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>G is the name of the fifth tone of the natural or model scale; -- called also <altname>sol</altname> by the Italians and French. It was also originally used as the treble clef, and has gradually changed into the character represented in the margin. See <er>Clef</er>. G<sharp/ (G sharp) is a tone intermediate between G and A.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab</hw> <pr>(g<acr/b)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gaff</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Steam Engine)</fld> <def>The hook on the end of an eccentric rod opposite the strap. See. <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Eccentric</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gabbe</ets> gabble, mocking, fr. Icel. <ets>gabb</ets> mocking, mockery, or OF. <ets>gab</ets>, <ets>gabe</ets>; perh. akin to E. <ets>gape</ets>, or <ets>gob</ets>. Cf. <er>Gab</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>, <er>Gibber</er>.]</ety> <def>The mouth; hence, idle prate; chatter; unmeaning talk; loquaciousness.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gift of gab</b></col>, <cd>facility of expression.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gabben</ets> to jest, lie, mock, deceive, fr. Icel. <ets>gabba</ets> to mock, or OF. <ets>gaber</ets>. See 2d <er>Gab</er>, and cf. <er>Gabble</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To deceive; to lie.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To talk idly; to prate; to chatter.</def> <rj><au>Holinshed.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"ar*age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of coarse cloth for packing goods.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gab`ar*dine"</hw>, <hw>Gab`er*dine"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>gabardina</ets>; cf. It. <ets>gavardina</ets>, OF. <ets>galvardine</ets>, <ets>calvardine</ets>, <ets>gavardine</ets>, <ets>galeverdine</ets>; perh. akin to Sp. & OF. <ets>gaban</ets> a sort of cloak or coat for rainy weather, F. <ets>caban</ets> great coat with a hood and sleeves, It. <ets>gabbano</ets> and perh. to E. <ets>cabin</ets>.]</ety> <def>A coarse frock or loose upper garment formerly worn by Jews; a mean dress.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"ber</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A liar; a deceiver.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One addicted to idle talk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gabbled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gabbling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Freq. of <ets>gab</ets>. See <er>Gab</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To talk fast, or to talk without meaning; to prate; to jabber.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To utter inarticulate sounds with rapidity; -- used of fowls as well as people; <as>as, <ex>gabbling</ex> geese</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"ble</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Loud or rapid talk without meaning.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Forthwith a hideous <qex>gabble</qex> rises loud<br/
+Among the builders.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Inarticulate sounds rapidly uttered; as of fowls.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"bler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gabbles; a prater.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"bro</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A name originally given by the Italians to a kind of serpentine, later to the rock called <altname>euphotide</altname>, and now generally used for a coarsely crystalline, igneous rock consisting of lamellar pyroxene (diallage) and labradorite, with sometimes chrysolite (olivine gabbro).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"bel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gabelle</ets>, LL. <ets>gabella</ets>, <ets>gabulum</ets>, <ets>gablum</ets>; of uncertain origin. Cf.<er>Gavel</er> tribute.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A rent, service, tribute, custom, tax, impost, or duty; an excise.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He enables St. Peter to pay his <qex>gabel</qex> by the ministry of a fish.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"bel*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A collector of gabels or taxes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga`belle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Gabel</er>.]</ety> <def>A tax, especially on salt.</def> <mark>[France]</mark> <rj><au>Brande & C.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*belle"man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gabeler.</def> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab`er*dine"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gabardine</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"er-lun`zie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gael. <ets>gabair</ets> talker + <ets>lunndair</ets> idler.]</ety> <def>A beggar with a wallet; a licensed beggar.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"ert</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf.F.<ets>gabare</ets>, Arm. <ets>kobar</ets>, <ets>gobar</ets>.]</ety> <def>A lighter, or vessel for inland navigation.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"bi*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[F., from It. <ets>gabbione</ets> a large cage, gabion, from <ets>gabbia</ets> cage, L. <ets>cavea</ets>. See <er>Cage</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>A hollow cylinder of wickerwork, like a basket without a bottom. Gabions are made of various sizes, and filled with earth in building fieldworks to shelter men from an enemy's fire.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Hydraul. Engin.)</fld> <def>An openwork frame, as of poles, filled with stones and sunk, to assist in forming a bar dyke, etc., as in harbor improvement.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga`bi*on*ade"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gabionnade</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>A traverse made with gabions between guns or on their flanks, protecting them from enfilading fire.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A structure of gabions sunk in lines, as a core for a sand bar in harbor improvements.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"bi*on*age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gabionnage</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>The part of a fortification built of gabions.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"bi*oned</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. a.</pos> <def>Furnished with gabions.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga`bion`nade"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gabionade</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A cable.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Chapman.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"ble</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gable</ets>, <ets>gabil</ets>, F. <ets>gable</ets>, fr. LL. <ets>gabalum</ets> front of a building, prob. of German or Scand. origin; cf. OHG. <ets>gibil</ets>, G. <ets>giebel</ets> gable, Icel. <ets>gafl</ets>, Goth. <ets>gibla</ets> pinnacle; perh. akin to Gr. <?/ head, and E. <ets>cephalic</ets>, or to G. <ets>gabel</ets> fork, AS. <ets>geafl</ets>, E. <ets>gaffle</ets>, L. <ets>gabalus</ets> a kind of gallows.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The vertical triangular portion of the end of a building, from the level of the cornice or eaves to the ridge of the roof. Also, a similar end when not triangular in shape, as of a gambrel roof and the like.</def> Hence: <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The end wall of a building, as distinguished from the front or rear side.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>A decorative member having the shape of a triangular gable, such as that above a Gothic arch in a doorway.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Bell gable</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Bell</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gable roof</b></col>, <cd>a double sloping roof which forms a gable at each end.</cd> -- <col><b>Gable wall</b></col>. <cd>Same as <er>Gable</er> <sd>(b)</sd>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gable window</b></col>, <cd>a window in a gable.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gabled</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>furnished or constructed with a gable; -- of a house or roof; <as>as, a <ex>gabled</ex> roof</as>. Opposite of <ant>ungabled</ant>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"blet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A small gable, or gable-shaped canopy, formed over a tabernacle, niche, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gab"lock</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gavelock</er>.]</ety> <def>A false spur or gaff, fitted on the heel of a gamecock.</def> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gabonese</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or relating to Gabon or its inhabitants; <as>as, <ex>Gabonese</ex> hills; <ex>Gabonese</ex> writers</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gabonese</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a native or inhabitant of Gabon.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"by</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gapi</ets> a rash, reckless man. Cf. <er>Gafe</er>.]</ety> <def>A simpleton; a dunce; a lout.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gad</ets>, Icel. <ets>gaddr</ets> goad, sting; akin to Sw. <ets>gadd</ets> sting, Goth. <ets>gazds</ets>, G. <ets>gerte</ets> switch. See <er>Yard</er> a measure.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The point of a spear, or an arrowhead.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A pointed or wedge-shaped instrument of metal, as a steel wedge used in mining, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I will go get a leaf of brass,<br/
+And with a <qex>gad</qex> of steel will write these words.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A sharp-pointed rod; a goad.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.</def> <rj><au>Fairholt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A wedge-shaped billet of iron or steel.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Flemish steel . . . some in bars and some in <qex>gads</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Moxon.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A rod or stick, as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. Local, U.S.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell. Bartlett.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Upon the gad</b></col>, <cd>upon the spur of the moment; hastily.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdAll this done <xex>upon the gad!</xex>\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gadded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gadding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Prob. fr. <ets>gad</ets>, <pos>n.</pos>, and orig. meaning <ets>to drive about</ets>.]</ety> <def>To walk about; to rove or go about, without purpose; hence, to run wild; to be uncontrolled.</def> \'bdThe <xex>gadding</xex> vine.\'b8 <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Why <qex>gaddest</qex> thou about so much to change thy way?</q> <rj><qau>Jer. ii. 36.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"a*bout`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gadder</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"bee`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The gadfly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who roves about idly, a rambling gossip.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ding</hw>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <def>Going about much, needlessly or without purpose.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Envy is a <qex>gadding</qex> passion, and walketh the streets.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The good nuns would check her <qex>gadding</qex> tongue.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gadding car</b></col>, <cd>in quarrying, a car which carries a drilling machine so arranged as to drill a line of holes.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ding*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a roving, idle manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"dish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Disposed to gad.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gad"dish*nes</wf>, <pos>n.</pos> \'bdGaddishness and folly.\'b8 <rj><au>Abp. Leighton.</au></rj></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gade</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Cod the fish.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A small British fish (<spn>Motella argenteola</spn>) of the Cod family.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A pike, so called at Moray Firth; -- called also <altname>gead</altname>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 607 --></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gad"er*e</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gad"re</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <def>To gather.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"fly`</hw> <pr>(g<acr/d"fl<imac/`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gadflies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[<ets>Gad</ets> + <ets>fly</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any dipterous insect of the genus <gen>Oestrus</gen>, and allied genera of botflies.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The sheep <ex>gadfly</ex> (<spn>Oestrus ovis</spn>) deposits its young in the nostrils of sheep, and the larv\'91 develop in the frontal sinuses. The common species which infests cattle (<spn>Hypoderma bovis</spn>) deposits its eggs upon or in the skin where the larv\'91 or bots live and produce sores called <xex>wormels</xex>. The <ex>gadflies</ex> of the horse produce the intestinal parasites called <xex>bots</xex>. See <er>Botfly</er>, and <er>Bots</er>. The true horseflies are often erroneously called <xex>gadflies</xex>, and the true <ex>gadflies</ex> are sometimes incorrectly called <altname>breeze flies</altname>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gadfly petrel</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>one of several small petrels of the genus <gen>Oestrelata</gen>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*dhel"ic</hw> <pr>(g<adot/*d<ecr/l"<icr/k; g<acr/d"<eit/l*<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gael</er>.]</ety> <def>Of, belonging to, or designating, that division of the Celtic languages which includes the Irish, Gaelic, and Manx.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or derived from, the cod (<gen>Gadus</gen>); -- applied to an acid obtained from cod-liver oil, viz., <ex>gadic</ex> acid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad`i*ta`ni*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Gaditanus</ets>, fr. <ets>Gades</ets> Cadiz.]</ety> <def>Of or relating to Cadiz, in Spain.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of Cadiz.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gad</ets>, n. + <ets>-ling</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Medi\'91val Armor)</fld> <mark>[R.]</mark> <def>See <er>Gad</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ling</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gad</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <def>Gadding about.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"ling</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A roving vagabond.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Rom. of R.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gadman</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gadsman.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"doid</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>gadus</ets> cod + <ets>-oid</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gado\'8bde</ets> gadoid, Gr. <?/ a sort of fish, F. <ets>gade</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the family of fishes (<fam>Gadid\'91</fam>) which includes the cod, haddock, and hake.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the <fam>Gadid\'91</fam>.</def></def2> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gadid</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad`o*lin"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Gadolinite</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare earth associated with yttria and regarded as the oxide (<chform>Gd2O3</chform>) of a metallic element, <er>gadolinium</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad`o*lin"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to or containing gadolinium.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"o*lin*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after <etsep>Gadolin</etsep>, a Russian chemist.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A mineral of a nearly black color and vitreous luster, and consisting principally of the silicates of yttrium, cerium, and iron.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad`o*lin"i*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Gadolinite</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare earth metallic element of the Lanthanide series, with a characteristic spectrum, found associated with yttrium and other rare earth elements. Symbol, <it>Gd</it>; it has an atomic number of 64, an atomic weight of 157.25 (C=12.011), and a valence of +3.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gads"man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who uses a gad or goad in driving.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"u*in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[NL. <ets>gadus</ets> codfish.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A yellow or brown amorphous substance, of indifferent nature, found in cod-liver oil.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gad"wall</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gad</ets> to walk about + <ets>well</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large duck (<spn>Anas strepera</spn>), valued as a game bird, found in the northern parts of Europe and America; -- called also <altname>gray duck</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gaddwell</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaea</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"<adot/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>Gai^a</grk>, <grk>Gh^</grk>]</ety> <fld>(Mythol.)</fld> <def>The goddess of the earth, considered as a personification of the earth. According to Hesiod she was the first-born of Chaos, and mother of Uranus, Pontus, Cronus and the Titans in ancient mythology.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>Gaia</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Gaia, Ge.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaek"war</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Also <ets>Gaikwar</ets>, <ets>Guicowar</ets>.]</ety> <ety>[Marathi <ets>g\'beekw\'ber</ets>, prop., a cowherd.]</ety> <def>The title of the ruling Prince of Baroda, in Gujarat, in Bombay, India.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gael</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.sing. & pl.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gaelic</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>A Celt or the Celts of the Scotch Highlands or of Ireland; now esp., a Scotch Highlander of Celtic origin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gael"ic</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gael. <ets>G\'85idhealach</ets>, <ets>Gaelach</ets>, from <ets>G\'85idheal</ets>, <ets>Gael</ets>, a Scotch Highlander.]</ety> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Gael, esp. to the Celtic Highlanders of Scotland; <as>as, the <ex>Gaelic</ex> language</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gael"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gael. <ets>Gaelig</ets>, <ets>G\'85ilig</ets>.]</ety> <def>The language of the Gaels, esp. of the Highlanders of Scotland. It is a branch of the Celtic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaff</hw> <pr>(g<acr/f)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaffe</ets>, F. <ets>gaffe</ets> an iron hook with which seamen pull great fishes into their ships; cf. Ir. <ets>gaf</ets>, <ets>gafa</ets> hook; perh. akin to G. <ets>gabel</ets> fork, Skr. <ets>gabhasti</ets>. Cf. <er>Gaffle</er>, <er>Gable</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A barbed spear or a hook with a handle, used by fishermen in securing heavy fish.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>The spar upon which the upper edge of a fore-and-aft sail is extended.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Gaffle</er>, 1.</def> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaff</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gaffed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaffing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To strike with a gaff or barbed spear; to secure by means of a gaff; <as>as, to <ex>gaff</ex> a salmon</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaffe</hw> <pr>(g<acr/f)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A socially awkward or tactless act.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> faux-pas, solecism, slip, gaucherie.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaf"fer</hw> <pr>(g<acr/f"f<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Possibly contr. fr. <ets>godfather</ets>; but prob. fr. <ets>gramfer</ets> for <ets>grandfather</ets>. Cf. <er>Gammer</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An old fellow; an aged rustic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Go to each <qex>gaffer</qex> and each goody.</q> <rj><qau>Fawkes.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Gaffer</xex> was originally a respectful title, now degenerated into a term of familiarity or contempt when addressed to an aged man in humble life.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A foreman or overseer of a gang of laborers.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaf"fle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. AS. <ets>geafl</ets> fork, LG., D., Sw., & Dan. <ets>gaffel</ets>, G. <ets>gabel</ets>, W. <ets>gafl</ets>, Ir. & Gael. <ets>gabhal</ets>. Cf. <er>Gaff</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An artificial spur or gaff for gamecocks.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A lever to bend crossbows.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaff`-top"sail</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A small triangular sail having its foot extended upon the gaff and its luff upon the topmast.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gagged</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gagging</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Prob. fr. W. <ets>cegio</ets> to choke or strangle, fr. <ets>ceg</ets> mouth, opening, entrance.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To stop the mouth of, by thrusting sometimes in, so as to hinder speaking; hence, to silence by authority or by violence; not to allow freedom of speech to.</def> <rj><au>Marvell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The time was not yet come when eloquence was to be <qex>gagged</qex>, and reason to be hood winked.</q> <rj><qau>Maccaulay.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To pry or hold open by means of a gag.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Mouths <qex>gagged</qex> to such a wideness.</q> <rj><qau>Fortescue (Transl.).</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To cause to heave with nausea.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To heave with nausea; to retch.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To introduce gags or interpolations. See <er>Gag</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 3.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark> <rj><au>Cornill Mag.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Something thrust into the mouth or throat to hinder speaking.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A mouthful that makes one retch; a choking bit; <as>as, a <ex>gag</ex> of mutton fat</as>.</def> <rj><au>Lamb.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A speech or phrase interpolated offhand by an actor on the stage in his part as written, usually consisting of some seasonable or local allusion.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark>
+<-- 4. a remark or act causing laughter.
+ 5. A prank. --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gag rein</b></col> <fld>(Harness)</fld>, <cd>a rein for drawing the bit upward in the horse's mouth.</cd> -- <col><b>Gag runner</b></col> <fld>(Harness)</fld>, <cd>a loop on the throat latch guiding the gag rein.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaga</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>mentally or physically infirm with age.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> doddering, senile.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>marked by foolish or unreasoning fondness; <as>as, <ex>gaga</ex> over his girlfriend</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> crazy about, dotty, enamored, infatuated, in love, smitten, soft on(predicate), taken with(predicate).</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag"ate</hw> <pr>(?; 48)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gagates</ets>. See <er>Jet</er> a black mineral.]</ety> <def>Agate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Fuller.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gage</hw> <pr>(g<amac/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gage</ets>, LL. <ets>gadium</ets>, <ets>wadium</ets>; of German origin; cf. Goth. <ets>wadi</ets>, OHG. <ets>wetti</ets>, <ets>weti</ets>, akin to E. <ets>wed</ets>. See <er>Wed</er>, and cf. <er>Wage</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A pledge or pawn; something laid down or given as a security for the performance of some act by the person depositing it, and forfeited by nonperformance; security.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Nor without <qex>gages</qex> to the needy lend.</q> <rj><qau>Sandys.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A glove, cap, or the like, cast on the ground as a challenge to combat, and to be taken up by the accepter of the challenge; a challenge; a defiance.</def> \'bdThere I throw my <xex>gage</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gage</hw> <pr>(g<amac/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[So called because an English family named <ets>Gage</ets> imported the greengage from France, in the last century.]</ety> <def>A variety of plum; <as>as, the <ex>greengage</ex>; also, the blue <ex>gage</ex>, frost <ex>gage</ex>, golden <ex>gage</ex>, etc., having more or less likeness to the greengage. See <er>Greengage</er>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gage</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gaged</conjf> <pr>(g<amac/jd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaging</conjf> <pr>(g<amac/"j<icr/ng)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gager</ets>. See <er>Gage</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, a pledge.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To give or deposit as a pledge or security for some act; to wage or wager; to pawn or pledge.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A moiety competent<br/
+Was <qex>gaged</qex> by our king.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To bind by pledge, or security; to engage.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Great debts<br/
+Wherein my time, sometimes too prodigal,<br/
+Hath left me <qex>gaged</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gage</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A measure or standard. See <er>Gauge</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gage</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To measure. See <er>Gauge</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>You shall not <qex>gage</qex> me<br/
+<qex>By what we do to-night</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"ger</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"j<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A measurer. See <er>Gauger</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag"ger</hw> <pr>(g<acr/g"g<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who gags.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Founding)</fld> <def>A piece of iron imbedded in the sand of a mold to keep the sand in place.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag"gle</hw> <pr>(g<acr/g"g'l)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gaggled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaggling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Of imitative origin; cf. D. <ets>gaggelen</ets>, <ets>gagelen</ets>, G. <ets>gackeln</ets>, <ets>gackern</ets>, MHG. <ets>g<amac/gen</ets>, E. <ets>giggle</ets>, <ets>cackle</ets>.]</ety> <def>To make a noise like a goose; to cackle.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag"gle</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gaggle</er> <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A flock of wild geese, especially when on the ground.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>A gathering of people, especially a noisy one.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>Any clustered group of related objects.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gag law</hw>. <fld>(Parliamentary Law)</fld> <def>A law or ruling prohibiting proper or free debate, as in closure.</def> <mark>[Colloq. or Cant]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gag"tooth`</hw> <pr>(g<acr/g"t<oomac/th`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <er>Gagteeth</er> <pr>(g<acr/g"t<emac/th`)</pr>.</plu> <def>A projecting tooth.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gag"-toothed"</hw> <pr>(g<acr/g"t<oomac/tht`)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having gagteeth.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gahn"ite</hw> <pr>(g<aum/n"<imac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after <persfn><etsep>Gahn</etsep></persfn>, a Swedish chemist.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Zinc spinel; automolite.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaia</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gai^a</grk> earth.]</ety> <def>Goddess of the earth; same as <er>Gaea</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Gaea, Ge.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ga*id"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gai^a</grk> earth.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to hypogeic acid; -- applied to an acid obtained from hypogeic acid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gai"e*ty</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"<esl/*t<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gayety</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gail"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A jailer.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gail`lard"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Galliard</er>.]</ety> <def>Gay; brisk; merry; galliard.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gail*liarde"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Galliard</er> a dance.]</ety> <def>A lively French and Italian dance.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gai"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gay</er>.]</ety> <def>Merrily; showily. See <er>gaily</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. W. <ets>gan</ets> a mortise.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A square or beveled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gein</ets>, <ets>gain</ets>, good, near, quick; cf. Icel. <ets>gegn</ets> ready, serviceable, and <ets>gegn</ets>, adv., against, opposite. Cf. <er>Ahain</er>.]</ety> <def>Convenient; suitable; direct; near; handy; dexterous; easy; profitable; cheap; respectable.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain</hw> <pr>(g<amac/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gain</ets>, <ets>gein</ets>, <ets>ga<yogh/hen</ets>, gain, advantage, Icel. <ets>gagn</ets>; akin to Sw. <ets>gagn</ets>, Dan. <ets>gavn</ets>, cf. Goth. <ets>gageigan</ets> to gain. The word was prob. influenced by F. <ets>gain</ets> gain, OF. <ets>gaain</ets>. Cf. <er>Gain</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That which is gained, obtained, or acquired, as increase, profit, advantage, or benefit; -- opposed to <ant>loss</ant>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>But what things were <qex>gain</qex> to me, those I counted loss for Christ.</q> <rj><qau>Phil. iii. 7.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Godliness with contentment is great <qex>gain</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>1 Tim. vi. 6.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Every one shall share in the <qex>gains</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The obtaining or amassing of profit or valuable possessions; acquisition; accumulation.</def> \'bdThe lust of <xex>gain</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Tennyson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gained</conjf> <pr>(g<amac/nd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaining</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[From <ets>gain</ets>, <pos>n.</pos> but. prob. influenced by F. <ets>gagner</ets> to earn, gain, OF. <ets>gaaignier</ets> to cultivate, OHG. <ets>weidin<omac/n</ets>, <ets>weidinen</ets> to pasture, hunt, fr. <ets>weida</ets> pasturage, G. <ets>weide</ets>, akin to Icel. <ets>vei<edh/r</ets> hunting, AS. <ets>w<amac/<edh/u</ets>, cf. L. <ets>venari</ets> to hunt, E. <ets>venison</ets>. See <er>Gain</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, profit.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To get, as profit or advantage; to obtain or acquire by effort or labor; <as>as, to <ex>gain</ex> a good living</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>What is a man profited, if he shall <qex>gain</qex> the whole world, and lose his own soul?</q> <rj><qau>Matt. xvi. 26.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To <qex>gain</qex> dominion, or to keep it <qex>gained</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>For fame with toil we <qex>gain</qex>, but lose with ease.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To come off winner or victor in; to be successful in; to obtain by competition; <as>as, to <ex>gain</ex> a battle; to <ex>gain</ex> a case at law; to <ex>gain</ex> a prize.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To draw into any interest or party; to win to one's side; to conciliate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>If he shall hear thee, thou hast <qex>gained</qex> thy brother.</q> <rj><qau>Matt. xviii. 15.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To gratify the queen, and <qex>gained</qex> the court.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To reach; to attain to; to arrive at; <as>as, to <ex>gain</ex> the top of a mountain; to <ex>gain</ex> a good harbor.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Forded Usk and <qex>gained</qex> the wood.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To get, incur, or receive, as loss, harm, or damage.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Ironical]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Ye should . . . not have loosed from Crete, and to have <qex>gained</qex> this harm and loss.</q> <rj><qau>Acts xxvii. 21.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gained day</b></col>, <cd>the calendar day gained in sailing eastward around the earth.</cd> -- <col><b>To gain ground</b></col>, <cd>to make progress; to advance in any undertaking; to prevail; to acquire strength or extent.</cd> -- <col><b>To gain over</b></col>, <cd>to draw to one's party or interest; to win over.</cd> -- <col><b>To gain the wind</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to reach the windward side of another ship.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To obtain; acquire; get; procure; win; earn; attain; achieve.</syn> <usage> See <er>Obtain</er>. -- <er>To Gain</er>, <er>Win</er>. <xex>Gain</xex> implies only that we get something by exertion; <xex>win</xex>, that we do it in competition with others. A person <xex>gains</xex> knowledge, or <xex>gains</xex> a prize, simply by striving for it; he <xex>wins</xex> a victory, or <xex>wins</xex> a prize, by taking it in a struggle with others.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress; <as>as, the sick man <ex>gains</ex> daily</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thou hast greedily <qex>gained</qex> of thy neighbors by extortion.</q> <rj><qau>Ezek. xxii. 12.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gaining twist</b></col>, <cd>in rifled firearms, a twist of the grooves, which increases regularly from the breech to the muzzle.</cd> <mcol><col><b>To gain on</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To gain upon</b></col></mcol>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To encroach on; <as>as, the ocean <ex>gains on</ex> the land</as>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To obtain influence with.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To win ground upon; to move faster than, as in a race or contest.</cd> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To get the better of; to have the advantage of.</cd><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The English have not only <qex>gained upon</qex> the Venetians in the Levant, but have their cloth in Venice itself.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj>
+</cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>My good behavior had so far <qex>gained on</qex> the emperor, that I began to conceive hopes of liberty.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[CF. F. <ets>gagnable</ets>. See <er>Gain</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>Capable of being obtained or reached.</def> <rj><au>Sherwood.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"age</hw> <pr>(?, 48)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gaignage</ets> pasturage, crop, F. <ets>gaignage</ets> pasturage. See <er>Gain</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The horses, oxen, plows, wains or wagons and implements for carrying on tillage.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The profit made by tillage; also, the land itself.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gains.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Profitable; advantageous; lucrative.</def> \'bdA <xex>gainful</xex> speculation.\'b8 <au>Macaulay.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Gain"ful*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gain"ful*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"giv`ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Again</er>, and <er>Give</er>.]</ety> <def>A misgiving.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Not producing gain; unprofitable.</def> <au>Hammond.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Gain"less/ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gain</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>Handily; readily; dexterously; advantageously.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dr. H. More.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"pain`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[F. <ets>gagner</ets> to gain + <ets>pain</ets> bread.]</ety> <def>Bread-gainer; -- a term applied in the Middle Ages to the sword of a hired soldier.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain`say"</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?; 277)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gainsaid</conjf> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gainsaying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>geinseien</ets>, <ets>ageinseien</ets>. See <er>Again</er>, and <er>Say</er> to utter.]</ety> <def>To contradict; to deny; to controvert; to dispute; to forbid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I will give you a mouth and wisdom which all your adversaries shall not be able to <qex>gainsay</qex> nor resist.</q> <rj><qau>Luke xxi. 15.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The just gods <qex>gainsay</qex><br/
+That any drop thou borrow'dst from thy mother,<br/
+My sacred aunt, should by my mortal sword<br/
+Be drained.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain`say"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gainsays, contradicts, or denies.</def> \'bdTo convince the <xex>gainsayers</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Tit. i. 9.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gains"borough hat</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A woman's broad-brimmed hat of a form thought to resemble those shown in portraits by <person>Thomas <etsep>Gainsborough</etsep></person>, the English artist (1727-88).</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"some</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Gainful.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Prepossessing; well-favored.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Massinger.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>'gainst</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prep.</pos> <def>A contraction of <er>Against</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"stand`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gainstood</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>gainstanding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[See <er>Again</er>, and <er>Stand</er>.]</ety> <def>To withstand; to resist.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Durst . . . <qex>gainstand</qex> the force of so many enraged desires.</q> <rj><qau>Sir P. Sidney.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gain"strive`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Again</er>, and <er>Strive</er>.]</ety> <def>To strive or struggle against; to withstand.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gair"fowl`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Garefowl</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gair"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos>, <hw>Gair"ish*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos>, <hw>Gair"ish/ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos></mhw> <def>Same as <er>Garish</er>, <er>Garishly</er>, <er>Garishness</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gait</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gate</er> a way.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A going; a walk; a march; a way.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Good gentleman, go your <qex>gait</qex>, and let poor folks pass.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Manner of walking or stepping; bearing or carriage while moving.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>'T is Cinna; I do know him by his <qex>gait</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gait"ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having (such) a gait; -- used in composition; <as>as, slow-<ex>gaited</ex>; heavy-<ex>gaited</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gait"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gu\'88tre</ets>, cf. Armor. <ets>gweltren</ets>; or perh. of German origin, and akin to E. <ets>wear</ets>, v.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A covering of cloth or leather for the ankle and instep, or for the whole leg from the knee to the instep, fitting down upon the shoe.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 608 --></p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A kind of shoe, consisting of cloth, and covering the ankle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gai"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To dress with gaiters.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gai"tre</hw>, <hw>Gay"tre</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"t<etil/r)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. Cf. <er>Gatten tree</er>.]</ety> <def>The dogwood tree.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gala</ets> show, pomp, fr. It. <ets>gala</ets> finery, gala; of German origin. See <er>Gallant</er>.]</ety> <def>Pomp, show, or festivity.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gala day</b></col>, <cd>a day of mirth and festivity; a holiday.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac"ta-gogue</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, milk + <?/ to lead.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An agent exciting secretion of milk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ milky, fr. <?/, <?/, milk. See <er>Galaxy</er>, and cf. <er>Lactic</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to milk; got from milk; <as>as, <ex>galactic</ex> acid</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to the galaxy or Milky Way.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galactic circle</b></col> <fld>(Astron.)</fld>, <cd>the great circle of the heavens, to which the course of the galaxy most nearly conforms.</cd> <au>Herschel.</au> -- <col><b>Galactic poles</b></col>, <cd>the poles of the galactic circle.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac"tin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, milk. Cf. <er>Lactin</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>An amorphous, gelatinous substance containing nitrogen, found in milk and other animal fluids. It resembles peptone, and is variously regarded as a coagulating or emulsifying agent.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A white waxy substance found in the sap of the South American cow tree (<gen>Galactodendron</gen>).</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>An amorphous, gummy carbohydrate resembling gelose, found in the seeds of leguminous plants, and yielding on decomposition several sugars, including galactose.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac`to*den*sim"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/ + E. <ets>densimeter</ets>.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Galactometer</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`ac*tom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, milk + <ets>-meter</ets>: cf. F. <ets>galactom\'8atre</ets>. Cf. <er>Lactometer</er>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for ascertaining the quality of milk (<it>i.e.</it>, its richness in cream) by determining its specific gravity; a lactometer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`ac*toph"a*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, milk + <?/ to eat: cf. <?/ to live on milk.]</ety> <def>One who eats, or subsists on, milk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`ac*toph"a*gous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>galactophade</ets>.]</ety> <def>Feeding on milk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`ac*toph"o*rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, <?/, milk + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear: cf. F. <ets>galactophore</ets>. Cf. <er>Lactiferous</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Milk-carrying; lactiferous; -- applied to the ducts of mammary glands.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac`to*poi*et"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, milk + <?/ capable of making; fr. <?/ to make.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Increasing the flow of milk; milk-producing.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A galactopoietic substance.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lac"tose</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A white, crystalline sugar, <chform>C6H12O6</chform>, isomeric with dextrose, obtained by the decomposition of milk sugar, and also from certain gums. When oxidized it forms mucic acid. Called also <altname>lactose</altname> (though it is not lactose proper).</def><-- lactose is a dimeric form of galactose, converted to galactose by acid or enzymatic activity (beta-galactosidase) --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lage"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Obs.)</fld> <def>See <er>Galoche</er>.</def> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*la"go</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Galagos</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of African lemurs, including numerous species.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The <stype>grand galago</stype> (<spn>Galago crassicaudata</spn>) is about the size of a cat; the <stype>mouse galago</stype> (<spn>G. murinus</spn>)is about the size of a mouse.</note></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ga*lan"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ga*lan"gal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[OE. <ets>galingale</ets>, OF. <ets>galingal</ets>, <ets>garingal</ets>, F. <ets>galanga</ets> (cf. Sp. <ets>galanga</ets>), prob. fr. Ar. <ets>khalanj<amac/n</ets>. ]</ety> <def>The pungent aromatic rhizome or tuber of certain East Indian or Chinese species of <gen>Alpinia</gen> (<spn>Alpinia Galanga</spn> and <spn>Alpinia officinarum</spn>) and of the <spn>K\'91mpferia Galanga</spn>), -- all of the Ginger family.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`a*te"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[After <ets>Galatea</ets>, a British man-of-war, the material being used for children's sailor suits.]</ety> <def>A kind of striped cotton fabric, usually of superior quality and striped with blue or red on white.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"an*tine</hw> <pr>(? or ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>galantine</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dish of veal, chickens, or other white meat, freed from bones, tied up, boiled, and served cold.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"a*pee` tree"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The West Indian <spn>Sciadophyllum Brownei</spn>, a tree with very large digitate leaves.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*la"tian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Galatia or its inhabitants. -- A native or inhabitant of Galatia, in Asia Minor; a descendant of the Gauls who settled in Asia Minor.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ax*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Galaxies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>galaxie</ets>, L. <ets>galaxias</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ (sc. <?/ circle), fr. <?/, <?/, milk; akin to L. <ets>lac</ets>. Cf. <er>Lacteal</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The Milky Way, that luminous tract, or belt, which is seen at night stretching across the heavens, and which is composed of innumerable stars, so distant and blended as to be distinguishable only with the telescope.</def> <rj><au>Nichol.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A very large collection of stars comparable in size to the Milky Way system, held together by gravitational force and separated from other such star systems by large distances of mostly empty space. Galaxies vary widely in shape and size, the most common nearby galaxies being over 70,000 light years in diameter and separated from each other by even larger distances. The number of stars in one galaxy varies, and may extend into the hundreds of billions.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A splendid or impressive assemblage of persons or things; <as>as, a <ex>galaxy</ex> of movie stars</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gal"ban</hw>, <hw>Gal"ba*num</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>galbanum</ets>, Gr. <?/, prob. from Heb. <ets>klekb'n<?/h</ets>: cf. F. <ets>galbanum</ets>.]</ety> <def>A gum resin exuding from the stems of certain Asiatic umbelliferous plants, mostly species of <gen>Ferula</gen>. The <spn>Bubon Galbanum</spn> of South Africa furnishes an inferior kind of galbanum. It has an acrid, bitter taste, a strong, unpleasant smell, and is used for medical purposes, also in the arts, as in the manufacture of varnish.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Galbe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.; OF. <ets>garbe</ets>, fr. It. <ets>garbo</ets> grace, gracefulness. See <er>Garb</er> dress.]</ety> <fld>(Art)</fld> <def>The general outward form of any solid object, as of a column or a vase.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Galbulidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A natural family of tropical American birds comprising the jacamars.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Galbulidae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw> <pr>(g<amac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. <ets>gal</ets> furious, Icel. <ets>galinn</ets>, cf. Icel. <ets>gala</ets> to sing, AS. <ets>galan</ets> to sing, Icel. <ets>galdr</ets> song, witchcraft, AS. <ets>galdor</ets> charm, sorcery, E. nightin<ets>gale</ets>; also, Icel. <ets>gj<omac/la</ets> gust of wind, <ets>gola</ets> breeze. Cf. <er>Yell</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A strong current of air; a wind between a stiff breeze and a hurricane. The most violent gales are called <stype>tempests</stype>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Gales</xex> have a velocity of from about eighteen (\'bdmoderate\'b8) to about eighty (\'bdvery heavy\'b8) miles an our.</note> <rj><au>Sir. W. S. Harris.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A moderate current of air; a breeze.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A little <qex>gale</qex> will soon disperse that cloud.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And winds of gentlest <qex>gale</qex> Arabian odors fanned<br/
+From their soft wings.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A state of excitement, passion, or hilarity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting into what, in New England, is sometimes called a <qex>gale</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Brooke (Eastford).</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Topgallant gale</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>one in which a ship may carry her topgallant sails.</cd></cs><-- add: gale warning --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To sale, or sail fast.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gal</ets>. See <er>Gale</er> wind.]</ety> <def>A song or story.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Toone.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>galan</ets>. See 1st <er>Gale</er>.]</ety> <def>To sing.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdCan he cry and <xex>gale</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Court of Love.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>gagel</ets>, akin to D. <ets>gagel</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the genus <gen>Myrica</gen>, growing in wet places, and strongly resembling the bayberry. The sweet gale (<spn>Myrica Gale</spn>) is found both in Europe and in America.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gale</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gabel</er>.]</ety> <def>The payment of a rent or annuity.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Mozley & W.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gale day</b></col>, <cd>the day on which rent or interest is due.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga"le*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a helmet.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The upper lip or helmet-shaped part of a labiate flower.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A kind of bandage for the head.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Pathol.)</fld> <def>Headache extending all over the head.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of fossil echini, having a vaulted, helmet-shaped shell.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The anterior, outer process of the second joint of the maxillae in certain insects.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"e*as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Galleass</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ga"le*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ga"le*a`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>galeatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>galeare</ets> helmet.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Wearing a helmet; protected by a helmet; covered, as with a helmet.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Helmeted; having a helmetlike part, as a crest, a flower, etc.; helmet-shaped.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga"le*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. <ets>Galeus</ets>, name of one genus, fr. Gr. <?/ a kind of shark.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>That division of elasmobranch fishes which includes the sharks.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*le"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[L. <ets>galena</ets> lead ore, dross that remains after melting lead: cf. F. <ets>gal\'8ane</ets> sulphide of lead ore, antidote to poison, stillness of the sea, calm, tranquility.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A remedy or antidote for poison; theriaca.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Parr.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Lead sulphide; the principal ore of lead. It is of a bluish gray color and metallic luster, and is cubic in crystallization and cleavage.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>False galena</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Blende</er>.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ga*len"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ga*len"ic*al</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or containing, galena.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ga*len"ic</hw>, <hw>Ga*len"ic*al</hw></mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <etsep>Galen</etsep>, the physician.]</ety> <def>Relating to <persfn>Galen</persfn> or to his principles and method of treating diseases.</def> <rj><au>Dunglison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galenic pharmacy</b></col>, <cd>that branch of pharmacy which relates to the preparation of medicines by infusion, decoction, etc., as distinguished from those which are chemically prepared.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"len*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The doctrines of Galen.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*len*ist</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A follower of Galen.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*le"nite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Galena; lead ore.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga`le*o*pi*the"cus</hw> <pr>(g<amac/`l<esl/*<osl/*p<icr/*th<emac/"k<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>gale`h</grk> a weasel + <grk>pi`qhkos</grk> an ape.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of flying Insectivora, formerly called <altname>flying lemurs</altname>. See <er>Colugo</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>galere</hw>, <hw>gal<egrave/re</hw></mhw> <pr>(g<adot/*l<etil/r)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. gallery.]</ety> <def>A group of people with some common characteristic, especially a coterie of undesirable people.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> rogue's gallery.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`er*ic"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>galericulum</ets>, dim. of <ets>galerum</ets> a hat or cap, fr. <ets>galea</ets> helmet.]</ety> <def>Covered as with a hat or cap.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"er*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>galerum</ets> a hat, cap: cf. F. <ets>gal\'82rite</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A cretaceous fossil sea urchin of the genus <gen>Galerites</gen>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*li"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Sp. <ets>Galiciano</ets>, <ets>Gallego</ets>, fr. L. <ets>Gallaecus</ets>, <ets>Gallaicus</ets>, fr. <ets>Gallaeci</ets> a people in Western Spain.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Galicia, in Spain, or to Galicia, the kingdom of Austrian Poland.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native of Galicia in Spain; -- called also <altname>Gallegan</altname>.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`i*le"an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Galileo; <as>as, the <ex>Galilean</ex> telescope</as>. See <er>Telescope</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`i*le"an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Galilaeus</ets>, fr. <ets>Galilaea</ets> Galilee, Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>galil\'82en</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or relating to Galilee.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`i*le"an</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A native or inhabitant of Galilee, the northern province of Palestine under the Romans.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Jewish Hist.)</fld> <def>One of the party among the Jews, who opposed the payment of tribute to the Romans; -- called also <altname>Gaulonite</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A Christian in general; -- used as a term of reproach by Mohammedans and Pagans.</def> <rj><au>Byron.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"i*lee</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Supposed to have been so termed in allusion to the scriptural \'bdGalilee of the Gentiles.\'b8 cf. OF. <ets>galil\'82e</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A porch or waiting room, usually at the west end of an abbey church, where the monks collected on returning from processions, where bodies were laid previous to interment, and where women were allowed to see the monks to whom they were related, or to hear divine service. Also, frequently applied to the porch of a church, as at Ely and Durham cathedrals.</def> <rj><au>Gwilt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`i*ma"tias</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Nonsense; gibberish; confused and unmeaning talk; confused mixture.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Her dress, like her talk, is a <qex>galimatias</qex> of several countries.</q> <rj><qau>Walpole.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"in*gale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Galangal</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the Sedge family (<spn>Cyperus longus</spn>) having aromatic roots; also, any plant of the same genus.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Meadow, set with slender <qex>galingale</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"i*ot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>galiote</ets>, F. <ets>galiote</ets>. See <er>Galley</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A small galley, formerly used in the Mediterranean, built mainly for speed. It was moved both by sails and oars, having one mast, and sixteen or twenty seats for rowers.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A strong, light-draft, Dutch merchant vessel, carrying a mainmast and a mizzenmast, and a large gaff mainsail.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"i*pot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>galipot</ets>; cf. OF. <ets>garipot</ets> the wild pine or pitch tree.]</ety> <def>An impure resin of turpentine, hardened on the outside of pine trees by the spontaneous evaporation of its essential oil. When purified, it is called <xex>yellow pitch</xex>, <xex>white pitch</xex>, or <xex>Burgundy pitch</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw> <pr>(g<add/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[OE. <ets>galle</ets>, <ets>gal</ets>, AS. <ets>gealla</ets>; akin to D. <ets>gal</ets>, OS. & OHG. <ets>galla</ets>, Icel. <ets>gall</ets>, SW. <ets>galla</ets>, Dan. <ets>galde</ets>, L. <ets>fel</ets>, Gr. <?/, and prob. to E. <ets>yellow</ets>. <root/49. See <er>Yellow</er>, and cf. <er>Choler</er>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found in the gall bladder, beneath the liver. It consists of the secretion of the liver, or bile, mixed with that of the mucous membrane of the gall bladder.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The gall bladder.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Anything extremely bitter; bitterness; rancor.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He hath . . . compassed me with <qex>gall</qex> and travail.</q> <rj><qau>Lam. iii. 5.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Comedy diverted without <qex>gall</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Impudence; brazen assurance.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gall bladder</b></col> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>the membranous sac, in which the bile, or gall, is stored up, as secreted by the liver; the cholecystis. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <xex>Digestive apparatus</xex>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gall duct</b></col>, <cd>a duct which conveys bile, as the cystic duct, or the hepatic duct.</cd> -- <col><b>Gall sickness</b></col>, <cd>a remitting bilious fever in the Netherlands.</cd> <au>Dunglison.</au> -- <col><b>Gall of the earth</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>an herbaceous composite plant with variously lobed and cleft leaves, usually the <spn>Prenanthes serpentaria</spn>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw> <pr>(g<add/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>galle</ets>, noix de <ets>galle</ets>, fr. L. <ets>galla</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An excrescence of any form produced on any part of a plant by insects or their larvae. They are most commonly caused by small Hymenoptera and Diptera which puncture the bark and lay their eggs in the wounds. The larvae live within the galls. Some galls are due to aphids, mites, etc. See <er>Gallnut</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The <xex>galls</xex>, or <xex>gallnuts</xex>, of commerce are produced by insects of the genus <gen>Cynips</gen>, chiefly on an oak (<spn>Quercus infectoria</spn> syn. <spn>Quercus Lusitanica</spn>) of Western Asia and Southern Europe. They contain much tannin, and are used in the manufacture of that article and for making ink and a black dye, as well as in medicine.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gall insect</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>any insect that produces galls.</cd> -- <col><b>Gall midge</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>any small dipterous insect that produces galls.</cd> -- <col><b>Gall oak</b></col>, <cd>the oak (<spn>Quercus infectoria</spn>) which yields the galls of commerce.</cd> -- <col><b>Gall of glass</b></col>, <cd>the neutral salt skimmed off from the surface of melted crown glass;- called also <altname>glass gall</altname> and <altname>sandiver</altname>.</cd> <au>Ure.</au>-- <col><b>Gall wasp</b></col>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Gallfly</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <fld>(Dyeing)</fld> <def>To impregnate with a decoction of gallnuts.</def> <rj><au>Ure.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Galled</conjf> <pr>(g<add/ld)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Galling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gallen</ets>; cf. F. <ets>galer</ets> to scratch, rub, <ets>gale</ets> scurf, scab, G. <ets>galle</ets> a disease in horses' feet, an excrescence under the tongue of horses; of uncertain origin. Cf. <er>Gall</er> gallnut.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To fret and wear away by friction; to hurt or break the skin of by rubbing; to chafe; to injure the surface of by attrition; <as>as, a saddle <ex>galls</ex> the back of a horse; to <ex>gall</ex> a mast or a cable.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I am loth to <qex>gall</qex> a new-healed wound.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To fret; to vex; <as>as, to be <ex>galled</ex> by sarcasm</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>They that are most <qex>galled</qex> with my folly,<br/
+They most must laugh.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To injure; to harass; to annoy; <as>as, the troops were <ex>galled</ex> by the shot of the enemy</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>In our wars against the French of old, we used to <qex>gall</qex> them with our longbows, at a greater distance than they could shoot their arrows.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To scoff; to jeer.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A wound in the skin made by rubbing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lant</hw> <pr>(g<acr/l"l<ait/nt)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gallant</ets>, prop. <ets>p. pr.</ets> of OF. <ets>galer</ets> to rejoice, akin to OF. <ets>gale</ets> amusement, It. <ets>gala</ets> ornament; of German origin; cf. OHG. <ets>geil</ets> merry, luxuriant, wanton, G. <ets>geil</ets> lascivious, akin to AS. <ets>g<amac/l</ets> wanton, wicked, OS. <ets>g<emac/l</ets> merry, Goth. <ets>gailjan</ets> to make to rejoice, or perh. akin to E. <ets>weal</ets>. See <er>Gala</er>, <er>Galloon</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Showy; splendid; magnificent; gay; well-dressed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The town is built in a very <qex>gallant</qex> place.</q> <rj><qau>Evelyn.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Our royal, good and <qex>gallant</qex> ship.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Noble in bearing or spirit; brave; high-spirited; courageous; heroic; magnanimous; <as>as, a <ex>gallant</ex> youth; a <ex>gallant</ex> officer.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>That <qex>gallant</qex> spirit hath aspired the clouds.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The gay, the wise, the <qex>gallant</qex>, and the grave.</q> <rj><qau>Waller.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- <er>Gallant</er>, <er>Courageous</er>, <er>Brave</er>.</syn> <usage> <xex>Courageous</xex> is generic, denoting an inward spirit which rises above fear; <xex>brave</xex> is more outward, marking a spirit which braves or defies danger; <xex>gallant</xex> rises still higher, denoting bravery on extraordinary occasions in a spirit of adventure. A <xex>courageous</xex> man is ready for battle; a <xex>brave</xex> man courts it; a <xex>gallant</xex> man dashes into the midst of the conflict.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*lant"</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Polite and attentive to ladies; courteous to women; chivalrous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*lant"</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A man of mettle or spirit; a gay, fashionable man; a young blood.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One fond of paying attention to ladies.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>One who wooes; a lover; a suitor; in a bad sense, a seducer.</def> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ In the first sense it is by some ortho\'89pists (as in Shakespeare) accented on the first syllable.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*lant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gallanted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gallanting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To attend or wait on, as a lady; <as>as, to <ex>gallant</ex> ladies to the play</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To handle with grace or in a modish manner; <as>as, to <ex>gallant</ex> a fan</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*lant"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a polite or courtly manner; like a gallant or wooer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lant*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gallant manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lant*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being gallant.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 609 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lant*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gallantries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>galanterie</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Splendor of appearance; ostentatious finery.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Guess the <qex>gallantry</qex> of our church by this . . . when the desk whereon the priest read was inlaid with plates of silver.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Bravery; intrepidity; <as>as, the troops behaved with great <ex>gallantry</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Civility or polite attention to ladies; in a bad sense, attention or courtesy designed to win criminal favors from a female; freedom of principle or practice with respect to female virtue; intrigue.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Gallant persons, collectively.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Helenus, Antenor, and all the <qex>gallantry</qex> of Troy.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- See <er>Courage</er>, and <er>Heroism</er>.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"late</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gallate</ets>. See <er>Gall</er> gallnut.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of gallic acid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"la*ture</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From L. <ets>gallus</ets> a cock.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The tread, treadle, or chalasa of an egg.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"le*ass</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gal\'82asse</ets>, <ets>gal\'82ace</ets>; cf. It. <ets>galeazza</ets>, Sp. <ets>galeaza</ets>; LL. <ets>galea</ets> a galley. See <er>Galley</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A large galley, having some features of the galleon, as broadside guns; esp., such a vessel used by the southern nations of Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries. See <er>Galleon</er>, and <er>Galley</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written variously <asp>galeas</asp>, <asp>gallias</asp>, etc.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ \'bdThe <xex>galleasses</xex> . . . were a third larger than the ordinary galley, and rowed each by three hundred galley slaves. They consisted of an enormous towering structure at the stern, a castellated structure almost equally massive in front, with seats for the rowers amidships.\'b8</note> <rj><au>Motley.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gal*le"gan</hw> <pr>(g<acr/l*l<emac/"g<ait/n)</pr>, <hw>Gal*le"go</hw> <pr>(g<acr/l*l<emac/"g<osl/ or g<adot/*ly<amac/"g<osl/)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>Gallego</ets>.]</ety> <def>A native or inhabitant of Galicia, in Spain; a Galician.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"le*\'8bn</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pyro<ets>gall</ets>ol + phthal<ets>e\'8bn</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A red crystalline dyestuff, obtained by heating together pyrogallic and phthalic acids.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"le*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>galeon</ets>, cf. F. <ets>galion</ets>; fr. LL. <ets>galeo</ets>, <ets>galio</ets>. See <er>Galley</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A sailing vessel of the 15th and following centuries, often having three or four decks, and used for war or commerce. The term is often rather indiscriminately applied to any large sailing vessel.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>galleons</qex> . . . were huge, round-stemmed, clumsy vessels, with bulwarks three or four feet thick, and built up at stem and stern, like castles.</q> <rj><qau>Motley.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"le*ot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>See <er>Galiot</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ler*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Galleries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>galerie</ets>, It. <ets>galleria</ets>, fr. LL. <ets>galeria</ets> gallery, perh. orig., a festal hall, banquetting hall; cf. OF. <ets>galerie</ets> a rejoicing, fr. <ets>galer</ets> to rejoice. Cf. <er>Gallant</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A long and narrow corridor, or place for walking; a connecting passageway, as between one room and another; also, a long hole or passage excavated by a boring or burrowing animal.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A room for the exhibition of works of art; <as>as, a picture <ex>gallery</ex></as>; hence, also, a large or important collection of paintings, sculptures, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A long and narrow platform attached to one or more sides of public hall or the interior of a church, and supported by brackets or columns; -- sometimes intended to be occupied by musicians or spectators, sometimes designed merely to increase the capacity of the hall.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A frame, like a balcony, projecting from the stern or quarter of a ship, and hence called <altname>stern gallery</altname> or <altname>quarter gallery</altname>, -- seldom found in vessels built since 1850.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>Any communication which is covered overhead as well as at the sides. When prepared for defense, it is a <stype>defensive gallery</stype>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>A working drift or level.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Whispering gallery</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Whispering</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"le*tyle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gallytile</ets>. Cf. <er>Gallipot</er>.]</ety> <def>A little tile of glazed earthenware.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdThe substance of <xex>galletyle</xex>.\'bd <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ley</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Galleys</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>gale</ets>, <ets>galeie</ets> (cf. OF. <ets>galie</ets>, <ets>gal\'82e</ets>, LL. <ets>galea</ets>, LGr. <?/; of unknown origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A vessel propelled by oars, whether having masts and sails or not</def>; as: <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A large vessel for war and national purposes; -- common in the Middle Ages, and down to the 17th century.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A name given by analogy to the Greek, Roman, and other ancient vessels propelled by oars.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>A light, open boat used on the Thames by customhouse officers, press gangs, and also for pleasure.</def> <sd>(d)</sd> <def>One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The typical galley of the Mediterranean was from one hundred to two hundred feet long, often having twenty oars on each side. It had two or three masts rigged with lateen sails, carried guns at prow and stern, and a complement of one thousand to twelve hundred men, and was very efficient in mediaeval warfare. Galleons, galliots, galleasses, half galleys, and quarter galleys were all modifications of this type.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel; -- sometimes on merchant vessels called the <altname>caboose</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An oblong oven or muffle with a battery of retorts; a gallery furnace.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <ety>[F. <ets>gal\'82e</ets>; the same word as E. <ets>galley</ets> a vessel.]</ety> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>An oblong tray of wood or brass, with upright sides, for holding type which has been set, or is to be made up, etc.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A proof sheet taken from type while on a galley; a galley proof.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galley slave</b></col>, <cd>a person condemned, often as a punishment for crime, to work at the oar on board a galley.</cd> \'bdTo toil like a <xex>galley slave</xex>.\'b8 <au>Macaulay.</au>-- <col><b>Galley slice</b></col> <fld>(Print.)</fld>, <cd>a sliding false bottom to a large galley.</cd> <au>Knight.</au></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ley-bird`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European green woodpecker, called also the <altname>yaffle</altname>; also, the spotted woodpecker.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ley-worm`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. so called because the numerous legs along the sides move rhythmically like the oars of a galley.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A chilognath myriapod of the genus <gen>Iulus</gen>, and allied genera, having numerous short legs along the sides; a milliped or \'bdthousand legs.\'b8 See <er>Chilognatha</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall"fly`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gallflies</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An insect that deposits its eggs in plants, and occasions galls, esp. any small hymenopteran of the genus <gen>Cynips</gen> and allied genera. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Gall</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`li*am"bic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>galliambus</ets> a song used by the priests of Cybele; <ets>Gallus</ets> (a name applied to these priests) + <ets>iambus</ets>]</ety> <fld>(Pros.)</fld> <def>Consisting of two iambic dimeters catalectic, the last of which lacks the final syllable; -- said of a kind of verse.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gallic</er>.]</ety> <def>Gallic; French.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"liard</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE., fr. F. <ets>gaillard</ets>, perh. of Celtic origin; cf. Ir. & Gael. <ets>galach</ets> valiant, or AS. <ets>gagol</ets>, <ets>geagl</ets>, wanton, lascivious.]</ety> <def>Gay; brisk; active.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"liard</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A brisk, gay man.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Selden is a <qex>galliard</qex> by himself.</q> <rj><qau>Cleveland.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"liard</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gaillarde</ets>, cf. Sp. <ets>gallarda</ets>. See <er>Galliard</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>A gay, lively dance. Cf. <er>Gailliarde</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Never a hall such a <qex>galliard</qex> did grace.</q> <rj><qau>Sir. W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`liard*ise</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gaillardise</ets>. See <er>Galliard</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>Excessive gayety; merriment.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The mirth and <qex>galliardise</qex> of company.</q> <rj><qau>Sir. T. Browne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"liard*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gayety.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Gayton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*ass</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Galleass</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gallium</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or containing, gallium.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lic</hw> <pr>(277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gall</er> the excrescence.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to, or derived from, galls, nutgalls, and the like.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gallic acid</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>an organic acid, very widely distributed in the vegetable kingdom, being found in the free state in galls, tea, etc., and produced artificially. It is a white, crystalline substance, <chform>C6H2(HO)3.CO2H</chform>, with an astringent taste, and is a strong reducing agent, as employed in photography. It is usually prepared from tannin, and both give a dark color with iron salts, forming tannate and gallate of iron, which are the essential ingredients of common black ink.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Gallicus</ets> belonging to the Gauls, fr. <ets>Galli</ets> the Gauls, <ets>Gallia</ets> Gaul, now France: cf. F. <ets>gallique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to Gaul or France; Gallican.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*can</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Gallicanus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gallican</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Gaul or France; Gallic; French; <as>as, the <ex>Gallican</ex> church or clergy</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*can</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An adherent to, and supporter of, Gallicanism.</def> <rj><au>Shipley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*can*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The principles, tendencies, or action of those, within the Roman Catholic Church in France, who (esp. in 1682) sought to restrict the papal authority in that country and increase the power of the national church.</def> <rj><au>Schaff-Herzog Encyc.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*cism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gallicisme</ets>.]</ety> <def>A mode of speech peculiar to the French; a French idiom; also, in general, a French mode or custom.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*cize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gallicized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gallicizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To conform to the French mode or idiom.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lied</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. p. & a.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>Worried; flurried; frightened.</def> <rj><au>Ham. Nav. Encyc.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*form</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like the Gallinae (or <ord>Galliformes</ord>) in structure.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`li*gas"kins</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Prob. corrupted fr. It. <ets>Grechesco</ets> Grecian, a name which seems to have been given in Venice, and to have been afterwards confused with <ets>Gascony</ets>, as if they came from Gascony.]</ety> <def>Loose hose or breeches; leather leg quards. The word is used loosely and often in a jocose sense.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gal`li*ma"ti*a</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Senseless talk. <mark>[Obs. or R.]</mark> See <er>Galimatias</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`li*mau"fry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gallimaufries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>galimafr\'82e</ets> a sort of ragout or mixed hash of different meats.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A hash of various kinds of meats, a ragout.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Delighting in hodge-podge, <qex>gallimaufries</qex>, forced meat.</q> <rj><qau>King.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Any absurd medley; a hotchpotch.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The Mahometan religion, which, being a <qex>gallimaufry</qex> made up of many, partakes much of the Jewish.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A substance obtained by the reduction of galle\'8bn.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gal"li*nace*ae</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Gallinaceous</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Gallinae</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`li*na"cean</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Gallinae or gallinaceous birds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`li*na"ceous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos><ety>[L. <ets>gallinaceus</ets>, fr. <ets>gallina</ets> hen, fr. <ets>gallus</ets> cock.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Resembling the domestic fowls and pheasants; of or pertaining to the Gallinae.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gal*li"nae</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it></plu> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>gallina</ets> a hen, <ets>gallus</ets> a cock.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of birds, including the common domestic fowls, pheasants, grouse, quails, and allied forms; -- sometimes called <altname><ord>Rasores</ord></altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gallinago</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A genus of birds consisting of certain of the snipes.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gallinago</gen>, Capella, genus <gen>Capella</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Fitted to gall or chafe; vexing; harassing; irritating.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gall"ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*nip`per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A large mosquito.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*nule</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gallinula</ets> chicken, dim. of <ets>gallina</ets> hen: cf. F. <ets>gallinule</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several wading birds, having long, webless toes, and a frontal shield, belonging to the family <fam>Rallidae</fam>. They are remarkable for running rapidly over marshes and on floating plants. The purple gallinule of America is <spn>Ionornis Martinica</spn>, that of the Old World is <spn>Porphyrio porphyrio</spn>. The common European gallinule (<spn>Gallinula chloropus</spn>) is also called <altname>moor hen</altname>, <altname>water hen</altname>, <altname>water rail</altname>, <altname>moor coot</altname>, <altname>night bird</altname>, and erroneously <altname>dabchick</altname>. Closely related to it is the Florida gallinule (<spn>Gallinula galeata</spn>).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The purple gallinule of Southern Europe and Asia was formerly believed to be able to detect and report adultery, and for that reason, chiefly, it was commonly domesticated by the ancients.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*ot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Galiot</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*lip"o*li oil`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>An inferior kind of olive oil, brought from Gallipoli, in Italy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*pot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. fr. OD. <ets>gleypot</ets>, the first part of which is possibly akin to E. <ets>glad</ets>. See <er>Glad</er>, and <er>Pot</er>.]</ety> <def>A glazed earthen pot or vessel, used by druggists and apothecaries for containing medicines, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.; perh. fr. L. <ets>Gallia</ets> France.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare metallic element, found combined in certain zinc ores. It is white, hard, and malleable, resembling aluminium, and remarkable for its low melting point (86\'f8 F., 30\'f8 C.). Symbol, <it>Ga</it>; at. wt., 69.9. Gallium is chiefly trivalent, resembling aluminium and indium. It was predicted with most of its properties, under the name <xex>eka-aluminium</xex>, by the Russian chemist Mendelyeev on the basis of the periodic law. This prediction was verified in its discovery (in 1875) by the French chemist Lecoq de Boisbaudran by its characteristic spectrum (two violet lines), in an examination of a zinc blende from the Pyrenees.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*vant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gallant</er>.]</ety> <def>To play the beau; to wait upon the ladies; also, to roam about for pleasure without any definite plan.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark> <rj><au>Dickens.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*vat</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[Prob. fr. Pg. <ets>galeota</ets>; cf. E. <ets>galiot</ets>, <ets>galley</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A small armed vessel, with sails and oars, -- used on the Malabar coast.</def> <rj><au>A. Chalmers.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"li*wasp`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A West Indian lizard (<spn>Celestus occiduus</spn>), about a foot long, imagined by the natives to be venomous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gallized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gallizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[After <person>Dr. L. <etsep>Gall</etsep></person>, a French chemist, who invented the process.]</ety> <def>In wine making, to add water and sugar to (unfermented grape juice) so as to increase the quantity of wine produced.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gal`li*za"tion</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall"nut`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A round gall produced on the leaves and shoots of various species of the oak tree. See <er>Gall</er>, and <er>Nutgall</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gall-of-the-earth</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A common perennial herb (<spn>Nabalus serpentarius</spn>) widely distributed in southern and eastern U. S., having drooping clusters of pinkish flowers and thick basal leaves suggesting a lion's foot in shape; sometimes placed in the genus <gen>Prenanthes</gen>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> lion's foot, gall of the earth, <spn>Nabalus serpentarius</spn>, <spn>Prenanthes serpentaria</spn>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`lo*ma"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Galli</ets> Gauls + <ets>mania</ets> madness.]</ety> <def>An excessive admiration of what is French.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gal`lo*ma"ni*ac</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF <ets>galon</ets>, <ets>jalon</ets>, LL. <ets>galo</ets>, <ets>galona</ets>, fr. <ets>galum</ets> a liquid measure; cf. F. <ets>jale</ets> large bowl. Cf. <er>Gill</er> a measure.]</ety> <def>A measure of capacity, containing four quarts; -- used, for the most part, in liquid measure, but sometimes in dry measure.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The <xex>standart gallon</xex> of the Unites States contains 231 cubic inches, or 8.3389 pounds avoirdupois of distilled water at its maximum density, and with the barometer at 30 inches. This is almost exactly equivalent to a cylinder of seven inches in diameter and six inches in height, and is the same as the old English <xex>wine gallon</xex>. The <xex>beer gallon</xex>, now little used in the United States, contains 282 cubic inches. The English <xex>imperial gallon</xex> contains 10 pounds avoirdupois of distilled water at 62<?/ of Fahrenheit, and barometer at 30 inches, equal to 277.274 cubic inches.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*loon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From F. or Sp. <ets>galon</ets>. See <er>Gala</er>. ]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A narrow tapelike fabric used for binding hats, shoes, etc., -- sometimes made ornamental.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A similar bordering or binding of rich material, such as gold lace.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Silver and gold <qex>galloons</qex>, with the like glittering gewgaws.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*looned`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Furnished or adorned with galloon.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lop</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Galloped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Galloping</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>galopen</ets>, F. <ets>galoper</ets>, of German origin; cf. assumed Goth. <ets>ga-hlaupan</ets> to run, OHG. <ets>giloufen</ets>, AS. <ets>gehle\'a0pan</ets> to leap, dance, fr. root of E. <ets>leap</ets>, and a prefix; or cf. OFlem. <ets>walop</ets> a gallop. See <er>Leap</er>, and cf. 1st <er>Wallop</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To move or run in the mode called a gallop; as a horse; to go at a gallop; to run or move with speed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>But <qex>gallop</qex> lively down the western hill.</q> <rj><qau>Donne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 610 --></p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To ride a horse at a gallop.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Fig.: To go rapidly or carelessly, as in making a hasty examination.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Such superficial ideas he may collect in <qex>galloping</qex> over it.</q> <rj><qau>Locke.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lop</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To cause to gallop.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lop</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>galop</ets>. See <er>Gallop</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>, and cf. <er>Galop</er>.]</ety> <def>A mode of running by a quadruped, particularly by a horse, by lifting alternately the fore feet and the hind feet, in successive leaps or bounds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Hand gallop</b></col>, <cd>a slow or gentle gallop.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lo*pade`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>galopade</ets>. See <er>Gallop</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>I horsemanship, a sidelong or curveting kind of gallop.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A kind of dance; also, music to the dance; a galop.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`lo*pade"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gallopaded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gallopading</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To gallop, as on horseback.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To perform the dance called gallopade.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lop*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who, or that which, gallops.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>A carriage on which very small guns were formerly mounted, the gun resting on the shafts, without a limber.</def> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galloper gun</b></col>, <cd>a light gun, supported on a galloper, -- formerly attached to British infantry regiments.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lo*pin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><ety>[F. <ets>galopin</ets>. See <er>Gallop</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <def>An under servant for the kitchen; a scullion; a cook's errand boy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lop*ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Going at a gallop; progressing rapidly; <as>as, a <ex>galloping</ex> horse</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`lo*tan"nic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gall</ets> nutgall + <ets>tannic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the tannin or nutgalls.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gallotannic acid</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Tannic acid</cref>, under <er>Tannic</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"low</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. AS. <ets>\'begelwan</ets> to stupefy.]</ety> <def>To fright or terrify. See <er>Gally</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lo*way</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small horse of a breed raised at <xex>Galloway</xex>, Scotland; -- called also <altname>garran</altname>, and <altname>garron</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"low*glass`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ir. <ets>galloglach</ets>. Cf. <er>Gillie</er>.]</ety> <def>A heavy-armed foot soldier from Ireland and the Western Isles in the time of Edward <?/</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"lows</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. sing.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gallowses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr> <it>or</it> <plw>Gallows</plw>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>galwes</ets>, pl., AS. <ets>galga</ets>, <ets>gealga</ets>, gallows, cross; akin to D. <ets>galg</ets> gallows, OS. & OHG. <ets>galgo</ets>, G. <ets>galgen</ets>, Icel. <ets>g\'belgi</ets>, Sw. & Dan. <ets>galge</ets>, Goth. <ets>galga</ets> a cross. Etymologically and historically considered, <ets>gallows</ets> is a noun in the plural number, but it is used as a singular, and hence is preceded by <it>a</it>; <as>as, <ex>a gallows</ex></as>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A frame from which is suspended the rope with which criminals are executed by hanging, usually consisting of two upright posts and a crossbeam on the top; also, a like frame for suspending anything.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>So they hanged Haman on the <qex>gallows</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Esther vii. 10.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>If I hang, I'll make a fat pair of <qex>gallows</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>O, there were desolation of gaolers and <qex>gallowses</qex>!</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A wretch who deserves the gallows.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>The rest for the tympan when raised.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>A pair of suspenders or braces.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gallows bird</b></col>, <cd>a person who deserves the gallows.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> -- <col><b>Gallows bitts</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>one of two or more frames amidships on deck for supporting spare spars; -- called also <altname>gallows</altname>, <altname>gallows top</altname>, <altname>gallows frame</altname>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gallows frame</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>The frame supporting the beam of an engine.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <cd>Gallows bitts.</cd> -- <col><b>Gallows tree</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Gallow tree</b></col>, <cd>the gallows.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q> At length him nail\'82d on a <qex>gallow tree</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gallowstree</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>same as <er>gallows</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gallows, gibbet, gallows tree, gallow tree.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall"stone`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A concretion, or calculus, formed in the gall bladder or biliary passages. See <er>Calculus</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 1.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gallow</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>To frighten; to worry.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>T. Brown.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gall"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like gall; bitter as gall.</def> <rj><au>Cranmer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Galley</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`ly*gas"kins</hw>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>See <er>Galligaskins</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ga*loche"</hw>, <hw>Ga*loshe"</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <ety>[OE. <ets>galoche</ets>, <ets>galache</ets>, <ets>galage</ets>, shoe, F. <ets>galoche</ets> galoche, perh. altered fr. L. <ets>gallica</ets> a Gallic shoe, or fr. LL. <ets>calopedia</ets> wooden shoe, or shoe with a wooden sole, Gr. <?/, dim. of <?/, <?/, a shoemaker's last; <?/ wood + <?/ foot.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A clog or patten.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Nor were worthy [to] unbuckle his <qex>galoche</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>An overshoe worn in wet weather, especially a waterproof rubber overshoe extending over the ankle, worn over one's regular shoes; now usually written <asp>galosh</asp>. It is used mostly in the plural.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A gaiter, or legging, covering the upper part of the shoe and part of the leg.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*loot"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A noisy, swaggering, or worthless fellow; a rowdy.</def> <mark>[Slang, U. S.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"op</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A kind of lively dance, in 2-4 time; also, the music to the dance.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*lore"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & a.</pos> <ety>[Scot. <ets>gelore</ets>, <ets>gilore</ets>, <ets>galore</ets>, fr. <ets>Gael</ets>. <ets>gu le\'95r</ets>, enough; <ets>gu-</ets> to, also an adverbial prefix + <ets>le\'95r</ets>, <ets>le\'95ir</ets>, enough; or fr. Ir. <ets>goleor</ets>, the same word.]</ety> <def>Plenty; abundance; in abundance.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*losh"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Galoche</er>, <er>Galoshe</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A strip of material, as leather, running around a shoe at and above the sole, as for protection or ornament.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*loshe"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Galoche</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Galpe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To gape,; to yawn.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"some</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gall</ets> bitterness + <ets>some</ets>.]</ety> <def>Angry; malignant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Morton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Galt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gault</er>.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Gault</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <ets>Galvani</ets>, a professor of physiology at Bologna, on account of his connection (about 1780) with the discovery of dynamical or current electricity: cf. F. <ets>galvanique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to, or exhibiting the phenomena of, galvanism; employing or producing electrical currents.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galvanic battery</b></col> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <cd>an apparatus for generating electrical currents by the mutual action of certain liquids and metals; -- now usually called <altname>voltaic battery</altname>. See <er>Battery</er>.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Galvanic circuit</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Galvanic circle</b></col></mcol>. <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Circuit</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Galvanic pile</b></col> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <cd>the voltaic pile. See under <er>Voltaic</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"va*nism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <ets>Galvani</ets>: cf. F. <ets>galvanisme</ets>. See <er>Galvanic</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Electricity excited by the mutual action of certain liquids and metals; dynamical electricity.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The branch of physical science which treats of dynamical elecricity, or the properties and effects of electrical currents.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The words <xex>galvanism</xex> and <xex>galvanic</xex>, formerly in very general use, are now rarely employed. For the latter, <xex>voltaic</xex>, from the name of <xex>Volta</xex>, is commonly used.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"va*nist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One versed in galvanism.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"va*niza`tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of process of galvanizing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"va*nize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Galvanized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Galvanizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>galvaniser</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To affect with galvanism; to subject to the action of electrical currents.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To plate, as with gold, silver, etc., by means of electricity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To restore to consciousness by galvanic action (as from a state of suspended animation); hence, to stimulate or excite to a factitious animation or activity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To coat, as iron, with zinc. See <cref>Galvanized iron</cref>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Galvanized iron</b></col>, <cd>formerly, iron coated with zink by electrical deposition; now more commonly, iron coated with zink by plunging into a bath of melted zink, after its surface has been cleaned by friction with the aid of dilute acid.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"va*ni`zer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, galvanize.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*caus"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>caustic</ets>.]</ety> <def>Relating to the use of galvanic heat as a caustic, especially in medicine.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*cau"ter*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Cautery effected by a knife or needle heated by the passage of a galvanic current.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nog"ly*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + Gr. <?/ to engrave.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Glyphography</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van"o*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Engraving)</fld> <def>A copperplate produced by the method of galvanography; also, a picture printed from such a plate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*graph"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to galvanography.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nog"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-graphy</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The art or process of depositing metals by electricity; electrotypy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A method of producing by means of electrotyping process (without etching) copperplates which can be printed from in the same manner as engraved plates.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nol"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who describes the phenomena of galvanism; a writer on galvanism.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <def>A treatise on galvanism, or a description of its phenomena.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-meter</ets>: cf. F. <ets>galvanom\'8atre</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>An instrument or apparatus for measuring the intensity of an electric current, usually by the deflection of a magnetic needle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Differential galvanometer</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Differental</er>, <pos>a.</pos></cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Sine galvanometer</b></col>, <col><b>Cosine galvanometer</b></col>, <col><b>Tangent galvanometer</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <cd>a galvanometer in which the sine, cosine, or tangent respectively, of the angle through which the needle is deflected, is proportional to the strength of the current passed through the instrument.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*met"ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of, pertaining to, or measured by, a galvanometer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nom"e*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or process of measuring the force of electric currents.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*plas"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-plastic</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the art or process of electrotyping; employing, or produced by, the process of electolytic deposition; <as>as, a <ex>galvano-plastic</ex> copy of a medal or the like</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van"o*plas`ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>galanoplastie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The art or process of electrotypy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*punc"ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Electro-puncture</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + <ets>-scope</ets>: cf. F. <ets>galvanoscope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>An instrument or apparatus for detecting the presence of electrical currents, especially such as are of feeble intensity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal*van`o*scop"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to a galvanoscope.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*nos"co*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The use of galvanism in physiological experiments.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gal`va*not"o*nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. E. <ets>galvanic</ets> + Gr. <?/ to tone.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Electrotonus</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal`va*not"ro*pism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Galvanic</ets> + Gr. <?/ to turn.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The tendency of a root to place its axis in the line of a galvanic current.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gal"wes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gallows.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Orig. uncert., perh. from <ets>gammon</ets>, talk.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A herd, or school, of whales.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A visit between whalers at sea; a holding of social intercourse between those on different vessels at sea, or (<mark>Local U. S.</mark>) between persons ashore.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A visit between whalers at sea; a holding of social intercourse between those on different vessels at sea, or (<mark>Local U. S.</mark>) between persons ashore.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[fr. <ets>gamba</ets> leg.]</ety> <def>a leg.</def> <mark>[slang]</mark><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gammed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gam"ming</conjf>.]</vmorph> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>To gather in a gam; -- said of whales.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>To engage in a gam, or (<mark>Local, U. S.</mark>) in social intercourse anywhere.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To have a gam with; to pay a visit to, esp. among whalers at sea.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"ma grass`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[From <ets>Gama</ets>, a cluster of the Maldive Islands.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A species of grass (<spn>Tripsacum dactyloides</spn>) tall, stout, and exceedingly productive; cultivated in the West Indies, Mexico, and the Southern States of North America as a forage grass; -- called also <altname>sesame grass</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*mash"es</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gamaches</ets>.]</ety> <def>High boots or buskins; in Scotland, short spatterdashes or riding trousers, worn over the other clothing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gam"ba</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A viola da gamba.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam*ba"does</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[I. or Sp. <ets>gamba</ets> leg. See <er>Gambol</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Gamashes</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>His thin legs tenanted a pair of <qex>gambadoes</qex> fastened at the side with rusty clasps.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam*beer"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gambier</ets> a kind of hook.]</ety> <fld>(Fishing)</fld> <def>To gaff, as mackerel.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"be*son</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gambison</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Fr. <ets>gambette</ets>, or It. <ets>gambetta</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any bird of the genuis <xex>Totanus</xex>. See <er>Tattler</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bier</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Malayan.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The inspissated juice of a plant (<spn>Uncaria Gambir</spn>) growing in Malacca. It is a powerful astringent, and, under the name of <spn>Terra Japonica</spn>, is used for chewing with the Areca nut, and is exported for tanning and dyeing.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Catechu.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gambeer</asp> and <asp>gambir</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bi*son</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gambeson</ets>, <ets>gambaison</ets>, fr. <ets>gambais</ets>, <ets>wambais</ets>, of German origin: cf. MHG. <ets>wambeis</ets>, G. <ets>wams</ets> doublet, fr. OHG. w<ets>amba</ets>, stomach. See <er>Womb</er>.]</ety> <def>A defensive garment formerly in use for the body, made of cloth stuffed and quilted.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>gamba</ets> leg.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A performer upon the <xex>viola di gamba</xex>. See under <er>Viola</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bit</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gambit</ets>, cf. It. <ets>gambitto</ets> gambit, a tripping up. See <er>Gambol</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Chess Playing)</fld> <def>A mode of opening the game, in which a pawn is sacrificed to gain an attacking position.</def>
+<-- Hence, Fig. any stratagem; in conversation, a remark, often prepared in advance, calculated to provoke discussion, amuse, or make a point = a conversational gambit --> <br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gambled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gambling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Dim. of <ets>game</ets>. See 2d <er>Game</er>.]</ety> <def>To play or game for money or other stake.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gamble</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To lose or squander by gaming; -- usually with <xex>away</xex>.</def> \'bdBankrupts or sots who have <xex>gambled</xex> or slept away their estates.\'b8 <rj><au>Ames.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An act of gambling; a transaction or proceeding involving gambling; hence, anything involving similar risk or uncertainty.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gambles.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gambling</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[p. pr. of <er>gamble</er>.]</ety> <def>the act of playing for stakes in the hope of winning (including the payment of a price for a chance to win a prize); <as>as, his <ex>gambling</ex> cost him a fortune</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gaming, play.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam*boge"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A concrete juice, or gum resin, produced by several species of trees in Siam, Ceylon, and Malabar. It is brought in masses, or cylindrical rolls, from <xex>Cambodia</xex>, or <etsep>Cambogia</etsep>, -- whence its name. The best kind is of a dense, compact texture, and of a beatiful reddish yellow. Taken internally, it is a strong and harsh cathartic and emetic.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>camboge</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ There are several kinds of gamboge, but all are derived from species of <gen>Garcinia</gen>, a genus of trees of the order <ord>Guttifer\'91</ord>. The best Siam gamboge is thought to come from <prodby><spn>Garcinia Hanburii</spn></prodby>. Ceylon gamboge is from <prodby><spn>G. Morella</spn></prodby>. <prodby><spn>G. pictoria</spn></prodby>, of Western India, yields <ex>gamboge</ex>, and also a kind of oil called <xex>gamboge butter</xex>.</note></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gam*bo"gi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gambogic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, resembling, or containing, gamboge.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bol</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gambolde</ets>, <ets>gambaulde</ets>, F. <ets>gambade</ets>, gambol, fr. It. <ets>gambata</ets> kick, fr. L. <ets>gamba</ets> leg, akin to F. <ets>jambe</ets>, OF. also, <ets>gambe</ets>, fr. L. <ets>gamba</ets>, hoof or perh. joint: cf. Gr. <?/ a binding, winding, W., Ir. & Gael. <ets>cam</ets> crooked; perhaps akin to E. <ets>chamber</ets>: cf.F. <ets>gambiller</ets> to kick about. Cf. <er>Jamb</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, <er>Gammon</er> ham, <er>Gambadoes</er>.]</ety> <def>A skipping or leaping about in frolic; a hop; a sportive prank.</def> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"bol</hw> <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gamboled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>, or <conjf>Gambolled</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gamboling</conjf> or <conjf>Gambolling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To dance and skip about in sport; to frisk; to skip; to play in frolic, like boys or lambs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"brel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gambe</ets>, <ets>jambe</ets> leg, F. <ets>jambe</ets>. Cf. <er>Cambrel</er>, <er>Chambrel</er>, and see <er>Gambol</er>. <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The hind leg of a horse.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A stick crooked like a horse's hind leg; -- used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gambrel roof</b></col> <fld>(Arch.)</fld>, <cd>a curb roof having the same section in all parts, with a lower steeper slope and an upper and flatter one, so that each gable is pentagonal in form.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"brel</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To truss or hang up by means of a gambrel.</def> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam*broon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of twilled linen cloth for lining.</def> <rj><au>Simmonds.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gambusia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A genus of fish including some of the mosquitofish.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gambusia</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. W. <ets>cam</ets> crooked, and E. <ets>gambol</ets>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>Crooked; lame; <as>as, a <ex>game</ex> leg</as>.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>game</ets>, <ets>gamen</ets>, AS. <ets>gamen</ets>, <ets>gomen</ets>, play, sport; akin to OS., OHG., & Icel. <ets>gaman</ets>, Dan. <ets>gammen</ets> mirth, merriment, OSw. <ets>gamman</ets> joy. Cf. <er>Gammon</er> a game, <er>Backgammon</er>, <er>Gamble</er> <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Sport of any kind; jest, frolic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>We have had pastimes here, and pleasant <qex>game</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A contest, physical or mental, according to certain rules, for amusement, recreation, or for winning a stake; <as>as, a <ex>game</ex> of chance; <ex>games</ex> of skill; field <ex>games</ex>, etc.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>But war's a <qex>game</qex>, which, were their subject wise,<br/
+Kings would not play at.</q> <rj><qau>Cowper.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Among the ancients, especially the Greeks and Romans, there were regularly recurring public exhibitions of strength, agility, and skill under the patronage of the government, usually accompanied with religious ceremonies. Such were the Olympic, the Pythian, the Nemean, and the Isthmian <xex>games</xex>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The use or practice of such a game; a single match at play; a single contest; <as>as, a <ex>game</ex> at cards</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Talk the <qex>game</qex> o'er between the deal.</q> <rj><qau>Lloyd.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>That which is gained, as the stake in a game; also, the number of points necessary to be scored in order to win a game; <as>as, in short whist five points are <ex>game</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Card Playing)</fld> <def>In some games, a point credited on the score to the player whose cards counts up the highest.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A scheme or art employed in the pursuit of an object or purpose; method of procedure; projected line of operations; plan; project.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Your murderous <qex>game</qex> is nearly up.</q> <rj><qau>Blackw. Mag.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It was obviously Lord Macaulay's <qex>game</qex> to blacken the greatest literary champion of the cause he had set himself to attack.</q> <rj><qau>Saintsbury.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Animals pursued and taken by sportsmen; wild meats designed for, or served at, table.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Those species of animals . . . distinguished from the rest by the well-known appellation of <qex>game</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Blackstone.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Confidence game</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Confidence</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To make game of</b></col>, <cd>to make sport of; to mock.</cd> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having a resolute, unyielding spirit, like the gamecock; ready to fight to the last; plucky.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I was <qex>game</qex> . . . .I felt that I could have fought even to the death.</q> <rj><qau>W. Irving.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to such animals as are hunted for game, or to the act or practice of hunting.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Game bag</b></col>, <cd>a sportsman's bag for carrying small game captured; also, the whole quantity of game taken.</cd> -- <col><b>Game bird</b></col>, <cd>any bird commonly shot for food, esp. grouse, partridges, quails, pheasants, wild turkeys, and the shore or wading birds, such as plovers, snipe, woodcock, curlew, and sandpipers. The term is sometimes arbitrarily restricted to birds hunted by sportsmen, with dogs and guns.</cd> -- <col><b>Game egg</b></col>, <cd>an egg producing a gamecock.</cd> -- <col><b>Game laws</b></col>, <cd>laws regulating the seasons and manner of taking game for food or for sport.</cd> -- <col><b>Game preserver</b></col>, <cd>a land owner who regulates the killing of game on his estate with a view to its increase.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> -- <col><b>To be game</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To show a brave, unyielding spirit.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To be victor in a game.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> -- <col><b>To die game</b></col>, <cd>to maintain a bold, unyielding spirit to the last; to die fighting.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 611 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Game</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gamed</conjf> <pr>(g<amac/md)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaming</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gamen</ets>, <ets>game<?/en</ets>, to rejoice, AS. <ets>gamenian</ets> to play. See <er>Game</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To rejoice; to be pleased; -- often used, in Old English, impersonally with dative.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>God loved he best with all his whole hearte<br/
+At alle times, though him <qex>gamed</qex> or smarte.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To play at any sport or diversion.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards, or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or some other thing waged upon the issue of the contest; to gamble.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>gamebag</hw>, <hw>game bag</hw></mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a canvas or leather bag for carrying game (especially birds) killed by a hunter.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"cock`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"k<ocr/k`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The male game fowl.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game" fowl`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"foul`)</pr>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A handsome breed of the common fowl, remarkable for the great courage and pugnacity of the males.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"ful</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"f<usdot/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of game or games.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"keep`er</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"k<emac/p`<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who has the care of game, especially in a park or preserve.</def> <rj><au>Blackstone.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Destitute of game.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game license</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a license authorizing the bearer to kill a certain type of animal during a specified period of time.</def>
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> hunting license, game license.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a plucky manner; spiritedly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"ness</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"n<ecr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Endurance; pluck.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game of chance</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a game that involves gambling.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> game of chance, gambling game.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game" plan`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"pl<acr/n`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A plan for achieving an objective (especially in some sport).</def>
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game" room`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"r<oomac/m`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a recreation room for noisy activities (parties or children's play etc) or for table games.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> rumpus room, playroom, game room.</syn>
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game" show`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"sh<omac/`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a television program in which contestants compete for awards. The contestants are members of the public selected to participate on the show, and not employed by the producer of the show.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"some</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"s<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Gay; sportive; playful; frolicsome; merry.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Gladness of the <qex>gamesome</qex> crowd.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Game"some*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Game"some*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Game"ster</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"st<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Game</ets> + <ets>-ster</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A merry, frolicsome person.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person who plays at games; esp., one accustomed to play for a stake; a gambler; one skilled in games.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>When lenity and cruelty play for a kingdom, the gentlest <qex>gamester</qex> is the soonest winner.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A prostitute; a strumpet.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gametangium</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A cell or organ in which gametes develop.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ete</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"<emac/t; g<adot/*m<emac/t"; <it>the latter usually in compounds</it>)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gameth`</grk> wife, or <grk>game`ths</grk> husband, fr. <grk>gamei^n</grk> to marry.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A sexual cell or germ cell having a single set of unpaired chromosomes; a conjugating cell which unites with another of like or unlike character to form a new individual. In <fld>Bot.</fld>, <ex>gamete</ex> designates esp. the similar sex cells of the lower thallophytes which unite by conjugation, forming a <xex>zygospore</xex>. The gametes of higher plants are of two sorts, <stype>sperm</stype> (male) and <stype>egg</stype> (female); their union is called <xex>fertilization</xex>, and the resulting zygote an <xex>o\'94spore</xex>. In <fld>Zo\'94l.</fld>, <xex>gamete</xex> is most commonly used of the sexual cells of certain Protozoa, though also extended to the germ cells of higher forms.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game theory</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A branch of mathematics that deals with strategies for maximizing gains or minimizing losses in competitive situations having defined constraints and involving random factors.</def> <note>Game theory is used for modelling and analysis of various decision-making situations such as military strategy or business policy. The theoretical models study the interactions among opposing entities called "players," where different kinds of situation can arise, for which the probabilities of occurence are known. Also known is the set of decisions each player can take. When a player takes a decision he makes a gain or incurs a loss. Based on the available knowledge each player tries to adopt a "strategy" so as to maximize his gains. The entire procedure constitutes a game.</note><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> theory of games.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gametocyte</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>An immature animal or plant cell that develops into a gamete by meiosis.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gametophore</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A modified branch bearing gametangia as in the thalloid liverworts.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*me"to*phyte</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gamete</ets> + Gr. <grk>fyto`n</grk> plant.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>In the alternation of generations in plants, that generation or phase which bears sex organs and produces gametes. In the lower plants, as the alg\'91, the gametophyte is the conspicuous part of the plant body; in mosses it is the so-called moss plant; in ferns it is reduced to a small, early perishing body; and in seed plants it is usually microscopic or rudimentary.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>game warden</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a public official who is responsible for the enforcement of laws regarding the hunting of animals.</def>
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gamekeeper, game warden.</syn>
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gamey</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>suggestive of sexual impropriety; <as>as, he skips asterisks and gives you the <ex>gamey</ex> details</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> blue, gamy, juicy, naughty, racy, risque, spicy, sexy.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>foul-smelling; -- used of the smell of game beginning to taint.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gamy, high.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>spirited and resolute.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> game, gamy, gritty, mettlesome, spirited, spunky.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>willing to proceed or act.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> game.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or resulting from, sexual connection; formed by the union of the male and female elements.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gam"in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A neglected and untrained city boy; a young street Arab.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>In Japan, the <qex>gamins</qex> run after you, and say, 'Look at the Chinaman.'</q> <rj><qau>L. Oliphant.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaminess</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>behavior or language bordering on indelicacy.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> raciness, ribaldry, spiciness.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gam"ing</hw> <pr>(g<amac/m"<icr/ng)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act or practice of playing games for stakes or wagers; gambling.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gam"ma</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The third letter (<GAMMA/, <gamma/ = Eng. <sig>G</sig>) of the Greek alphabet.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam*ma"di*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A cross formed of four capital gammas, formerly used as a mysterious ornament on ecclesiastical vestments, etc. See <er>Fylfot</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ma ray</hw>. <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>A very penetrating electromagnetic ray not appreciably deflected by a magnetic or electric field, emitted by radioactive substances. <ex>Gamma rays</ex> are photons of electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength shorter than that of X-rays, (i. e. shorter than 0.1 nanometer) and are correspondingly more penetrating than X-rays. In addition to being given off in certain types of radioactive decay, they may be found in cosmic radiation, though they are largely absorbed by the earth's atmosphere. Gamma-ray detectors orbited above the atmosphere have found bursts of gamma radiation, in some cases associated with visually observed supernova explosions, but in most cases from unidentified sources.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mer</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Possibly contr. fr. <ets>godmother</ets>; but prob. fr. <ets>grammer</ets> for <ets>grandmother</ets>. Cf. <er>Gaffer</er>.]</ety> <def>An old wife; an old woman; -- correlative of <contr>gaffer</contr>, an old man.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<ucr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gambon</ets>, F. <ets>jambon</ets>, fr. OF. <ets>gambe</ets> leg, F. <ets>jambe</ets>. See <er>Gambol</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, and cf. <er>Ham</er>.]</ety> <def>The buttock or thigh of a hog, salted and smoked or dried; the lower end of a flitch.</def> <rj><au>Goldsmith.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<ucr/n)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gammoned</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<ucr/nd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gammoning</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To make bacon of; to salt and dry in smoke.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon</hw> <pr>(g<acr/m"m<ucr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See 2d <er>Game</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Backgammon.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A victory in the game of backgammon in which one player gammons another, i. e., the winner bears off all of his pieces before his opponent bears off any pieces; <as>as, he won the match with three <ex>gammons</ex> in a row</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>An imposition or hoax; humbug.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To beat in the game of backgammon, before an antagonist has been able to get his \'bdmen\'b8 or counters home and withdraw any of them from the board; <as>as, to <ex>gammon</ex> a person</as>. In certain variants of the game one who <ex>gammons</ex> an opponent scores twice the normal value of the game.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To impose on; to hoax; to cajole.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Hood.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. unknown.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To fasten (a bowsprit) to the stem of a vessel by lashings of rope or chain, or by a band of iron.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From 5th <er>Gammon</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>The lashing or iron band by which the bowsprit of a vessel is secured to the stem to opposite the lifting action of the forestays.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gammoning fashion</b></col>, <cd>in the style of gammoning lashing, that is, having the turns of rope crossed.</cd> -- <col><b>Gammoning hole</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a hole cut through the knee of the head of a vessel for the purpose of gammoning the bowsprit.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"mon*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From 4th <er>Gammon</er>.]</ety> <def>The act of imposing upon or hoaxing a person.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gam`o*gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage + E. <ets>genesis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The production of offspring by the union of parents of different sexes; sexual reproduction; -- the opposite of <xex>agamogenesis</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam`o*ge*net"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Relating to gamogenesis.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gam`o*ge*net"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam`o*mor"phism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage + <grk>morfh`</grk> form, shape.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>That stage of growth or development in an organism, in which the reproductive elements are generated and matured in preparation for propagating the species.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam`o*pet"al*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage + E. <ets>petalous</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gamop\'82tale</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having the petals united or joined so as to form a tube or cup; monopetalous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*moph"yl*lous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage + <?/ leaf.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Composed of leaves united by their edges (coalescent).</def> <rj><au>Gray.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam`o*sep"al*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ marriage + E. <ets>sepal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Formed of united sepals; monosepalous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gamp</hw> <pr>(g<acr/mp)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A large umbrella; -- said to allude to Mrs. Gamp's umbrella, in Dickens's \'bdMartin Chuzzlewit.\'b8</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gam"ut</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gamme + ut</ets> the name of a musical note. F. <ets>gamme</ets> is fr. the name of the Greek letter <?/, which was used by Guido d'Arezzo to represent the first note of his model scale. See <er>Gamma</er>, and <er>Ut</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The scale.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gam"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Cookery)</fld> <def>Having the flavor of game, esp. of game kept uncooked till near the condition of tainting; high-flavored.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Sporting)</fld> <def>Showing an unyielding spirit to the last; plucky; furnishing sport; <as>as, a <ex>gamy</ex> trout</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Same as <er>gamey</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>gam"i*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>imp.</pos> <mord>of <er>Gin</er>.</mord> <ety>[See <er>Gin</er>, <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <def>Began; commenced.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Gan</xex> was formerly used with the infinitive to form compound imperfects, as <xex>did</xex> is now employed. <xex>Gan</xex> regularly denotes the singular; the plural is usually denoted by <xex>gunne</xex> or <xex>gonne</xex>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>This man <qex>gan fall</qex> (<it>i.e.</it>, fell) in great suspicion.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The little coines to their play <qex>gunne hie</qex> (<it>i. e.</it>, hied).</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note>Later writers use <xex>gan</xex> both for singular and plural.<br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Yet at her speech their rages <qex>gan</qex> relent.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj></note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*nan"cial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Sp., pertaining to gain, held in common, fr. <ets>ganancia</ets> gain.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Designating, pertaining to, or held under, the Spanish system of law (called <col><b>ganancial system</b></col>) which controls the title and disposition of the property acquired during marriage by the husband or wife.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ganch</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>ganche</ets>, <pos>n.</pos>, also Sp. & Pg. <ets>gancho</ets> hook, It. <ets>gancio</ets>.]</ety> <def>To drop from a high place upon sharp stakes or hooks, as the Turks dropped malefactors, by way of punishment.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Ganching</qex>, which is to let fall from on high upon hooks, and there to hang until they die.</q> <rj><qau>Sandys.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>gandra</ets>, <ets>ganra</ets>, akin to Prov. G. <ets>gander</ets>, <ets>ganter</ets>, and E. <ets>goose</ets>, <ets>gannet</ets>. See <er>Goose</er>.]</ety> <def>The male of any species of goose.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gandhi</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def><person>Mohandas Gandhi</person>, a Hindu nationalist and religious leader, who preached non-violent resistance to oppression.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gandhian</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to <person>Mohandas Gandhi</person>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gane</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Yawn</er>.]</ety> <def>To yawn; to gape.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ga*ne"sa</hw>, <hw>Ganesh</hw>, <hw>Ganesha</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Hindu Myth.)</fld> <def>The Hindu god of wisdom, prudence and prophesy; the remover of obstacles.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Ganapati.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ He is represented as a short, fat, red-colored man, with a large belly and the head of an elephant.</note> <rj><au>Balfour.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gang</hw> <pr>(g<acr/ng)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>gangan</ets>, akin to OS. & OHG. <ets>gangan</ets>, Icel. <ets>ganga</ets>, Goth. <ets>gaggan</ets>; cf. Lith. <ets><zdot/engti</ets> to walk, Skr. <ets>ja<ndot/gha</ets> leg. <root/48. Cf. <er>Go</er>.]</ety> <def>To go; to walk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Obsolete in English literature, but still used in the North of England, and also in Scotland.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gang</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gangr</ets> a going, gang, akin to AS., D., G., & Dan. <ets>gang</ets> a going, Goth. <ets>gaggs</ets> street, way. See <er>Gang</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A going; a course.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A number going in company; hence, a company, or a number of persons associated for a particular purpose; a group of laborers under one foreman; a squad; <as>as, a <ex>gang</ex> of sailors; a chain <ex>gang</ex>; a <ex>gang</ex> of thieves.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A combination of similar implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set; <as>as, a <ex>gang</ex> of saws, or of plows</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A set; all required for an outfit; <as>as, a new <ex>gang</ex> of stays</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gangue</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>The mineral substance which incloses a vein; a matrix; a gangue.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A group of teenagers or young adults forming a more or less formalized group associating for social purposes, in some cases requiring initiation rites to join; <as>as, a teen <ex>gang</ex>; a youth <ex>gang</ex>; a street <ex>gang</ex></as>.</def> <note>Youth <ex>gangs</ex> often associate with particular areas in a city, and may turn violent when they feel their territory is encroached upon. In Los Angeles the <stype>Crips</stype> and the <stype>Bloods</stype> are large gangs antagonistic to each other.</note><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>A group of persons organized for criminal purposes; a criminal organization; <as>as, the Parker <ex>gang</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gang board</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Gang plank</b></col></mcol>. <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A board or plank, with cleats for steps, forming a bridge by which to enter or leave a vessel.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A plank within or without the bulwarks of a vessel's waist, for the sentinel to walk on.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang cask</b></col>, <cd>a small cask in which to bring water aboard ships or in which it is kept on deck.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Gang cultivator</b></col>, <col><b>Gang plow</b></col></mcol>, <cd>a cultivator or plow in which several shares are attached to one frame, so as to make two or more furrows at the same time.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang days</b></col>, <cd>Rogation days; the time of perambulating parishes. See <cref>Gang week</cref> (below).</cd> -- <col><b>Gang drill</b></col>, <cd>a drilling machine having a number of drills driven from a common shaft.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang master</b></col>, <cd>a master or employer of a gang of workmen.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang plank</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Gang board</cref> (above).</cd> -- <col><b>Gang plow</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Gang cultivator</cref> (above).</cd> -- <col><b>Gang press</b></col>, <cd>a press for operating upon a pile or row of objects separated by intervening plates.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang saw</b></col>, <cd>a saw fitted to be one of a combination or gang of saws hung together in a frame or sash, and set at fixed distances apart.</cd> -- <col><b>Gang tide</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Gang week</cref> (below).</cd> -- <col><b>Gang tooth</b></col>, <cd>a projecting tooth.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Halliwell.</au> -- <col><b>Gang week</b></col>, <cd>Rogation week, when formerly processions were made to survey the bounds of parishes.</cd> <au>Halliwell.</au> -- <mcol><col><b>Live gang</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Round gang</b></col></mcol>, <cd>the Western and the Eastern names, respectively, for a gang of saws for cutting the round log into boards at one operation.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Slabbing gang</b></col>, <cd>an arrangement of saws which cuts slabs from two sides of a log, leaving the middle part as a thick beam.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>gangboard</hw>, <hw>gang board</hw></mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a temporary bridge for getting on and off a vessel at dockside.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gangplank, gang plank, gangway.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gang"dom</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>criminal organizations, collectively.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> organized crime, gangland.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gange</hw> <pr>(g<acr/nj)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Ganged</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/njd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Ganging</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/n"j<icr/ng)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Of uncertain origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To protect (the part of a line next a fishhook, or the hook itself) by winding it with wire.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To attach (a fishhook) to a line or snell, as by knotting the line around the shank of the hook.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gang"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who oversees a gang of workmen.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Mayhew.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan*get"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or inhabiting, the Ganges River; <as>as, the <ex>Gangetic</ex> shark</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gang"-flow`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The common English milkwort (<spn>Polygala vulgaris</spn>), so called from blossoming in <xex>gang</xex> week.</def> <rj><au>Dr. Prior.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"gion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <def>A short line attached to a trawl. See <er>Trawl</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gan"gli*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gan"gli*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Relating to a ganglion; ganglionic.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gan"gli*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gan"gli*a`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Furnished with ganglia; <as>as, the <ex>gangliated</ex> cords of the sympathetic nervous system</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gan"gli*form`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gan"gli*o*form`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Ganglion</ets> + <ets>-form</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Having the form of a ganglion.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"gli*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> L. <plw>Ganglia</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, E. <plw>Ganglions</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>ganglion</ets> a sort of swelling or excrescence, a tumor under the skin, Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>ganglion</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A mass or knot of nervous matter, including nerve cells, usually forming an enlargement in the course of a nerve.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A node, or gland in the lymphatic system; <as>as, a lymphatic <ex>ganglion</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A globular, hard, indolent tumor, situated somewhere on a tendon, and commonly formed by the effusion of a viscid fluid into it; -- called also <altname>weeping sinew</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Ganglion cell</b></col>, <cd>a nerve cell. See <xex>Illust.</xex> under <er>Bipolar</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"gli*on*a*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>ganglionnarie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Ganglionic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan`gli*on"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>ganglionique</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, containing, or consisting of, ganglia or ganglion cells; <as>as, a <ex>ganglionic</ex> artery; the <ex>ganglionic</ex> columns of the spinal cord.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"grel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gang</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <def>Wandering; vagrant.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"gre*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To gangrene.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"grene</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gangr\'8ane</ets>, L. <ets>gangraena</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to gnaw, eat; cf. Skr. <ets>gras</ets>, <ets>gar</ets>, to devour, and E. <ets>voracious</ets>, also <ets>canker</ets>, <pos>n.</pos>, in sense 3.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A term formerly restricted to mortification of the soft tissues which has not advanced so far as to produce complete loss of vitality; but now applied to mortification of the soft parts in any stage.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"grene</hw>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gangrened</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gangrening</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gangr\'82ner</ets>.]</ety> <def>To produce gangrene in; to be affected with gangrene.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan`gre*nes"cent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Tending to mortification or gangrene.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"gre*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gangr\'82neux</ets>.]</ety> <def>Affected by, or produced by, gangrene; of the nature of gangrene.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gangue</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gangue</ets>, fr. G. <ets>gang</ets> a metallic vein, a passage. See <er>Gang</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>The mineral or earthy substance associated with metallic ore.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gang"way`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gang</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A passage or way into or out of any inclosed place; esp., a temporary way of access formed of planks.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In the English House of Commons, a narrow aisle across the house, below which sit those who do not vote steadly either with the government or with the opposition.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>The opening through the bulwarks of a vessel by which persons enter or leave it.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>That part of the spar deck of a vessel on each side of the booms, from the quarter-deck to the forecastle; -- more properly termed the <xex>waist</xex>.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gangway ladder</b></col>, <cd>a ladder rigged on the side of a vessel at the gangway.</cd> -- <col><b>To bring to the gangway</b></col>, <cd>to punish (a seaman) by flogging him at the gangway.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"il</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A kind of brittle limestone.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Kirwan.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gan"is*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gan"nis*ter</hw></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A refractory material consisting of crushed or ground siliceous stone, mixed with fire clay; -- used for lining Bessemer converters; also used for macadamizing roads.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"ja</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>g\'benjh\'be</ets>.]</ety> <def>The dried hemp plant, used in India for smoking. It is extremely narcotic and intoxicating.</def><-- marijuana, hashish --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"net</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gant</ets>, AS. <ets>ganet</ets>, ganot, a sea fowl, a fen duck; akin to D. <ets>gent</ets> gander, OHG. <ets>ganazzo</ets>. See <er>Gander</er>, <er>Goose</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several species of sea birds of the genus <gen>Sula</gen>, allied to the pelicans.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The common gannet of Europe and America (<spn>Sula bassana</spn>), is also called <altname>solan goose</altname>, <altname>chandel goose</altname>, and <altname>gentleman</altname>. In Florida the wood ibis is commonly called <xex>gannet</xex>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Booby gannet</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Sula</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gan`o*ceph"a*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ brightness + <?/ head.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A group of fossil amphibians allied to the labyrinthodonts, having the head defended by bony, sculptured plates, as in some ganoid fishes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan`o*ceph"a*lous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Ganocephala.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"noid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ brightness + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to <subclass>Ganoidei</subclass>. -- <pos>n.</pos> One of the Ganoidei.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Ganoid scale</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>one kind of scales of the ganoid fishes, composed of an inner layer of bone, and an outer layer of shining enamel. They are often so arranged as to form a coat of mail.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*noid"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Ganoid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga*noi"de*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Ganoid</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the subclasses of fishes. They have an arterial cone and bulb, spiral intestinal valve, and the optic nerves united by a chiasma. Many of the species are covered with bony plates, or with ganoid scales; others have cycloid scales.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ They were numerous, and some of them of large size, in early geological periods; but they are represented by comparatively few living species, most of which inhabit fresh waters, as the bowfin, gar pike, bichir, Ceratodus, paddle fish, and sturgeon.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*noid"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Ganoid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"no*ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A peculiar bony tissue beneath the enamel of a ganoid scale.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"sa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Ganza</er>.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gant"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<it>Gantlet</it> is corrupted fr. <ets>gantlope</ets>; <ets>gantlope</ets> is for <ets>gatelope</ets>, Sw. <ets>gatlopp</ets>, orig., a running down a lane; gata street, lane + lopp course, career, akin to l\'94pa to run. See <er>Gate</er> a way, and <er>Leap</er>.]</ety> <def>A military punishment formerly in use, wherein the offender was made to run between two files of men facing one another, who struck him as he passed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>To run the gantlet</b></col>, <cd>to suffer the punishment of the gantlet; hence, to go through the ordeal of severe criticism or controversy, or ill-treatment at many hands.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Winthrop ran the <qex>gantlet</qex> of daily slights.</q> <rj><qau>Palfrey.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Written also, but less properly, <xex>gauntlet</xex>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gant"let</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A glove. See <er>Gauntlet</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gant"line`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A line rigged to a mast; -- used in hoisting rigging; a girtline.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 612 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gant"lope`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gantlet</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gauntree</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gan"za</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>gansa</ets>, <ets>ganso</ets>, goose; of Gothic origin. See <er>Gannet</er>, <er>Goose</er>.]</ety> <def>A kind of wild goose, by a flock of which a virtuoso was fabled to be carried to the lunar world.</def> <altsp>[Also <asp>gansa</asp>.]</altsp> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ganz system</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <def>A haulage system for canal boats, in which an electric locomotive running on a monorail has its adhesion materially increased by the pull of the tow rope on a series of inclined gripping wheels.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaol</hw> <pr>(j<amac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Jail</er>.]</ety> <def>A place of confinement, especially for minor offenses or provisional imprisonment; a jail.</def> <altsp>[Preferably, and in the United States usually, written <asp>jail</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Commission of general gaol delivery</b></col>, <cd>an authority conferred upon judges and others included in it, for trying and delivering every prisoner in jail when the judges, upon their circuit, arrive at the place for holding court, and for discharging any whom the grand jury fail to indict.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> -- <col><b>Gaol delivery</b></col>. <fld>(Law)</fld> <cd>See <cref>Jail delivery</cref>, under <er>Jail</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaolbird</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a person serving a prison sentence; a jail bird.</def> <mark>[Chiefly Brit.]</mark><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> convict, inmate, jailbird, jail bird.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaolbreak</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an escape from jail; same as <er>jailbreak</er>.</def> <mark>[Chiefly Brit.]</mark><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> break, breakout, jailbreak, prisonbreak, prison-breaking.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaol"er</hw> <pr>(j<amac/l"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The keeper of a jail. Same as <er>Jailer</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gap</hw> <pr>(g<acr/p)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gap</ets>; cf. Icel. <ets>gap</ets> an empty space, Sw. <ets>gap</ets> mouth, breach, abyss, Dan. <ets>gab</ets> mouth, opening, AS. <ets>geap</ets> expanse; as adj., wide, spacious. See <er>Gape</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An opening in anything made by breaking or parting; <as>as, a <ex>gap</ex> in a fence</as>; an opening for a passage or entrance; an opening which implies a breach or defect; a vacant space or time; a hiatus; a mountain pass.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Miseries ensued by the opening of that <qex>gap</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Knolles.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It would make a great <qex>gap</qex> in your own honor.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(A\'89ronautics)</fld> <def>The vertical distance between two superposed surfaces, esp. in a biplane.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gap lathe</b></col> <fld>(Mach.)</fld>, <cd>a turning lathe with a deep notch in the bed to admit of turning a short object of large diameter.</cd> -- <col><b>To stand in the gap</b></col>, <cd>to expose one's self for the protection of something; to make defense against any assailing danger; to take the place of a fallen defender or supporter.</cd> -- <col><b>To stop a gap</b></col>, <cd>to secure a weak point; to repair a defect.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gap</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To notch, as a sword or knife.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To make an opening in; to breach.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Their masses are <qex>gapp'd</qex> with our grape.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gape</hw> <pr>(g<aum/p; <it>in Eng, commonly</it> g<amac/p; 277)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gaped</conjf> <pr>(g<aum/pt or g<amac/pt)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gaping</conjf>]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gapen</ets>, AS. <ets>geapan</ets> to open; akin to D. <ets>gapen</ets> to gape, G. <ets>gaffen</ets>, Icel. & Sw. <ets>gapa</ets>, Dan. <ets>gabe</ets>; cf. Skr. <ets>jabh</ets> to snap at, open the mouth. Cf. <er>Gaby</er>, <er>Gap</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To open the mouth wide</def>; <specif>as:</specif> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Expressing a desire for food; <as>as, young birds <ex>gape</ex></as>.</def> <au>Dryden.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Indicating sleepiness or indifference; to yawn.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>She stretches, <qex>gapes</qex>, unglues her eyes,<br/
+And asks if it be time to rise.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>Showing unselfconsciousness in surprise, astonishment, expectation, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>With <qex>gaping</qex> wonderment had stared aghast.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>Manifesting a desire to injure, devour, or overcome.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>They have <qex>gaped</qex> upon me with their mouth.</q> <rj><qau>Job xvi. 10.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To open or part widely; to exhibit a gap, fissure, or hiatus.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>May that ground <qex>gape</qex> and swallow me alive!</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To long, wait eagerly, or cry aloud for something; -- with <xex>for</xex>, <xex>after</xex>, or <xex>at</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The hungry grave for her due tribute <qex>gapes</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Denham.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To gaze; stare; yawn. See <er>Gaze</er>.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gape</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of gaping; a yawn.</def> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The width of the mouth when opened, as of birds, fishes, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>The gapes</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A fit of yawning.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A disease of young poultry and other birds, attended with much gaping. It is caused by a parasitic nematode worm (<spn>Syngamus trachealis</spn>), in the windpipe, which obstructs the breathing. See <er>Gapeworm</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gap"er</hw> <pr>(g<amac/p"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who gapes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A European fish. See 4th <er>Comber</er>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A large edible clam (<spn>Schizoth\'91rus Nuttalli</spn>), of the Pacific coast; -- called also <altname>gaper clam</altname>.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>An East Indian bird of the genus <gen>Cymbirhynchus</gen>, related to the broadbills.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gapes</hw> <pr>(g<amac/ps)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See as <cref>the gapes</cref>, under <er>gape</er>, <pos>n.</pos>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gape"seed`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/p"s<emac/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Any strange sight.</def> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person who looks or stares gapingly.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>To buy gapeseed</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>To sow gapeseed</b></col></mcol>, <cd>to stare idly or in idle wonderment, instead of attending to business.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gapes"ing</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Act of gazing about; sightseeing.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gape"worm`</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The parasitic worm that causes <causes>the gapes</causes> in birds. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gap"ing*stock`</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who is an object of open-mouthed wonder.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I was to be a <qex>gapingstock</qex> and a scorn to the young volunteers.</q> <rj><qau>Godwin.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gap"-toothed`</hw> <pr>(g<acr/p"t<oomac/tht`)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having conspicuous interstices between the teeth; <as>as, his <ex>gap-toothed</ex> grin</as>.</def> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. AS. <ets>g\'ber</ets> dart, spear, lance. The name is applied to the fish on account of its long and slender body and pointed head. Cf. <er>Goad</er>, <er>Gore</er>, <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Any slender marine fish of the genera <gen>Belone</gen> and <gen>Tylosurus</gen>. See <er>Garfish</er>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The gar pike. See <cref>Alligator gar</cref> (under <er>Alligator</er>), and <cref>Gar pike</cref>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gar pike</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Garpike</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a large, elongated ganoid fish of the genus <gen>Lepidosteus</gen>, of several species, inhabiting the lakes and rivers of temperate and tropical America.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Of Scand. origin. See <er>Gear</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>To cause; to make.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga`rage"</hw> <pr>(g<adot/`r<aum/zh" <it>or</it> g<adot/`r<aum/j" <it>or</it> (<it>Brit.</it>) g<adot/r"<asl/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>an enclosed structure for housing or parking motor vehicles, especially automobiles.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(A\'89ronautics)</fld> <def>A shed for housing an airship or flying machine; a hangar.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A side way or space in a canal to enable vessels to pass each other; a siding.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>a commercial establishment that repairs or services automobiles.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga`rage"</hw> <pr>(g<adot/`r<aum/zh" <it>or</it> g<adot/`r<aum/j" <it>or</it> (<it>Brit.</it>) g<adot/r"<asl/j)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garaged</conjf> <pr>(g<adot/`r<aum/zhd", g<adot/`r<aum/jd" <it>or</it> g<adot/r"<asl/jd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garaging</conjf> <pr>(g<adot/"r<aum/zh"<icr/ng, g<adot/"r<aum/j"<icr/ng <it>or</it> g<adot/r"<asl/*j<icr/ng)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To keep in a garage.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>garambulla</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An arborescent cactus of Western Mexico (<spn>Myrtillocactus geometrizans</spn>) bearing a small oblong edible berrylike fruit.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> garambulla cactus, <spn>Myrtillocactus geometrizans</spn>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The small berrylike fruit of the <spn>Myrtillocactus geometrizans</spn>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>garand</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the inventor, <person>John C. <etsep>Garand</etsep></person>.]</ety> <def>A semiautomatic rifle, also called the <altname>M-1</altname>, used by soldiers of the U. S. army in World War II and Korea. It was the standard weapon issued to infantrymen.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Garand rifle, M-1, M-1 rifle.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"an*cin</hw> <pr>(?; 104)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>garance</ets> madder, LL. <ets>garantia</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An extract of madder by sulphuric acid. It consists essentially of alizarin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garb</hw> <pr>(g<aum/rb)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>garbe</ets> looks, countenance, grace, ornament, fr. OHG. <ets>garaw\'c6</ets>, <ets>garw\'c6</ets>, ornament, dress. akin to E. <ets>gear</ets>. See <er>Gear</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Clothing in general.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The whole dress or suit of clothes worn by any person, especially when indicating rank or office; <as>as, the <ex>garb</ex> of a clergyman or a judge</as>.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>Costume; fashion; <as>as, the <ex>garb</ex> of a gentleman in the 16th century</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>External appearance, as expressive of the feelings or character; looks; fashion or manner, as of speech.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>You thought, because he could not speak English in the native <qex>garb</qex>, he could not therefore handle an English cudgel.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garb</hw> <pr>(g<aum/rb)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gerbe</ets>, OF. also <ets>garbe</ets>, OHG. <ets>garba</ets>, G. <ets>garbe</ets>; cf. Skr. <ets>g<rsdot/bh</ets> to seize, E. <ets>grab</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>A sheaf of grain (wheat, unless otherwise specified).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garb</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To clothe; array; deck.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>These black dog-Dons<br/
+<qex>Garb</qex> themselves bravely.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"bage</hw> <pr>(?; 48)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. also <ets>garbash</ets>, perh. orig., that which is purged or cleansed away; cf. OF. <ets>garber</ets> to make fine, neat, OHG. <ets>garawan</ets> to make ready, prepare, akin to E. <ets>garb</ets> dress; or perh. for <ets>garbleage</ets>, fr. <ets>garble</ets>; or cf. OF. <ets>garbage</ets> tax on sheaves, E. <ets>garb</ets> sheaf.]</ety> <def>Offal, as the bowels of an animal or fish; refuse animal or vegetable matter from a kitchen; hence, anything worthless, disgusting, or loathsome.</def> <rj><au>Grainger.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"bage</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To strip of the bowels; to clean.</def> \'bdPilchards . . . are <xex>garbaged</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garbed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Dressed; habited; clad.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"bel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Garboard</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"bel</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Garble</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>Anything sifted, or from which the coarse parts have been taken.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garbled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garbling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Formerly, to pick out, sort, OF. <ets>grabeler</ets>, for <ets>garbeler</ets> to examine precisely, garble spices, fr. LL. <ets>garbellare</ets> to sift; cf. Sp. <ets>garbillar</ets> to sift, <ets>garbillo</ets> a coarse sieve, L. <ets>cribellum</ets>, dim. of <ets>cribrum</ets> sieve, akin to <ets>cernere</ets> to separate, sift (cf. E. <er>Discern</er>); or perh. rather from Ar. <ets>gharb\'bel</ets>, <ets>gharbil</ets>, sieve.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To sift or bolt, to separate the fine or valuable parts of from the coarse and useless parts, or from dros or dirt; <as>as, to <ex>garble</ex> spices</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To pick out such parts of as may serve a purpose; to mutilate; to pervert; <as>as, to <ex>garble</ex> a quotation; to <ex>garble</ex> an account.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ble</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Refuse; rubbish.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Wolcott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>Impurities separated from spices, drugs, etc.; -- also called <altname>garblings</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"bler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who garbles.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"board</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>One of the planks next the keel on the outside, which form a garboard strake.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Garboard strake</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Garboard streak</b></col></mcol>, <cd>the first range or strake of planks laid on a ship's bottom next the keel.</cd> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"boil</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>garbouil</ets>; cf. Sp. <ets>garbullo</ets>, It. <ets>garbuglio</ets>; of uncertain origin; the last part is perh. fr. L. <ets>bullire</ets> to boil, E. <ets>boil</ets>.]</ety> <def>Tumult; disturbance; disorder.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gar*cin"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants, including the mangosteen tree (<spn>Garcinia Mangostana</spn>), found in the islands of the Indian Archipelago; -- so called in honor of Dr. <etsep>Garcin</etsep>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gar`\'87on"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A boy; fellow; esp., a serving boy or man; a waiter; -- in Eng. chiefly applied to French waiters.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gard</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Garde</er>, <er>Yard</er>]</ety> <def>Garden.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdTrees of the <xex>gard</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>F. Beaumont.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gard</hw>, <pos>v. & n.</pos> <def>See <er>Guard</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"dant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Guardant</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>Turning the head towards the spectator, but not the body; -- said of a lion or other beast.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Garde` ci`vique"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>See <er>Army organization</er>, above.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den</hw> <pr>(g<aum/r"d'n; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gardin</ets>, OF. <ets>gardin</ets>, <ets>jardin</ets>, F. <ets>jardin</ets>, of German origin; cf. OHG. <ets>garto</ets>, G. <ets>garten</ets>; akin to AS. <ets>geard</ets>. See <er>Yard</er> an inclosure.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy,<br/
+The pleasant <qex>garden</qex> of great Italy.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Garden</xex> is often used adjectively or in self-explaining compounds; as, <xex>garden</xex> flowers, <xex>garden</xex> tools, <xex>garden</xex> walk, <xex>garden</xex> wall, <xex>garden</xex> house or <xex>garden</xex>house.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Garden balsam</b></col>, <cd>an ornamental plant (<spn>Impatiens Balsamina</spn>).</cd> -- <col><b>Garden engine</b></col>, <cd>a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering gardens.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden glass</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A bell glass for covering plants.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal, to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an ornament in gardens in Germany.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden house</b></col> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A summer house.</cd> <au>Beau. & Fl.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A privy.</cd> <mark>[Southern U.S.]</mark> -- <col><b>Garden husbandry</b></col>, <cd>the raising on a small scale of seeds, fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Garden mold</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Garden mould</b></col></mcol>, <cd>rich, mellow earth which is fit for a garden.</cd> <au>Mortimer.</au> -- <col><b>Garden nail</b></col>, <cd>a cast nail, used for fastening vines to brick walls.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Garden net</b></col>, <cd>a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc., to protect them from birds.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden party</b></col>, <cd>a social party held out of doors, within the grounds or garden attached to a private residence.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden plot</b></col>, <cd>a plot appropriated to a garden.</cd> <col><b>Garden pot</b></col>, <cd>a watering pot.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden pump</b></col>, <cd>a garden engine; a barrow pump.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden shears</b></col>, <cd>large shears, for clipping trees and hedges, pruning, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden spider</b></col>, <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the diadem spider (<spn>Epeira diadema</spn>), common in gardens, both in Europe and America. It spins a geometrical web. See <cref>Geometric spider</cref>, and <cref>Spider web</cref>.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden stand</b></col>, <cd>a stand for flower pots.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden stuff</b></col>, <cd>vegetables raised in a garden.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> -- <col><b>Garden syringe</b></col>, <cd>a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Garden truck</b></col>, <cd>vegetables raised for the market.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> -- <col><b>Garden ware</b></col>, <cd>garden truck.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Mortimer.</au> -- <mcol><col><b>Bear garden</b></col>, <col><b>Botanic garden</b></col></mcol>, <cd>etc. See under <er>Bear</er>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Hanging garden</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Hanging</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Kitchen garden</b></col>, <cd>a garden where vegetables are cultivated for household use.</cd> -- <col><b>Market garden</b></col>, <cd>a piece of ground where vegetable are cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gardened</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gardening</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To lay out or cultivate a garden; to labor in a garden; to practice horticulture.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To cultivate as a garden.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who makes and tends a garden; a horticulturist.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Garde"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants, some species of which produce beautiful and fragrant flowers; Cape jasmine; -- so called in honor of Dr. Alexander <xex>Garden</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den*ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art of occupation of laying out and cultivating gardens; horticulture.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den*less</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Destitute of a garden.</def> <rj><au>Shelley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a garden.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>W. Marshall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"den*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Horticulture.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"don</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A European cyprinoid fish; the id.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar`dy*loo"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gare l'eau</ets> beware of the water.]</ety> <def>An old cry in throwing water, slops, etc., from the windows in Edingburgh.</def> <rj><au>Sir. W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gare</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gear</er>.]</ety> <def>Coarse wool on the legs of sheep.</def> <rj><au>Blount.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gare"fowl`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The great auk; also, the razorbill. See <er>Auk</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gairfowl</asp>, and <asp>gurfel</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"fish`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gar</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A European marine fish (<spn>Belone vulgaris</spn>); -- called also <altname>gar</altname>, <altname>gerrick</altname>, <altname>greenback</altname>, <altname>greenbone</altname>, <altname>gorebill</altname>, <altname>hornfish</altname>, <altname>longnose</altname>, <altname>mackerel guide</altname>, <altname>sea needle</altname>, and <altname>sea pike</altname>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>One of several species of similar fishes of the genus <gen>Tylosurus</gen>, of which one species (<spn>T. marinus</spn>) is common on the Atlantic coast. <spn>T. Caribb\'91us</spn>, a very large species, and <spn>T. crassus</spn>, are more southern; -- called also <altname>needlefish</altname>. Many of the common names of the European garfish are also applied to the American species.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ga*lize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gargle</er>, <er>Gargarize</er>.]</ety> <def>To gargle; to rinse.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Marston.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ga*ney</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small European duck (<spn>Anas querquedula</spn>); -- called also <altname>cricket teal</altname>, and <altname>summer teal</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar*gan"tu*an</hw> <pr>(?; 135)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <ets>Gargantua</ets>, an allegorical hero of Rabelais.]</ety> <def>Characteristic of Gargantua, a gigantic, wonderful personage; enormous; prodigious; inordinate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ga*rism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gargarisme</ets>, L. <ets>gargarisma</ets>. See <er>Gargarize</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A gargle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ga*rize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gargarizare</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/.]</ety> <def>To gargle; to rinse or wash, as the mouth and throat.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garget</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garget</ets>, <ets>gargate</ets>, throat, OF. <ets>gargate</ets>. Cf. <er>Gorge</er>. The etymol. of senses 2, 3, & 4 is not certain.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The throat.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A diseased condition of the udders of cows, etc., arising from an inflammation of the mammary glands.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A distemper in hogs, indicated by staggering and loss of appetite.</def> <rj><au>Youatt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Poke</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gil</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Garget</er>, <er>Gargoyle</er>.]</ety> <def>A distemper in geese, affecting the head.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gargoyle</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gle</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garggled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gargling</conjf> (<?/).]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>gargouiller</ets> to dabble, paddle, gargle. Cf. <er>Gargoyle</er>, <er>Gurgle</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To wash or rinse, as the mouth or throat, particular the latter, agitating the liquid (water or a medicinal preparation) by an expulsion of air from the lungs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To warble; to sing as if gargling</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Waller.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gle</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A liquid, as water or some medicated preparation, used to cleanse the mouth and throat, especially for a medical effect.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gol</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gargil</er>.]</ety> <def>A distemper in swine; garget.</def> <rj><au>Mortimer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gar`gou*lette"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A water cooler or jug with a handle and spout; a gurglet.</def> <rj><au>Mollett.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"goyle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garguilie</ets>, <ets>gargouille</ets>, cf. Sp. <ets>g\'a0rgola</ets>, prob. fr. the same source as F. <ets>gorge</ets> throat, influenced by L. <ets>gargarizare</ets> to gargle. See <er>Gorge</er> and cf. <er>Gargle</er>, <er>Gargarize</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A spout projecting from the roof gutter of a building, often carved grotesquely.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gargle</asp>, <asp>gargyle</asp>, and <asp>gurgoyle</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"gyle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gargoyle</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga`ri*bal"di</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A jacket worn by women; -- so called from its resemblance in shape to the red shirt worn by the Italians patriot <xex>Garibaldi</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A California market fish (<spn>Pomancentrus rubicundus</spn>) of a deep scarlet color.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ish</hw> <pr>(g<acir/r"<icr/sh)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OE. <ets>gauren</ets> to stare; of uncertain origin. Cf. <er>gairish</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Showy; dazzling; ostentatious; attracting or exciting attention.</def> \'bdThe <xex>garish</xex> sun.\'b8 \'bdA <xex>garish</xex> flag.\'b8 <au>Shak.</au> \'bd<xex>In</xex> . . . <xex>garish</xex> colors.\'b8 <au>Asham.</au> \'bd<xex>The garish</xex> day.\'b8 <au>J. H. Newman.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Garish</qex> like the laughters of drunkenness.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Gay to extravagance; flighty.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It makes the mind loose and <qex>garish</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Gar"ish*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gar"ish*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms> <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gar"ish*ness</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>tasteless showiness.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> flashiness, gaudiness, loudness, meretriciousness, tawdriness, glitz.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>strident color or excessive ornamentation.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gaudiness.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"land</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garland</ets>, <ets>gerlond</ets>, OF. <ets>garlande</ets>, F. <ets>guirlande</ets>; of uncertain origin; cf. OHG. <ets>wiara</ets>, <ets>wiera</ets>, crown, pure gold, MHG. <ets>wieren</ets> to adorn.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The crown of a king.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Graffon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A wreath of chaplet made of branches, flowers, or feathers, and sometimes of precious stones, to be worn on the head like a crown; a coronal; a wreath.</def> <rj><au>Pope.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 613 --></p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The top; the thing most prized.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A book of extracts in prose or poetry; an anthology.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>They [ballads] began to be collected into little miscellanies under the name of <qex>garlands</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Percy.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A sort of netted bag used by sailors to keep provision in.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A grommet or ring of rope lashed to a spar for convenience in handling.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"land</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garlanded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garlanding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To deck with a garland.</def> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"land*less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Destitute of a garland.</def> <rj><au>Shelley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"lic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garlek</ets>, AS. <ets>g\'berle\'a0c</ets>; <ets>gar</ets> spear, lance + <ets>le\'a0c</ets> leek. See <er>Gar</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, and <er>Leek</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the genus <gen>Allium</gen> (<spn>A. sativum</spn> is the cultivated variety), having a bulbous root, a very strong smell, and an acrid, pungent taste. Each root is composed of several lesser bulbs, called <xex>cloves of garlic</xex>, inclosed in a common membranous coat, and easily separable.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A kind of jig or farce.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Taylor (1630).</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Garlic mustard</b></col>, <cd>a European plant of the Mustard family (<spn>Alliaria officinalis</spn>) which has a strong smell of garlic.</cd> -- <col><b>Garlic pear tree</b></col>, <cd>a tree in Jamaica (<spn>Crat\'91va gynandra</spn>), bearing a fruit which has a strong scent of garlic, and a burning taste.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"lick*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like or containing garlic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garnement</ets>, OF. <ets>garnement</ets>, <ets>garniment</ets>, fr. <ets>garnir</ets> to garnish. See <er>Garnish</er>.]</ety> <def>Any article of clothing, as a coat, a gown, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>No man putteth a piece of new cloth unto old <qex>garment</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Matt. ix. 16.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ment*ed</hw>, <pos>p. a.</pos> <def>Having on a garment; attired; enveloped, as with a garment.</def> <mark>[Poetic]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A lovely lady <qex>garmented</qex> in light<br/
+From her own beauty.</q> <rj><qau>Shelley.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"men*ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Clothing; dress.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ner</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garner</ets>, <ets>gerner</ets>, <ets>greiner</ets>, OF. <ets>gernier</ets>, <ets>grenier</ets>, F. <ets>grenier</ets>, fr. L. <ets>granarium</ets>, fr. <ets>granum</ets>. See 1st <er>Grain</er>, and cf. <er>Granary</er>.]</ety> <def>A granary; a building or place where grain is stored for preservation.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ner</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garnered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garnering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To gather for preservation; to store, as in a granary; to treasure.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"net</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gernet</ets>, <ets>grenat</ets>, OF. <ets>grenet</ets>,<ets>grenat</ets>, F. <ets>grenat</ets>, LL. <ets>granatus</ets>, fr. L. <ets>granatum</ets> pomegranate, <ets>granatus</ets> having many grains or seeds, fr. <ets>granum</ets> grain, seed. So called from its resemblance in color and shape to the grains or seeds of the pomegranate. See <er>Grain</er>, and cf. <er>Grenade</er>, <er>Pomegranate</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A mineral having many varieties differing in color and in their constituents, but with the same crystallization (isometric), and conforming to the same general chemical formula. The commonest color is red, the luster is vitreous, and the hardness greater than that of quartz. The dodecahedron and trapezohedron are the common forms.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ There are also white, green, yellow, brown, and black varieties. The garnet is a silicate, the bases being aluminia lime (<xex>grossularite</xex>, <xex>essonite</xex>, or <xex>cinnamon stone</xex>), or aluminia magnesia (<xex>pyrope</xex>), or aluminia iron (<xex>almandine</xex>), or aluminia manganese (<xex>spessartite</xex>), or iron lime (<xex>common garnet</xex>, <xex>melanite</xex>, <xex>allochroite</xex>), or chromium lime (<xex>ouvarovite</xex>, color emerald green). The transparent red varieties are used as gems. The garnet was, in part, the carbuncle of the ancients. Garnet is a very common mineral in gneiss and mica slate.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Garnet berry</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>the red currant; -- so called from its transparent red color.</cd> -- <col><b>Garnet brown</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>an artificial dyestuff, produced as an explosive brown crystalline substance with a green or golden luster. It consists of the potassium salt of a complex cyanogen derivative of picric acid.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"net</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. unknown.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A tackle for hoisting cargo in or out.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Clew garnet</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Clew</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar`net*if"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[1st <ets>garnet</ets> + <ets>-ferous</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Containing garnets.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ni*er*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after the French geologist <etsep>Garnier</etsep>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>An amorphous mineral of apple-green color; a hydrous silicate of nickel and magnesia. It is an important ore of nickel.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"nish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garnished</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garnishing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>garnischen</ets>, <ets>garnissen</ets>, OF. <ets>garnir</ets> to provide, strengthen, prepare, garnish, warn, F. <ets>garnir</ets> to provide, furnish, garnish, -- of German origin; cf. OHG. <ets>warn\'d3n</ets> to provide, equip; akin to G. <ets>wahren</ets> to watch, E. <ets>aware</ets>, <ets>ware</ets>, <ets>wary</ets>, and cf. also E. <ets>warn</ets>. See <er>Wary</er>, <er>-ish</er>, and cf. <er>Garment</er>, <er>Garrison</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To decorate with ornamental appendages; to set off; to adorn; to embellish.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>All within with flowers was <qex>garnished</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Cookery)</fld> <def>To ornament, as a dish, with something laid about it; <as>as, a dish <ex>garnished</ex> with parsley</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To furnish; to supply.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To fit with fetters.</def> <mark>[Cant]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>To warn by garnishment; to give notice to; to garnishee. See <er>Garnishee</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"nish</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Something added for embellishment; decoration; ornament; also, dress; garments, especially such as are showy or decorated.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>So are you, sweet,<br/
+Even in the lovely <qex>garnish</qex> of a boy.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Matter and figure they produce;<br/
+For <qex>garnish</qex> this, and that for use.</q> <rj><qau>Prior.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Cookery)</fld> <def>Something set round or upon a dish as an embellishment, such as <stype>parsley</stype>. See <er>Garnish</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 2.</def> <rj><au>Smart.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Fetters.</def> <mark>[Cant]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A fee; specifically, in English jails, formerly an unauthorized fee demanded by the old prisoners of a newcomer.</def> <mark>[Cant]</mark> <rj><au>Fielding.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Garnish bolt</b></col> <fld>(Carp.)</fld>, <cd>a bolt with a chamfered or faceted head.</cd> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar`nish*ee"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who is garnished; a person upon whom garnishment has been served in a suit by a creditor against a debtor, such person holding property belonging to the debtor, or owing him money.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The order by which warning is made is called a <ecol><b>garnishee order</b></ecol>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar`nish*ee"</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garnisheed</conjf> <pr>(-<emac/d)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garnisheeing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <fld>(Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>To make (a person) a garnishee; to warn by garnishment; to garnish.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>To attach (the fund or property sought to be secured by garnishment); to trustee.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"nish*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, garnishes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"nish*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>garnissement</ets> protection, guarantee, warning.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Ornament; embellishment; decoration.</def> <rj><au>Sir H. Wotton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Warning, or legal notice, to one to appear and give information to the court on any matter.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Warning to a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached, not to pay the money or deliver the goods to the defendant, but to appear in court and give information as garnishee.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A fee. See <er>Garnish</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ni*ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>garniture</ets>. See <er>Garnish</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>That which garnishes; ornamental appendage; embellishment; furniture; dress.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The pomp of groves and <qex>garniture</qex> of fields.</q> <rj><qau>Beattie.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga*roo"kuh</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small fishing vessel met with in the Persian Gulf.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Garum</er>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to, or resembling, garum.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gar" pike`</hw> <it>or</it> <hw>Gar"pike`</hw></mhw>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See under <er>Gar</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ran</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gael. <ets>garr\'a0n</ets>, <ets>gearr\'a0n</ets>, gelding, work horse, hack.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Galloway</er>.</def> <altsp>[Scot. <asp>garron</asp> or <asp>gerron</asp>. <au>Jamieson.</au>]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garite</ets>, <ets>garette</ets>, watchtower, place of lookout, OF. <ets>garite</ets>, also meaning, a place of refuge, F. <ets>gu\'82rite</ets> a place of refuge, donjon, sentinel box, fr. OF. <ets>garir</ets> to preserve, save, defend, F. <ets>gu\'82rir</ets> to cure; of German origin; cf. OHG. <ets>werian</ets> to protect, defend, hinder, G. <ets>wehren</ets>, akin to Goth. <ets>warjan</ets> to hinder, and akin to E. <ets>weir</ets>, or perhaps to <ets>wary</ets>. See <er>Weir</er>, and cf. <er>Guerite</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A turret; a watchtower.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He saw men go up and down on the <qex>garrets</qex> of the gates and walls.</q> <rj><qau>Ld. Berners.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That part of a house which is on the upper floor, immediately under or within the roof; an attic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The tottering <qex>garrets</qex> which overhung the streets of Rome.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ret*ed</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Protected by turrets.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>R. Carew.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar`ret*eer"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who lives in a garret; a poor author; a literary hack.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ret*ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Small splinters of stone inserted into the joints of coarse masonry.</def> <rj><au>Weale.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ri*son</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>garnisoun</ets>, F. <ets>garnison</ets> garrison, in OF. & OE. also, provision, munitions, from <ets>garnir</ets> to garnish. See <er>Garnish</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A body of troops stationed in a fort or fortified town.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A fortified place, in which troops are quartered for its security.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>In garrison</b></col>, <cd>in the condition of a garrison; doing duty in a fort or as one of a garrison.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ri*son</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garrisoned</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garrisoning</conjf>.]</vmorph> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>To place troops in, as a fortification, for its defense; to furnish with soldiers; <as>as, to <ex>garrison</ex> a fort or town</as>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>To secure or defend by fortresses manned with troops; <as>as, to <ex>garrison</ex> a conquered territory</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Garran</er>.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"rot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. Cf. <er>Garrote</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A stick or small wooden cylinder used for tightening a bandage, in order to compress the arteries of a limb.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"rot</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European golden-eye.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar*rote"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>garrote</ets>, from <ets>garra</ets> claw, talon, of Celtic origin; cf. Armor. & W. <ets>gar</ets> leg, ham, shank. Cf. <er>Garrot</er> stick, <er>Garter</er>.]</ety> <def>A Spanish mode of execution by strangulation, with an iron collar affixed to a post and tightened by a screw until life become extinct.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The instrument by means of which the garrote{1} is inflicted.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> garrote, garotte, iron collar.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>A short length of rope or other instrument used to strangle a person.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar*rote"</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Garroted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Garroting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To strangle with the garrote; hence, to seize by the throat, from behind, with a view to strangle and rob.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gar*rot"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who seizes a person by the throat from behind, with a view to strangle and rob him.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garrulinae</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A subfamily of the crow family, including the jays.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> subfamily <fam>Garrulinae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gar*ru"li*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>garrulitas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>garrulit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>Talkativeness; loquacity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ru*lous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>garrulus</ets>, fr. <ets>garrire</ets> to chatter, talk; cf. Gr. <?/ voice, <?/ to speak, sing. Cf. <er>Call</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Talking much, especially about commonplace or trivial things; talkative; loquacious.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The most <qex>garrulous</qex> people on earth.</q> <rj><qau>De Quincey.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having a loud, harsh note; noisy; -- said of birds; <as>as, the <ex>garrulous</ex> roller</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- <er>Garrulous</er>, <er>Talkative</er>, <er>Loquacious</er>.</syn> <usage> A <xex>garrulous</xex> person indulges in long, prosy talk, with frequent repetitions and lengthened details; <xex>talkative</xex> implies simply a great desire to talk; and <xex>loquacious</xex> a great flow of words at command. A child is <xex>talkative</xex>; a lively woman is <xex>loquacious</xex>; an old man in his dotage is <xex>garrulous</xex>.</usage></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Gar"ru*lous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gar"ru*lous*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garrulus</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the Garrulinae, conmprising the Old World jays.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Garrulus</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar*ru"pa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prob. fr. Pg. <ets>garupa</ets> crupper. Cf. <er>Grouper</er> the fish.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several species of California market fishes, of the genus <gen>Sebastichthys</gen>; -- called also <altname>rockfish</altname>. See <er>Rockfish</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gartier</ets>, F. <ets>jarreti\'8are</ets>, fr. OF. <ets>garet</ets> bend of the knee, F. <ets>jarret</ets>; akin to Sp. <ets>garra</ets> claw, Prov. <ets>garra</ets> leg. See <er>Garrote</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A band used to prevent a stocking from slipping down on the leg.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The distinguishing badge of the highest order of knighthood in Great Britain, called the <xex>Order of the Garter</xex>, instituted by Edward III.; also, the Order itself.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Bendlet</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Garter fish</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a fish of the genus <gen>Lepidopus</gen>, having a long, flat body, like the blade of a sword; the scabbard fish.</cd> -- <col><b>Garter king-at-arms</b></col>, <cd>the chief of the official heralds of England, king-at-arms to the Order of the Garter; -- often abbreviated to <altname>Garter</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Garter snake</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>one of several harmless American snakes of the genus <gen>Eut\'91nia</gen>, of several species (esp. <spn>E. saurita</spn> and <spn>E. sirtalis</spn>); one of the striped snakes; -- so called from its conspicuous stripes of color.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gartered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gartering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To bind with a garter.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He . . . could not see to <qex>garter</qex> his hose.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To invest with the Order of the Garter.</def> <rj><au>T. Warton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garter stitch</hw>. <def>The simplest stitch in knitting.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garth</hw> <pr>(g<aum/rth)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gar<edh/r</ets> yard. See <er>Yard</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A close; a yard; a croft; a garden; <as>as, a cloister <ex>garth</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A clapper clapping in a <qex>garth</qex><br/
+To scare the fowl from fruit.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A dam or weir for catching fish.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garth</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<er>Girth</er>.]</ety> <def>A hoop or band.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Garuda</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Hinduism)</fld> <def> supernatural half-man and half-bird vehicle or bearer of Vishnu.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga"rum</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"r<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <grk>ga`ros</grk>.]</ety> <def>A sauce made of small fish. It was prized by the ancients.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gar"vie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The sprat; -- called also <altname>garvie herring</altname>, and <altname>garvock</altname>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas</hw> <pr>(g<acr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gases</plw> <pr>(g<acr/s"<ecr/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Invented by the chemist <person>Van Helmont</person> of Brussels, who died in 1644.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An a\'89riform fluid; -- a term used at first by chemists as synonymous with <xex>air</xex>, but since restricted to fluids supposed to be permanently elastic, as oxygen, hydrogen, etc., in distinction from vapors, as steam, which become liquid on a reduction of temperature. In present usage, since all of the supposed permanent gases have been liquified by cold and pressure, the term has resumed nearly its original signification, and is applied to any substance in the elastic or a\'89riform state.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Popular Usage)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A complex mixture of gases, of which the most important constituents are marsh gas, olefiant gas, and hydrogen, artificially produced by the destructive distillation of gas coal, or sometimes of peat, wood, oil, resin, etc. It gives a brilliant light when burned, and is the common gas used for illuminating purposes.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Laughing gas.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>Any irrespirable a\'89riform fluid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>same as <er>gasoline</er>; -- a shortened form. Also, the accelerator pedal of a motor vehicle; used in the term \'bd step on the <ex>gas</ex>\'b8.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>the accelerator pedal of a motor vehicle; used in the term \'bd step on the <ex>gas</ex>\'b8.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Same as <er>natural gas</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>an exceptionally enjoyable event; a good time; <as>as, The concert was a <ex>gas</ex></as>.</def> <mark>[slang]</mark><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Gas</xex> is often used adjectively or in combination; as, <xex>gas</xex> fitter or <xex>gas</xex>fitter; <xex>gas</xex> meter or <xex>gas</xex>-meter, etc.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Air gas</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of gas made by forcing air through some volatile hydrocarbon, as the lighter petroleums. The air is so saturated with combustible vapor as to be a convenient illuminating and heating agent.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas battery</b></col> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <cd>a form of voltaic battery, in which gases, especially hydrogen and oxygen, are the active agents.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Gas carbon</b></col>, <col><b>Gas coke</b></col></mcol>, <cd>etc. See under <er>Carbon</er>, <er>Coke</er>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas coal</b></col>, <cd>a bituminous or hydrogenous coal yielding a high percentage of volatile matters, and therefore available for the manufacture of illuminating gas.</cd> <au>R. W. Raymond.</au> -- <col><b>Gas engine</b></col>, <cd>an engine in which the motion of the piston is produced by the combustion or sudden production or expansion of gas; -- especially, an engine in which an explosive mixture of gas and air is forced into the working cylinder and ignited there by a gas flame or an electric spark.</cd><-- = internal combustion engine --> -- <col><b>Gas fitter</b></col>, <cd>one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for gas.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas fitting</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>The occupation of a gas fitter.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <cd>The appliances needed for the introduction of gas into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas fixture</b></col>, <cd>a device for conveying illuminating or combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner, consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are adjusted.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas generator</b></col>, <cd>an apparatus in which gas is evolved</cd>; as: <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by heat</cd>; <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor</cd>; <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for a\'89rating water, bread, etc.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Gas jet</b></col>, <cd>a flame of illuminating gas.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas machine</b></col>, <cd>an apparatus for carbureting air for use as illuminating gas.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas meter</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for recording the quantity of gas consumed in a given time, at a particular place.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas retort</b></col>, <cd>a retort which contains the coal and other materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the manufacture of gas.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas stove</b></col>, <cd>a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by gas.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas tar</b></col>, <cd>coal tar.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas trap</b></col>, <cd>a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th <er>Trap</er>, 5.</cd> -- <col><b>Gas washer</b></col> <fld>(Gas Works)</fld>, <cd>an apparatus within which gas from the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Gas water</b></col>, <cd>water through which gas has been passed for purification; -- called also <altname>gas liquor</altname> and <altname>ammoniacal water</altname>, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac, carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue.</cd> <au>Tomlinson.</au> -- <col><b>Gas well</b></col>, <cd>a deep boring, from which natural gas is discharged.</cd> <au>Raymond.</au> -- <col><b>Gas works</b></col>, <cd>a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting cities.</cd> -- <col><b>Laughing gas</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Laughing</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Marsh gas</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>a light, combustible, gaseous hydrocarbon, <chform>CH4</chform>, produced artificially by the dry distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools, whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin series. Called also <altname>methane</altname>, and in coal mines, <altname>fire damp</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Natural gas</b></col>, <cd>gas obtained from wells, etc., in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from the Coal Measures.</cd> -- <col><b>Olefiant gas</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>. <cd>See <er>Ethylene</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Water gas</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.<-- = <altname>synthesis gas</altname> --></cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 614 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas</hw> <pr>(g<acr/s)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gassed</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/st)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gassing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Textiles)</fld> <def>To singe, as in a gas flame, so as to remove loose fibers; <as>as, to <ex>gas</ex> thread</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To impregnate with gas; <as>as, to <ex>gas</ex> lime with chlorine in the manufacture of bleaching powder</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>to expose to a poisonous or noxious gas</def> \'bdThe protest threatened to become violent, and the police <ex>gassed</ex> the demonstrators to force them to disperse.\'b8<br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`a*lier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Formed from <ets>gas</ets>, in imitation of chande<ets>lier</ets>.]</ety> <def>A chandelier arranged to burn gas.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gaselier.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gasbag</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a person who talks a great deal about uninteresting topics.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> windbag.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>the bag containing the gas in a balloon.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> envelope.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"-burn`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The jet piece of a gas fixture where the gas is burned as it escapes from one or more minute orifices.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gascogne</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A region of southwestern France; Gascony.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Gascony.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"coines</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>See <er>Gaskins</er>, 1.</def> <rj><au>Lyly.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"con</hw> <pr>(?; F. ?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Gascony, in France, or to the Gascons; also, braggart; swaggering.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native of Gascony; a boaster; a bully. See <er>Gasconade</er>.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`con*ade"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gasconnade</ets>, from <ets>Gascon</ets> an inhabitant of Gascony, the people of which were noted for boasting.]</ety> <def>A boast or boasting; a vaunt; a bravado; a bragging; braggodocio.</def> <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`con*ade"</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gasconaded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gasconading</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To boast; to brag; to bluster.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`con*ad"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A great boaster; a blusterer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"coynes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>Gaskins.</def> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*e"i*ty</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>State of being gaseous.</def> <mark>[R]</mark> <rj><au>Eng. Cyc.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`e*lier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Formed from <ets>gas</ets>, in imitation of chande<ets>lier</ets>.]</ety> <def>A chandelier arranged to burn gas.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gasalier.</syn><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas engine</hw>. <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A kind of internal-combustion engine (which see) using fixed gas; also, broadly, any internal-combustion engine.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"e*ous</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gas</er>. Cf. F. <ets>gazeux</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>In the form, or of the nature, of gas, or of an a\'89riform fluid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Lacking substance or solidity; tenuous.</def> \'bdUnconnected, <xex>gaseous</xex> information.\'b8 <rj><au>Sir J. Stephen.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gash</hw> <pr>(g<acr/sh)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gashed</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/sht)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gashing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[For older <ets>garth</ets> or <ets>garse</ets>, OF. <ets>garser</ets> to scarify, F. <ets>gercer</ets> to chap, perh. from an assumed LL. <ets>carptiare</ets>, fr. L. <ets>carpere</ets>, <ets>carptum</ets>, to pluck, separate into parts; cf. LL. <ets>carptare</ets> to wound. Cf. <er>Carpet</er>.]</ety> <def>To make a gash, or long, deep incision in; -- applied chiefly to incisions in flesh.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Grievously <qex>gashed</qex> or gored to death.</q> <rj><qau>Hayward.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gash</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A deep and long cut; an incision of considerable length and depth, particularly in flesh.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gasherbrum</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A mountain in Kashmir, 26,470 feet high.</def> <mark>[proper name]</mark><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gash"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of gashes; hideous; frightful.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdA <xex>gashful</xex>, horrid, ugly shape.\'b8 <rj><au>Gayton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`i*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gasify</er>.]</ety> <def>The act or process of converting into gas.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"i*form</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having a form of gas; gaseous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"i*fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gasified</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gasifying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[<ets>Gas</ets> + <ets>-fy</ets>.]</ety> <def>To convert into a gas, as by the application of heat, or by chemical processes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"i*fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To become gas; to pass from a liquid to a gaseous state.</def> <rj><au>Scientific American.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"ket</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>garcette</ets>, It. <ets>gaschetta</ets>, Sp. <ets>cajeta</ets> caburn, <ets>garceta</ets> reef point.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A line or band used to lash a furled sail securely. <stype>Sea gaskets</stype> are common lines; <stype>harbor gaskets</stype> are plaited and decorated lines or bands. Called also <altname>casket</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The plaited hemp used for packing a piston, as of the steam engine and its pumps.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Any ring or washer of made of a compressible material, used to make joints impermeable to fluids.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"kins</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Galligaskins</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Loose hose or breeches; galligaskins.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Packing of hemp.</def> <rj><au>Simmonds.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A horse's thighs.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gasmask</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a mask with a filter which protects the face and lungs against poisonous gases. It is used in warfare, and also by police to allow them to effectively use tear gas or other disabling gas to disperse a crowd or force fugitives to leave a building.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> respirator, gas helmet.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"light`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The light yielded by the combustion of illuminating gas.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A gas jet or burner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"o*gen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gas</ets> + <ets>-gen</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An apparatus for the generation of gases, or for impregnating a liquid with a gas, or a gas with a volatile liquid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A volatile hydrocarbon, used as an illuminant, or for charging illuminating gas.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`o*lene</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gasoline</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`o*lier"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gasalier</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gas"o*line</hw>, <hw>Gas"o*lene</hw></mhw> <pr>(? <or/ ?; 104)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A highly volatile mixture of fluid hydrocarbons, obtained mostly from petroleum, as also by the distillation of bituminous coal. It is used as a fuel for most automobiles and for many other vehicles with internal combustion engines. The <ex>gasoline</ex> of commerce is typically blended with additives to improve its performance in internal combustion engines. <ex>Gasoline</ex> was also used in the early 1900's in making air gas, and in giving illuminating power to water gas. See <er>Carburetor</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> petrol[Brit].</syn>
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gas"o*line en"gine</hw>, <it>or</it> <hw>Gas"o*lene en"gine</hw> }</mhw>. <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A kind of internal-combustion engine; -- in British countries called usually <altname><ecol><b>petrol engine</b></ecol></altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*om"e*ter</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gas</ets> + <ets>-meter</ets>. Cf. F. <ets>gazom\'8atre</ets>.]</ety> <def>An apparatus for holding and measuring of gas; in gas works, a huge iron cylinder closed at one end and having the other end immersed in water, in which it is made to rise or fall, according to the volume of gas it contains, or the pressure required.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gas`o*met"ric</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <hw>Gas`o*met"ric*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to the measurement of gases; <as>as, <ex>gasometric</ex> analysis</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*om"e*try</hw> <pr>(? <or/ ?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or practice of measuring gases; also, the science which treats of the nature and properties of these elastic fluids.</def> <rj><au>Coxe.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"o*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gas</ets> + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <def>An apparatus for detecting the presence of any dangerous gas, from a gas leak in a coal mine or a dwelling house.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gasp</hw> <pr>(g<adot/sp)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gasped</conjf> <pr>(g<adot/spt)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gasping</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaspen</ets>, <ets>gaispen</ets>, to yawn, gasp, Icel. <ets>geispa</ets> to yawn; akin to Sw. <ets>g\'84spa</ets>, Dan. <ets>gispe</ets> to gasp.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To open the mouth wide in catching the breath, or in laborious respiration; to labor for breath; to respire convulsively; to pant violently.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>She <qex>gasps</qex> and struggles hard for life.</q> <rj><qau>Lloyd.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To pant with eagerness; to show vehement desire.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Quenching the <qex>gasping</qex> furrows' thirst with rain.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gasp</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To emit or utter with gasps; -- with <xex>forth</xex>, <xex>out</xex>, <xex>away</xex>, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And with short sobs he <qex>gasps</qex> away his breath.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gasp</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of opening the mouth convulsively to catch the breath; a labored respiration; a painful catching of the breath.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>At the last gasp</b></col>, <cd>at the point of death.</cd> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"per*eau</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The alewife.</def> <mark>[Local, Canada]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*se"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Relating to Casserio (L. <it>Gasserius</it>), the discover of the Gasserian ganglion.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gasserian ganglion</b></col> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>a large ganglion, at the root of the trigeminal, or fifth cranial, nerve.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"sing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Manuf.)</fld> <def>The process of passing cotton goods between two rollers and exposing them to numerous minute jets of gas to burn off the small fibers; any similar process of singeing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Boasting; insincere or empty talk.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Full of gas; like gas.</def> <specif>Hence:</specif> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <def>Inflated; full of boastful or insincere talk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>passing intestinal gas excessively; flatulent.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gast</hw> <pr>(g<adot/st)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gasten</ets>, <ets>g<aemac/sten</ets> to frighten, akin to Goth. <ets>usgaisjan</ets>. See <er>Aghast</er>, <er>Ghastly</er>, and cf. <er>Gaze</er>.]</ety> <def>To make aghast; to frighten; to terrify. See <er>Aghast</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer. Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gast"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To gast.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas`te*ro*my*ce"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <?/ stomach + <?/ a mushroom.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>An order of fungi, in which the spores are borne inside a sac called the peridium, as in the puffballs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gasterophilus</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the <fam>Gasterophilidae</fam>, comprising the horse botflies.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gasterophilus</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"ter*o*pod</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Gastropod</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas`te*rop`o*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Gastropoda</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`ter*op"o*dous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Gastropodous</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gast"ful</hw>, <hw>Gast"ly</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <def>See <er>Ghastful</er>, <er>Ghastly</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tight`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>So tightly fitted as to preclude the escape of gas; impervious to gas.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gast"ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Ghastness</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*tor"nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from <ets>Gaston</ets> M. Plante, the discover + Gr. <?/ bird.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of large eocene birds from the Paris basin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*tr\'91"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <?/, <?/, the stomach.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A primeval larval form; a double-walled sac from which, according to the hypothesis of Haeckel, man and all other animals, that in the first stages of their individual evolution pass through a two-layered structural stage, or gastrula form, must have descended. This idea constitutes the <xex>Gastr\'91a theory</xex> of Haeckel. See <er>Gastrula</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*tral"gi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ pain.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Pain in the stomach or epigastrium, as in gastric disorders.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach: cf. F. <ets>gastrique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; <as>as, the <ex>gastric</ex> artery</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gastric digestion</b></col> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, <cd>the conversion of the albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric juice.</cd> -- <col><b>Gastric fever</b></col> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>a fever attended with prominent gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the stomach attended with fever.</cd> -- <col><b>Gastric juice</b></col> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, <cd>a thin, watery fluid, with an acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.</cd> -- <col><b>Gastric remittent fever</b></col> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>a form of remittent fever with pronounced stomach symptoms.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tril"o*quist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gasth`r</grk>, <grk>gastro`s</grk>, stomach + L. <xex>loqui</xex> to speak.]</ety> <def>One who appears to speak from his stomach; a ventriloquist.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tril"o*quous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Ventriloquous.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tril"o*quy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A voice or utterance which appears to proceed from the stomach; ventriloquy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*tri"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <ets>-itis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Inflammation of the stomach, esp. of its mucuos membrane.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tro-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A combining form from the Gr. <?/, <?/, the stomach, or belly; as in <xex>gastro</xex>colic, <xex>gastro</xex>cele, <xex>gastro</xex>tomy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`troc*ne"mi*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <?/ the calf of the leg.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The muscle which makes the greater part of the calf of the leg.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*col"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>colic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to both the stomach and the colon; <as>as, the <ex>gastrocolic</ex>, or great, omentum</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*disc</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>disc</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>That part of blastoderm where the hypoblast appears like a small disk on the inner face of the epibladst.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*du"o*de"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-duodenal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the stomach and duodenum; <as>as, the <ex>gastroduodenal</ex> artery</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*du`o*de*ni"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Gastroduodenal</er>, and <er>-itis</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Inflammation of the stomach and duodenum. It is one of the most frequent causes of jaundice.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*el`y*trot"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + Gr <?/ sheath + <?/ a cutting]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The operation of cutting into the upper part of the vagina, through the abdomen (without opening the peritoneum), for the purpose of removing a fetus. It is a substitute for the C\'91sarean operation, and less dangerous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*en*te"ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-enteric</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat. & Med.)</fld> <def>Gastrointestinal.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas`tro*en`te*ri"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Gastroenrteric</er>, and <er>-itis</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Inflammation of the lining membrane of the stomach and the intestines.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*ep`i*plo"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-epiploic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the stomach and omentum.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*he*pat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-hepatic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the stomach and liver; hepatogastric; <as>as, the <ex>gastrohepatic</ex>, or lesser, omentum</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*hys`ter*ot"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + Gr. <?/ womb + <ets><?/</ets> to cut.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>C\'91sarean section. See under <er>C\'91sarean</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*in*tes"ti*nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-intestinal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat. & Med.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines; gastroenteric.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*lith</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-lith</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <cref>Crab's eyes</cref>, under <er>Crab</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*trol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr <?/; <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ discourse: cf. F. <ets>gastrologie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The science which treats of the structure and functions of the stomach; a treatise of the stomach.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas`tro*ma*la"ci*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ softness, fr. <?/ soft.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A softening of the coats of the stomach; -- usually a post-morten change.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*man"cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-mancy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gastromancy</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Antiq.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A kind of divination, by means of words seemingly uttered from the stomach.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A species of divination, by means of glasses or other round, transparent vessels, in the center of which figures are supposed to appear by magic art.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas`tro*my"ces</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/, <?/, a fungus.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The fungoid growths sometimes found in the stomach; such as Torula, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tro*myth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + Gr. <?/ to say, speak.]</ety> <def>One whose voice appears to proceed from the stomach; a ventriloquist.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gas"tro*nome</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gas*tron"o*mer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gastronome</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ law, <?/ to distribute.]</ety> <def>One fond of good living; an epicure.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gas`tro*nom"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gas`tro*nom"ic*al</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gastronomique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to gastromony.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tron"o*mist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gastromomer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tron"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>gastronomie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The art or science of good eating; epicurism; the art of good cheer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*phren"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-phrenic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the stomach and diaphragm; <as>as, the <ex>gastrophrenic</ex> ligament</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*pneu*mat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>pneumatic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the alimentary canal and air passages, and to the cavities connected with them; <as>as, the <ex>gastropneumatic</ex> mucuos membranes</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tro*pod</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Gastropoda.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gasteropod</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*trop"o*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos>, <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <ets>-poda</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat, muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See <er>Mollusca</er>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Gasteropoda</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The Gastropoda are divided into three subclasses; viz.: (<stype>a</stype>) The Streptoneura or Dioecia, including the Pectinibranchiata, Rhipidoglossa, Docoglossa, and Heteropoda. (<stype>b</stype>) The Euthyneura, including the Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia. (<stype>c</stype>) The Amphineura, including the Polyplacophora and Aplacophora.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*trop"o*dous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Gastropoda.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tror"a*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr.<?/; <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ a sewing, fr. <?/ to sew: cf. F. <ets>gastrorrhaphie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The operation of sewing up wounds of the abdomen.</def> <rj><au>Quincy.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas"tro*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>An instrument for viewing or examining the interior of the stomach.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*scop"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to gastroscopy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tros"co*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Examination of the abdomen or stomach, as with the gastroscope.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*splen"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>splenic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the stomach and spleen; <as>as, the <ex>gastrosplenic</ex> ligament</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tros"tege</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + Gr. <?/ roof.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the large scales on the belly of a serpent.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tros"to*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + Gr. <?/ mouth.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The operation of making a permanent opening into the stomach, for the introduction of food.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*trot"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro</ets> + Gr. <?/ to cut: cf. F. <ets>gastrotomie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A cutting into, or opening of, the abdomen or the stomach.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*trot"ri*cha</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos>, <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ belly + <?/, <?/, hair.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A group of small wormlike animals, having cilia on the ventral side. The group is regarded as an ancestral or synthetic one, related to rotifers and annelids.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*trot"ro*cha</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, stomach + <?/ a wheel.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A form of annelid larva having cilia on the ventral side.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tro*vas"cu*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gastro-</ets> + <ets>-vascular</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the structure, or performing the functions, both of digestive and circulatory organs; <as>as, the <ex>gastrovascular</ex> cavity of c<oe/lenterates</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas"tru*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it></plu> <plw>Gastrul\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr> <ety>[NL., dim. fr. Gr. <?/ the stomach.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>An embryonic form having its origin in the invagination or pushing in of the wall of the planula or blastula (the <xex>blastosphere</xex>) on one side, thus giving rise to a double-walled sac, with one opening or mouth (the <xex>blastopore</xex>) which leads into the cavity (the <xex>archenteron</xex>) lined by the inner wall (the <xex>hypoblast</xex>). See <xex>Illust.</xex> under <er>Invagination</er>. In a more general sense, an ideal stage in embryonic development. See <er>Gastr\'91a</er>.</def> -- <def2><pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to a gastrula.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 615 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas`tru*la"tion</hw> <pr>(g<acr/s`tr<usdot/*l<amac/"sh<ucr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The process of invagination, in embryonic development, by which a gastrula is formed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gas*tru"ra</hw> <pr>(g<acr/s*tr<udd/"r<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>gasth`r</grk> belly + <grk>o'yra`</grk> tail.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Stomatopoda</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gas*tru"rous</hw> <pr>(g<acr/s*tr<udd/"r<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the Gastrura.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gat</hw> <pr>(g<acr/t)</pr>, <def><pos>imp.</pos> of <er>Get</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gatch</hw> <pr>(g<acr/ch)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Per. <ets>gach</ets> mortar.]</ety> <def>Plaster as used in Persian architecture and decorative art.</def></p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gatch decoration</b></col>, <cd>decoration in plaster often producing design of great beauty.</cd> -- <col><b>Gatch work</b></col>, <cd>work in which gatch is employed; also, articles of gatch ornamentation collectively.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets><yogh/et</ets>, <ets><yogh/eat</ets>, <ets>giat</ets>, gate, door, AS. <ets>geat</ets>, <ets>gat</ets>, gate, door; akin to OS., D., & Icel. <ets>gat</ets> opening, hole, and perh. to E. <ets>gate</ets> a way, <ets>gait</ets>, and <ets>get</ets>, v. Cf. <er>Gate</er> a way, 3d <er>Get</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A large door or passageway in the wall of a city, of an inclosed field or place, or of a grand edifice, etc.; also, the movable structure of timber, metal, etc., by which the passage can be closed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An opening for passage in any inclosing wall, fence, or barrier; or the suspended framework which closes or opens a passage. Also, figuratively, a means or way of entrance or of exit.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Knowest thou the way to Dover?<br/
+Both stile and <qex>gate</qex>, horse way and footpath.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Opening a <qex>gate</qex> for a long war.</q> <rj><qau>Knolles.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Script.)</fld> <def>The places which command the entrances or access; hence, place of vantage; power; might.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>gates</qex> of hell shall not prevail against it.</q> <rj><qau>Matt. xvi. 18.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Founding)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mold; the ingate.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>geat</asp> and <asp>git</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gate chamber</b></col>, <cd>a recess in the side wall of a canal lock, which receives the opened gate.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate channel</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Gate</er>, 5.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate hook</b></col>, <cd>the hook-formed piece of a gate hinge.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate money</b></col>, <cd>entrance money for admission to an inclosure.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate tender</b></col>, <cd>one in charge of a gate, as at a railroad crossing.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate valva</b></col>, <cd>a stop valve for a pipe, having a sliding gate which affords a straight passageway when open.</cd> -- <col><b>Gate vein</b></col> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>the portal vein.</cd> -- <col><b>To break gates</b></col> <fld>(Eng. Univ.)</fld>, <cd>to enter a college inclosure after the hour to which a student has been restricted.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To stand in the gate</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To stand in the gates</b></col></mcol>, <cd>to occupy places or advantage, power, or defense.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To supply with a gate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Eng. Univ.)</fld> <def>To punish by requiring to be within the gates at an earlier hour than usual.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gata</ets>; akin to SW. <ets>gata</ets> street, lane, Dan. <ets>gade</ets>, Goth. <ets>gatw\'94</ets>, G. <ets>gasse</ets>. Cf. <er>Gate</er> a door, <er>Gait</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A way; a path; a road; a street (as in High<xex>gate</xex>).</def> <mark>[O. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I was going to be an honest man; but the devil has this very day flung first a lawyer, and then a woman, in my <qex>gate</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Manner; gait.</def> <mark>[O. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>ga*teau"</hw>, <hw>g<acir/*teau"</hw></mhw> <pr>(g<adot/*t<omac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. cake.]</ety> <fld>(Cookery)</fld> <def>Any of various rich and elaborate cakes, particularly a light sponge cake having a rich filling or rich icing, such as <stype>gateau foret noire</stype> (Black Forest Cake).</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gate"crash`</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>to enter uninvited into a party or other social event.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> intrude, barge in, crash, gate-crash, irrupt.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gate"crash`er</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>A person who enters into a party or other social event without an invitation, or into a theater or other public performance without a ticket.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gate-crashing</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>entering a gathering uninvited; <as>as, <ex>gate-crashing</ex> guests disrupted the party</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gat"ed</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"<ecr/d)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having gates.</def> <rj><au>Young.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"house`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"hous`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A house connected or associated with a gate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having no gate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"man</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"m<ait/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gate keeper; a gate tender.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"post`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"p<omac/st`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A post to which a gate is hung; -- called also <altname>swinging post</altname> <it>or</it> <altname>hinging post</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A post against which a gate closes; -- called also <altname>shutting post</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"way`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"w<amac/`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A passage through a fence or wall; a gate; also, a frame, arch, etc., in which a gate in hung, or a structure at an entrance or gate designed for ornament or defense.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gate"wise`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/t"w<imac/z`)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In the manner of a gate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Three circles of stones set up <qex>gatewise</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er</hw> <pr>(g<acr/<th/"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gathered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gathering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaderen</ets>, AS. <ets>gaderian</ets>, <ets>gadrian</ets>, fr. <ets>gador</ets>, <ets>geador</ets>, together, fr. <ets>g\'91d</ets> fellowship; akin to E. <ets>good</ets>, D. <ets>gaderen</ets> to collect, G. <ets>gatte</ets> husband, MHG. <ets>gate</ets>, also companion, Goth. <ets>gadiliggs</ets> a sister's son. <root/29. See <er>Good</er>, and cf. <er>Together</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And Belgium's capital had <qex>gathered</qex> them<br/
+Her beauty and her chivalry.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>When he had <qex>gathered</qex> all the chief priests and scribes of the people together.</q> <rj><qau>Matt. ii. 4.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To pick out and bring together from among what is of less value; to collect, as a harvest; to harvest; to cull; to pick off; to pluck.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A rose just <qex>gathered</qex> from the stalk.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Do men <qex>gather</qex> grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?</q> <rj><qau>Matt. vii. 16.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Gather</qex> us from among the heathen.</q> <rj><qau>Ps. cvi. 47.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To accumulate by collecting and saving little by little; to amass; to gain; to heap up.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He that by usury and unjust gain increaseth his substance, he shall <qex>gather</qex> it for him that will pity the poor.</q> <rj><qau>Prov. xxviii. 8.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To pay the creditor . . . he must <qex>gather</qex> up money by degrees.</q> <rj><qau>Locke.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To bring closely together the parts or particles of; to contract; to compress; to bring together in folds or plaits, as a garment; also, to draw together, as a piece of cloth by a thread; to pucker; to plait; <as>as, to <ex>gather</ex> a ruffle</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Gathering</qex> his flowing robe, he seemed to stand<br/
+In act to speak, and graceful stretched his hand.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To derive, or deduce, as an inference; to collect, as a conclusion, from circumstances that suggest, or arguments that prove; to infer; to conclude.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Let me say no more!<br/
+<qex>Gather</qex> the sequel by that went before.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>To gain; to win.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He <qex>gathers</qex> ground upon her in the chase.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue, or the like.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To haul in; to take up; <as>as, to <ex>gather</ex> the slack of a rope</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>To be gathered to one's people</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To be gathered to one's fathers</b></col></mcol> <cd>to die.</cd> <au>Gen. xxv. 8.</au> -- <col><b>To gather breath</b></col>, <cd>to recover normal breathing after being out of breath; to get one's breath; to rest.</cd> <au>Spenser.</au> -- <col><b>To gather one's self together</b></col>, <cd>to collect and dispose one's powers for a great effort, as a beast crouches preparatory to a leap.</cd> -- <col><b>To gather way</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to begin to move; to move with increasing speed.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>When small humors <qex>gather</qex> to a gout.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Tears from the depth of some divine despair<br/
+Rise in the heart, and <qex>gather</qex> to the eyes.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To grow larger by accretion; to increase.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Their snowball did not <qex>gather</qex> as it went.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; <as>as, a boil has <ex>gathered</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To collect or bring things together.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thou knewest that I reap where I sowed not, and <qex>gather</qex> where I have not strewed.</q> <rj><qau>Matt. xxv. 26.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Carriage Making)</fld> <def>The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in <xex>gathering</xex>. See <er>Gather</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 7.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er*a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being gathered or collected; deducible from premises.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Godwin.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who gathers or collects.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Sewing Machine)</fld> <def>An attachment for making gathers in the cloth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of collecting or bringing together.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is gathered, collected, or brought together</def>; as: <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A crowd; an assembly; a congregation.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A charitable contribution; a collection.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>A tumor or boil suppurated or maturated; an abscess.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gath"er*ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Assembling; collecting; used for gathering or concentrating.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gathering board</b></col> <fld>(Bookbinding)</fld>, <cd>a table or board on which signatures are gathered or assembled, to form a book.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Gathering coal</b></col>, <cd>a lighted coal left smothered in embers over night, about which kindling wood is gathered in the morning.</cd> -- <col><b>Gathering hoop</b></col>, <cd>a hoop used by coopers to draw together the ends of barrel staves, to allow the hoops to be slipped over them.</cd> -- <col><b>Gathering peat</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A piece of peat used as a gathering coal, to preserve a fire.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>In Scotland, a fiery peat which was sent round by the Borderers as an alarm signal, as the fiery cross was by the Highlanders.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gat"ling gun`</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>. <ety>[From the inventor, R.J. <ets>Gatling</ets>.]</ety> <def>An American machine gun, consisting of a cluster of barrels which, being revolved by a crank, are automatically loaded and fired.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The improved <xex>Gatling gun</xex> can be fired at the rate of 1,200 shots per minute.</note> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>GATT</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>G</ets>eneral <ets>A</ets>greement on <ets>T</ets>arriffs and <ets>T</ets>rade.]</ety> <def>a United Nations agency created by a multinational treaty to promote trade by the reduction of tariffs and import quotas.</def> <mark>[acronym]</mark> <br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> General Agreement on Tarriffs and Trade.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gat"ten tree`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[Cf. Prov. E. <ets>gatter bush</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A name given to the small trees called guelder-rose (<spn>Viburnum Opulus</spn>), cornel (<spn>Cornus sanguinea</spn>), and spindle tree (<spn>Euonymus Europ\'91us</spn>).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gat"-toothed`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gat</ets> goat + <ets>tooth</ets>. See <er>Goat</er> the animal.]</ety> <def>Goat-toothed; having a lickerish tooth; lustful; wanton.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gauche</hw> <pr>(g<omac/sh)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Left handed;</def> <specif>hence,</specif> <def>awkward; clumsy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>Winding; twisted; warped; -- applied to curves and surfaces.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Lacking grace and perceptivity in social situations; crude; tactless; socially inept.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> graceless; unsophisticated.</syn><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Not planar; -- of molecules or molecular conformations.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gauche"ness</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an impolite manner that is vulgar and lacking tact or refinement.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> crudeness, crudity.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gauche`rie"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>An awkward action; clumsiness; boorishness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gau"cho</hw> <pr>(gou"ch<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gauchos</plw> <pr>(gou"ch<osl/z)</pr></plu> <ety>[Sp.]</ety> <def>One of the native inhabitants of the South American pampas, of Spanish-American descent. They live mostly by rearing cattle. Hence, a South American cowboy, especially on the pampas.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A member of an Indian population, somewhat affected by Spanish blood, in the archipelagoes off the Chilean coast.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaude</ets> jest, trick, <ets>gaudi</ets> bead of a rosary, fr. L. <ets>gaudium</ets> joy, gladness. See <er>Joy</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Trick; jest; sport.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Deceit; fraud; artifice; device.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>An ornament; a piece of worthless finery; a trinket.</def> \'bdAn idle <xex>gaud</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. se <ets>gaudir</ets> to rejoice, fr. L. <ets>gaudere</ets>. See <er>Gaud</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>To sport or keep festival.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd<xex>Gauding</xex> with his familiars. \'b8 <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. North.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gauded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gauding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To bedeck gaudily; to decorate with gauds or showy trinkets or colors; to paint.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdNicely <xex>gauded</xex> cheeks.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"-day`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gaudy</er>, a feast.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"er*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Finery; ornaments; ostentatious display.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdTarnished <xex>gaudery</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Joyful; showy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"i*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gaudy manner.</def> <rj><au>Guthrie.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"i*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being gaudy.</def> <rj><au>Whitlock.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"ish</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Gaudy.</def> \'bd<xex>Gaudish</xex> ceremonies.\'b8 <rj><au>Bale.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Destitute of ornament.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Gaudier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Gauidiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Ostentatiously fine; showy; gay, but tawdry or meretricious.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,<br/
+But not expressed in fancy; rich, not <qex>gaudy</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Gay; merry; festal.</def> <rj><au>Tennyson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Let's have one other <qex>gaudy</qex> night.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"y</hw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gaudies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr></plu> <ety>[See <er>Gaud</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Gower.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"y</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A feast or festival; -- called also <altname>gaud-day</altname> and <altname>gaudy day</altname>.</def> <mark>[Oxford Univ.]</mark> <rj><au>Conybeare.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaud"y*green`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. <or/ n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaude grene</ets>.]</ety> <def>Light green.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer. Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauf"fer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gaufrer</ets> to figure cloth, velvet, and other stuffs, fr. <ets>gaufre</ets> honeycomb, waffle; of German origin. See <er>Waffle</er>, <er>Wafer</er>, and cf. <er>Goffer</er>, <er>Gopher</er> an animal.]</ety> <def>To plait, crimp, or flute; to goffer, as lace. See <er>Goffer</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauf"fer*ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A mode of plaiting or fluting.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gauffering iron</b></col>, <cd>a kind of fluting iron for fabrics.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauffering press</b></col> <fld>(Flower Manuf.)</fld>, <cd>a press for crimping the leaves and petals into shape.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gauf"fre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gopher</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A gopher, esp. the pocket gopher.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauge</hw> <pr>(g<amac/j)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gauged</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gauging</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>]</vmorph> <ety>[OF. <ets>gaugier</ets>, F. <ets>jauger</ets>, cf. OF. <ets>gauge</ets> gauge, measuring rod, F. <ets>jauge</ets>; of uncertain origin; perh. fr. an assumed L. <ets>qualificare</ets> to determine the qualities of a thing (see <er>Qualify</er>); but cf. also F. <ets>jalon</ets> a measuring stake in surveying, and E. <ets>gallon</ets>.]</ety> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gage</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To measure or determine with a gauge.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The vanes nicely <qex>gauged</qex> on each side.</q> <rj><qau>Derham.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>You shall not <qex>gauge</qex> me<br/
+By what we do to-night.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauge</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Written also <ets>gage</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>This plate must be a <qex>gauge</qex> to file your worm and groove to equal breadth by.</q> <rj><qau>Moxon.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>There is not in our hands any fixed <qex>gauge</qex> of minds.</q> <rj><qau>I. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Measure; dimensions; estimate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>gauge</qex> and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt.</q> <rj><qau>Burke.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mach. & Manuf.)</fld> <def>Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template; <as>as, a button maker's <ex>gauge</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument; <as>as, a rain <ex>gauge</ex>; a steam <ex>gauge</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind; <as>as, a vessel has the weather <ex>gauge</ex> of another when on the windward side of it, and the lee <ex>gauge</ex> when on the lee side of it</as>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>The distance between the rails of a railway.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The <xex>standard gauge</xex> of railroads in most countries is four feet, eight and one half inches. <xex>Wide</xex>, or <xex>broad</xex>, <xex>gauge</xex>, in the United States, is six feet; in England, seven feet, and generally any gauge exceeding standard gauge. Any gauge less than standard gauge is now called <xex>narrow gauge</xex>. It varies from two feet to three feet six inches.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <fld>(Plastering)</fld> <def>The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Building)</fld> <def>That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gauge of a carriage</b></col>, <col><b>car</b></col></mcol>, <cd>etc., the distance between the wheels; -- ordinarily called the <altname>track</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge cock</b></col>, <cd>a stop cock used as a try cock for ascertaining the height of the water level in a steam boiler.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge concussion</b></col> <fld>(Railroads)</fld>, <cd>the jar caused by a car-wheel flange striking the edge of the rail.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge glass</b></col>, <cd>a glass tube for a water gauge.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge lathe</b></col>, <cd>an automatic lathe for turning a round object having an irregular profile, as a baluster or chair round, to a templet or gauge.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge point</b></col>, <cd>the diameter of a cylinder whose altitude is one inch, and contents equal to that of a unit of a given measure; -- a term used in gauging casks, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge rod</b></col>, <cd>a graduated rod, for measuring the capacity of barrels, casks, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge saw</b></col>, <cd>a handsaw, with a gauge to regulate the depth of cut.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Gauge stuff</b></col>, <cd>a stiff and compact plaster, used in making cornices, moldings, etc., by means of a templet.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauge wheel</b></col>, <cd>a wheel at the forward end of a plow beam, to determine the depth of the furrow.</cd> -- <col><b>Joiner's gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument used to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Printer's gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument to regulate the length of the page.</cd> -- <col><b>Rain gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain at any given place.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Salt gauge</b></col>, or <col><b>Brine gauge</b></col></mcol>, <cd>an instrument or contrivance for indicating the degree of saltness of water from its specific gravity, as in the boilers of ocean steamers.</cd> -- <col><b>Sea gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for finding the depth of the sea.</cd> -- <col><b>Siphon gauge</b></col>, <cd>a glass siphon tube, partly filled with mercury, -- used to indicate pressure, as of steam, or the degree of rarefaction produced in the receiver of an air pump or other vacuum; a manometer.</cd> -- <col><b>Sliding gauge</b></col>. <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A templet or pattern for gauging the commonly accepted dimensions or shape of certain parts in general use, as screws, railway-car axles, etc.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A gauge used only for testing other similar gauges, and preserved as a reference, to detect wear of the working gauges.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Railroads)</fld> <cd>See Note under <er>Gauge</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 5.</cd> -- <col><b>Star gauge</b></col> <fld>(Ordnance)</fld>, <cd>an instrument for measuring the diameter of the bore of a cannon at any point of its length.</cd> -- <col><b>Steam gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for measuring the pressure of steam, as in a boiler.</cd> -- <col><b>Tide gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for determining the height of the tides.</cd> -- <col><b>Vacuum gauge</b></col>, <cd>a species of barometer for determining the relative elasticities of the vapor in the condenser of a steam engine and the air.</cd> -- <col><b>Water gauge</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A contrivance for indicating the height of a water surface, as in a steam boiler; as by a gauge cock or glass.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>The height of the water in the boiler.</cd> -- <col><b>Wind gauge</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for measuring the force of the wind on any given surface; an anemometer.</cd> -- <col><b>Wire gauge</b></col>, <cd>a gauge for determining the diameter of wire or the thickness of sheet metal; also, a standard of size. See under <er>Wire</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 616 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauge"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being gauged.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauged</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>p. a.</pos> <def>Tested or measured by, or conformed to, a gauge.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gauged brick</b></col>, <cd>brick molded, rubbed, or cut to an exact size and shape, for arches or ornamental work.</cd> -- <col><b>Gauged mortar</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Gauge stuff</cref>, under <er>Gauge</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gau"ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gauges; an officer whose business it is to ascertain the contents of casks.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gau"ger-ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The office of a gauger.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gau"ging rod`</hw>. <def>See <er>Gauge rod</er>, under <er>Gauge</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaul</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>Gaule</ets>, fr. L. <ets>Gallia</ets>, fr. <ets>Gallus</ets> a Gaul.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The Anglicized form of <xex>Gallia</xex>, which in the time of the Romans included France and Upper Italy (Transalpine and Cisalpine Gaul).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A native or inhabitant of Gaul.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaul"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to ancient France, or Gaul; Gallic.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gault</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Norw. <ets>gald</ets> hard ground, Icel. <ets>gald</ets> hard snow.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A series of beds of clay and marl in the South of England, between the upper and lower greensand of the Cretaceous period.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gaul*the"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of ericaceous shrubs with evergreen foliage, and, often, edible berries. It includes the American winter-green (<spn>Gaultheria procumbens</spn>), and the larger-fruited <stype>salal</stype> of Northwestern America (<spn>Gaultheria Shallon</spn>).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gaum"less</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>stupid. Oposite of <ant>smart</ant>.</def> <mark>[British informal]</mark><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gormless.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaunt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Norw. <ets>gand</ets> a thin pointed stick, a tall and thin man, and W. <ets>gwan</ets> weak.]</ety> <def>Attenuated, as with fasting or suffering; lean; meager; pinched and grim.</def> \'bdThe <xex>gaunt</xex> mastiff.\'b8 <rj><au>Pope.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A mysterious but visible pestilence, striding <qex>gaunt</qex> and fleshless across our land.</q> <rj><qau>Nichols.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaunt"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gantlet</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaunt"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gantelet</ets>, dim. of <ets>gant</ets> glove, LL. <ets>wantus</ets>, of Teutonic origin; cf. D. <ets>want</ets>, Sw. & Dan. <ets>vante</ets>, Icel. <ets>v\'94ttr</ets>, for <ets>vantr</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A glove of such material that it defends the hand from wounds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The gauntlet of the Middle Ages was sometimes of chain mail, sometimes of leather partly covered with plates, scales, etc., of metal sewed to it, and, in the 14th century, became a glove of small steel plates, carefully articulated and covering the whole hand except the palm and the inside of the fingers.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A long glove, covering the wrist.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A rope on which hammocks or clothes are hung for drying.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>To take up the gauntlet</b></col>, <cd>to accept a challenge.</cd> -- <col><b>To throw down the gauntlet</b></col>, <cd>to offer or send a challenge. The gauntlet or glove was thrown down by the knight challenging, and was taken up by the one who accepted the challenge; -- hence the phrases.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaunt"lett*ed</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Wearing a gauntlet.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaunt"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gaunt manner; meagerly.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gaun"tree</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gaun"try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>chantier</ets>, LL. <ets>cantarium</ets>, fr. L. <ets>canterius</ets> trellis, sort of frame.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A frame for supporting barrels in a cellar or elsewhere.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Engin.)</fld> <def>A scaffolding or frame carrying a crane or other structure.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gaur</hw> <pr>(g<add/r <it>or</it> gour)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An East Indian species of wild cattle (<spn>Bibos gauris</spn>), of large size and an untamable disposition.</def> <altsp>[Spelt also <asp>gour</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaure</hw> <pr>(g<add/r)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To gaze; to stare.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauss</hw> <pr>(gous)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[So named after <person>Karl F. <etsep>Gauss</etsep></person>, a German mathematician.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>The C.G.S. unit of density of magnetic field, equal to a field of one line of force per square centimeter, being thus adopted as an international unit at Paris in 1900; sometimes used as a unit of intensity of magnetic field. It was previously suggested as a unit of magnetomotive force.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def><person>Karl F. <etsep>Gauss</etsep></person>, a German mathematician.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gauss"age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>The intensity of a magnetic field expressed in C.G.S. units, or gausses.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaussian</hw> <pos>prop. adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to Gauss{2}; <as>as, a <ex>Gaussian</ex> distribution</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gauss"me*ter</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an instrument to compare strengths of magnetic fields.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> magnetometer.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gau"ta*ma</hw> <pr>(gou"t<adot/*m<adot/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The family name of <er>Buddha</er>, the founder of Buddhism; born ca. 563 b.c., died ca. 483 b.c. In He is worshipped by Buddhists as a god. See <er>Buddha</er>.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>Gotama</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Buddha, the Buddha, Siddhartha, Gotama, Gautama Buddha.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauze</hw> <pr>(g<add/z)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gaze</ets>; so called because it was first introduced from Gaza, a city of Palestine.]</ety> <def>A very thin, slight, transparent stuff, generally of silk; also, any fabric resembling silk gauze; <as>as, wire <ex>gauze</ex>; cotton <ex>gauze</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gauze dresser</b></col>, <cd>one employed in stiffening gauze.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauze</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having the qualities of gauze; thin; light; <as>as, <ex>gauze</ex> merino underclothing</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauz"i*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being gauzy; flimsiness.</def> <rj><au>Ruskin.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gauz"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or resembling, gauze; thin and slight as gauze.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga`vage"</hw> <pr>(g<adot/`v<adot/zh")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>gaver</ets> to gorge.]</ety> <def>Forced feeding (as of poultry or infants) by means of a tube passed through the mouth down to the stomach.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gave</hw> <pr>(g<amac/v)</pr>, <def><pos>imp.</pos> of <er>Give</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el</hw> <pr>(g<acr/v"<ecr/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gable.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gavelle</ets>, F. <ets>javelle</ets>, prob. dim. from L. <ets>capulus</ets> handle, fr. <ets>capere</ets> to lay hold of, seize; or cf. W. <ets>gafael</ets> hold, grasp. Cf. <er>Heave</er>.]</ety> <def>A small heap of grain, not tied up into a bundle.</def> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The mallet of the presiding officer in a legislative body, public assembly, court, masonic body, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A mason's setting maul.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gavel</ets>, AS. <ets>gafol</ets>, prob. fr. <ets>gifan</ets> to give. See <er>Give</er>, and cf. <er>Gabel</er> tribute.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Tribute; toll; custom. <mark>[Obs.]</mark> See <er>Gabel</er>.</def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el*et</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gavel</er> tribute.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>An ancient special kind of <xex>cessavit</xex> used in Kent and London for the recovery of rent.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"el*kind`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gavelkynde</ets>, <ets>gavelkende</ets>. See <er>Gavel</er> tribute, and <er>Kind</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A tenure by which land descended from the father to all his sons in equal portions, and the land of a brother, dying without issue, descended equally to his brothers. It still prevails in the county of Kent.</def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"e*loche</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gavelock</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gav"e*lock</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gaveloc</ets> a dart, AS. <ets>gafeluc</ets>; cf. Icel. <ets>gaflok</ets>, MHG. <ets>gabil<?/t</ets>, OF. <ets>gavelot</ets>, <ets>glavelot</ets>, F. <ets>javelot</ets>, Ir. <ets>gabhla</ets> spear, W. <ets>gaflach</ets> fork, dart, E. <ets>glave</ets>, <ets>gaff</ets>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A spear or dart.</def> <mark>[R. & Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An iron crow or lever.</def> <mark>[Scot. & North of Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"ver*ick</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The European red gurnard (<spn>Trigla cuculus</spn>).</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gavidae</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A natural family of birds including the loons.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Gavidae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaviiformes</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>An order of large aquatic birds, including loons and some extinct forms.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> order <ord>Gaviiformes</ord>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ga"vi\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>gavia</ets> a sea mew.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of birds which includes the gulls and terns.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"vi*al</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"v<icr/*<ait/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>gha<rsdot/iy<amac/l</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gavial</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large Asiatic crocodilian (<spn>Gavialis Gangeticus</spn>); -- called also <altname>nako</altname>, and <altname>Gangetic crocodile</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The <xex>gavial</xex> has a long, slender muzzle, teeth of nearly uniform size, and feet completely webbed. It inhabits the Ganges and other rivers of India. The name is also applied to several allied fossil species.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gav"ot</hw>, <hw>Gav"otte</hw></mhw> <pr>(? <or/ ?; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gavotte</ets>, fr. <ets>Gavots</ets>, a people inhabiting a mountainous district in France, called <ets>Gap</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A kind of difficult, old formal French dance in quadruple time.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Music composed in quadruple time for dancing the gavotte, having a dance tune which has two brisk and lively, yet dignified, strains in common time, each played twice over.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaw"by</hw> <pr>(g<add/"b<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A baby; a dunce.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gawk</hw> <pr>(g<add/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gok</ets>, <ets>gowk</ets>, cuckoo, fool, Icel. <ets>gaukr</ets> cuckoo; akin to OHG. <ets>gouh</ets>, G. <ets>gauch</ets> cuckoo, fool, AS. <ets>g\'82ac</ets> cuckoo, Sw. <ets>g\'94k</ets>, Dan. <ets>gi\'94g</ets>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A cuckoo.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A simpleton; a booby; a gawky.</def> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gawk</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To act like a gawky.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To stare with empty-minded fascination; to stare stupidly; to gape; -- usually used with <ptcl>at</ptcl>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gawk"y</hw> <pr>(g<add/k"<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Gawkier</adjf> <pr>(g<add/k"<icr/*<etil/r)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Gawkiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <def>Foolish and awkward; clumsy; clownish; <as>as, <ex>gawky</ex> behavior</as>. -- <pos>n.</pos> A fellow who is awkward from being overgrown, or from stupidity, a gawk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gawn</hw> <pr>(g<add/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Corrupted fr. <ets>gallon</ets>.]</ety> <def>A small tub or lading vessel.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gawn"tree</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gauntree</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay</hw> <pr>(g<amac/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Gayer</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Gayest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[F. <ets>gai</ets>, perhaps fr. OHG. <ets>g<?/hi</ets> swift, rapid, G. <ets>g\'84h</ets>, <ets>j\'84h</ets>, steep, hasty; or cf. OHG. <ets>w<?/hi</ets> beatiful, good. Cf. <er>Jay</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Excited with merriment; manifesting sportiveness or delight; inspiring delight; livery; merry.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Belinda smiled, and all the world was <qex>gay</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Gay</qex> hope is theirs by fancy fed.</q> <rj><qau>Gray.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Brilliant in colors; splendid; fine; richly dressed.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Why is my neighbor's wife so <qex>gay</qex>?</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A bevy of fair women, richly <qex>gay</qex><br/
+In gems and wanton dress!</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Loose; dissipated; lewd.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Merry; gleeful; blithe; airy; lively; sprightly, sportive; light-hearted; frolicsome; jolly; jovial; joyous; joyful; glad; showy; splendid; vivacious.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An ornament</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>L'Estrange.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A Southern Asiatic species of wild cattle (<spn>Bibos frontalis</spn>).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gay"di*ang</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A vessel of Anam, with two or three masts, lofty triangular sails, and in construction somewhat resembling a Chinese junk.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"e*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gayeties</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gaiety</asp>.]</altsp> <ety>[F. <ets>gaiet\'82</ets>. See <er>Gay</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The state of being gay; merriment; mirth; acts or entertainments prompted by, or inspiring, merry delight; -- used often in the plural; <as>as, the <ex>gayeties</ex> of the season</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Finery; show; <as>as, the <ex>gayety</ex> of dress</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Liveliness; mirth; animation; vivacity; glee; blithesomeness; sprightliness; jollity. See <er>Liveliness</er>.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"ley proc"ess</hw>. <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The process of removing moisture from the blast of an iron blast furnace by reducing its temperature so far that it will not remain suspended as vapor in the blast current, but will be deposited as snow in the cooling apparatus. The resultant uniformly dehydrated blast effects great economy in fuel consumption, and promotes regularity of furnace operation, and certainty of furnace control.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"lus*site`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after <etsep>Gay-Lussac</etsep>, the French chemist.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A yellowish white, translucent mineral, consisting of the carbonates of lime and soda, with water.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>gaily</asp>.]</altsp> <sn>1.</sn> <def>With mirth and frolic; merrily; blithely; gleefully.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Finely; splendidly; showily; <as>as, ladies <ex>gayly</ex> dressed; a flower <ex>gayly</ex> blooming.</as></def> <rj><au>Pope.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gayne</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gain</er>.]</ety> <def>To avail.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gayety; finery.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"some</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of gayety.</def> <au>Mir. for Mag.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gay"tre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gaitre</er>.]</ety> <def>The dogwood tree.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gay-wings</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A common trailing perennial milkwort (<spn>Polygala paucifolia</spn>) of eastern North America having leaves like wintergreen and usually rosy-purple flowers with winged sepals.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> flowering wintergreen, gaywings, bird-on-the-wing, fringed polygala, <spn>Polygala paucifolia</spn>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gazania</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>any plant of the genus <gen>Gazania</gen> valued for their showy daisy flowers.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze</hw> <pr>(g<amac/z)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gazed</conjf> <pr>(g<amac/zd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gazing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gasen</ets>, akin to dial. Sw. <ets>gasa</ets>, cf. Goth. us-<ets>gaisjan</ets> to terrify, us-<ets>geisnan</ets> to be terrified. Cf. <er>Aghast</er>, <er>Ghastly</er>, <er>Ghost</er>, <er>Hesitate</er>.]</ety> <def>To fix the eyes in a steady and earnest look; to look with eagerness or curiosity, as in admiration, astonishment, or with studious attention.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Why stand ye <qex>gazing</qex> up into heaven?</q> <rj><qau>Acts i. 11.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To gape; stare; look.</syn> <usage> -- To <er>Gaze</er>, <er>Gape</er>, <er>Stare</er>. To <xex>gaze</xex> is to look with fixed and prolonged attention, awakened by excited interest or elevated emotion; to <xex>gape</xex> is to look fixedly, with open mouth and feelings of ignorant wonder; to <xex>stare</xex> is to look with the fixedness of insolence or of idiocy. The lover of nature <xex>gazes</xex> with delight on the beauties of the landscape; the rustic <xex>gapes</xex> with wonder at the strange sights of a large city; the idiot <xex>stares</xex> on those around with a vacant look.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To view with attention; to gaze on .</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And <qex>gazed</qex> a while the ample sky.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A fixed look; a look of eagerness, wonder, or admiration; a continued look of attention.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>With secret <qex>gaze</qex><br/
+Or open admiration him behold.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The object gazed on.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Made of my enemies the scorn and <qex>gaze</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>At gaze</b></col> <sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <cd>With the face turned directly to the front; -- said of the figures of the stag, hart, buck, or hind, when borne, in this position, upon an escutcheon.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>In a position expressing sudden fear or surprise; -- a term used in stag hunting to describe the manner of a stag when he first hears the hounds and gazes round in apprehension of some hidden danger; hence, standing agape; idly or stupidly gazing.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I that rather held it better men should perish one by one,<br/
+Than that earth should stand at <qex>gaze</qex> like Joshua's moon in Ajalon!</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zee"bo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Humorously formed from <ets>gaze</ets>.]</ety> <def>A summerhouse so situated as to command an extensive prospect.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Gazing.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze"hound`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A hound that pursues by the sight rather than by the scent.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga"zel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The black currant; also, the wild plum.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zel"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gazelle</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zelle"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gazelle</ets>, OF. also, <ets>gazel</ets>; cf. Sp. <ets>gacela</ets>, Pr. <ets>gazella</ets>, It. <ets>gazella</ets>; all fr. Ar. <ets>ghaz<?/l</ets> a wild goat.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several small, swift, elegantly formed species of antelope, of the genus <gen>Gazella</gen>, esp. <spn>G. dorcas</spn>; -- called also <altname>algazel</altname>, <altname>corinne</altname>, <altname>korin</altname>, and <altname>kevel</altname>. The gazelles are celebrated for the luster and soft expression of their eyes.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>gazel</asp>.]</altsp></p>
+
+<p><-- subtypes -->
+<note><hand/ The common species of Northern Africa (<spn>Gazella dorcas</spn>); the Arabian gazelle, or ariel (<spn>G. Arabica</spn>); the mohr of West Africa (<spn>G. mohr</spn>); the Indian (<spn>G. Bennetti</spn>); the <stype>ahu</stype> or Persian (<spn>G. subgutturosa</spn>); and the springbok or tsebe (<spn>G. euchore</spn>) of South Africa, are the best known.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaze"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>View.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaz"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gazes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>gazeta</ets>, <ets>gazzetta</ets>, prob. dim. of L. <ets>gaza</ets> royal treasure.]</ety> <def>A Venetian coin, worth about three English farthings, or one and a half cents.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zette"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gazette</ets>, It. <ets>gazzetta</ets>, perh. from <ets>gazetta</ets> a Venetian coin (see <er>Gazet</er>), said to have been the price of the first newspaper published at Venice; or perh. dim. of <ets>gazza</ets> magpie, a name perh. applied to the first newspaper; cf. OHG. <ets>agalstra</ets> magpie, G. <ets>elster</ets>.]</ety> <def>A newspaper; a printed sheet published periodically; esp., the official journal published by the British government, and containing legal and state notices.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zette"</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gazetted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gazetting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To announce or publish in a gazette; to announce officially, as an appointment, or a case of bankruptcy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaz`et*teer"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gazetier</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A writer of news, or an officer appointed to publish news by authority.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A newspaper; a gazette.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Burke.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A geographical dictionary; a book giving the names and descriptions, etc., of many places.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>An alphabetical descriptive list of anything.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaz"ing*stock`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A person or thing gazed at with scorn or abhorrence; an object of curiosity or contempt.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gaz"o*gene</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gazog\'8ane</ets>; <ets>gaz</ets> gas + <ets>-g\'8ane</ets>, E. <ets>-gen</ets>.]</ety> <def>A portable apparatus for making soda water or a\'89rated liquids on a small scale.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ga*zon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gazon</ets> turf, fr. OHG. <ets>waso</ets>, G. <ets>wasen</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>One of the pieces of sod used to line or cover parapets and the faces of earthworks.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The chemical symbol for germanium, a metalloid element of atomic number 32. See <er>germanium</er>.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> germanium.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mythol.)</fld> <def>goddess of the earth and mother of Cronus and the Titans in ancient mythology. See <er>Gaea</er>.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Gaea, Gaia.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>An Anglo-Saxon prefix. See <er>Y-</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>geler</ets>, fr. L. <ets>gelare</ets>, fr. <ets>gelu</ets>. See <er>Gelid</er>.]</ety> <def>To congeal.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gean</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>guigne</ets> the fruit of the gean; cf. OHG. <ets>w\'c6hsila</ets>, G. <ets>weichsel</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A species of cherry tree common in Europe (<spn>Prunus avium</spn>); also, the fruit, which is usually small and dark in color.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`an*ti*cli"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ the earth + E. <ets>anticlinal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>An upward bend or flexure of a considerable portion of the earth's crust, resulting in the formation of a class of mountain elevations called <xex>anticlinoria</xex>; -- opposed to <xex>geosynclinal</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gear</hw> <pr>(g<emac/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gere</ets>, <ets>ger</ets>, AS. <ets>gearwe</ets> clothing, adornment, armor, fr. <ets>gearo</ets>, <ets>gearu</ets>, ready, yare; akin to OHG. <ets>garaw\'c6</ets>, <ets>garw\'c6</ets> ornament, dress. See <er>Yare</er>, and cf. <er>Garb</er> dress.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Clothing; garments; ornaments.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Array thyself in thy most gorgeous <qex>gear</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Goods; property; household stuff.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Homely <qex>gear</qex> and common ware.</q> <rj><qau>Robynson (More's Utopia).</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Whatever is prepared for use or wear; manufactured stuff or material.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Clad in a vesture of unknown <qex>gear</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>The harness of horses or cattle; trapping.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Warlike accouterments.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>Manner; custom; behavior.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Business matters; affairs; concern.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thus go they both together to their <qex>gear</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A toothed wheel, or cogwheel; <as>as, a spur <ex>gear</ex>, or a bevel <ex>gear</ex></as>; also, toothed wheels, collectively.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>An apparatus for performing a special function; gearing; <as>as, the feed <ex>gear</ex> of a lathe</as>.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>Engagement of parts with each other; <as>as, in <ex>gear</ex>; out of <ex>gear</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>9.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>See 1st <er>Jeer</er> <sd>(b)</sd>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>10.</sn> <def>Anything worthless; stuff; nonsense; rubbish.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>That servant of his that confessed and uttered this <qex>gear</qex> was an honest man.</q> <rj><qau>Latimer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Bever gear</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Bevel gear</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Core gear</b></col>, <cd>a mortise gear, or its skeleton. See <cref>Mortise wheel</cref>, under <er>Mortise</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Expansion gear</b></col> <fld>(Steam Engine)</fld>, <cd>the arrangement of parts for cutting off steam at a certain part of the stroke, so as to leave it to act upon the piston expansively; the cut-off. See under <er>Expansion</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Feed gear</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Feed motion</cref>, under <er>Feed</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd> -- <col><b>Gear cutter</b></col>, <cd>a machine or tool for forming the teeth of gear wheels by cutting.</cd> -- <col><b>Gear wheel</b></col>, <cd>any cogwheel.</cd> -- <col><b>Running gear</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Running</er>.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To throw in gear</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To throw out of gear</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Mach.)</fld>, <cd>to connect or disconnect (wheelwork or couplings, etc.); to put in, or out of, working relation.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 617 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gear</hw> <pr>(g<emac/r)</pr> <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Geared</conjf> <pr>(g<emac/rd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gearing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To dress; to put gear on; to harness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>To provide with gearing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To adapt toward some specific purpose; <as>as, they <ex>geared</ex> their advertising for maximum effect among teenagers</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Double geared</b></col>, <cd>driven through twofold compound gearing, to increase the force or speed; -- said of a machine.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gear</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>To be in, or come into, gear.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gear"box`</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>the metal casing in which a train of gears is sealed.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gear case.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gear"ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Harness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>The parts by which motion imparted to one portion of an engine or machine is transmitted to another, considered collectively; <as>as, the valve <ex>gearing</ex> of a locomotive engine; belt <ex>gearing</ex></as>; esp., a train of wheels for transmitting and varying motion in machinery.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Frictional gearing</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Frictional</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gearing chain</b></col>, <cd>an endless chain transmitting motion from one sprocket wheel to another. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Chain wheel</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Spur gearing</b></col>, <cd>gearing in which the teeth or cogs are ranged round either the concave or the convex surface (properly the latter) of a cylindrical wheel; -- for transmitting motion between parallel shafts, etc.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gear"train`</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a connected set of rotating gears by which force is transmitted or motion or torque is changed.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gearing, gears, power train, train.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gear` up"</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>To prepare (for an event or activity); <as>as, to gear up for the election campaign</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gea"son</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gesen</ets>, <ets>geson</ets>, rare, scanty, AS. <ets>g<?/sne</ets> barren, wanting. Cf. <er>Geest</er>.]</ety> <def>Rare; wonderful.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geastrum</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the <fam>Geastraceae</fam>, consisting of fungi whose outer peridium when dry splits into starlike segments.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Geastrum</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geat</hw> <pr>(g<emac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gate</er> a door.]</ety> <fld>(Founding)</fld> <def>The channel or spout through which molten metal runs into a mold in casting.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>git</asp>, <asp>gate</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geb</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mythol.)</fld> <def>The god of the earth; father of Osiris and Isis.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Keb.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`car*cin"i*an</hw> <pr>(j<emac/`k<aum/r*s<icr/n"<icr/*<ait/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gh^</grk> earth + <grk>karki`nos</grk> crab.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A land crab of the genus <gen>Gecarcinus</gen>, or of allied genera.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geck</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>gek</ets> fool, fop; akin to G. <ets>geck</ets>; cf. Icel. <ets>gikkr</ets> a pert, rude person.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Scorn, derision, or contempt.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An object of scorn; a dupe; a gull.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To become the <qex>geck</qex> and scorn<br/
+O'the other's villainy.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geck</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OD. <ets>ghecken</ets>, G. <ets>gecken</ets>. See <er>Geck</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To deride; to scorn; to mock.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To cheat; trick, or gull.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geck</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To jeer; to show contempt.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geck"o</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/k"<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Geckoes</plw> <pr>(g<ecr/k"<omac/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Cf. F. & G. <ets>gecko</ets>; -- so called from the sound which the animal utters.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any lizard of the family <fam>Geckonid\'91</fam>. The geckoes are small, carnivorous, mostly nocturnal animals with large eyes and vertical, elliptical pupils. Their toes are generally expanded, and furnished with adhesive disks, by which they can run over walls and ceilings. They are numerous in warm countries, and a few species are found in Europe and the United States. See <er>Wall gecko</er>, <er>Fanfoot</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geck*o"tian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A gecko.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ged</hw>, <hw>Gedd</hw></mhw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The European pike.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gee</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Geed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Geeing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To agree; to harmonize.</def> <mark>[Colloq. or Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Forby.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <ety>[Cf. G. <ets>j\'81</ets>, interj., used in calling to a horse, It. gi\'95, F. <ets>dia</ets>, used to turn a horse to the left.]</ety> <def>To turn to the off side, or from the driver (<it>i.e.</it>, in the United States, to the right side); -- said of cattle, or a team; used most frequently in the imperative, often with <xex>off</xex>, by drivers of oxen, in directing their teams, and opposed to <xex>haw</xex>, or <xex>hoi</xex>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jee</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ In England, the teamster walks on the right-hand side of the cattle; in the United States, on the left-hand side. In all cases, however, <xex>gee</xex> means to turn <xex>from</xex> the driver, and <xex>haw</xex> to turn <xex>toward</xex> him.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gee ho</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Gee whoa</b></col></mcol>. <cd>Same as <er>Gee</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geek</hw> <pr>(g<emac/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A performer in a carnival, often presented as a wild man, who performs grotesquely disgusting acts, such as biting the head off a live chicken or snake.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>Any eccentric or strange person; an oddball; an eccentric.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>A student who is socially inept and a misfit in his class, especially one who is an intellectual; a nerd; a dork.</def> <mark>[Informal]</mark><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>An intellectually inclined person, especially one who is interested in scientific or technical subjects; <as>as, a group of <ex>geeks</ex> wearing pocket protectors</as>; -- originally a deprecatory and contemptuous term, but in the 1990's, with the increase in popularity of computers and the frequency of accumulation of great wealth by computer entrepreneurs, it has come to be used with noticeable frequency by technically competent people to refer to themselves, ironically and sometimes proudly.</def> <mark>[Informal]</mark><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gee</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gee</er> to turn.]</ety> <def>To cause (a team) to turn to the off side, or from the driver.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jee</asp>.]</altsp></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Geer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Geer"ing</hw></mhw>. <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <def>See <er>Gear</er>, <er>Gearing</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geese</hw> <pr>(g<emac/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <def><pos>pl.</pos> of <er>Goose</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. LG. <ets>geest</ets>, <ets>geest</ets>land, sandy, dry and, OFries. <ets>g<emac/st</ets>, <ets>g<amac/st</ets>, <ets>g<emac/st</ets>lond, <ets>g<amac/st</ets>lond, fr. Fries. <ets>g<amac/st</ets> barren. Cf. <er>Geason</er>.]</ety> <def>Alluvial matter on the surface of land, not of recent origin.</def> <rj><au>R. Jameson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Jet</er>.]</ety> <def>Jet.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geez</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The original native name for the ancient Ethiopic language or people. See <er>Ethiopic</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gee"zer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Dial. corrupt. of <er>Guiser</er> a mummer.]</ety> <def>A queer old fellow; an old chap; sometimes, an old woman.</def> <mark>[Contemptuous, Slang.]</mark><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> bloke.</syn><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge"gen*schein`</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"g<icr/n*sh<imac/n`)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[German: counterglow.]</ety> <def>A faint patch of light in the night sky that appears opposite the sun; a reflection of sunlight by micrometeoric material in space.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> counterglow.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*hen"na</hw> <pr>(g<esl/*h<ecr/n"n<adot/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Gehenna</ets>, Gr. <grk>Ge`enna</grk>, Heb. <ets>G<emac/ Hinn<omac/m</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Jewish Hist.)</fld> <def>The valley of Hinnom, near Jerusalem, where some of the Israelites sacrificed their children to Moloch, which, on this account, was afterward regarded as a place of abomination, and made a receptacle for all the refuse of the city, perpetual fires being kept up in order to prevent pestilential effluvia. In the New Testament the name is transferred, by an easy metaphor, to <simto>Hell</simto>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The pleasant valley of Hinnom. Tophet thence<br/
+And black <qex>Gehenna</qex> called, the type of Hell.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge"ic</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gh^</grk> earth.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or derived from, earthy or vegetable mold.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>geic acid</b></col>. <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Humin</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge"in</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"<icr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>gh^</grk> earth.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>See <er>Humin</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gei"sha</hw> <pr>(g<amac/"sh<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>geisha</plw> <pr>(g<amac/"sh<adot/)</pr>, <plw>Geishas</plw> <pr>(g<amac/"sh<adot/z)</pr></plu>. <ety>[Jap., art person.]</ety> <def>A Japanese singing and dancing girl, trained to provide entertainment and company for a man or group of men.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geis"sler tube`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>A glass tube provided with platinum electrodes, and containing some gas under very low tension, which becomes luminous when an electrical discharge is passed through it; -- so called from the name of a noted maker in germany. It is called also <altname>Pl\'81cker tube</altname>, from the German physicist who devised it.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gei"to*nog"a*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ neighbor + <?/ marriage.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Fertilization of flowers by pollen from other flowers on the same plant.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gelare</ets> to congeal: cf. F. <ets>gelable</ets>. See <er>Geal</er>.]</ety> <def>Capable of being congealed; capable of being converted into jelly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gel"a*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A baboon (<spn>Gelada Ruppelli</spn>) of Abyssinia, remarkable for the length of the hair on the neck and shoulders of the adult male.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*las"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ inclined to laugh, from <?/ to laugh.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to laughter; used in laughing.</def> \'bd<xex>Gelastic</xex> muscles.\'b8 <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gelatin</ets> + L. <ets>-ficare</ets>. (in comp.) to make. See <er>-fy</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>The formation of gelatin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel`a*tig"e*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gelatin</ets> + <ets>-genous</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>Producing, or yielding, gelatin; gelatiniferous; <as>as, the <ex>gelatigeneous</ex> tissues</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gel"a*tin</hw>, <hw>Gel"a*tine</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82latine</ets>, fr. L. <ets>gelare</ets> to congeal. See <er>Geal</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Animal jelly; glutinous material obtained from animal tissues by prolonged boiling. Specifically <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld>, a nitrogeneous colloid, not existing as such in the animal body, but formed by the hydrating action of boiling water on the collagen of various kinds of connective tissue (as tendons, bones, ligaments, etc.). Its distinguishing character is that of dissolving in hot water, and forming a jelly on cooling. It is an important ingredient of calf's-foot jelly, isinglass, glue, etc. It is used as food, but its nutritious qualities are of a low order.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Both spellings, gela<xex>tin</xex> and gela<xex>tine</xex>, are in good use, but the tendency of writers on physiological chemistry favors the form in -<xex>in</xex>, as in the United States Dispensatory, the United States Pharmacop\'d2ia, Fownes' Watts' Chemistry, Brande & Cox's Dictionary.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Blasting gelatin</b></col>, <cd>an explosive, containing about ninety-five parts of nitroglycerin and five of collodion.</cd> -- <col><b>Gelatin process</b></col>, <cd>a name applied to a number of processes in the arts, involving the use of gelatin.</cd> Especially: <sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Photog.)</fld> <cd>A dry-plate process in which gelatin is used as a substitute for collodion as the sensitized material. This is the dry-plate process in general use, and plates of extreme sensitiveness are produced by it.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <cd>A method of producing photographic copies of drawings, engravings, printed pages, etc., and also of photographic pictures, which can be printed from in a press with ink, or (in some applications of the process) which can be used as the molds of stereotype or electrotype plates.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Print. or Copying)</fld> <cd>A method of producing facsimile copies of an original, written or drawn in aniline ink upon paper, thence transferred to a cake of gelatin softened with glycerin, from which impressions are taken upon ordinary paper.</cd> -- <col><b>Vegetable gelatin</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Gliadin</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gelatinated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gelatinating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To convert into gelatin, or into a substance resembling jelly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*nate</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To be converted into gelatin, or into a substance like jelly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Lapis lazuli, if calcined, does not effervesce, but <qex>gelatinates</qex> with the mineral acids.</q> <rj><qau>Kirwan.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat`i*na"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of process of converting into gelatin, or a substance like jelly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"a*tine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gelatin</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel`a*tin*if"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gelatin</ets> + <ets>-ferous</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>Yielding gelatin on boiling with water; capable of gelatination.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel`a*tin"i*form</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having the form of gelatin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat`i*ni*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gelatination</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*nize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To convert into gelatin or jelly. Same as <er>Gelatinate</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Photog.)</fld> <def>To coat, or otherwise treat, with gelatin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*nize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Gelatinate</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lat"i*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82latineux</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of the nature and consistence of gelatin or the jelly; resembling jelly; viscous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gelatio</ets> a freezing, fr. <ets>gelare</ets> to freeze.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>The process of becoming solid by cooling; a cooling and solidifying.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>gild</ets>, <ets>gield</ets>, <ets>geld</ets>, tribute, payment, fr. <ets>gieldan</ets> to pay, render. See <er>Yield</er>.]</ety> <def>Money; tribute; compensation; ransom.</def><mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ This word occurs in old law books in composition, as in dane<xex>geld</xex>, or dane<xex>gelt</xex>, a tax imposed by the Danes; were<xex>geld</xex>, compensation for the life of a man, etc.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gelded</conjf> or Gelt (<?/); <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gelding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gelda</ets> to castrate; akin to Dan. <ets>gilde</ets>, Sw. <ets>g\'84lla</ets>, and cf. AS. <ets>gilte</ets> a young sow, OHG. <ets>galt</ets> dry, not giving milk, G. <ets>gelt</ets>, Goth. <ets>gilpa</ets> siclke.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To castrate; to emasculate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To deprive of anything essential.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Bereft and <qex>gelded</qex> of his patrimony.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To deprive of anything exceptionable; <as>as, to <ex>geld</ex> a book, or a story</as>; to expurgate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being gelded.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld"a*ble</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Geld</er> money.]</ety> <def>Liable to taxation.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gelds or castrates.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"der-rose</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Guelder-rose</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>gelding</ets> a gelding, akin to <ets>geldingr</ets> wether, eunuch, Sw. <ets>g\'84lling</ets> gelding, Dan. <ets>gilding</ets> eunuch. See <er>Geld</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>A castrated animal; -- usually applied to a horse, but formerly used also of the human male.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>They went down both into the water, Philip and the <qex>gelding</qex>, and Philip baptized him.</q> <rj><qau>Wyclif (Acts viii. 38).</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geld"ing</hw>, <pos>p. pr., a., & vb. n.</pos> <def>from <er>Geld</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gelechia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the <fam>Gelechiidae</fam>, including pink bollworms.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gelechia</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gelechiid</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a small slender-winged moth whose larvae are agricultural pests.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gelechiid moth.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gelechiidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A family of moths which include important economic pests, feeding on the seeds of the cotton boll.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Gelechiidae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"id</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/l"<icr/d)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gelidus</ets>, fr. <ets>gelu</ets> frost, cold. See <er>Cold</er>, and cf. <er>Congeal</er>, <er>Gelatin</er>, <er>Jelly</er>.]</ety> <def>Cold; very cold; frozen.</def> \'bd<xex>Gelid</xex> founts.\'b8 <rj><au>Thompson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lid"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state of being gelid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"id*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gelid manner; coldly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"id*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state of being gelid; gelidity.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"ly</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/l"l<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Jelly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*los"copy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ to laugh + <ets>-scopy</ets>.]</ety> <def>Divination by means of laughter.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*lose"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gelatin</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An amorphous, gummy carbohydrate, found in <xex>Gelidium</xex>, agar-agar, and other seaweeds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel*se"mic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Gelseminic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel"se*mine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An alkaloid obtained from the yellow jasmine (<spn>Gelsemium sempervirens</spn>), as a bitter white semicrystalline substance; -- called also <altname>gelsemia</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gel`se*min"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or derived from, the yellow jasmine (<spn>Gelsemium sempervirens</spn>); <as>as, <ex>gelseminic</ex> acid, a white crystalline substance resembling esculin</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gel*se"mium</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. It. <ets>gelsomino</ets> jasmine.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of climbing plants. The yellow (false) jasmine (<spn>Gelsemium sempervirens</spn>) is a native of the Southern United States. It has showy and deliciously fragrant flowers.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The root of the yellow jasmine, used in malarial fevers, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gelt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See 1st <er>Geld</er>.]</ety> <def>Trubute, tax.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>All these the king granted unto them . . . free from all <qex>gelts</qex> and payments, in a most full and ample manner.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gelt</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gelt</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>A gelding.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Mortimer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gelt</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gilding; tinsel.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gemme</ets> precious stone, F. <ets>gemme</ets>, fr. L. <ets>gemma</ets> a precious stone, bud.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A bud.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>From the joints of thy prolific stem<br/
+A swelling knot is raised called a <qex>gem</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Denham.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A precious stone of any kind, as the ruby, emerald, topaz, sapphire, beryl, spinel, etc., especially when cut and polished for ornament; a jewel.</def> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, as a small picture, a verse of poetry, a witty or wise saying.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Artificial gem</b></col>, <cd>an imitation of a gem, made of glass colored with metallic oxide. Cf. <er>Paste</er>, and <er>Strass</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem</hw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gemmed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gemming</conjf>]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To put forth in the form of buds.</def> \'bd<xex>Gemmed</xex> their blossoms.\'b8 <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To adorn with gems or precious stones.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To embellish or adorn, as with gems; <as>as, a foliage <ex>gemmed</ex> with dewdrops</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>England is . . . <qex>gemmed</qex> with castles and palaces.</q> <rj><qau>W. Irving.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ma"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Heb.]</ety> <fld>(Jewish Law)</fld> <def>The second part of the Talmud, or the commentary on the Mishna (which forms the first part or text).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*mar"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to the Gemara.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ma"rist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One versed in the Gemara, or adhering to its teachings.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gemel</ets> twin, F. <ets>jumeau</ets>, L. <ets>gemellus</ets> twin, doubled, dim. of <ets>geminus</ets>. See <er>Gemini</er>, and cf. <er>Gimmal</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>Coupled; paired.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Bars gemel</b></col> <fld>(Her.)</fld>, <cd>two barrulets placed near and parallel to each other.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One of the twins.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Wyclif.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Heb.)</fld> <def>One of the barrulets placed parallel and closed to each other. Cf. <cref>Bars gemel</cref>, under <er>Gemel</er>, <pos>a.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Two <qex>gemels</qex> silver between two griffins passant.</q> <rj><qau>Strype.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gemel hinge</b></col> <fld>(Locksmithing)</fld>, <cd>a hinge consisting of an eye or loop and a hook.</cd> -- <col><b>Gemel ring</b></col>, <cd>a ring with two or more links; a gimbal. See <er>Gimbal</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Gemel window</b></col>, <cd>a window with two bays.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`el*lip"a-rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemellipara</ets>, fem., <ets>gemellus</ets> twin + <ets>parere</ets> to bear, produce.]</ety> <def>Producing twins.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"i*nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geminus</ets> twin.]</ety> <def>A pair.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Drayton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"i*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geminatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>genimare</ets> to double. See <er>Gemini</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>In pairs or twains; two together; binate; twin; <as>as, <ex>geminate</ex> flowers</as>.</def> <rj><au>Gray.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"i*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To double.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`i*na"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geminatio</ets>.]</ety> <def>A doubling; duplication; repetition.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Boyle.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gem"i*ni</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., twins, pl. of <ets>geminus</ets>; cf. Skr. <ets>j<?/mi</ets> related as brother or sister.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>A constellation of the zodiac, containing the two bright stars <xex>Castor</xex> and <xex>Pollux</xex>; also, the third sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters about May 20th.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`i*ni*flo"rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geminus</ets> twin + <ets>flos</ets>, <ets>floris</ets>, flower.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having the flowers arranged in pairs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"i*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geminus</ets>.]</ety> <def>Double; in pairs.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gemi*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gemini</er>.]</ety> <def>Twins; a pair; a couple.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gem`i*to"res</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>gemere</ets>, <ets>gemitum</ets>, to sign, moan.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of birds including the true pigeons.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gem"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gemm\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a bud.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A leaf bud, as distinguished from a flower bud.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A bud spore; one of the small spores or buds in the reproduction of certain Protozoa, which separate one at a time from the parent cell.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem*ma"ceous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to gems or to gemm\'91; of the nature of, or resembling, gems or gemm\'91.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"ma*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemmarius</ets>. See <er>Gem</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to gems.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 618 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"ma*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A receptacle for jewels or gems; a jewel house; jewels or gems, collectively.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"mate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemmatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>gemmare</ets> to put forth buds, fr. <ets>gemma</ets> bud.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having buds; reproducing by buds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"ma*ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having buds; adorned with gems or jewels.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem*ma"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gemmation</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The formation of a new individual, either animal or vegetable, by a process of budding; an asexual method of reproduction; gemmulation; gemmiparity. See <er>Budding</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The arrangement of buds on the stalk; also, of leaves in the bud.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"me*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemmeus</ets>. See <er>Gem</er>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to gems; of the nature of gems; resembling gems.</def> <rj><au>Pennant.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem*mif"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemma</ets> bud + <ets>-ferous</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gemmif\'8are</ets>.]</ety> <def>Producing gems or buds</def>; <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>multiplying by buds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`mi*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemma</ets> bud + <ets>-ficare</ets> (in comp.) to make. See <er>-fy</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The production of a bud or gem.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`mi*flo"rate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemma</ets> bud + <ets>flos</ets>, <ets>floris</ets>, flower.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having flowers like buds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"mi*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state or quality of being gemmy; spruceness; smartness.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>\'d8Gem*mip"a*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <hw>\'d8Gem*mip"a*res</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw> <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>gemma</ets> bud + <ets>parere</ets> to produce.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Animals which increase by budding, as hydroids.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`mi*par"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Reproduction by budding; gemmation. See <er>Budding</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem*mip"a*rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gemmipare</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Producing buds; reproducing by buds. See <er>Gemmation</er>, 1.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem*mos"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemmosus</ets> set with jewels. See <er>Gem</er>.]</ety> <def>The quality or characteristics of a gem or jewel.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`mu*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From L. <ets>gemmula</ets>, dim. of <ets>gemma</ets> bud.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gemmation</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"mule</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gemmula</ets>, dim. of <ets>gemma</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gemmule</ets>. See <er>Gem</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A little leaf bud, as the plumule between the cotyledons.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>One of the buds of mosses.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>One of the reproductive spores of alg\'91.</def> <sd>(d)</sd> <def>An ovule.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A bud produced in generation by gemmation.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>One of the imaginary granules or atoms which, according to Darwin's hypothesis of pangenesis, are continually being thrown off from every cell or unit, and circulate freely throughout the system, and when supplied with proper nutriment multiply by self-division and ultimately develop into cells like those from which they were derived. They are supposed to be transmitted from the parent to the offspring, but are often transmitted in a dormant state during many generations and are then developed. See <er>Pangenesis</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem`mu*lif"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gemmule</ets> + <ets>-ferous</ets>.]</ety> <def>Bearing or producing gemmules or buds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gem"my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gem</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Full of gems; bright; glittering like a gem.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>gemmy</qex> bridle glittered free.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Spruce; smart.</def> <mark>[Colloq. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*mote"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[As. <ets>gem<?/t</ets> an assembly. See <er>Meet</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(AS. Hist.)</fld> <def>A meeting; -- used in combination, <as>as, Witena<ex>gemote</ex>, an assembly of the wise men</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gems</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The chamois.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gems"bok</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D.; akin to G. <ets>gemsbock</ets> the male or buck of the chamois; <ets>gemse</ets> chamois, goat of the Alps + <ets>bock</ets> buck.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A South African antelope (<spn>Oryx Capensis</spn>), having long, sharp, nearly straight horns.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gems"-horn`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G., prop., chamois horn.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>An organ stop with conical tin pipes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*mul"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South American deer (<spn>Furcifer Chilensis</spn>), with simple forked horns.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>guemul</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>-gen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[(1) From Gr. <grk>-gen-</grk>, from the same root as <grk>ge`nos</grk> race, stock (see <er>Genus</er>). (2) From Gr. suffix <grk>-genh`s</grk> born. Cf. F. <ets>-g\'8ane</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A suffix used in scientific words in the sense of <xex>producing</xex>, <xex>generating</xex>: as, amphi<xex>gen</xex>, amido<xex>gen</xex>, halo<xex>gen</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A suffix meaning <xex>produced</xex>, <xex>generated</xex>; <as>as, exo<ex>gen</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <ety>[L., the cheek.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The cheek; the feathered side of the under mandible of a bird.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The part of the head to which the jaws of an insect are attached.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge*nappe"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <ets>Genappe</ets>, in Belgium.]</ety> <def>A worsted yarn or cord of peculiar smoothness, used in the manufacture of braid, fringe, etc.</def> <au>Simmonds.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gen`darme"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gendarmes</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, or <plw>Gens d'armes</plw>.</plu> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>One of a body of heavy cavalry.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <mark>[France]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An armed policeman in France.</def> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen*darm"er*ie</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gendarmerie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The French police force; the body of gendarmes or gendarmes collectively.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>gendarmery</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gendarmery.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen*darm"er*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>gendarmerie</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"der</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n"d<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>genre</ets>, <ets>gendre</ets> (with excrescent <it>d</it>.), F.<ets>genre</ets>, fr. L. <ets>genus</ets>, <ets>generis</ets>, birth, descent, race, kind, gender, fr. the root of <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>gignere</ets>, to beget, in pass., to be born, akin to E. <ets>kin</ets>. See <er>Kin</er>, and cf. <er>Generate</er>, <er>Genre</er>, <er>Gentle</er>, <er>Genus</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Kind; sort.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdOne <xex>gender</xex> of herbs.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Sex, male or female.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The use of the term <ex>gender</ex> to refer to the sex of an animal, especially a person, was once common, then fell into disuse as the term became used primarily for the distinction of grammatical declension forms in inflected words. In the late 1900's, the term again became used to refer to the sex of people, as a euphemism for the term <altname>sex</altname>, especially in discussions of laws and policies on equal treatment of sexes. Objections by prescriptivists that the term should be used only in a grammatical context ignored the earlier uses.</note><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>A classification of nouns, primarily according to sex; and secondarily according to some fancied or imputed quality associated with sex.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Gender</qex> is a grammatical distinction and applies to words only. Sex is natural distinction and applies to living objects.</q> <rj><qau>R. Morris.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Adjectives and pronouns are said to vary in gender when the form is varied according to the gender of the words to which they refer.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gendered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gendering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OF. <ets>gendrer</ets>, fr. L. <ets>generare</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>To beget; to engender.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"der</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To copulate; to breed.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"der*less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having no gender.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*a*gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ race + E. <ets>genesis</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Alternate generation. See under <er>Generation</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*a*log"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Genealogical.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*a*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82alogique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to genealogy; <as>as, a <ex>genealogical</ex> table; <ex>genealogical</ex> order.</as></def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gen`e*a*log"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Genealogical tree</b></col>, <cd>a family lineage or genealogy drawn out under the form of a tree and its branches.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*al"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82alogiste</ets>.]</ety> <def>One who traces genealogies or the descent of persons or families.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*al"o*gize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To investigate, or relate the history of, descents.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*al"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Genealogies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>genealogi</ets>, <ets>genelogie</ets>, OF. <ets>genelogie</ets>, F. <ets>g\'82n\'82alogie</ets>, L. <ets>genealogia</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/; <?/ birth, race, descent (akin to L. <ets>genus</ets>) + <?/ discourse.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>An account or history of the descent of a person or family from an ancestor; enumeration of ancestors and their children in the natural order of succession; a pedigree.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Regular descent of a person or family from a progenitor; pedigree; lineage.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"e*arch</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/ race + <?/ a leader.]</ety> <def>The chief of a family or tribe.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"e*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>See <er>Genus</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Capability of being generated.</def> <rj><au>Johnstone.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>generabilis</ets>.]</ety> <def>Capable of being generated or produced.</def> <rj><au>Bentley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ral</ets>, fr. L. <ets>generalis</ets>. See <er>Genus</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Relating to a genus or kind; pertaining to a whole class or order; <as>as, a <ex>general</ex> law of animal or vegetable economy</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Comprehending many species or individuals; not special or particular; including all particulars; <as>as, a <ex>general</ex> inference or conclusion</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Not restrained or limited to a precise import; not specific; vague; indefinite; lax in signification; <as>as, a loose and <ex>general</ex> expression</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Common to many, or the greatest number; widely spread; prevalent; extensive, though not universal; <as>as, a <ex>general</ex> opinion; a <ex>general</ex> custom.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>This <qex>general</qex> applause and cheerful shout<br/
+Argue your wisdom and your love to Richard.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Having a relation to all; common to the whole; <as>as, Adam, our <ex>general</ex> sire</as>.</def> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>As a whole; in gross; for the most part.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>His <qex>general</qex> behavior vain, ridiculous.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Usual; common, on most occasions; <as>as, his <ex>general</ex> habit or method</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The word <xex>general</xex>, annexed to a name of office, usually denotes <xex>chief</xex> or <xex>superior</xex>; as, attorney-<xex>general</xex>; adjutant <xex>general</xex>; commissary <xex>general</xex>; quartermaster <xex>general</xex>; vicar-<xex>general</xex>, etc.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>General agent</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>an agent whom a principal employs to transact all his business of a particular kind, or to act in his affairs generally.</cd> -- <col><b>General assembly</b></col>. <cd>See the Note under <er>Assembly</er>.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>General average</b></col>, <col><b>General Court</b></col></mcol>. <cd>See under <er>Average</er>, <er>Court</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>General court-martial</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>the highest military and naval judicial tribunal.</cd> -- <col><b>General dealer</b></col> <fld>(Com.)</fld>, <cd>a shopkeeper who deals in all articles in common use.</cd> -- <col><b>General demurrer</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>a demurrer which objects to a pleading in general terms, as insufficient, without specifying the defects.</cd> <au>Abbott.</au> -- <col><b>General epistle</b></col>, <cd>a canonical epistle.</cd> -- <col><b>General guides</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>two sergeants (called the <xex>right</xex>, and the <xex>left</xex>, <xex>general guide</xex>) posted opposite the right and left flanks of an infantry battalion, to preserve accuracy in marching.</cd> <au>Farrow.</au> -- <col><b>General hospitals</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>hospitals established to receive sick and wounded sent from the field hospitals.</cd> <au>Farrow.</au> <col><b>General issue</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>an issue made by a general plea, which traverses the whole declaration or indictment at once, without offering any special matter to evade it.</cd> <au>Bouvier.</au> <au>Burrill.</au> -- <col><b>General lien</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>a right to detain a chattel, etc., until payment is made of any balance due on a general account.</cd> -- <col><b>General officer</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>any officer having a rank above that of colonel.</cd> -- <col><b>General orders</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>orders from headquarters published to the whole command.</cd> -- <col><b>General practitioner</b></col>, <cd>in the United States, one who practices medicine in all its branches without confining himself to any specialty; in England, one who practices both as physician and as surgeon.</cd> -- <col><b>General ship</b></col>, <cd>a ship not chartered or let to particular parties.</cd> -- <col><b>General term</b></col> <fld>(Logic)</fld>, <cd>a term which is the sign of a general conception or notion.</cd> -- <col><b>General verdict</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>the ordinary comprehensive verdict in civil actions, \'bdfor the plaintiff\'b8 or \'bdfor the defendant\'b8.</cd> <au>Burrill.</au> -- <col><b>General warrant</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>a warrant, now illegal, to apprehend suspected persons, without naming individuals.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> <er>General</er>, <er>Common</er>, <er>Universal</er>.</syn> <usage> <xex>Common</xex> denotes primarily that in which many share; and hence, that which is often met with. <xex>General</xex> is stronger, denoting that which pertains to a majority of the individuals which compose a <xex>genus</xex>, or whole. <xex>Universal</xex>, that which pertains to all without exception. To be able to read and write is so <xex>common</xex> an attainment in the United States, that we may pronounce it <xex>general</xex>, though by no means <xex>universal</xex>.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ral</ets>. See <er>General</er>., <pos>a.</pos>]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The whole; the total; that which comprehends or relates to all, or the chief part; -- opposed to <xex>particular</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>In particulars our knowledge begins, and so spreads itself by degrees to <qex>generals</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Locke.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>One of the chief military officers of a government or country; the commander of an army, of a body of men not less than a brigade. In European armies, the highest military rank next below field marshal.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ In the United States the office of <xex>General of the Army</xex> has been created by temporary laws, and has been held only by Generals U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, and P. H. Sheridan. <-- = 5-star general. Eisenhower? MacArthur? Pershing? -->Popularly, the title <xex>General</xex> is given to various <xex>general officers</xex>, as General, Lieutenant general, Major general, Brigadier general, Commissary general, etc. See <er>Brigadier general</er>, <er>Lieutenant general</er>, <er>Major general</er>, in the Vocabulary.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>The roll of the drum which calls the troops together; <as>as, to beat the <ex>general</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Eccl.)</fld> <def>The chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations under the same rule.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>The public; the people; the vulgar.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>In general</b></col>, <cd>in the main; for the most part.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gen`e*ra"li*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Neut. pl., fr. L. <ets>generalis</ets>.]</ety> <def>Generalities; general terms.</def> <rj><au>J. S. Mill.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>generalise</hw> <pos>v.</pos> <def>same as <er>generalize</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*al*is"si*mo</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., superl. of <ets>generale</ets> general. See <er>General</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>The chief commander of an army; especially, the commander in chief of an army consisting of two or more grand divisions under separate commanders; -- a title used in most foreign countries.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*al"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Generalities</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>generalitas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ralit\'82</ets>. Cf. <er>Generalty</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The state of being general; the quality of including species or particulars.</def> <rj><au>Hooker.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is general; that which lacks specificalness, practicalness, or application; a general or vague statement or phrase.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Let us descend from <qex>generalities</qex> to particulars.</q> <rj><qau>Landor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The glittering and sounding <qex>generalities</qex> of natural right which make up the Declaration of Independence.</q> <rj><qau>R. Choate.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The main body; the bulk; the greatest part; <as>as, the <ex>generality</ex> of a nation, or of mankind</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*i`za*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being generalized, or reduced to a general form of statement, or brought under a general rule.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Extreme cases are . . . not <qex>generalizable</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*al*i*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ralisation</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The act or process of generalizing; the act of bringing individuals or particulars under a genus or class; deduction of a general principle from particulars.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Generalization</qex> is only the apprehension of the one in the many.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Hamilton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A general inference.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen"er*al*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Generalized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Generalizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82raliser</ets>.]</ety> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>generalise</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To bring under a genus or under genera; to view in relation to a genus or to genera.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Copernicus <qex>generalized</qex> the celestial motions by merely referring them to the moon's motion. Newton <qex>generalized</qex> them still more by referring this last to the motion of a stone through the air.</q> <rj><qau>W. Nicholson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To apply to other genera or classes; to use with a more extensive application; to extend so as to include all special cases; to make universal in application, as a formula or rule.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>When a fact is <qex>generalized</qex>, our discontent is quited, and we consider the generality itself as tantamount to an explanation.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Hamilton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To derive or deduce (a general conception, or a general principle) from particulars.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> generalize, extrapolate, infer.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A mere conclusion <qex>generalized</qex> from a great multitude of facts.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To speak in generalities; to talk in abstract terms.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> generalise, speak generally.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ize</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To form into a genus; to view objects in their relations to a genus or class; to take general or comprehensive views.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ized</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Comprising structural characters which are separated in more specialized forms; synthetic; <as>as, a <ex>generalized</ex> type</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*i`zer</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who takes general or comprehensive views.</def> <rj><au>Tyndall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>In general; commonly; extensively, though not universally; most frequently.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In a general way, or in general relation; in the main; upon the whole; comprehensively.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Generally</qex> speaking, they live very quietly.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Collectively; as a whole; without omissions.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I counsel that all Israel be <qex>generally</qex> gathered unto thee.</q> <rj><qau>2 Sam. xvii. ll.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The condition or quality of being general; frequency; commonness.</def> <rj><au>Sir P. Sidney.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al sem*an"tics</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fu>(1933)</fu> <def>a doctrine and philosophical approach to language and its relationship to thought and behavior, developed by Alfred Korzybski (1879-1950), which holds that the capacity to express ideas and thereby improve one's interaction with others and one's environment is enhanced by training in the more critical use of words and other symbols; -- sometimes also called <altname>semantics</altname>.</def> <note>More information can be found on the web site of the <a HREF="http://www.general-semantics.org/">Institute of General Semantics</a>.</note><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>General Semantics</qex> is the study of the relations between language, \'bdthought\'b8, and behavior: between how we talk, therefore how we think, therefore how we act.</q> <rj><qau>George Doris</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The office of a general; the exercise of the functions of a general; -- sometimes, with the possessive pronoun, the personality of a general.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Your <qex>generalship</qex> puts me in mind of Prince Eugene.</q> <rj><qau>Goldsmith.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Military skill in a general officer or commander.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Fig.: Leadership; management.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>An artful stroke of <qex>generalship</qex> in Trim to raise a dust.</q> <rj><qau>Sterne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*al*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Generality.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir M. Hale.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*ant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>generans</ets>, <ets>p. pr.</ets> of <ets>generare</ets>.]</ety> <def>Generative; producing</def>; esp. <fld>(Geom.)</fld>, <def>acting as a generant.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*ant</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That which generates.</def> <rj><au>Glanvill.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>A generatrix.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Generated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Generating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>generatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>generare</ets> to generate, fr. <ets>genus</ets>. See <er>Genus</er>, <er>Gender</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To beget; to procreate; to propagate; to produce (a being similar to the parent); to engender; <as>as, every animal <ex>generates</ex> its own species</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To cause to be; to bring into life.</def> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To originate, especially by a vital or chemical process; to produce; to cause.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Whatever <qex>generates</qex> a quantity of good chyle must likewise <qex>generate</qex> milk.</q> <rj><qau>Arbuthnot.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>To trace out, as a line, figure, or solid, by the motion of a point or a magnitude of inferior order.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 619 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>generacioun</ets>, F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ration</ets>, fr.L. <ets>generatio</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Origination by some process, mathematical, chemical, or vital; production; formation; <as>as, the <ex>generation</ex> of sounds, of gases, of curves, etc.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>That which is generated or brought forth; progeny; offspiring.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy. Hence: The body of those who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one period; also, the average lifetime of man, or the ordinary period of time at which one rank follows another, or father is succeeded by child, usually assumed to be one third of a century; an age.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>This is the book of the <qex>generations</qex> of Adam.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. v. 1.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Ye shall remain there [in Babylon] many years, and for a long season, namely, seven <qex>generations</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Baruch vi. 3.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>All <qex>generations</qex> and ages of the Christian church.</q> <rj><qau>Hooker.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Race; kind; family; breed; stock.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thy mother's of my <qex>generation</qex>; what's she, if I be a dog?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude; <as>as, the <ex>generation</ex> of a line or curve by the motion of a point, of a surface by a line, a sphere by a semicircle, etc.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The aggregate of the functions and phenomene which attend reproduction.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ There are four modes of generation in the animal kingdom: <xex>scissiparity</xex> or by fissiparous generation, <xex>gemmiparity</xex> or by budding, <xex>germiparity</xex> or by germs, and <xex>oviparity</xex> or by ova.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Alternate generation</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>alternation of sexual with asexual generation, in which the products of one process differ from those of the other, -- a form of reproduction common both to animal and vegetable organisms. In the simplest form, the organism arising from sexual generation produces offspiring unlike itself, agamogenetically. These, however, in time acquire reproductive organs, and from their impregnated germs the original parent form is reproduced. In more complicated cases, the first series of organisms produced agamogenetically may give rise to others by a like process, and these in turn to still other generations. Ultimately, however, a generation is formed which develops sexual organs, and the original form is reproduced.</cd> -- <col><b>Spontaneous generation</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>the fancied production of living organisms without previously existing parents from inorganic matter, or from decomposing organic matter, a notion which at one time had many supporters; abiogenesis.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*a*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82ratif</ets>.]</ety> <def>Having the power of generating, propagating, originating, or producing.</def> \'bdThat <xex>generative</xex> particle.\'b8 <rj><au>Bentley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*a`tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who, or that which, generates, begets, causes, or produces.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An apparatus in which vapor or gas is formed from a liquid or solid by means of heat or chemical process, as a steam boiler, gas retort, or vessel for generating carbonic acid gas, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The principal sound or sounds by which others are produced; the fundamental note or root of the common chord; -- called also <altname>generating tone</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>Any machine that transforms mechanical into electrical energy; a dynamo.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>a mathematical entity which, when subjected to an operation, yields another mathematical entity; also, a <er>generatrix</er>. </def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*a"trix</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> L. <plw>Generatrices</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, E. <plw>Generatrixes</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>That which generates; the point, or the mathematical magnitude, which, by its motion, generates another magnitude, as a line, surface, or solid; -- called also <altname>describent</altname>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge*ner"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge*ner"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genus</ets>, <ets>generis</ets>, race, kind: cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82rique</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to a genus or kind; relating to a genus, as distinct from a species, or from another genus; <as>as, a <ex>generic</ex> description; a <ex>generic</ex> difference; a <ex>generic</ex> name.</as></def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Very comprehensive; pertaining or appropriate to large classes or their characteristics; -- opposed to <ant>specific</ant>.</def> <wns>[wns=3]</wns><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Commerce)</fld> <def>Not protected by trademark; -- used especially of the names of medications; <as>as, a <ex>generic</ex> drug; the <ex>generic</ex> name of Rogaine is minoxidil</as>.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Since patented medications cannot be sold except under license from the patentee, medication which is still under patent is not typically sold as a <er>generic drug</er>, i.e., sold under its generic name, though it can be referred to by its <ex>generic</ex> name.</note><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ner"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>With regard to a genus, or an extensive class; <as>as, an animal <ex>generically</ex> distinct from another, or two animals or plants <ex>generically</ex> allied</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ner"ic*al*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being generic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*ner"ic drug`</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A medication sold under its generic name; -- usually legal only after the patent has expired, or if no patent was issued for the substance. Generic drugs are usually less expensive than proprietary medications.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*ner"ic name`</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The name for a medication, as used in the pharmacopoeia; it cannot be a trademark. The name is typically given by the inventor or discoverer of the drug, but must be approved by a national or international naming authority.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ner`i*fi*ca"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genus</ets> kind, class + <ets>-ficare</ets> (in comp.) to make. See <er>-fy</er>.]</ety> <def>The act or process of generalizing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Out of this the universal is elaborated by <qex>generification</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Hamilton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`er*os"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>generositas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82n\'82rosit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Noble birth.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Harris (Voyages).</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The quality of being noble; noble-mindedness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Generosity</qex> is in nothing more seen than in a candid estimation of other men's virtues and good qualities.</q> <rj><qau>Barrow.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Liberality in giving; munificence.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Magnanimity; liberality.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82n\'82reux</ets>, fr. L. <ets>generous</ets> of noble birth, noble, excellent, magnanimous, fr. <ets>genus</ets> birth, race: cf. It. <ets>generoso</ets>. See 2d <er>Gender</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Of honorable birth or origin; highborn.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>generous</qex> and gravest citizens.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Exhibiting those qualities which are popularly reregarded as belonging to high birth; noble; honorable; magnanimous; spirited; courageous.</def> \'bdThe <xex>generous</xex> critic.\'b8 <au>Pope.</au> \'bdHis <xex>generous</xex> spouse.\'b8 <au>Pope.</au> \'bdA <xex>generous</xex> pack [of hounds].\'b8 <au>Addison.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Open-handed; free to give; not close or niggardly; munificent; <as>as, a <ex>generous</ex> friend or father</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Characterized by generosity; abundant; overflowing; <as>as, a <ex>generous</ex> table</as>.</def> <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Full of spirit or strength; stimulating; exalting; <as>as, <ex>generous</ex> wine</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Magnanimous; bountiful. See <er>Liberal</er>.</syn></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Gen"er*ous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gen"er*ous*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*see" ep"och</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>The closing subdivision of the Hamilton period in the American Devonian system; -- so called because the formations of this period crop out in <xex>Genesee</xex>, New York.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"sial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or relating to generation.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne`si*ol"gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ birth + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <def>The doctrine or science of generation.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"e*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <grk>ge`nesis</grk>, fr. the root of <grk>gi`gnesqai</grk> to beget, be born; akin to L. <ets>genus</ets> birth, race. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of producing, or giving birth or origin to anything; the process or mode of originating; production; formation; origination.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The origin and <qex>genesis</qex> of poor Sterling's club.</q> <rj><qau>Carlyle.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The first book of the Old Testament; -- so called by the Greek translators, from its containing the history of the creation of the world and of the human race.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Generation</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gen"et</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n"<ecr/t <it>or</it> j<esl/*n<ecr/t")</pr>, <hw>Ge*nette"</hw> <pr>(j<esl/*n<ecr/t")</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>genette</ets>, Sp. <ets>gineta</ets>, fr. Ar. <ets>jarnei<tsdot/</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several species of small Carnivora of the genus <gen>Genetta</gen>, allied to the civets, but having the scent glands less developed, and without a pouch.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The common genet (<spn>Genetta vulgaris</spn>) of Southern Europe, Asia Minor, and North Africa, is dark gray, spotted with black. The long tail is banded with black and white. The Cape genet (<spn>Genetta felina</spn>), and the berbe (<spn>Genetta pardina</spn>), are related African species.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The fur of the common genet (<spn>Genetta vulgaris</spn>); also, any skin dressed in imitation of this fur.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"et</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Jennet</er>.]</ety> <def>A small-sized, well-proportioned, Spanish horse; a jennet.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*neth"li*ac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genethliacus</ets>, Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ belonging to one's birth, <grk>gene`qlh</grk> birth, fr. <grk>gi`gnesqai</grk> to be born.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to nativities; calculated by astrologers; showing position of stars at one's birth.</def> <rj><au>Howell.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*neth"li*ac</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A birthday poem.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One skilled in genethliacs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`eth*li"a*cal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Genethliac.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*neth"li*acs</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The science of calculating nativities, or predicting the future events of life from the stars which preside at birth.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*neth`li*al"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>geneqlhalogi`a</grk> astrology; <grk>gene`qlh</grk> birth + <grk>lo`gos</grk> discourse.]</ety> <def>Divination as to the destinies of one newly born; the act or art of casting nativities; astrology.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*neth`li*at"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who calculates nativities.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Drummond.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*net"ic</hw> <pr>(j<esl/*n<ecr/t"<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Genetical</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to genes or genetics; <as>as, the <ex>genetic</ex> code</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*net"ic*al</hw> <pr>(j<esl/*n<ecr/t"<icr/*k<ait/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Genesis</er>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to, concerned with, or determined by, the genesis of anything, or its natural mode of production or development.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>This historical, <qex>genetical</qex> method of viewing prior systems of philosophy.</q> <rj><qau>Hare.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*net"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a genetical manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*net"i*cist</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a scientist who specializes in genetics.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Genetta</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A genus of mammals comprising the genets.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Genetta</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"va</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The chief city of Switzerland.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Geneva Bible</b></col>, <cd>a translation of the Bible into English, made and published by English refugees in Geneva (Geneva, 1560; London, 1576). It was the first English Bible printed in Roman type instead of the ancient black letter, the first which recognized the division into verses, and the first which omitted the Apocrypha. In form it was a small quarto, and soon superseded the large folio of Cranmer's translation. Called also <altname>Genevan Bible</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geneva convention</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>an agreement made by representatives of the great continental powers at Geneva and signed in 1864, establishing new and more humane regulation regarding the treatment of the sick and wounded and the status of those who minister to them in war. Ambulances and military hospitals are made neutral, and this condition affects physicians, chaplains, nurses, and the ambulance corps. Great Britain signed the convention in 1865.</cd> -- <col><b>Geneva cross</b></col> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>a red Greek cross on a white ground; -- the flag and badge adopted in the Geneva convention.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"va</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>geni\'8avre</ets> juniper, juniper berry, gin, OF. <ets>geneivre</ets> juniper, fr. L. <ets>juniperus</ets> the juniper tree: cf. D. <ets>jenever</ets>, fr. F. <ets>geni\'8avre</ets>. See <er>Juniper</er>, and cf. <er>Gin</er> a liquor.]</ety> <def>A strongly alcoholic liquor, flavored with juniper berries; -- made in Holland; Holland gin; Hollands.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"van</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Geneva, in Switzerland; Genevese.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"van</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A native or inhabitant of Geneva.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A supported of Genevanism.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ne"van*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <ets>Geneva</ets>, where Calvin resided.]</ety> <def>Strict Calvinism.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Montagu.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`e*vese"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. L. <ets>Genevensis</ets>, F. <ets>g\'82nevois</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Geneva, in Switzerland; Genevan.</def> -- <def2><pos>n. sing. & pl.</pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of Geneva; collectively, the inhabitants of Geneva; people of Geneva.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ni"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Genian</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genialis</ets>: cf. OF. <ets>genial</ets>. See <er>Genius</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Contributing to, or concerned in, propagation or production; generative; procreative; productive.</def> \'bdThe <xex>genial</xex> bed.\'b8 <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Creator Venus, <qex>genial</qex> power of love.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Contributing to, and sympathizing with, the enjoyment of life; sympathetically cheerful and cheering; jovial and inspiring joy or happiness; exciting pleasure and sympathy; enlivening; kindly; <as>as, she was of a cheerful and <ex>genial</ex> disposition</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>So much I feel my <qex>genial</qex> spirits droop.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Belonging to one's genius or natural character; native; natural; inborn.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Natural incapacity and <qex>genial</qex> indisposition.</q> <rj><qau>Sir T. Browne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Denoting or marked with genius; belonging to the higher nature.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Men of genius have often attached the highest value to their less <qex>genial</qex> works.</q> <rj><qau>Hare.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Genial gods</b></col> <fld>(Pagan Mythol.)</fld>, <cd>the powers supposed to preside over marriage and generation.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`ni*al"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genialitas</ets>.]</ety> <def>The quality of being genial; sympathetic cheerfulness; warmth of disposition and manners.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ial*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>By genius or nature; naturally.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Some men are <qex>genially</qex> disposed to some opinions.</q> <rj><qau>Glanvill.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Gayly; cheerfully.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ial*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being genial.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ni"an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`neion</grk> chin; akin to <?/ under jaw. Cf. <er>Chin</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the chin; mental; <as>as, the <ex>genian</ex> prominence</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*nic"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geniculatus</ets>, fr. <ets>geniculum</ets> little knee, knot or joint, dim. of <ets>genu</ets> knee. See <er>Knee</er>.]</ety> <def>Bent abruptly at an angle, like the knee when bent; <as>as, a <ex>geniculate</ex> stem; a <ex>geniculate</ex> ganglion; a <ex>geniculate</ex> twin crystal.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*nic"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Geniculated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Geniculating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To form joints or knots on.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cockeram.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*nic"u*la`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Geniculate</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*nic`u*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geniculatio</ets> a kneeling.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of kneeling.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The state of being bent abruptly at an angle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge"nie</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"n<emac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>jinnee</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8G\'82`nie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>See <er>Genius</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge"ni*o</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"n<icr/*<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. See <er>Genius</er>.]</ety> <def>A man of a particular turn of mind.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Tatler.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge`ni*o*hy"oid</hw> <pr>(j<emac/`n<icr/*<osl/*h<imac/"oid)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`neion</grk> the chin + E. <ets>hyoid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the chin and hyoid bone; <as>as, the <ex>geniohyoid</ex> muscle</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gen"ip</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <it>or</it> <hw>Genip tree</hw></mhw>. <sn>1.</sn> <def>Any tree or shrub of the genus <gen>Genipa</gen>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The West Indian sapindaceous tree <spn>Melicocca bijuga</spn>, which yields the honeyberry; also, the related trees <spn>Exothea paniculata</spn> and <spn>E. trifoliata</spn>; called also <altname>ginep</altname>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Spanish lime, Spanish lime tree, honey berry, mamoncillo, <spn>Melicocca bijuga</spn>, <spn>Melicocca bijugatus</spn>.</syn><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*pap</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The edible fruit of a West Indian tree (<spn>Genipa Americana</spn>) of the order <ord>Rubiace\'91</ord>. It is oval in shape, as a large as a small orange, of a pale greenish color, and with dark purple juice.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*nis"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L., broom.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants including the common broom of Western Europe.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*tal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genitalis</ets>, fr. <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>gignere</ets>, to beget: cf. F. <ets>g\'82nital</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to generation, or to the generative organs; <as>as, <ex>genital</ex> herpes</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Genital cord</b></col> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>a cord developed in the fetus by the union of portions of the Wolffian and M\'81llerian ducts and giving rise to parts of the urogenital passages in both sexes.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>genitalia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The sex organs, especially the external sex organs, called the <altname>external genitalia</altname>; the genitals.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genital, genitals, private parts, privates, crotch.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*tals</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Genital</er>, <pos>a.</pos>: cf. L. <ets>genitalia</ets>.]</ety> <def>The organs of generation; the sexual organs; the private parts.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*ting</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Jenneting</er>.]</ety> <def>A species of apple that ripens very early.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`i*ti"val</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Possessing genitive from; pertaining to, or derived from, the genitive case; <as>as, a <ex>genitival</ex> adverb</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Gen`i*ti"val*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genitivus</ets>, fr. <ets>gignere</ets>, <ets>genitum</ets>, to beget: cf. F. <ets>g\'82nitif</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to that case (as the second case of Latin and Greek nouns) which expresses source or possession. It corresponds to the possessive case in English.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*tive</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>The genitive case.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Genitive absolute</b></col>, <cd>a construction in Greek similar to the ablative absolute in Latin. See <cref>Ablative absolute</cref>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`i*to*cru"ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Genit</ets>al + <ets>crural</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to the genital organs and the thigh; -- applied especially to one of the lumbar nerves.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who begets; a generator; an originator.</def> <rj><au>Sheldon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>The genitals.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`i*to*u"ri*na*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Genit</ets>al + <ets>urinary</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>See <er>Urogenital</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"i*ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genitura</ets>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82niture</ets>.]</ety> <def>Generation; procreation; birth.</def> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ius</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Geniuses</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>; <xex>in sense 1</xex>, L. <plw>Genii</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>genius</ets>, prop., the superior or divine nature which is innate in everything, the spirit, the tutelar deity or genius of a person or place, taste, talent, genius, from <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>gignere</ets>, to beget, bring forth. See <er>Gender</er>, and cf. <er>Engine</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A good or evil spirit, or demon, supposed by the ancients to preside over a man's destiny in life; a tutelary deity; a supernatural being; a spirit, good or bad. Cf. <er>Jinnee</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The unseen <qex>genius</qex> of the wood.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>We talk of genius still, but with thought how changed! The <qex>genius</qex> of Augustus was a tutelary demon, to be sworn by and to receive offerings on an altar as a deity.</q> <rj><qau>Tylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The peculiar structure of mind with which each individual is endowed by nature; that disposition or aptitude of mind which is peculiar to each man, and which qualifies him for certain kinds of action or special success in any pursuit; special taste, inclination, or disposition; <as>as, a <ex>genius</ex> for history, for poetry, or painting</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Peculiar character; animating spirit, as of a nation, a religion, a language.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Distinguished mental superiority; uncommon intellectual power; especially, superior power of invention or origination of any kind, or of forming new combinations; <as>as, a man of <ex>genius</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Genius</qex> of the highest kind implies an unusual intensity of the modifying power.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A man endowed with uncommon vigor of mind; a man of superior intellectual faculties and creativity; <as>as, Shakespeare was a rare <ex>genius</ex></as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- <er>Genius</er>, <er>Talent</er>.</syn> <usage> <xex>Genius</xex> implies high and peculiar gifts of nature, impelling the mind to certain favorite kinds of mental effort, and producing new combinations of ideas, imagery, etc. <xex>Talent</xex> supposes general strength of intellect, with a peculiar aptitude for being molded and directed to specific employments and valuable ends and purposes. <xex>Genius</xex> is connected more or less with the exercise of imagination, and reaches its ends by a kind of intuitive power. <xex>Talent</xex> depends more on high mental training, and a perfect command of all the faculties, memory, judgment, sagacity, etc. Hence we speak of a <xex>genius</xex> for poetry, painting. etc., and a <xex>talent</xex> for business or diplomacy. Among English orators, Lord Chatham was distinguished for his <xex>genius</xex>; William Pitt for his pre\'89minent <xex>talents</xex>, and especially his unrivaled <xex>talent</xex> for debate.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 620 --></p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>\'d8Genius loci</b></col> <pr>(<?/)</pr> <ety>[L.]</ety>, <cd>the genius or presiding divinity of a place; hence, the pervading spirit of a place or institution, as of a college, etc.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"o*a cake</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Cookery)</fld> <def>A rich glazed cake, with almonds, pistachios, filberts, or other nuts; also, a rich currant cake with almonds on the top.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen`o*cid"al</hw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to genocide; <as>as, the <ex>genocidal</ex> policies of the Serbs in Bosnia</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen"o*cide</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The systematic killing of a racial or cultural group; <as>as, the Nazi <ex>genocide</ex> of Jews left few in Germany or Poland after World War II</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> race murder, racial extermination.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`o*ese"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Genoa, a city of Italy; <as>as, the <ex>Genoese</ex> sailor we call Columbus</as>.</def> -- <def2><pos>n. sing. & pl.</pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of Genoa; collectively, the people of Genoa.</def></def2><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Genovese.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen"o*type</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Genetics)</fld> <def>A group of organisms sharing a specific genetic constitution.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Genetics)</fld> <def>The genetic constitution of an organism, specifying the particular alleles at defined loci in the genome; -- used with respect to one gene, a specific group of genes, or the entire set of genes within the organism. Contrasted with <contr>phenotype</contr>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genetic constitution.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> + <source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>genotypic</hw> <hw>genotypical</hw></mhw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to genotypes (definition 2); <as>as, <ex>genotypical</ex> pattern</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge*nouil`l\'8are"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anc. Armor)</fld> <def>A metal plate covering the knee.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>That part of a parapet which lies between the gun platform and the bottom of an embrasure.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>-ge*nous</hw>. <ety>[<ets>-gen</ets> + <ets>-ous</ets>.]</ety> <def>A suffix signifying <sig>producing</sig>, <sig>yielding</sig>; <as>as, alkali<ex>genous</ex>; endo<ex>genous</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Genovese</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>same as <er>Genoese</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Genoese.</syn><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gen"re</hw> <pr>(zh<aum/N"r')</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Kind; genus; class; form; style, esp. in literature.</def></p>
+
+<p><q>French drama was lisping or still inarticulate; the great French <qex>genre</qex> of the fabliau was hardly born.</q> <rj><qau>Saintsbury.</qau></rj></p>
+
+<p><q>A particular demand . . . that we shall pay special attention to the matter of <qex>genres</qex> -- that is, to the different forms or categories of literature.</q> <rj><qau>W. P. Trent.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Fine Arts)</fld> <def>A style of painting, sculpture, or other imitative art, which illustrates everyday life and manners.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gens</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/nz)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gentes</plw> <pr>(j<ecr/n"t<emac/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. See <er>Gentle</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Rom. Hist.)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A clan or family connection, embracing several families of the same stock, who had a common name and certain common religious rites; a subdivision of the Roman curia or tribe.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>A minor subdivision of a tribe, among American aborigines. It includes those who have a common descent, and bear the same totem.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gent</ets>, fr. L. <ets>genitus</ets> born, or (less prob.) fr. <ets>gentilis</ets>. See <er>Genteel</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Gentle; noble; of gentle birth.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>All of a knight [who] was fair and <qex>gent</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Neat; pretty; fine; elegant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Her body <qex>gent</qex> and small.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*teel"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gentil</ets> noble, pretty, graceful. See <er>Gentle</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Possessing or exhibiting the qualities popularly regarded as belonging to high birth and breeding; free from vulgarity, or lowness of taste or behavior; adapted to a refined or cultivated taste; polite; well-bred; <as>as, <ex>genteel</ex> company, manners, address</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Graceful in mien or form; elegant in appearance, dress, or manner; <as>as, the lady has a <ex>genteel</ex> person</as>. <xex>Law</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Suited to the position of lady or a gentleman; <as>as, to live in a <ex>genteel</ex> allowance</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Polite; well-bred; refined; polished.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*teel"ish</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Somewhat genteel.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*teel"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a genteel manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*teel"ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being genteel.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gen"ter*ie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gen"trie</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. See <er>Gentry</er>.]</ety> <def>Nobility of birth or of character; gentility.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tian</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n"sh<ait/n <it>or</it> j<ecr/n"sh<icr/*<ait/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>genciane</ets>, F. <ets>gentiane</ets>, L. <ets>gentiana</ets>, fr. <ets>Gentius</ets>, an Illyrian king, said to have discovered its properties.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Any one of a genus (<gen>Gentiana</gen>) of herbaceous plants with opposite leaves and a tubular four- or five-lobed corolla, usually blue, but sometimes white, yellow, or red. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Capsule</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Many species are found on the highest mountains of Europe, Asia, and America, and some are prized for their beauty, as the Alpine (<spn>Gentiana verna</spn>, <spn>Gentiana Bavarica</spn>, and <spn>Gentiana excisa</spn>), and the American fringed gentians (<spn>Gentiana crinita</spn> and <spn>Gentiana detonsa</spn>). Several are used as tonics, especially the bitter roots of <spn>Gentiana lutea</spn>, the officinal gentian of the pharmacopoeias.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Horse gentian</b></col>, <cd>fever root.</cd> -- <col><b>Yellow gentian</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>the officinal gentian (<spn>Gentiana lutea</spn>). See <er>Bitterwort</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gentiana</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the <fam>Gentianaceae</fam>; it is a genus of herbs nearly cosmopolitan in cool temperate regions; in some classifications it includes the genera <gen>Gentianopsis</gen> and <gen>Gentianella</gen>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gentiana</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gentianaceae</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A natural family of chiefly herbaceous plants with showy flowers; some are cultivated as ornamentals.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Gentianaceae</fam>, gentian family.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gentianales</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>An order of plants including the <fam>Gentianaceae</fam>; <fam>Apocyanaceae</fam>; <fam>Asclepiadaceae</fam>; <fam>Loganiaceae</fam>; <fam>Oleaceae</fam>; and <fam>Salvadoraceae</fam>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> order Gentianales.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`tian*a"ceous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to a natural family of plants (<fam>Gentianace\'91</fam>) of which the gentian is the type.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`tian*el"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gentian</er>.]</ety> <def>A kind of blue color.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`ti*an"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to or derived from the gentian; <as>as, <ex>gentianic</ex> acid</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tian*ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A bitter, crystallizable substance obtained from gentian.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tian*ose`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A crystallizable, sugarlike substance, with a slightly sweetish taste, obtained from the gentian.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <def>Gentle.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tile</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n"t<imac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gentilis</ets> belonging to the same clan, stock, race, people, or nation; in opposition to <contr>Roman</contr>, a foreigner; in opposition to <contr>Jew</contr> or <contr>Christian</contr>, a heathen: cf. F. <ets>gentil</ets>. See <er>Gentle</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One neither a Jew nor a Christian; a worshiper of false gods; a heathen.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person who is not Jewish; -- used in this sense by Jews.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> goy[male], shiksa[female].</syn><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The Hebrews included in the term <ets>g\'d3yim</ets>, or nations, all the tribes of men who had not received the true faith, and were not circumcised. The Christians translated <ets>g\'d3yim</ets> by the L. <ets>gentes</ets>, and imitated the Jews in giving the name <ex>gentiles</ex> to all nations who were neither Jews nor Christians. In civil affairs, the denomination was given to all nations who were not Romans. As used by Mormons, the term <ex>gentile</ex> designates any person who is not a Mormon.</note></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Pagan; heathen. See <er>Pagan</er>.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tile</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Belonging to the nations at large, as distinguished from the <xex>Jews</xex>; ethnic; of pagan or heathen people.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Denoting a race or country; <as>as, a <ex>gentile</ex> noun or adjective</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tile-fal`con</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Falcon-gentil</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`ti*lesse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>gentilesse</ets>, <ets>gentelise</ets>, F. <ets>gentillesse</ets>. See <er>Gentle</er>. <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>Gentleness; courtesy; kindness; nobility.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til*ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Heathenish; pagan.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gentilisme</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Hethenism; paganism; the worship of false gods.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Tribal feeling; devotion to one's <xex>gens</xex>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gen`ti*li"tial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gen`ti*li"tious</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gentilitius</ets>. See <er>Gentile</er>.]</ety> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Peculiar to a people; national.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hereditary; entailed on a family.</def> <rj><au>Arbuthnot.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*til"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gentilitas</ets> the relationship of those who belong to the same clan, also, heathenism: cf. F. <ets>gentilit\'82</ets> heathenism. See <er>Gentile</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Good extraction; dignity of birth.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He . . . mines my <qex>gentility</qex> with my education.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The quality or qualities appropriate to those who are well born, as self-respect, dignity, courage, courtesy, politeness of manner, a graceful and easy mien and behavior, etc.; good breeding.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The class in society who are, or are expected to be, genteel; the gentry.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir J. Davies.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Paganism; heathenism.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Hooker.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gentile</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To live like a gentile or heathen.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To act the gentleman; -- with <xex>it</xex> (see <er>It</er>, 5).</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til*ize</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To render gentile or gentlemanly; <as>as, to <ex>gentilize</ex> your unworthy sones</as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sylvester.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"til*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gentil</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>In a gentle or hoble manner; frankly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`ti*o*pi"krin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gentian</ets> + Gr. <?/ bitter.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A bitter, yellow, crystalline substance, regarded as a glucoside, and obtained from the gentian.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ti*sin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A tasteless, yellow, crystalline substance, obtained from the gentian; -- called also <altname>gentianin</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Gentler</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Gentlest</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</amorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gentil</ets>, F. <ets>gentil</ets> noble, pretty, graceful, fr. L. <ets>gentilis</ets> of the same clan or race, fr. <ets>gens</ets>, <ets>gentis</ets>, tribe, clan, race, orig. that which belongs together by birth, fr. the root of <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>gignere</ets>, to beget; hence <ets>gentle</ets>, properly, of birth or family, that is, of good or noble birth. See <er>Gender</er>, and cf. <er>Genteel</er>, <er>Gentil</er>, <er>Gentile</er>, <er>Gentoo</er>, <er>Jaunty</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Well-born; of a good family or respectable birth, though not noble.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>British society is divided into nobility, gentry, and yeomanry, and families are either noble, <qex>gentle</qex>, or simple.</q> <rj><qau>Johnson's Cyc.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The studies wherein our noble and <qex>gentle</qex> youth ought to bestow their time.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Quiet and refined in manners; not rough, harsh, or stern; mild; meek; bland; amiable; tender; <as>as, a <ex>gentle</ex> nature, temper, or disposition; a <ex>gentle</ex> manner; a <ex>gentle</ex> address; a <ex>gentle</ex> voice.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A compellative of respect, consideration, or conciliation; <as>as, <ex>gentle</ex> reader</as>.</def> \'bd<xex>Gentle</xex> sirs.\'b8 \'bd<xex>Gentle</xex> Jew.\'b8 \'bd<xex>Gentle</xex> servant.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Not wild, turbulent, or refractory; quiet and docile; tame; peaceable; <as>as, a <ex>gentle</ex> horse</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Soft; not violent or rough; not strong, loud, or disturbing; easy; soothing; pacific; <as>as, a <ex>gentle</ex> touch; a <ex>gentle</ex> gallop</as> .</def> \'bd<xex>Gentle</xex> music.\'b8 <rj><au>Sir J. Davies.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>O sleep! it is a <qex>gentle</qex> thing.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>The gentle craft</b></col>, <cd>the art or trade of shoemaking.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Mild; meek; placid; dovelike; quiet; peaceful; pacific; bland; soft; tame; tractable; docile.</syn> -- <usage><er>Gentle</er>, <er>Tame</er>, <er>Mild</er>, <er>Meek</er>. <xex>Gentle</xex> describes the natural disposition; <xex>tame</xex>, that which is subdued by training; <xex>mild</xex> implies a temper which is, by nature, not easily provoked; <xex>meek</xex>, a spirit which has been schooled to mildness by discipline or suffering. The lamb is <xex>gentle</xex>; the domestic fowl is <xex>tame</xex>; John, the Apostle, was <xex>mild</xex>; Moses was <xex>meek</xex>.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One well born; a gentleman.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Gentles</qex>, methinks you frown.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A trained falcon. See <er>Falcon-gentil</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A dipterous larva used as fish bait.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gent"le</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To make genteel; to raise from the vulgar; to ennoble.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj>
+<-- = gentrify? --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To make smooth, cozy, or agreeable.</def> <mark>[R. or Poet.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To <qex>gentle</qex> life's descent,<br/
+We shut our eyes, and think it is a plain.</q> <rj><qau>Young.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To make kind and docile, as a horse.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Gen"tle*folk`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gen"tle*folks`</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>Persons of gentle or good family and breeding.</def> <mark>[Generally in the United States in the plural form.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle-heart`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having a kind or gentle disposition.</def> <au>Shak.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Gen"tle-heart`ed*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gentlemen</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>gentilman</ets> nobleman; <ets>gentil</ets> noble + <ets>man</ets> man; cf. F. <ets>gentilhomme</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A man well born; one of good family; one above the condition of a yeoman.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of gentle or refined manners; a well-bred man.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Her.)</fld> <def>One who bears arms, but has no title.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>The servant of a man of rank.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The count's <qex>gentleman</qex>, one Cesario.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A man, irrespective of condition; -- used esp. in the plural (= citizens; people), in addressing men in popular assemblies, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ In Great Britain, the term <xex>gentleman</xex> is applied in a limited sense to those having coats of arms, but who are without a title, and, in this sense, <xex>gentlemen</xex> hold a middle rank between the nobility and yeomanry. In a more extended sense, it includes every man above the rank of yeoman, comprehending the nobility. In the United States, the term is applied to men of education and good breeding of every occupation.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gentleman commoner</b></col>, <cd>one of the highest class of commoners at the University of Oxford.</cd> -- <col><b>Gentleman usher</b></col>, <cd>one who ushers visitors into the presence of a sovereign, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gentleman usher of the black rod</b></col>, <cd>an usher belonging to the Order of the Garter, whose chief duty is to serve as official messenger of the House of Lords.</cd> -- <col><b>Gentlemen-at-arms</b></col>, <cd>a band of forty gentlemen who attend the sovereign on state occasions; formerly called <altname>gentlemen pensioners</altname>.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*man*hood</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The qualities or condition of a gentleman.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Gen"tle*man*like`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Gen"tle*man*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of, pertaining to, resembling, or becoming, a gentleman; befitting a man of good breeding; well-behaved; courteous; polite; <as>as, <ex>gentlemanly</ex> behavior</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*man*li*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state of being gentlemanly; gentlemanly conduct or manners.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*man*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The carriage or quality of a gentleman.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*men's a*gree"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>An agreement binding only as a matter of honor; often, specif., such an agreement among the heads of industrial or merchantile enterprises, the terms of which could not be included and enforced in a legal contract.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being gentle, well-born, mild, benevolent, docile, etc.; gentility; softness of manners, disposition, etc.; mildness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The deportment or conduct of a gentleman.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ascham.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gent"lesse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gentilesse; gentleness.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tle*wom`an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gentlewomen</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A woman of good family or of good breeding; a woman above the vulgar.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A woman who attends a lady of high rank.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"tly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gentle manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>My mistress <qex>gently</qex> chides the fault I made.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*too"</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n*t<oomac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Gentoos</plw> <pr>(j<ecr/n*t<oomac/z")</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Pg. <ets>gentio</ets> gentile, heathen. See <er>Gentile</er>.]</ety> <def>A native of Hindostan; a Hindoo.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen*too"</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/n*t<oomac/")</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>Gentoos</plw> <pr>(j<ecr/n*t<oomac/z")</pr></plu>. <def>A penguin (<spn>Pygosceles t\'91niata</spn>).</def> <mark>[Falkland Is.]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>genterie</ets>, <ets>gentrie</ets>, noble birth, nobility, cf. <ets>gentrise</ets>, and OF. <ets>gentelise</ets>, <ets>genterise</ets>, E. <ets>gentilesse</ets>, also OE. <ets>genteleri</ets> high-mindedness. See <er>Gent</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, <er>Gentle</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Birth; condition; rank by birth.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdPride of <xex>gentrie</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>She conquers him by high almighty Jove,<br/
+By knighthood, <qex>gentry</qex>, and sweet friendship's oath.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>People of education and good breeding; in England, in a restricted sense, those between the nobility and the yeomanry.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Courtesy; civility; complaisance.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To show us so much <qex>gentry</qex> and good will.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen"ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From F. <ets>gentil</ets>. Cf. <er>Jaunty</er>.]</ety> <def>Neat; trim.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Burns.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge"nu</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Genua</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., the knee.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The knee.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The kneelike bend, in the anterior part of the callosum of the brain.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gen`u*flect"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Genuflected</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Genuflecting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[See <er>Genuflection</er>.]</ety> <def>To bend the knee, as in worship.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>gen`u*flec"tion</hw>, <hw>gen`u*flex"ion</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82nuflexion</ets>, fr. LL. <ets>genuflexio</ets>, fr. L. <ets>genu</ets> knee + <ets>flexio</ets> a bending, fr. <ets>flectere</ets>, <ets>flexum</ets>, to bend. See <er>Knee</er>, <er>Flexible</er>.]</ety> <def>The act of bending the knee, particularly in worship or reverence.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Stillingfleet.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gen"u*ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>genuinus</ets>, fr. <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>gignere</ets>, to beget, in pass., to be born: cf. F. <ets>g\'82nuine</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>.]</ety> <def>Belonging to, or proceeding from, the original stock; native;</def> <specif>hence,</specif> <def>not counterfeit, spurious, false, or adulterated; authentic; real; natural; true; pure; <as>as, a <ex>genuine</ex> text; a <ex>genuine</ex> production; <ex>genuine</ex> materials.</as></def> \'bdTrue, <xex>genuine</xex> night.\'b8 <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Authentic; real; true; pure; unalloyed; unadulterated. See <er>Authentic</er>.</syn></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Gen"u*ine*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gen"u*ine*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The evidence, both internal and external, against the <qex>genuineness</qex> of these letters, is overwhelming.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"nus</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"n<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Genera</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., birth, race, kind, sort; akin to Gr. <?/. See <er>Gender</er>, and cf. <er>Benign</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Logic)</fld> <def>A class of objects divided into several subordinate species; a class more extensive than a species; a precisely defined and exactly divided class; one of the five predicable conceptions, or sorts of terms.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>An assemblage of species, having so many fundamental points of structure in common, that in the judgment of competent scientists, they may receive a common substantive name. A genus is not necessarily the lowest definable group of species, for it may often be divided into several subgenera. In proportion as its definition is exact, it is <xex>natural</xex> genus; if its definition can not be made clear, it is more or less an <xex>artificial</xex> genus.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Thus in the animal kingdom the lion, leopard, tiger, cat, and panther are species of the Cat kind or genus, while in the vegetable kingdom all the species of oak form a single genus. Some genera are represented by a multitude of species, as Solanum (<it>Nightshade</it>) and Carex (<it>Sedge</it>), others by few, and some by only one known species.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Subaltern genus</b></col> <fld>(Logic)</fld>, <cd>a genus which may be a species of a higher genus, as the genus denoted by <xex>quadruped</xex>, which is also a species of <xex>mammal</xex>.</cd> -- <col><b>Summum genus</b></col> <ety>[L.]</ety> <fld>(Logic)</fld>, <cd>the highest genus; a genus which can not be classed as a species, as <xex>being</xex>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge"nys</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"n<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>ge`nys</grk> the under jaw.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gonys</er>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*cen"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*cen"tric*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>ke`ntron</grk> center: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ocentrique</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Having, considering, or based on, the earth as center; <as>as, the <ex>geocentric</ex> theory of the universe</as>; in relation to or seen from the earth, -- usually opposed to <contr>heliocentric</contr>, as seen from the sun; <as>as, the <ex>geocentric</ex> longitude or latitude of a planet</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Geocentric latitude</b></col><cd> (of place) the angle included between the radius of the earth through the place and the plane of the equator, in distinction from <xex>geographic</xex> latitude. It is a little less than the geographic latitude.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*cen"tric*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a geocentric manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geochelone</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A genus of giant tortoises.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Geochelone</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge`o*chem"is*try</hw> <pr>(j<emac/`<osl/*k<ecr/m"<icr/s*tr<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <ets>chemistry</ets>.]</ety> <def>The study of the chemical composition of, and of actual or possible chemical changes in, the crust of the earth.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ge`o*chem"ic*al</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> -- <wf>Ge`o*chem"ist</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geococcyx</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The genus of birds comprising the roadrunners.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Geococcyx</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*oc"ro*nite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>Kro`nos</grk> Saturn, the alchemistic name of lead: cf. G. <ets>geokronit</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A lead-gray or grayish blue mineral with a metallic luster, consisting of sulphur, antimony, and lead, with a small proportion of arsenic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*cyc"lic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>ky`klos</grk> circle.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of, pertaining to, or illustrating, the revolutions of the earth; <as>as, a <ex>geocyclic</ex> machine</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Circling the earth periodically.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"ode</hw> <pr>(j<emac/"<omac/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82ode</ets>, L. <ets>geodes</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ earthlike; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>e'i^dos</grk> form.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A nodule of stone, containing a cavity, lined with crystals or mineral matter.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The cavity in such a nodule.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 621 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*deph"a*gous</hw> <pr>(j<emac/`<osl/*d<ecr/f"<adot/*g<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, earth + <grk>'adhfa`gos</grk> eating one's fill; gluttonous.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Living in the earth; -- applied to the ground beetles.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*des"ic</hw> <pr>(j<emac/`<osl/*d<ecr/s"<icr/k)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*des"ic*al</hw> <pr>(-<icr/*k<ait/l)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82od\'82sique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to geodesy; geodetic.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Architecture)</fld> <def>Made of lightweight structural supporting elements connected in a manner to provide great rigidity; -- of structures; <as>as, The <ex>geodesic</ex> dome was invented by <person>R. Buckminster Fuller</person></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*des"ic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A geodetic line or curve.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge`o*des"ic dome</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A domelike structure invented by <person>R. Buckminster Fuller</person>, in which straight structural parts are connected to form interlocking polygons, affording great strength and rigidity combined with light weight. The typical form has the outlines of the top half of an icosahedron, with the triangular spaces filled with structural members forming triangles, hexagons, and squares.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*od"e*sist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One versed in geodesy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*od"e*sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ to divide: cf. F. <ets>g\'82od\'82sie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>That branch of applied mathematics which determines, by means of observations and measurements, the figures and areas of large portions of the earth's surface, or the general figure and dimenshions of the earth; or that branch of surveying in which the curvature of the earth is taken into account, as in the surveys of States, or of long lines of coast.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*det"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*det"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to geodesy; obtained or determined by the operations of geodesy; engaged in geodesy; geodesic; <as>as, <ex>geodetic</ex> surveying; <ex>geodetic</ex> observers.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Geodetic line</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Geodetic curve</b></col></mcol>, <cd>the shortest line that can be drawn between two points on the elipsoidal surface of the earth; a curve drawn on any given surface so that the osculating plane of the curve at every point shall contain the normal to the surface; the minimum line that can be drawn on any surface between any two points.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*det"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a geodetic manner; according to geodesy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*det"ics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Geodesy</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*dif"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Geode</ets> + <ets>-ferous</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Producing geodes; containing geodes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"o*duck</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[American Indian name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A gigantic clam (<spn>Glycimeris generosa</spn>) of the Pacific coast of North America, highly valued as an article of food.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`og*no"sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Geognosy</er>.]</ety> <def>Knowledge of the earth.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>G. Eliot.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"og*nost</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82ognoste</ets>.]</ety> <def>One versed in geognosy; a geologist.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`og*nos"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`og*nos"tic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82ognostique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to geognosy, or to a knowledge of the structure of the earth; geological.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*og"no*sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>gnw^sis</grk> knowing, knowledge, fr. <grk>gignw`skein</grk> to know: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ognosie</ets>.]</ety> <def>That part of geology which treats of the materials of the earth's structure, and its general exterior and interior constitution.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*gon"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*gon"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82ogonique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to geogony, or to the formation of the earth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*og"o*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ generation, birth, fr. the root of <?/ to be born: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ogonie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The branch of science which treats of the formation of the earth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*og"ra*pher</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One versed in geography.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*graph"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*graph"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geographicus</ets>, Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ographique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to geography.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Geographical distribution</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Distribution</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geographic latitude</b></col><cd> (of a place), the angle included between a line perpendicular or normal to the level surface of water at rest at the place, and the plane of the equator; differing slightly from the geocentric latitude by reason of the difference between the earth's figure and a true sphere.</cd> -- <col><b>Geographical mile</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Mile</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geographical variation</b></col>, <cd>any variation of a species which is dependent on climate or other geographical conditions.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*graph"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a geographical manner or method; according to geography.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge`o*graph"ics</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>geography</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> geography.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*og"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Geographies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82ographie</ets>, l. <ets>geographia</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ description, fr. <?/ to write, describe. See <er>Graphic</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The science which treats of the world and its inhabitants; a description of the earth, or a portion of the earth, including its structure, features, products, political divisions, and the people by whom it is inhabited. It also includes the responses and adaptations of people to topography, climate, soil and vegetation</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A treatise on this science.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Astronomical</b></col>, <col><b>or Mathematical</b></col></mcol>, <cd>geography treats of the earth as a planet, of its shape, its size, its lines of latitude and longitude, its zones, and the phenomena due to to the earth's diurnal and annual motions.</cd> -- <col><b>Physical geography</b></col><cd> treats of the conformation of the earth's surface, of the distribution of land and water, of minerals, plants, animals, etc., and applies the principles of physics to the explanation of the diversities of climate, productions, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Political geography</b></col><cd> treats of the different countries into which earth is divided with regard to political and social and institutions and conditions.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ol"a*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ worship.]</ety> <def>The worship of the earth.</def> <rj><au>G. W. Cox.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><caption><er>The Geological Series</er>.
+<note><hand/ The science of geology, as treating of the history of the globe, involves a description of the different strata which compose its crust, their order of succession, characteristic forms of animal and vegetable life, etc. The principal subdivisions of geological time, and the most important strata, with their relative positions, are indicated in the following diagram.</note></caption>
+<-- illustration of geological periods, with rock layers, takes one column from top to bottom of the page here --></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge*ol"o*ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*lo"gi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A geologist.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*log"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82ologique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to geology, or the science of the earth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*log"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a geological manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ol"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>G\'82ologiste</ets>.]</ety> <def>One versed in the science of geology.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ol"o*gize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Geologized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Geologizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To study geology or make geological investigations in the field; to discourse as a geologist.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>During midsummer <qex>geologized</qex> a little in Shropshire.</q> <rj><qau>Darwin.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Geologies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <ets>-logy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ologie</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The science which treats: <sd>(a)</sd> Of the structure and mineral constitution of the globe; <sfield>structural geology</sfield>. <sd>(b)</sd> Of its history as regards rocks, minerals, rivers, valleys, mountains, climates, life, etc.; <sfield>historical geology</sfield>. <sd>(c)</sd> Of the causes and methods by which its structure, features, changes, and conditions have been produced; <sfield>dynamical geology</sfield>. See Chart of <er>The Geological Series</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A treatise on the science.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"a*lism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>"omalismo`s</grk> a leveling.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The tendency of an organism to respond, during its growth, to the force of gravitation.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"o*man`cer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who practices, or is versed in, geomancy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"o*man`cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>geomance</ets>, <ets>geomancie</ets>, F. <ets>g\'82omance</ets>, <ets>g\'82omancie</ets>, LL. <ets>geomantia</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>mantei`a</grk> divination.]</ety> <def>A kind of divination by means of figures or lines, formed by little dots or points, originally on the earth, and latterly on paper.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*man"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*man"tic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82omantique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining or belonging to geomancy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82om\'8atre</ets>, L. <ets>geometres</ets>, <ets>geometra</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>gewme`trhs</grk>, fr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>me`tron</grk> measure. See <er>Meter</er> measure.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One skilled in geometry; a geometrician; a mathematician.</def> <rj><au>I. Watts.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any species of geometrid moth; a geometrid.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*tral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82om\'82tral</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to geometry.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*met"ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*met"ric*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>geometricus</ets>; Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>g\'82om\'82trique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to, or according to the rules or principles of, geometry; determined by geometry; <as>as, a <ex>geometrical</ex> solution of a problem</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Art)</fld> <def>characterized by simple geometric forms in design and decoration; <as>as, a buffalo hide painted with red and black <ex>geometrical</ex> designs</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> geometric.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Geometric</xex> is often used, as opposed to <xex>algebraic</xex>, to include processes or solutions in which the propositions or principles of geometry are made use of rather than those of algebra.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Geometrical</xex> is often used in a limited or strictly technical sense, as opposed to <xex>mechanical</xex>; thus, a construction or solution is <xex>geometrical</xex> which can be made by ruler and compasses, <it>i. e.</it>, by means of right lines and circles. Every construction or solution which requires any other curve, or such motion of a line or circle as would generate any other curve, is not <xex>geometrical</xex>, but <xex>mechanical</xex>. By another distinction, a <xex>geometrical</xex> solution is one obtained by the rules of geometry, or processes of analysis, and hence is exact; while a <xex>mechanical</xex> solution is one obtained by trial, by actual measurements, with instruments, etc., and is only approximate and empirical.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Geometrical curve</b></col>. <cd>Same as <cref>Algebraic curve</cref>; -- so called because their different points may be constructed by the operations of elementary geometry.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometric lathe</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for engraving bank notes, etc., with complicated patterns of interlacing lines; -- called also <altname>cycloidal engine</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometrical pace</b></col>, <cd>a measure of five feet.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometric pen</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for drawing geometric curves, in which the movements of a pen or pencil attached to a revolving arm of adjustable length may be indefinitely varied by changing the toothed wheels which give motion to the arm.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometrical plane</b></col> <fld>(Persp.)</fld>, <cd>the same as <altname>Ground plane</altname> .</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Geometrical progression</b></col>, <col><b>proportion</b></col>, <col><b>ratio</b></col></mcol>. <cd>See under <er>Progression</er>, <er>Proportion</er> and <er>Ratio</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometrical radius</b></col>, <cd>in gearing, the radius of the pitch circle of a cogwheel.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Geometric spider</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>one of many species of spiders, which spin a geometrical web. They mostly belong to <gen>Epeira</gen> and allied genera, as the garden spider. See <er>Garden spider</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometric square</b></col>, <cd>a portable instrument in the form of a square frame for ascertaining distances and heights by measuring angles.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometrical staircase</b></col>, <cd>one in which the stairs are supported by the wall at one end only.</cd> -- <col><b>Geometrical tracery</b></col>, <cd>in architecture and decoration, tracery arranged in geometrical figures.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 622 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*met"ric*al*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>According to the rules or laws of geometry.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om`e*tri"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in geometry; a geometer; a mathematician.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*trid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Pertaining or belonging to the <fam>Geometrid\'91</fam>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*trid</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of numerous genera and species of moths, of the family <fam>Geometrid\'91</fam>; -- so called because their larv\'91 (called <stage>loopers</stage>, <stage>measuring worms</stage>, <stage>spanworms</stage>, and <stage>inchworms</stage>) creep in a looping manner, as if measuring. Many of the species are injurious to agriculture, as the cankerworms.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geometridae</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A natural family of moths whose larvae are called <cref>measuring worms</cref>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Geometridae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*trize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Geometrized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Geometrizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To investigate or apprehend geometrical quantities or laws; to make geometrical constructions; to proceed in accordance with the principles of geometry.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Nature <qex>geometrizeth</qex>, and observeth order in all things.</q> <rj><qau>Sir T. Browne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*om"e*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it></plu> <plw>Geometries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82om\'82trie</ets>, L. <ets>geometria</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ to measure land; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ to measure. So called because one of its earliest and most important applications was to the measurement of the earth's surface. See <er>Geometer</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That branch of mathematics which investigates the relations, properties, and measurement of solids, surfaces, lines, and angles; the science which treats of the properties and relations of magnitudes; the science of the relations of space.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A treatise on this science.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Analytical geometry</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Co\'94rdinate geometry</b></col></mcol>, <cd>that branch of mathematical analysis which has for its object the analytical investigation of the relations and properties of geometrical magnitudes.</cd> -- <col><b>Descriptive geometry</b></col>, <cd>that part of geometry which treats of the graphic solution of all problems involving three dimensions.</cd> -- <col><b>Elementary geometry</b></col>, <cd>that part of geometry which treats of the simple properties of straight lines, circles, plane surface, solids bounded by plane surfaces, the sphere, the cylinder, and the right cone.</cd> -- <col><b>Higher geometry</b></col>, <cd>that pert of geometry which treats of those properties of straight lines, circles, etc., which are less simple in their relations, and of curves and surfaces of the second and higher degrees.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*oph"a*gism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, earth + <?/ to eat.]</ety> <def>The act or habit of eating earth. See <cref>Dirt eating</cref>, under <er>Dirt</er>.</def> <rj><au>Dunglison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*oph"a*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who eats earth, as dirt, clay, chalk, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*oph"a*gous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Earth-eating.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge*oph"i*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., from Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, earth + <?/ to love.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of Mollusca which includes the land snails and slugs.</def></p>
+
+<p><hw>Geophilidae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A natural family of small extremely elongate earth-living centipedes.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> family <fam>Geophilidae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geophilomorpha</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>an order of myriopod arthropods containing elongated centipedes living in soil and under stones and having more than 30 pairs of legs.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> order <ord>Geophilomorpha</ord>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geophilus</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The type type genus of the <fam>Geophilidae</fam>, a cosmopolitan genus of centipedes sometimes called earwigs.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Geophilus</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geophysical</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to geophysics; <as>as, <ex>geophysical</ex> sciences</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geophysicist</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a specialist in geology.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> geologist.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geophysics</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A branch of geology that uses physical principles to study the properties of the earth.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> geophysical science.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geophyte</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a perennial plant propagated by overwintering buds on underground bulbs or tubers or corms.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geopolitical</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to geopolitics.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>geopolitics</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>the study of the effects of economic geography on the powers of the state.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge`o*pon"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ge`o*pon"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, earth + <?/ toilsome, fr. <?/ labor: cf. F. <ets>g\'82oponique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to tillage of the earth, or agriculture.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*pon"ics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>g\'82oponique</ets>.]</ety> <def>The art or science of cultivating the earth; agriculture.</def> <rj><au>Evelin.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*ra"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ sight, view, <?/ to see, view: cf. F. <ets>g\'82orama</ets>.]</ety> <def>A hollow globe on the inner surface of which a map of the world is depicted, to be examined by one standing inside.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geor"die</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A name given by miners to <xex>George</xex> Stephenson's safety lamp.</def> <rj><au>Raymond.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>George</hw> <pr>(j<ocir/rj)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>George</ets>, or <ets>Georges</ets>, a proper name, fr. Gr. <grk>gewrgo`s</grk> husbandman, laborer; <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <grk>'e`rgein</grk> to work; akin to E. <ets>work</ets>. See <er>Work</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A figure of St. George (the patron saint of England) on horseback, appended to the collar of the Order of the Garter. See <er>Garter</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A kind of brown loaf.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any coin having an image of Saint George.</def> <mark>[Brit. slang]</mark><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>George" no`ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[So called from the image of St. <ets>George</ets> on it.]</ety> <def>A gold noble of the time of <person>Henry VIII.</person> See <er>Noble</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geor"gi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to Georgia, a former Soviet republic, now an independent country in the Causcuses in Asia, or to Georgia, one of the United States.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or relating to the reigns of the four Georges, kings of Great Britan; <as>as, the <ex>Georgian</ex> era</as>.</def>
+<-- five? --><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geor"gi*an</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A native of, or dweller in, Georgia.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Georgian architecture</hw>. <def>British or British colonial architecture of the period of the four Georges, especially that of the period before 1800.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geor"gic</hw> <pr>(j<ocir/r"j<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>georgicum</ets> (sc. <ets>carmen</ets>), and <ets>georgica</ets>, pl., Gr. <grk>bi`blion gewrgiko`n</grk>, and <grk>ta~ gewrgika`</grk>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82orgiques</ets>, pl. See <er>Georgic</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>A rural poem; a poetical composition on husbandry, containing rules for cultivating lands, etc.; <as>as, the <ex>Georgics</ex> of Virgil</as>.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Geor"gic</hw> <pr>(j<ocir/r"j<icr/k)</pr>, <hw>Geor"gic*al</hw> <pr>(j<ocir/r"j<icr/*k<ait/l)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>georgicus</ets>, Gr. <grk>gewrgiko`s</grk>, fr. <grk>gewrgi`a</grk> tillage, agriculture: cf. F. <ets>g\'82orgique</ets>. See <er>George</er>.]</ety> <def>Relating to agriculture and rural affairs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Geor"gi*um Si`dus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[NL., the star of <ets>George</ets> (III. of England).]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>The planet Uranus, so named by its discoverer, Sir W. Herschel.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*os"co*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <ets>-scopy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>g\'82oscopie</ets>.]</ety> <def>Knowledge of the earth, ground, or soil, obtained by inspection.</def> <rj><au>Chambers.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*se*len"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ moon.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to the earth and moon; belonging to the joint action or mutual relations of the earth and moon; <as>as, <ex>geoselenic</ex> phenomena</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*stat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, earth + E. <ets>static</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Civil Engin.)</fld> <def>Relating to the pressure exerted by earth or similar substance.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Geostatic arch</b></col>, <cd>an arch having a form adapted to sustain pressure similar to that exerted by earth.</cd> <rj><au>Rankine.</au></rj></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*syn*cli"nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + E. <ets>synclinal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>the downward bend or subsidence of the earth's crust, which allows of the gradual accumulation of sediment, and hence forms the first step in the making of a mountain range; -- opposed to <xex>geanticlinal</xex>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*ther*mom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + E. <ets>thermometer</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>A thermometer specially constructed for measuring temperetures at a depth below the surface of the ground.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ot"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth.]</ety> <def>Belonging to earth; terrestrial.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge`o*trop"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Geotropism</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Relating to, or showing, geotropism.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ot"ro*pism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ge`a</grk>, <grk>gh^</grk>, the earth + <?/ to turn.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A disposition to turn or incline towards the earth; the influence of gravity in determining the direction of growth of an organ.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ In plants, organs which grow towards the center of the earth are said to be <xex>positively geotropic</xex>, and those growing in the opposite direction <xex>negatively geotropic</xex>. In animals, geotropism is supposed by some to have an influence either direct or indirect on the plane of division of the ovum.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge*phyr"e*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a dam, a bridge.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of marine Annelida, in which the body is imperfectly, or not at all, annulated externally, and is mostly without set\'91.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*phyr"e*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the Gephyrea. -- <pos>n.</pos> One of the Gerphyrea.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*phyr"e*oid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Gephyrea</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <def>Gephyrean.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*pound"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Gipoun</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge"rah</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Heb. <ets>g<?/rah</ets>, lit., a bean.]</ety> <fld>(Jewish Antiq.)</fld> <def>A small coin and weight; 1-20th of a shekel.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ The silver gerah is supposed to have been worth about three cents; the gold about fifty-four cents; the weight equivalent to about thirteen grains.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ra`ni*a"ceous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to a natural order of pants (<ord>Geraniace\'91</ord>) which includes the genera Geranium, Pelargonium, and many others.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ge*ra"ni*ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ger"a*nine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Geranium</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A valuable astringent obtained from the root of the <prodby><spn>Geranium maculatum</spn></prodby> or crane's-bill.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A liquid terpene, obtained from the crane's-bill (<prodby><spn>Geranium maculatum</spn></prodby>), and having a peculiar mulberry odor.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>geraniin</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ge*ra"ni*ol</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Geranium</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A terpene alcohol (<chform>C10H18O</chform>) which constitutes the principal part of the oil of palmarosa and the oil of rose. Chemically it is <chname>3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol</chname>. It has a sweet rose odor.</def> <au>MI11</au><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*ra"ni*um</hw> <pr>(j<esl/*r<amac/"n<icr/*<ucr/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <grk>gera`nion</grk>, from <grk>ge`ranos</grk> crane: cf. F. <ets>g\'82ranium</ets>. See <er>Crane</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants having a beaklike torus or receptacle, around which the seed capsules are arranged, and membranous projections, or stipules, at the joints. Most of the species have showy flowers and a pungent odor. Called sometimes <altname>crane's-bill</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Floriculture)</fld> <def>A cultivated pelargonium.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ Many plants referred to the genus <gen>Geranium</gen> by the earlier botanists are now separated from it under the name of <gen>Pelargonium</gen>, which includes all the commonly cultivated \'bdgeraniums\'b8, mostly natives of South Africa.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"rant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82rant</ets>.]</ety> <def>The manager or acting partner of a company, joint-stock association, etc.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gerardia</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>any plant of the genus <gen>Gerardia</gen>.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gerbe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., prop. a sheaf.]</ety> <fld>(Pyrotechny)</fld> <def>A kind of ornamental firework.</def> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gerbera</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A genus of South African or Asiatic herbs having showy daisy-like flowers; it includes some of the African daisies.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gerbera</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ger"bil</hw> <pr>(j<etil/r"b<icr/l)</pr>, <hw>\'d8Ger`bille"</hw> <pr>(zh<asl/r`b<esl/l")</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gerbille</ets>. Cf. <er>Jerboa</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several species of small, jumping, murine burrowing rodents, of the genus <gen>Gerbillus</gen> and related genera of the subfamily <fam>Gerbillinae</fam>. They have long soft pale fur and hind legs adapted for leaping. In their leaping powers they resemble the jerboa. They inhabit Africa, India, and Southern Europe.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A rodent (<spn>Meriones unguiculatus</spn>) of the subfamily <fam>Gerbillinae</fam> that is commonly kept as a pet; it is also called the <altname>tamarisk gerbil</altname>, <altname>sand rat</altname> and <altname>jird</altname>. Its natural habitats are the dry regions of Northern Africa and Asia.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gerbillinae</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A natural family of rodents including the gerbils.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> subfamily <fam>Gerbillinae</fam>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gerbillus</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>The type genus of the <fam>Gerbillinae</fam>, comprising the typical gerbils{1}.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gerbillus</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*bo"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The jerboa.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gere</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Gear.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gerea</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small genus of hairy herbs with yellow flowers.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Gerea</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge"rent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gerens</ets>, <ets>p. pr.</ets> of <ets>gerere</ets> to bear, manage.]</ety> <def>Bearing; carrying.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ger"e*nuk</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/r"<esl/*n<oocr/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A slender East African antelope (<spn>Litocranius walleri</spn>) with a long slim neck and backward-curving horns; called also <altname>Waller's gazelle</altname>, and in German <altname>Giraffengazelle</altname>. It feeds on the foliage of bushes and trees, and often stands erect on its hind legs, leaning against the bush, to browse on the higher branches; in this habit it is distinctive and easy to recognize.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> <spn>Litocranius walleri</spn>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"fal`con</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Gyrfalcon</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>girer</ets> to twirl, E. <ets>gyrate</ets>.]</ety> <def>Changeable; capricious.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>Ger"land</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ger"lond</hw></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A garland.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"lind</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A salmon returning from the sea the second time.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ</hw> <pr>(j<etil/rm)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>germe</ets>, fr. L. <ets>germen</ets>, <ets>germinis</ets>, sprout, but, germ. Cf. <er>Germen</er>, <er>Germane</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>That which is to develop a new individual; <as>as, the <ex>germ</ex> of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like</as>; the earliest form under which an organism appears.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>In the entire process in which a new being originates . . . two distinct classes of action participate; namely, the act of generation by which the <qex>germ</qex> is produced; and the act of development, by which that <qex>germ</qex> is evolved into the complete organism.</q> <rj><qau>Carpenter.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That from which anything springs; origin; first principle; <as>as, the <ex>germ</ex> of civil liberty</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The germ cells, collectively, as distinguished from the <xex>somatic</xex> cells, or <contr>soma</contr>. <xex>Germ</xex> is often used in place of <xex>germinal</xex> to form phrases; <as>as, <ex>germ</ex> area, <ex>germ</ex> disc, <ex>germ</ex> membrane, <ex>germ</ex> nucleus, <ex>germ</ex> sac, etc.</as></def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A microorganism, especially a disease-causing bacterium or virus; -- used informally, <as>as, the don't eat food that falls on the floor, it may have <ex>germs</ex> on it</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Disease germ</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>a name applied to certain tiny bacterial organisms or their spores, such as <stype>Anthrax bacillus</stype> and the <gen>Micrococcus</gen> of fowl cholera, which have been demonstrated to be the cause of certain diseases; same as germ{4}. See <cref>Germ theory</cref> (below).</cd> -- <col><b>Germ cell</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>the germ, egg, spore, or cell from which the plant or animal arises. At one time a part of the body of the parent, it finally becomes detached, and by a process of multiplication and growth gives rise to a mass of cells, which ultimately form a new individual like the parent. See <er>Ovum</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Germ gland</b></col>. <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Gonad</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Germ stock</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a special process on which buds are developed in certain animals. See <er>Doliolum</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Germ theory</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>the theory that living organisms can be produced only by the evolution or development of living germs or seeds. See <er>Biogenesis</er>, and <er>Abiogenesis</er>. As applied to the origin of disease, the theory claims that the zymotic diseases are due to the rapid development and multiplication of various bacteria, the germs or spores of which are either contained in the organism itself, or transferred through the air or water. See <cref>Fermentation theory</cref>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To germinate.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>J. Morley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*main"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <def>See <er>Germane</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>german</ets>, <ets>germain</ets>, F. <ets>germain</ets>, fr. L. <ets>germanus</ets> full, own (said of brothers and sisters who have the same parents); akin to <ets>germen</ets> germ. Cf. <er>Germ</er>, <er>Germane</er>.]</ety> <def>Nearly related; closely akin.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Wert thou a leopard, thou wert <qex>german</qex> to the lion.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Brother german</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Brother german</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Cousins german</b></col>. <cd>See the Note under <er>Cousin</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man</hw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it></plu> <plw>Germans</plw> <pr>(#)</pr> <ety>[L. <ets>Germanus</ets>, prob. of Celtis origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A native or one of the people of Germany.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The German language.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A round dance, often with a waltz movement, abounding in capriciosly involved figures.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A social party at which the german is danced.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>High German</b></col>, <cd>the Teutonic dialect of Upper or Southern Germany, -- comprising <xex>Old High German</xex>, used from the 8th to the 11th century; <xex>Middle H. G</xex>., from the 12th to the 15th century; and Modern or <xex>New H. G</xex>., the language of Luther's Bible version and of modern German literature. The dialects of Central Germany, the basis of the modern literary language, are often called <xex>Middle German</xex>, and the Southern German dialects <xex>Upper German</xex>; but <xex>High German</xex> is also used to cover both groups.</cd> -- <col><b>Low German</b></col>, <cd>the language of Northern Germany and the Netherlands, -- including <stype>Friesic</stype>; <stype>Anglo-Saxon</stype> or <stype>Saxon</stype>; <stype>Old Saxon</stype>; <stype>Dutch</stype> or <stype>Low Dutch</stype>, with its dialect, <stype>Flemish</stype>; and <stype>Plattdeutsch</stype> (called also <altname>Low German</altname>), spoken in many dialects.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Germanus</ets>. See <er>German</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Germany.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>German Baptists</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Dunker</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>German bit</b></col>, <cd>a wood-boring tool, having a long elliptical pod and a scew point.</cd> -- <col><b>German carp</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the crucian carp.</cd> -- <col><b>German millet</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of millet (<spn>Setaria Italica</spn>, var.), whose seed is sometimes used for food.</cd> -- <col><b>German paste</b></col>, <cd>a prepared food for caged birds.</cd> -- <col><b>German process</b></col> <fld>(Metal.)</fld>, <cd>the process of reducing copper ore in a blast furnace, after roasting, if necessary.</cd> <au>Raymond.</au> -- <col><b>German sarsaparilla</b></col>, <cd>a substitute for sarsaparilla extract.</cd> -- <col><b>German sausage</b></col>, <cd>a polony, or gut stuffed with meat partly cooked.</cd> -- <col><b>German silver</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>a silver-white alloy, hard and tough, but malleable and ductile, and quite permanent in the air. It contains nickel, copper, and zinc in varying proportions, and was originally made from old copper slag at Henneberg. A small amount of iron is sometimes added to make it whiter and harder. It is essentially identical with the Chinese alloy <altname>packfong</altname>. It was formerly much used for tableware, knife handles, frames, cases, bearings of machinery, etc., but is now largely superseded by other white alloys.</cd> -- <col><b>German steel</b></col> <fld>(Metal.)</fld>, <cd>a metal made from bog iron ore in a forge, with charcoal for fuel.</cd> -- <col><b>German text</b></col> <fld>(Typog.)</fld>, <cd>a character resembling modern German type, used in English printing for ornamental headings, etc., as in the words,<br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <germantype><point10>This line is German Text.</point10></germantype></note>
+</cd></p>
+
+<p>-- <col><b>German tinder</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Amadou</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*man"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>germaunder</ets>, F. <ets>germandr\'82e</ets>, It. <ets>calamandrea</ets>, L. <ets>chamaedrys</ets>, fr. Gr.<?/; <?/ on the earth or ground + <?/ tree. See <er>Humble</er>, and <er>Tree</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the genus <gen>Teucrium</gen> (esp. <spn>Teucrium Cham\'91drys</spn> or wall germander), mintlike herbs and low shrubs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>American germander</b></col>, <cd><spn>Teucrium Canadense</spn>.</cd> -- <col><b>Germander chickweed</b></col>, <cd><spn>Veronica agrestis</spn>.</cd> -- <col><b>Water germander</b></col>, <cd><spn>Teucrium Scordium</spn>.</cd> -- <col><b>Wood germander</b></col>, <cd><spn>Teucrium Scorodonia</spn>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*mane"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>German</er> akin, nearly related.]</ety> <def>Literally, near akin; hence, closely allied; appropriate or fitting; relevant.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The phrase would be more <qex>germane</qex> to the matter.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>[An amendment] must be <qex>germane</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Barclay (Digest).</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*man"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or containing, germanium.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*man"ic</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Germanicus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>germanique</ets>. See <er>German</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to Germany; <as>as, the <ex>Germanic</ex> confederacy</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Teutonic.</def> <mark>[A loose sense]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>germanisme</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An idiom of the German language.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A characteristic of the Germans; a characteristic German mode, doctrine, etc.; rationalism.</def> <rj><au>J. W. Alexander.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger*ma"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <etsep>Germania</etsep> Germany.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare element, discovered in 1885 in a silver ore (<partof>argyrodite</partof>) at Freiberg. It is a brittle, silver-white metal, chemically intermediate between the metals and nonmetals, resembles tin, and is in general identical with the predicted <altname>ekasilicon</altname>. Symbol Ge. Atomic number 32. Atomic weight 72.59. It has excellent semiconductor properties, and is used in transistors and diodes.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`man*i*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of Germanizing.</def> <rj><au>M. Arnold.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Germanized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Germanizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To make German, or like what is distinctively German; <as>as, to <ex>Germanize</ex> a province, a language, a society</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"man*ize</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To reason or write after the manner of the Germans.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>German-speaking</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>able to communicate in the German language.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ger*ma"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Germ</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An organ in which the ova are developed in certain Turbellaria.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 623 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ cell</hw>. <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A cell, of either sex, directly concerned in the production of a new organism.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"men</hw> <pr>(j<etil/r"m<ecr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Germens</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Germina</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>See <er>Germ</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ger"mi*ci`dal</hw> <pr>(j<etil/r"m<icr/*s<imac/`d<ait/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Germ</ets> + L. <ets>caedere</ets> to kill + <ets>-al</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Destructive to germs; -- applied to any agent which has a killing action upon living microorganisms, particularly bacteria or viruses, which are the cause of many infectious diseases.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> antiseptic.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ger"mi*cide</hw> <pr>(j<etil/r"m<icr/*s<imac/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A germicidal agent.</def> -- <def2><pos>a.</pos> <def>Germicidal.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mi*nal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Germ</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining or belonging to a germ; <as>as, the <ex>germinal</ex> vesicle</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the germ, or germ cells, as distinguished from the somatic cells.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Germinal layers</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>the two layers of cells, the ectoblast and entoblast, which form respectively the outer covering and inner wall of the gastrula. A third layer of cells, the mesoblast, which is formed later and lies between these two, is sometimes included.</cd> -- <col><b>Germinal membrane</b></col>. <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <cd>Same as <er>Blastoderm</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Germinal spot</b></col> <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <cd>the nucleolus of the ovum.</cd> -- <col><b>Germinal vesicle</b></col>, <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <cd>, the nucleus of the ovum of animals.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ger`mi*nal"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Germ</er> .]</ety> <def>The seventh month of the French republican calendar [1792 -- 1806]. It began March 21 and ended April 19. See <er>Vend\'90miaire</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mi*nant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>germinans</ets>, <ets>p. pr.</ets>]</ety> <def>Sprouting; sending forth germs or buds.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mi*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Germinated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Germinating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>germinatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>germinare</ets> to sprout, fr. <ets>germen</ets>. See <er>Germ</er>.]</ety> <def>To sprout; to bud; to shoot; to begin to vegetate, as a plant or its seed; to begin to develop, as a germ.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mi*nate</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To cause to sprout.</def> <rj><au>Price (1610).</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`mi*na"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>germinatio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>germination</ets>.]</ety> <def>The process of germinating; the beginning of vegetation or growth in a seed or plant; the first development of germs, either animal or vegetable.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Germination apparatus</b></col>, <cd>an apparatus for malting grain.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mi*na*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>germinatif</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to germination; having power to bud or develop.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Germinative spot</b></col>, <col><b>Germinative vesicle</b></col></mcol>. <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <cd>Same as <cref>Germinal spot</cref>, <cref>Germinal vesicle</cref>, under <er>Germinal</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`mi*par"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Germ</ets> + L. <ets>parere</ets> to produce.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Reproduction by means of germs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Without germs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"mo*gen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Germ</ets> + <ets>-gen</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A polynuclear mass of protoplasm, not divided into separate cells, from which certain ova are developed.</def> <au>Balfour.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The primitive cell in certain embryonic forms.</def> <au>Balfour.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ" plasm`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>See <er>Plasmogen</er>, and <er>Idioplasm</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ theory</hw>. <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The theory that living organisms can be produced only by the development of living germs. Cf. <er>Biogenesis</er>, <er>Abiogenesis</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>The theory which attributes contagious and infectious diseases, suppurative lesions, etc., to the agency of germs, i.e. pathogenic microorganisms. The science of bacteriology was developed after this theory had been established.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Germ"ule</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Dim. fr. <ets>germ</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A small germ.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gern</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Grin</er>.]</ety> <def>To grin or yawn.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd[/He] gaped like a gulf when he did <xex>gern</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"ner</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A garner.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ger`o*co"mi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <def>See <er>Gerocomy</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`o*com"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to gerocomy.</def> <rj><au>Dr. John Smith.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*roc"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>g\'82rocomie</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ an old man + <?/ to take care of.]</ety> <def>That part of medicine which treats of regimen for old people.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ge*ron"tes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/.]</ety> <fld>(Gr. Antiq.)</fld> <def>Magistrates in Sparta, who with the ephori and kings, constituted the supreme civil authority.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`on*toc"ra*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <?/, an old man + <?/ to rule.]</ety> <def>Government by old men.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Gladstone.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ger`o*pig"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pg. <ets>geropiga</ets>.]</ety> <def>A mixture composed of unfermented grape juice, brandy, sugar, etc., for adulteration of wines.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jerupigia</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>-ger*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L. <ets>-ger</ets>, fr. <ets>gerere</ets> to bear, carry. See <er>Jest</er>.]</ety> <def>A suffix signifying <xex>bearing</xex>, <xex>producing</xex>; <as>as, calci<ex>gerous</ex>; denti<ex>gerous</ex>.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger`ry*man"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gerrymandered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gerrymandering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To divide (a State) into districts for the choice of representatives, in an unnatural and unfair way, with a view to give a political party an advantage over its opponent.</def> <mark>[Political Cant, U. S.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ This was done in Massachusetts at a time when Elbridge <etsep>Gerry</etsep> was governor, and was attributed to his influence, hence the name; though it is now known that he was opposed to the measure.</note> <rj><au>Bartlett.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"und</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gerundium</ets>, fr. <ets>gerere</ets> to bear, carry, perform. See <er>Gest</er> a deed, <er>Jest</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Lat. Gram.)</fld><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(AS. Gram.)</fld> <def>A verbal noun ending in <xex>-e</xex>, preceded by <xex>to</xex> and usually denoting <xex>purpose</xex> or <xex>end</xex>; -- called also the <altname>dative infinitive</altname>; as, \'bdIc h\'91bbe mete t\'93 <it>etanne</it>\'b8 (I have meat to <it>eat</it>.) In Modern English the name has been applied to verbal or participal nouns in <xex>-ing</xex> denoting a transitive action; <it>e. g.</it>, by <xex>throwing</xex> a stone.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*run"di*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or resembling, a gerund; <as>as, a <ex>gerundial</ex> use</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*run"dive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gerundivus</ets>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to, or partaking of, the nature of the gerund; gerundial.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Lat. Gram.)</fld> <def>The future passive participle; <as>as, <ex>amandus</ex>, <it>i. e.</it>, to be loved</as>.</def></def2><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ge*run"dive*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In the manner of a gerund; <as>as, or in place of, a gerund</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ger"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gerful</er>.]</ety> <def>Changeable; fickle.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A gosling.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gesse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <def>To guess.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ges"so</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., chalk, plaster.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Plaster of Paris, or gypsum, esp. as prepared for use in painting, or in making bas-reliefs and the like; by extension, a plasterlike or pasty material spread upon a surface to fit it for painting or gilding, or a surface so prepared.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A work of art done in gesso.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ges"so du"ro</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[It., hard plaster.]</ety> <def>A variety of gesso which when dried becomes hard and durable, often used in making bas-relief casts, which are colored and mounted in elaborate frames.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A guest.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>geste</ets> exploit. See <er>Jest</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Something done or achieved; a deed or an action; an adventure.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An action represented in sports, plays, or on the stage; show; ceremony.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Mede.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A tale of achievements or adventures; a stock story.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer. Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Gesture; bearing; deportment.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Through his heroic grace and honorable <qex>gest</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gist</er> a resting place.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A stage in traveling; a stop for rest or lodging in a journey or progress; a rest.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Kersey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A roll recting the several stages arranged for a royal progress. Many of them are extant in the herald's office.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Hanmer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"tant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gestans</ets>, <ets>p. pr.</ets> of <ets>gestare</ets>.]</ety> <def>Bearing within; laden; burdened; pregnant.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdClouds <xex>gestant</xex> with heat.\'b8 <rj><au>Mrs. Browning.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gestatio</ets> a bearing, carrying, fr. <ets>gestare</ets> to bear, carry, intens. fr. <ets>gerere</ets>, <ets>gestum</ets>, to bear: cf. F. <ets>gestation</ets>. See <er>Gest</er> deed, <er>Jest</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of wearing (clothes or ornaments).</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The act of carrying young in the womb from conception to delivery; pregnancy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Exercise in which one is borne or carried, as on horseback, or in a carriage, without the exertion of his own powers; passive exercise.</def> <rj><au>Dunglison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ta*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gestatorius</ets> that serves for carrying: cf. F. <ets>gestatoire</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to gestation or pregnancy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Capable of being carried or worn.</def> <mark>[Obs. or R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geste</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To tell stories or gests.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gest</er> a deed, <er>Gesture</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to deeds or feats of arms; legendary.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And the gay grandsire, skilled in <qex>gestic</qex> lore.</q> <rj><qau>Goldsmith.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Relating to bodily motion; consisting of gestures; -- said especially with reference to dancing.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Carried away by the enthusiasm of the <qex>gestic</qex> art.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*tic"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gesticulated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gesticulating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>gesticulatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>gesticulari</ets> to gesticulate, fr. <ets>gesticulus</ets> a mimic gesture, gesticulation, dim. of <ets>gestus</ets> gesture, fr. <ets>gerere</ets>, <ets>gestum</ets>, to bear, carry, peform. See <er>Gestic</er>.]</ety> <def>To make gestures or motions, as in speaking; to use postures.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Herbert.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*tic"u*late</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To represent by gesture; to act.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*tic`u*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gesticulatio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>gesticulation</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of gesticulating, or making gestures to express passion or enforce sentiments.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A gesture; a motion of the body or limbs in speaking, or in representing action or passion, and enforcing arguments and sentiments.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Antic tricks or motions.</def> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*tic"u*la`tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>One who gesticulates.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges*tic"u*la*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Representing by, or belonging to, gestures.</def> <rj><au>T. Warton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"tour</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Gest</er> a deed.]</ety> <def>A reciter of gests or legendary tales; a story-teller.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Minstrels and <qex>gestours</qex> for to tell tales.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"tur*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Relating to gesture.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>gestura</ets> mode of action, fr. L. <ets>gerere</ets>, <ets>gestum</ets>, to bear, behave, perform, act. See <er>Gest</er> a deed.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Manner of carrying the body; position of the body or limbs; posture.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Accubation, or lying down at meals, was a <qex>gesture</qex> used by many nations.</q> <rj><qau>Sir T. Browne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A motion of the body or limbs expressive of sentiment or passion; any action or posture intended to express an idea or a passion, or to enforce or emphasize an argument, assertion, or opinion.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Humble and reverent <qex>gestures</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Hooker.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye,<br/
+In every <qex>gesture</qex> dignity and love.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ture</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gestured</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gesturing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action; to gesticulate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It is not orderly read, nor <qex>gestured</qex> as beseemeth.</q> <rj><qau>Hooker.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ture</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To make gestures; to gesticulate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The players . . . <qex>gestured</qex> not undecently withal.</q> <rj><qau>Holland.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ture*less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Free from gestures.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ges"ture*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Act of making gestures; gesturing.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get</hw> <pr>(j<ecr/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Jet, the mineral.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>get</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Fashion; manner; custom.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Artifice; contrivance.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/t)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp.</pos> <conjf>Got</conjf> <pr>(g<ocr/t)</pr> (<mark>Obs</mark>. <conjf>Gat</conjf> <pr>(g<acr/t)</pr>); <pos>p. p.</pos> <conjf>Got</conjf> (<mark>Obsolescent</mark> <conjf>Gotten</conjf> <pr>(g<ocr/t"t'n)</pr>); <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Getting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>geten</ets>, AS. <ets>gitan</ets>, <ets>gietan</ets> (in comp.); akin to Icel. <ets>geta</ets>, Goth. bi<ets>gitan</ets> to find, L. pre<ets>hendere</ets> to seize, take, Gr. <grk>chanda`nein</grk> to hold, contain. Cf. <er>Comprehend</er>, <er>Enterprise</er>, <er>Forget</er>, <er>Impregnable</er>, <er>Prehensile</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To procure; to obtain; to gain possession of; to acquire; to earn; to obtain as a price or reward; to come by; to win, by almost any means; <as>as, to <ex>get</ex> favor by kindness; to <ex>get</ex> wealth by industry and economy; to <ex>get</ex> land by purchase, etc.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, with <xex>have</xex> and <xex>had</xex>, to come into or be in possession of; to have.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thou hast <qex>got</qex> the face of man.</q> <rj><qau>Herbert.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To beget; to procreate; to generate.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I had rather to adopt a child than <qex>get</qex> it.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To obtain mental possession of; to learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; <as>as to <ex>get</ex> a lesson</as>; also with <xex>out</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>get</ex> out one's Greek lesson</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It being harder with him to <qex>get</qex> one sermon by heart, than to pen twenty.</q> <rj><qau>Bp. Fell.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To prevail on; to induce; to persuade.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Get</qex> him to say his prayers.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>To procure to be, or to cause to be in any state or condition; -- with a following participle.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Those things I bid you do; <qex>get</qex> them dispatched.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>To betake; to remove; -- in a reflexive use.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Get</qex> thee out from this land.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xxxi. 13.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He . . . <qex>got</qex> himself . . . to the strong town of Mega.</q> <rj><qau>Knolles.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Get</xex>, as a transitive verb, is combined with adverbs implying motion, to express the causing to, or the effecting in, the object of the verb, of the kind of motion indicated by the preposition; thus, <xex>to get in</xex>, to cause to enter, to bring under shelter; as, <xex>to get in</xex> the hay; <xex>to get out</xex>, to make come forth, to extract; <xex>to get off</xex>, to take off, to remove; <xex>to get together</xex>, to cause to come together, to collect.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>To get by heart</b></col>, <cd>to commit to memory.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To get the better of</b></col>, <col><b>To get the best of</b></col></mcol>, <cd>to obtain an advantage over; to surpass; to subdue.</cd> -- <col><b>To get up</b></col>, <cd>to cause to be established or to exit; to prepare; to arrange; to construct; to invent; as, <xex>to get up</xex> a celebration, a machine, a book, an agitation.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To obtain; gain; win; acquire. See <er>Obtain</er>.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/t)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily <qex>get</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To arrive at, or bring one's self into, a state, condition, or position; to come to be; to become; -- with a following adjective or past participle belonging to the subject of the verb; <as>as, to <ex>get</ex> sober; to <ex>get</ex> awake; to <ex>get</ex> beaten; to <ex>get</ex> elected.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>To <qex>get</qex> rid of fools and scoundrels.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>His chariot wheels <qex>get</qex> hot by driving fast.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ It [<it>get</it>] gives to the English language a middle voice, or a power of verbal expression which is neither active nor passive. Thus we say to <xex>get</xex> acquitted, beaten, confused, dressed.<br/
+<rj><au>Earle.</au></rj></note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Get</xex>, as an intransitive verb, is used with a following preposition, or adverb of motion, to indicate, on the part of the subject of the act, movement or action of the kind signified by the preposition or adverb; or, in the general sense, to move, to stir, to make one's way, to advance, to arrive, etc.; as, <xex>to get away</xex>, to leave, to escape; to disengage one's self from; <xex>to get down</xex>, to descend, esp. with effort, as from a literal or figurative elevation; <xex>to get along</xex>, to make progress; hence, to prosper, succeed, or fare; <xex>to get in</xex>, to enter; <xex>to get out</xex>, to extricate one's self, to escape; <xex>to get through</xex>, to traverse; also, to finish, to be done; <xex>to get to</xex>, to arrive at, to reach; <xex>to get off</xex>, to alight, to descend from, to dismount; also, to escape, to come off clear; <xex>to get together</xex>, to assemble, to convene.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>To get ahead</b></col>, <cd>to advance; to prosper.</cd> -- <col><b>To get along</b></col>, <cd>to proceed; to advance; to prosper.</cd> -- <col><b>To get a mile</b></col><cd> (or other distance), to pass over it in traveling.</cd> -- <col><b>To get among</b></col>, <cd>to go or come into the company of; to become one of a number.</cd> -- <col><b>To get asleep</b></col>, <cd>to fall asleep.</cd> -- <col><b>To get astray</b></col>, <cd>to wander out of the right way.</cd> -- <col><b>To get at</b></col>, <cd>to reach; to make way to.</cd> <col><b>To get away with</b></col>, <cd>to carry off; to capture; hence, to get the better of; to defeat.</cd> -- <col><b>To get back</b></col>, <cd>to arrive at the place from which one departed; to return.</cd> -- <col><b>To get before</b></col>, <cd>to arrive in front, or more forward.</cd> -- <col><b>To get behind</b></col>, <cd>to fall in the rear; to lag.</cd> -- <col><b>To get between</b></col>, <cd>to arrive between.</cd> -- <col><b>To get beyond</b></col>, <cd>to pass or go further than; to exceed; to surpass.</cd> \'bdThree score and ten is the age of man, a few <xex>get beyond</xex> it.\'b8 <au>Thackeray.</au> -- <col><b>To get clear</b></col>, <cd>to disengage one's self; to be released, as from confinement, obligation, or burden; also, to be freed from danger or embarrassment.</cd> -- <col><b>To get drunk</b></col>, <cd>to become intoxicated.</cd> -- <col><b>To get forward</b></col>, <cd>to proceed; to advance; also, to prosper; to advance in wealth.</cd> -- <col><b>To get home</b></col>, <cd>to arrive at one's dwelling, goal, or aim.</cd> -- <col><b>To get into</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To enter, <as>as, \'bdshe prepared <xex>to get into</xex> the coach.\'b8</as></cd> <au>Dickens.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To pass into, or reach; <as>as, \'bd a language has <ex>got into</ex> the inflated state.\'b8</as></cd> <au>Keary.</au> -- <mcol><col><b>To get loose</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To get free</b></col></mcol>, <cd>to disengage one's self; to be released from confinement.</cd> -- <col><b>To get near</b></col>, <cd>to approach within a small distance.</cd> -- <col><b>To get on</b></col>, <cd>to proceed; to advance; to prosper.</cd> -- <col><b>To get over</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To pass over, surmount, or overcome, as an obstacle or difficulty.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To recover from, as an injury, a calamity.</cd> -- <col><b>To get through</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To pass through something.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To finish what one was doing.</cd> -- <col><b>To get up</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To rise; to arise, as from a bed, chair, etc.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To ascend; to climb, as a hill, a tree, a flight of stairs, etc.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Offspring; progeny; <as>as, the <ex>get</ex> of a stallion</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>get</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>gittin</plw> or <plw>gitim</plw>.</plu> <def>A divorce granted by a Rabbi in accordance with Jewish law; also, the document attesting to the divorce.</def> <au>RHUD</au><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>get"a</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Jap.]</ety> <def>A type of Japanese footwear usually with wooden soles, held to the foot by a thong that passes between the first two toes.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> clog, patten, sabot.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>getable</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>Obtainable; able to be gotten.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> gettable, obtainable, procurable.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>get*at"a*ble</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <def>Aapable of being reached or attained; <as>as, a very <ex>getatable</ex> man; both oil and coal are there but not in <ex>getatable</ex> locations</as>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> come-at-able, get-at-able.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>get"a*way`</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>rapid acceleration.</def> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> pickup.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a rapid escape (as by criminals); <as>as, the thieves made a clean <ex>getaway</ex>; they made their <ex>getaway</ex> in a stolen car</as>.</def> <wns>[wns=2]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> lam.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"en</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <mark>obs.</mark> <def><pos>p. p.</pos> of <er>Get</er>.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <def>the original <pos>third pers. sing. pres.</pos> of <er>Go</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"-pen`ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Something which gets or gains money; a successful affair.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Chapman.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"ta*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>That may be obtained.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who gets, gains, obtains, acquires, begets, or procreates.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"ter*up`</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who contrives, makes, or arranges for, anything, as a book, a machine, etc.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A diligent <qex>getter-up</qex> of miscellaneous works.</q> <rj><qau>W. Irving.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Get"ting</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of obtaining or acquiring; acquisition.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>With all thy <qex>getting</qex>, get understanding.</q> <rj><qau>Prov. iv. 7.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is got or obtained; gain; profit.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gettysburg</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The name of a battle of the American Civil War fought in and around the town of <city>Gettysburg</city>, Pennsylavania, in 1863. At this battle, the defeat of <person>General Robert E. Lee's</person> invading Confederate army was a major victory for the Union, and is considered by many a turning point in the war, after which victory by the Confederacy was no longer thought possible; <as>as, many thousands died at <ex>Gettysburg</ex></as>. See also <er>Gettysburg Address</er>.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> battle of Gettysburg.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gettysburg Address</hw> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The popular name of a speech given by <person>Abraham Lincoln</person> on <datey>November 19, 1863</datey>, on the battlefield near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, USA, as part of a ceremony to dedicate a portion of that battlefield as a cemetary for soldiers who died fighting there. See note below.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <b>Lincoln's Gettysburg Address</b>,<br/
+<br/
+Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation: conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.<br/
+<br/
+Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.<br/
+<br/
+But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate -- we cannot consecrate -- we cannot hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from this earth.</note></p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>get"up</hw>, <hw>get"-up</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>General composition or structure; manner in which the parts of a thing are combined; arrangement; format; make-up; style of dress, etc.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>H. Kingsley.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <specif>Specifically:</specif> <def>A set of clothing (with accessories); <as>as, what are you doing in that <ex>getup</ex>?</as>; -- often used with implied disapproval or scorn.</def> <mark>[informal]</mark> <wns>[wns=1]</wns><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> outfit, rig.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>get-up-and-go</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a character trait manifested in a readiness and ability to initiate action; an enterprising and energetic spirit; a go-getting attitude.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> energy; drive; enterprise; initiative.</syn>
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geum</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <def>A genus of plants of the rose family comprising the avens.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Geum</gen>.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Geusd"ism</hw> <pr>(g<ecr/d"<icr/z'm)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The Marxian socialism and programme of reform through revolution as advocated by the French political leader <person>Jules Basile Guesde</person> <pr>(<it>pron.</it> g<ecr/d)</pr> (1845- ).</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Guesd"ist</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n. & a.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gew"gaw</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gigawe</ets>, <ets>gugawe</ets>, <ets>gewgaude</ets>, prob. the same word as OE. <ets>givegove</ets> gewgaw, apparently a reduplicated form fr. AS. <ets>gifan</ets> to give; cf. also F. <ets>joujou</ets> plaything, and E. <ets>gaud</ets>, <pos>n.</pos> See <er>Give</er>, and cf. <er>Giffgaff</er>.]</ety> <def>A showy trifle; a toy; a splendid plaything; a pretty but worthless bauble.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> knicknack; bauble; tschotschke.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>A heavy <qex>gewgaw</qex> called a crown.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gew"gaw</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Showy; unreal; pretentious.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Seeing his <qex>gewgaw</qex> castle shine.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gey"ser</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>geysir</ets>, fr. <ets>geysa</ets> to rush furiously, fr. <ets>gj<omac/sa</ets> to gush. Cf. <er>Gush</er>.]</ety> <def>A boiling spring which throws forth at frequent intervals jets of water, mud, etc., driven up by the expansive power of steam.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Geysers</xex> were first known in Iceland, and later in New Zealand. In the Yellowstone region in the United States they are numerous, and some of them very powerful, throwing jets of boiling water and steam to a height of 200 feet. They are grouped in several areas called <xex>geyser basins</xex>. The mineral matter, or <xex>geyserite</xex>, with which geyser water is charged, forms <xex>geyser cones</xex> about the orifice, often of great size and beauty.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 624 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gey"ser*ite</hw> <pr>(g<imac/"z<etil/r*<imac/t <it>or</it> g<imac/"s<etil/r*<imac/t; 277)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Geyser</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A loose hydrated form of silica, a variety of opal, deposited in concretionary cauliflowerlike masses, around some hot springs and geysers.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gha"na</hw> <pr>(g<aum/"n<adot/)</pr> <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A country in Western Africa, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Cote d'Ivoire and Togo, with Burkina Faso bordering on the north, with a population of 17,698,271 (July 1996 est), and a total area of 238,540 sq km. The government is a constitutional democracy, and the capital city is Accra.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note> It has a tropical climate, being warm and comparatively dry along the southeast coast, hot and humid in southwest and hot and dry in the north. Its terrain is mostly low plains with a dissected plateau in the south-central area.<br/
+ The official language is English, and several African languages are spoken, including Akan, Moshi-Dagomba, Ewe, and Ga. The population is comprised 99.8% of black Africans and 0.2% European and other nationalities. The major tribes are: Akan 44%, Moshi-Dagomba 16%, Ewe 13%, and Ga 8%. The religious composition is 38% indigenous beliefs, 30% Muslim, 24% Christian and 8% others.<br/
+ The unit of currency is the new cedi; 1 new cedi (C) = 100 pesewas. The exchange rates for the cedi were: new cedis per US$1 - 1,246.11 (September 1995), 956.71 (1994), 649.06 (1993), 437.09 (1992), 367.83 (1991).<br/
+ Navigable waterways include the Volta, Ankobra, and Tano Rivers, providing 168 km of perennial navigation for launches and lighters.</note> <au>CIA Factbook 1996</au><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghanaian</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>of or pertaining to the inhabitants of Ghana; <as>as, <ex>Ghanaian</ex> writers</as>.</def> <illu></illu><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Ghanian, Ghanese.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>of or pertaining to Ghana.</def> <illu><ex>Ghanaian</ex> cocoa production</illu><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Ghanese, Ghanian.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghanese</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>same as Ghanaian (in both senses).</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Ghanian, Ghanaian.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghanian</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>same as Ghanaian (in both senses).</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Ghanese, Ghanaian.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghanian</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a native or inhabitant of Ghana.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Ghar"ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>g\'be<?/i</ets>.]</ety> <def>Any wheeled cart or carriage.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gasten</ets>. See <er>Ghastly</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>To strike aghast; to affright.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Ghasted</qex> by the noise I made.<br/
+Full suddenly he fled.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Ghastly</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>Fit to make one aghast; dismal.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> -- <wordforms><wf>Ghast"ful*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast"li*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state of being ghastly; a deathlike look.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Ghastlier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Ghastliest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gastlich</ets>, <ets>gastli</ets>, fearful, causing fear, fr. <ets>gasten</ets> to terrify, AS. <ets>g\'91stan</ets>. Cf. <er>Aghast</er>, <er>Gast</er>, <er>Gaze</er>, <er>Ghostly</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Like a ghost in appearance; deathlike; pale; pallid; dismal.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Each turned his face with a <qex>ghastly</qex> pang.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>His face was so <qex>ghastly</qex> that it could scarcely be recognized.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Horrible; shocking; dreadful; hideous.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Mangled with <qex>ghastly</qex> wounds through plate and mail.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a ghastly manner; hideously.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Staring full <qex>ghastly</qex> like a strangled man.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghast"ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Ghastliness.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>\'d8Ghat</hw> <hw>Ghaut</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>gh\'bet</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A pass through a mountain.</def> <mark>[India]</mark> <rj><au>J. D. Hooker.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A range of mountains.</def> <rj><au>Balfour (Cyc. of Ind. ).</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Stairs descending to a river; a landing place; a wharf.</def> <mark>[India]</mark> <rj><au>Malcom.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gha*wa"zi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <def>Egyptian dancing girls, of a lower sort than the almeh.</def></p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>\'d8Ghaz"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>\'d8Ghaz"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>ghazal</ets>.]</ety> <def>A kind of Oriental lyric, and usually erotic, poetry, written in recurring rhymes.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gha"zi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>gh\'bez\'c6</ets>.]</ety> <def>Among Mohammedans, a warrior champion or veteran, esp. in the destruction of infidels.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ghe"ber</hw>, <hw>Ghe"bre</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pers. <ets>ghebr</ets>: cf. F. <ets>Gu\'8abre</ets>. Cf. <er>Giaour</er>.]</ety> <def>A worshiper of fire; a Zoroastrian; a Parsee.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghee</hw> <pr>(g<emac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>gh\'c6</ets> clarified butter, Skr. <ets>gh<rsdot/ta</ets>.]</ety> <def>Butter clarified by boiling, and thus converted into a kind of oil.</def> <mark>[India]</mark> <rj><au>Malcom.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gher"kin</hw> <pr>(g<etil/r"k<icr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>agurkje</ets>, a dim. akin to G. <ets>gurke</ets>, Dan. <ets>agurke</ets>; cf. Pol. <ets>og\'a2rek</ets>, Bohem. <ets>okurka</ets>, LGr. <grk>'aggoy`rion</grk> watermelon, Ar. <ets>al-khiy\'ber</ets>, Per. <ets>khiy\'ber</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A kind of small, prickly cucumber, much used for pickles.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>See <er>Sea gherkin</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghess</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <def>See <er>Guess</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghet"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <def>A quarter of a city where Jews live in greatest numbers.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I went to the <qex>Ghetto</qex>, where the Jews dwell.</q> <rj><qau>Evelyn.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <specif>By extension:</specif> <def>Any section of a town inhabited predominantly by members of a specific ethnic, national or racial group, such segregation usually arising from social or economic pressure. The term is commonly applied to areas in cities having a high concentration of low-income African-Americans.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <mark>[fig.]</mark> <def>Any isolated group of people.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <mark>[fig.]</mark> <def>Any group isolated by external pressures, with an implication of inferiority.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>ghetto blaster</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[from their popularity with negro inner-city (<ets>ghetto</ets>) youth]</ety> <def>A portable casette or compact disk player, usually having an integrated radio receiver. It typically has two (stereophonic) speakers, and can be adjusted to play at a high sound intensity, from which the name comes.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> boom box.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghet"to*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>to form into a ghetto; to isolate (people) as though into a ghetto.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghib"el*line</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>Ghibellino</ets>; of German origin.]</ety> <fld>(It. Hist.)</fld> <def>One of a faction in Italy, in the 12th and 13th centuries, which favored the German emperors, and opposed the Guelfs, or adherents of the poses.</def> <rj><au>Brande & C.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghole</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Ghoul</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost</hw> <pr>(g<omac/st)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gast</ets>, <ets>gost</ets>, soul, spirit, AS. <ets>g\'best</ets> breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. <ets>g<emac/st</ets> spirit, soul, D. <ets>geest</ets>, G. <ets>geist</ets>, and prob. to E. <ets>gaze</ets>, <ets>ghastly</ets>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>The spirit; the soul of man.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Then gives her grieved <qex>ghost</qex> thus to lament.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a specter.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The mighty <qex>ghosts</qex> of our great Harrys rose.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I thought that I had died in sleep,<br/
+And was a blessed <qex>ghost</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a phantom; a glimmering; <as>as, not a <ex>ghost</ex> of a chance; the <ex>ghost</ex> of an idea.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Each separate dying ember wrought its <qex>ghost</qex> upon the floor.</q> <rj><qau>Poe.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Ghost moth</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a large European moth (<spn>Hepialus humuli</spn>); so called from the white color of the male, and the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also <altname>great swift</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Holy Ghost</b></col>, <cd>the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter; <fld>(Theol.)</fld> the third person in the Trinity.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To give up the ghost</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To yield up the ghost</b></col></mcol>, <cd>to die; to expire.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>And he <qex>gave up the ghost</qex> full softly.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Jacob . . . <qex>yielded up the ghost</qex>, and was gathered unto his people</q>. <rj><qau>Gen. xlix. 33.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To die; to expire.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir P. Sidney.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To appear to or haunt in the form of an apparition.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost dance</hw>. <def>A religious dance of the North American Indians, participated in by both sexes, and looked upon as a rite of invocation the purpose of which is, through trance and vision, to bring the dancer into communion with the unseen world and the spirits of departed friends. The dance is the chief rite of the <col><b>Ghost-dance</b></col>, <xex>or</xex> <col><b>Messiah</b></col>, <col><b>religion</b></col>, which originated about 1890 in the doctrines of the Piute Wovoka, the Indian Messiah, who taught that the time was drawing near when the whole Indian race, the dead with the living, should be reunited to live a life of millennial happiness upon a regenerated earth. The religion inculcates peace, righteousness, and work, and holds that in good time, without warlike intervention, the oppressive white rule will be removed by the higher powers. The religion spread through a majority of the western tribes of the United States, only in the case of the Sioux, owing to local causes, leading to an outbreak.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"fish`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A pale unspotted variety of the wrymouth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Without life or spirit.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"like`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a ghost; ghastly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"li*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality of being ghostly.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"ly</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gastlich</ets>, <ets>gostlich</ets>, AS. <ets>g\'bestlic</ets>. See <er>Ghost</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Relating to the soul; not carnal or secular; spiritual; <as>as, a <ex>ghostly</ex> confessor</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Save and defend us from our <qex>ghostly</qex> enemies.</q> <rj><qau>Book of Common Prayer [Ch. of Eng. ]</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>One of the <qex>gostly</qex> children of St. Jerome.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to apparitions.</def> <rj><au>Akenside.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>Spiritually; mystically.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghost*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Ghost lore.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>It seemed even more unaccountable than if it had been a thing of <qex>ghostology</qex> and witchcraft.</q> <rj><qau>Hawthorne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>ghost"write`</hw>, <hw>ghost"-write`</hw></mhw> <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To write (a book, article, speech, etc.) for someone else; -- the written material appears under the name of the person for whom it was written.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> ghost.</syn><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><mhw><hw>ghost"writ`er</hw>, <hw>ghost"-writ`er</hw></mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who ghost-writes (a book, article, etc.) for someone else.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghoul</hw> <pr>(g<oomac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Per. <ets>gh<omac/l</ets> an imaginary sylvan demon, supposed to devour men and animals: cf. Ar. <ets>gh<umac/l</ets>, F. <ets>goule</ets>.]</ety> <def>An imaginary evil being among Eastern nations, which was supposed to feed upon human bodies.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>ghole</asp> .]</altsp> <rj><au>Moore.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghoul"ish</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Characteristic of a ghoul; vampirelike; hyenalike.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Ghyll</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A ravine. See <er>Gill</er> a woody glen.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. & Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Wordsworth.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gial`lo*li"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., from <ets>giallo</ets> yellow, prob. fr. OHG. <ets>gelo</ets>, G. <ets>gelb</ets>; akin to E. <ets>yellow</ets>.]</ety> <def>A term variously employed by early writers on art, though commonly designating the yellow oxide of lead, or massicot.</def> <rj><au>Fairholt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Giam"beux</hw> <pr>(zh<adot/m"b<usdot/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Jambeux</er>.]</ety> <def>Greaves; armor for the legs.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>giant</ets>, <ets>geant</ets>, <ets>geaunt</ets>, OF. <ets>jaiant</ets>, <ets>geant</ets>, F. <ets>g\'82ant</ets>, L. <ets>gigas</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/, <?/, from the root of E. <ets>gender</ets>, <ets>genesis</ets>. See <er>Gender</er>, and cf. <er>Gigantic</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A man of extraordinari bulk and stature.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q><qex>Giants</qex> of mighty bone and bold emprise.</q> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person of extraordinary strength or powers, bodily or intellectual.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any animal, plant, or thing, of extraordinary size or power.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Giant's Causeway</b></col>, <cd>a vast collection of basaltic pillars, in the county of Antrim on the northern coast of Ireland.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a giant; extraordinary in size, strength, or power; <as>as, <ex>giant</ex> brothers; a <ex>giant</ex> son.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Giant cell</b></col>. <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Myeloplax</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant clam</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a bivalve shell of the genus <gen>Tridacna</gen>, esp. <spn>T. gigas</spn>, which sometimes weighs 500 pounds. The shells are sometimes used in churches to contain holy water.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant heron</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a very large African heron (<spn>Ardeomega goliath</spn>). It is the largest heron known.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant kettle</b></col>, <cd>a pothole of very large dimensions, as found in Norway in connection with glaciers. See <er>Pothole</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant powder</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Nitroglycerin</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant puffball</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a fungus (<spn>Lycoperdon giganteum</spn>), edible when young, and when dried used for stanching wounds.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant salamander</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a very large aquatic salamander (<spn>Megalobatrachus maximus</spn>), found in Japan. It is the largest of living Amphibia, becoming a yard long.</cd> -- <col><b>Giant squid</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>one of several species of very large squids, belonging to <gen>Architeuthis</gen> and allied genera. Some are over forty feet long.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant*ess</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A woman of extraordinary size.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>g\'82antiser</ets>.]</ety> <def>To play the giant.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sherwood.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant*ly</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Appropriate to a giant.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Usher.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The race of giants.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cotgrave.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ant*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state, personality, or character, of a giant; -- a compellation for a giant.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>His <qex>giantship</qex> is gone somewhat crestfallen</q>. <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Giaour</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Turk. <ets>giaur</ets> an infidel, Per. <ets>gawr</ets>, another form of <ets>ghebr</ets> fire worshiper. Cf. <er>Kaffir</er>, <er>Gheber</er> .]</ety> <def>An infidel; -- a term applied by Turks to disbelievers in the Mohammedan religion, especially Christrians.</def> <rj><au>Byron.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Abbreviated fr. <ets>Gilbert</ets>, the name of the cat in the old story of \'bdReynard the Fox\'b8. in the \'bdRomaunt of the Rose\'b8, etc.]</ety> <def>A male cat; a tomcat.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To act like a cat.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <def>A piece or slip of metal or wood, notched or otherwise, in a machine or structure, to hold other parts in place or bind them together, or to afford a bearing surface; -- usually held or adjusted by means of a wedge, key, or screw.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gib and key</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Gib and cotter</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Steam Engine)</fld>, <cd>the fixed wedge or <xex>gib</xex>, and the driving wedge,<xex>key</xex>, or <xex>cotter</xex>, used for tightening the strap which holds the brasses at the end of a connecting rod.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gibbed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gibbing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To secure or fasten with a gib, or gibs; to provide with a gib, or gibs.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gibbed lathe</b></col>, <cd>an engine lathe in which the tool carriage is held down to the bed by a gib instead of by a weight.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To balk. See <er>Jib</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos></def> <rj><au>Youatt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi"ba*ro</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>Gibaros</plw> <pr>(#)</pr></plu>. <ety>[Amer. Sp. <ets>j\'a1baro</ets> wild.]</ety> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>The offspring of a Spaniard and an Indian; a Spanish-Indian mestizo.</def> <mark>[Sp. Amer.]</mark><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib*bar"tas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Ar. <ets>jebb\'ber</ets> giant; or L. <ets>gibber</ets> humpbacked: cf. F. <ets>gibbar</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of several finback whales of the North Atlantic; -- called also <altname>Jupiter whale</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>jubartas</asp>, <asp>gubertas</asp>, <asp>dubertus</asp>.]</altsp><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"ber</hw> <pr>(j<icr/b"b<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gib</er> to balk.]</ety> <def>A balky horse.</def> <rj><au>Youatt.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gib"ber</hw> <pr>(g<icr/b"b<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>gibbered</conjf> <pr>(g<icr/b"b<etil/rd)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>gibbering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Akin to <ets>jabber</ets>, and <ets>gabble</ets>.]</ety> <def>To speak rapidly and inarticulately.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> jabber.</syn><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gibberellic acid</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <def>A plant growth hormone of the <isa>gibberellin</isa> series (<chform>C19H22O6</chform>), also called <altname>gibberellin A<sub>3</sub></altname>. It was first isolated from the fungus <spn>Gibberella fujikuroi</spn>. It is used to promote the growth of seedlings. See also <er>gibberellin</er>.</def> <au>MI11</au><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gibberellin</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <def>Any of a number plant growth hormones, the first of which was isolated in 1938 from the fungus <spn>Gibberella fujikuroi</spn>; more than 60 related gibberelins are known. The most important is <stype>gibberellin A<sub>3</sub></stype>, also called <stype>gibberellic acid</stype>. They are used in agriculture for promoting plant growth.</def><br/
+[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gib"ber*ish</hw> <pr>(j<icr/b"b<etil/r*<icr/sh <it>or</it> g<icr/b"b<etil/r*<icr/sh)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Gibber</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Rapid and inarticulate talk; unintelligible language; unmeaning words.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He, like a gypsy, oftentimes would go;<br/
+All kinds of <qex>gibberish</qex> he had learnt to know.</q> <rj><qau>Drayton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Such <qex>gibberish</qex> as children may be heard amusing themselves with.</q> <rj><qau>Hawthorne.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Incomprehensible, obscure, or pretentious technical talk or writing; excessively obscure jargon.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"ber*ish</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Unmeaning; <as>as, <ex>gibberish</ex> language</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"bet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gibet</ets>, F. <ets>gibet</ets>, in OF. also club, fr. LL. <ets>gibetum</ets>;; cf. OF. <ets>gibe</ets> sort of sickle or hook, It. <ets>giubbetto</ets> gibbet, and <ets>giubbetta</ets>, dim. of <ets>giubba</ets> mane, also, an under waistcoat, doublet, Prov. It. <ets>gibba</ets> (cf. <er>Jupon</er>); so that it perhaps originally signified a halter, a rope round the neck of malefactors; or it is, perhaps, derived fr. L. <ets>gibbus</ets> hunched, humped, E. <ets>gibbous</ets>; or cf. E. <ets>jib</ets> a sail.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of gallows; an upright post with an arm projecting from the top, on which, formerly, malefactors were hanged in chains, and their bodies allowed to remain as a warning.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The projecting arm of a crane, from which the load is suspended; the jib.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"bet</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gibbeted</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gibbeting</conjf>.]</vmorph><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>To hang and expose on a gibbet.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To expose to infamy; to blacken.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>I'll <qex>gibbet</qex> up his name.</q> <rj><qau>Oldham.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"bier</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>gibier</ets>.]</ety> <def>Wild fowl; game.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"bon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gibbon</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any arboreal ape of the genus <gen>Hylobates</gen>, of which many species and varieties inhabit the East Indies and Southern Asia. They are tailless and without cheek pouches, and have very long arms, adapted for climbing.</def></p>
+
+<p><-- common subtypes -->
+<note><hand/ The white-handed gibbon (<spn>Hylobates lar</spn>), the crowned (<spn>H. pilatus</spn>), the wou-wou or singing gibbon (<spn>H. agilis</spn>), the siamang, and the hoolock. are the most common species.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib" boom`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>See <er>Jib boom</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib*bose"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>gibbosus</ets>, fr. <ets>gibbus</ets>, <ets>gibba</ets>, hunch, hump. Cf. <er>Gibbous</er>.]</ety> <def>Humped; protuberant; -- said of a surface which presents one or more large elevations.</def> <rj><au>Brande & C.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib*bost"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gibbosit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>The state of being gibbous or gibbose; gibbousness.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"bous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>gibbeux</ets>. See <er>Gibbose</er>.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Swelling by a regular curve or surface; protuberant; convex; <as>as, the moon is <ex>gibbous</ex> between the half-moon and the full moon</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The bones will rise, and make a <qex>gibbous</qex> member.</q> <rj><qau>Wiseman.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hunched; hump-backed.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj></p>
+
+<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Gib"bous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Gib"bous*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gibbs"ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after George <ets>Gibbs</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A hydrate of alumina.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"-cat`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A male cat, esp. an old one. See 1st <er>Gib</er>. <pos>n.</pos></def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gibe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gibed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gibing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. Prov. F. <ets>giber</ets>, equiv. to F. <ets>jouer</ets> to play, Icel. <ets>geipa</ets> to talk nonsense, E. <ets>jabber</ets>.]</ety> <def>To cast reproaches and sneering expressions; to rail; to utter taunting, sarcastic words; to flout; to fleer; to scoff.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Fleer and <qex>gibe</qex>, and laugh and flout.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gibe</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To reproach with contemptuous words; to deride; to scoff at; to mock.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Draw the beasts as I describe them,<br/
+ From their features, while I <qex>gibe</qex> them.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gibe</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An expression of sarcastic scorn; a sarcastic jest; a scoff; a taunt; a sneer.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Mark the fleers, the <qex>gibes</qex>, and notable scorns.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>With solemn <qex>gibe</qex> did Eustace banter me.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>\'d8Gib"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[G. <ets>gibel</ets>, <ets>giebel</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A kind of carp (<spn>Cyprinus gibelio</spn>); -- called also <altname>Prussian carp</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who utters gibes.</def> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"fish`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The male of the salmon.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Wright.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"ing*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a gibing manner; scornfully.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Made of giblets; <as>as, a <ex>giblet</ex> pie</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"lets</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gibelet</ets>, OF. <ets>gibelet</ets> game: cf. F. <ets>gibelotte</ets> stewed rabbit. Cf. <er>Gibbier</er>.]</ety> <def>The inmeats, or edible viscera (heart, gizzard, liver, etc.), of poultry.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gi*bral"tar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A strongly fortified town on the south coast of Spain, held by the British since 1704; hence, an impregnable stronghold.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A kind of candy sweetmeat, or a piece of it; -- called, in full, <altname>Gibraltar rock</altname>.</def><br/
+[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gib"staff`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prov. E. <ets>gib</ets> a hooked stick + E. <ets>staff</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A staff to guage water, or to push a boat.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A staff formerly used in fighting beasts on the stage.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Bailey.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Giddy</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>A disease of sheep, characterized by vertigo; the staggers. It is caused by the presence of the C<?/nurus, a larval tapeworm, in the brain. See <er>C<?/nurus</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"di*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a giddy manner.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"di*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being giddy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Giddier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Giddiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>gidi</ets> mad, silly, AS. <ets>gidig</ets>, of unknown origin, cf. Norw. <ets>gidda</ets> to shake, tremble.]</ety><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>1.</sn> <def>Having in the head a sensation of whirling or reeling about; having lost the power of preserving the balance of the body, and therefore wavering and inclined to fall; lightheaded; dizzy.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>By <qex>giddy</qex> head and staggering legs betrayed.</q> <rj><qau>Tate.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Promoting or inducing giddiness; <as>as, a <ex>giddy</ex> height; a <ex>giddy</ex> precipice.</as></def> <rj><au>Prior.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Upon the <qex>giddy</qex> footing of the hatches.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Bewildering on account of rapid turning; running round with celerity; gyratory; whirling.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>The <qex>giddy</qex> motion of the whirling mill.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Characterized by inconstancy; unstable; changeable; fickle; wild; thoughtless; heedless.</def> \'bd<xex>Giddy</xex>, foolish hours.\'b8 <au>Rowe.</au> \'bd<xex>Giddy</xex> chance.\'b8 <au>Dryden.</au><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Young heads are <qex>giddy</qex> and young hearts are warm.</q> <rj><qau>Cowper.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To reel; to whirl.</def> <rj><au>Chapman.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To make dizzy or unsteady.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy-head`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A person without thought fulness, prudence, or judgment.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Burton.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy-head`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Thoughtless; unsteady.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gid"dy-paced`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Moving irregularly; flighty; fickle.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To guide. See <er>Gye</er> .</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To give.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Burns.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gier"-ea`gle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. D. <ets>gier</ets> vulture, G. <ets>gier</ets>, and E. <ets>gyrfalcon</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A bird referred to in the Bible (<au>Lev. xi. 18</au>and <au>Deut. xiv. 17</au>) as unclean, probably the Egyptian vulture (<spn>Neophron percnopterus</spn>).</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gier"-fal`con</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Gier-eagle</er>, <er>Gyrfalcon</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The gyrfalcon.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gie"seck*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Named after <person>Karl <etsep>Giesecke</etsep></person>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A mineral occurring in greenish gray six-sided prisms, having a greasy luster. It is probably a pseudomorph after el\'91olite.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gif</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>conj.</pos> <ety>[AS. See <er>If</er>.]</ety> <def>If.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><note><hand/ <xex>Gif</xex> is the old form of <xex>if</xex>, and frequently occurs in the earlier English writers. See <er>If</er>.</note><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>GIF</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Acronym from <ets>G</ets>raphics <ets>I</ets>nterchange <ets>F</ets>ormat.]</ety> <fld>(Computers)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The Graphics Interchange Format, one of the most popular standardized formats for storing graphic data in binary computer files. The standard has been revised several times, and includes provisions for interlacing and animating images. Its disadvantage is that it can store only 256 colors. Compare <er>JPEG</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Computers)</fld> <def>An image stored in GIF{1} format, or the file in which the image is stored; <as>as, he sent three GIF's with lovely pictures of his children</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><-- p. 625 --></p>
+
+<p><hw>Gif"fard in*ject"or</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>See under <er>Injector</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Giff"gaff</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Reduplicated fr. <ets>give</ets>.]</ety> <def>Mutual accommodation; mutual giving.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gif"fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <def>See <er>Jiffy</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gift</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gift</ets>, <ets>yift</ets>, <ets>yeft</ets>, AS. <ets>gift</ets>, fr. <ets>gifan</ets> to give; akin to D. & G. <ets>gift</ets>, Icel. <ets>gift</ets>, <ets>gipt</ets>, Goth. <ets>gifts</ets> (in comp.). See <er>Give</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Anything given; anything voluntarily transferred by one person to another without compensation; a present; an offering.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Shall I receive by <qex>gift</qex>, what of my own, . . .<br/
+I can command ?</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The act, right, or power of giving or bestowing; <as>as, the office is in the <ex>gift</ex> of the President</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A bribe; anything given to corrupt.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Neither take a <qex>gift</qex>, for a <qex>gift</qex> doth blind the eyes of the wise.</q> <rj><qau>Deut. xvi. 19.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Some exceptional inborn quality or characteristic; a striking or special talent or aptitude; power; faculty; <as>as, the <ex>gift</ex> of wit; a <ex>gift</ex> for speaking.</as></def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A voluntary transfer of real or personal property, without any consideration. It can be perfected only by deed, or in case of personal property, by an actual delivery of possession.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au> <au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><col><b>Gift rope</b></col> <fld>(Naut)</fld>, <cd>a rope extended to a boat for towing it; a guest rope.</cd></cs></p>
+
+<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Present; donation; grant; largess; benefaction; boon; bounty; gratuity; endowment; talent; faculty.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Gift</er>, <er>Present</er>, <er>Donation</er>. These words, as here compared, denote something gratuitously imparted to another out of one's property. A <xex>gift</xex> is something given whether by a superior or an inferior, and is usually designed for the relief or benefit of him who receives it. A <xex>present</xex> is ordinarly from an equal or inferior, and is always intended as a compliment or expression of kindness. <xex>Donation</xex> is a word of more dignity, denoting, properly, a gift of considerable value, and ordinarly a gift made either to some public institution, or to an individual on account of his services to the public; as, a <xex>donation</xex> to a hospital, a charitable society, or a minister.</usage><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gift</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Gifted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Gifting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To endow with some power or faculty. See <er>gift</er>{4}.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>He was <qex>gifted</qex> . . . with philosophical sagacity.</q> <rj><qau>I. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>gifted</hw> <pos>adj.</pos> <ety>[Cf. See <er>gift</er>{4} and <er>gift</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>having unusual talent in some field.</def><br/
+<syn><b>Syn. --</b> talented.</syn><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>having exceptionally high intelligence; -- said of children, especially in discourse on education; <as>as, a program for <ex>gifted</ex> children</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gift"ed*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The state of being gifted.</def> <rj><au>Echard.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw> <pr>(j<icr/g <it>or</it> g<icr/g)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>gigue</ets>. See <er>Jig</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>A fiddle.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw> <pr>(g<icr/g)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Prob. fr. L. <ets>gignere</ets> to beget.]</ety> <def>To engender.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of spear or harpoon. See <er>Fishgig</er>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To fish with a gig.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>gigge</ets>. Cf. <er>Giglot</er>.]</ety> <def>A playful or wanton girl; a giglot.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Icel. <ets>g<imac/gja</ets> fiddle, MHG. <ets>g<imac/ge</ets>, G. <ets>geige</ets>, Icel. <ets>geiga</ets> to take a wrong direction, rove at random, and E. <ets>jig</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A top or whirligig; any little thing that is whirled round in play.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><q>Thou disputest like an infant; go, whip thy <qex>gig</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A light carriage, with one pair of wheels, drawn by one horse; a kind of chaise.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A long, light rowboat, generally clinkerbuilt, and designed to be fast; a boat appropriated to the use of the commanding officer; <as>as, the captain's <ex>gig</ex></as>.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A rotatory cylinder, covered with wire teeth or teasels, for teaseling woolen cloth.</def><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Gig machine</b></col>, <col><b>Gigging machine</b></col>, <col><b>Gig mill</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Napping machine</b></col></mcol>. <cd>See <er>Gig</er>, 4.</cd> -- <col><b>Gig saw</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Jig saw</er>.</cd></cs><br/
+[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
+
+<p><hw>Gig</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A job for a specified, usually short period of time; -- used especially for the temporary engagements of an entertainer, such as a jazz musician or a rock group; <as>as, a one-week <ex>gig</ex> in Las Vegas</as>.</def><br/
+[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
+