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@@ -1393,13 +1393,13 @@ Works edited by Ellis, Spedding, and Heath (7 vols. 1857); Life by Spedding
<p><hw>Bac*te"ri*ol`o*gist</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in bacteriology.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><hw>Bac*te"ri*ol`o*gy</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Bacterium</ets> + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The branch of microbiology relating to bacteria.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p>\'d8<hw>Bac*te`ri*ol"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.; fr. Gr. <grk>bakth`rion</grk>, <grk>bak`tron</grk>, a staff + <?/ a loosing.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Chemical decomposition brought about by bacteria without the addition of oxygen.</def><br/
+<p><hw>Bac*te`ri*ol"y*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.; fr. Gr. <grk>bakth`rion</grk>, <grk>ba`ktron</grk>, a staff + <?/ a loosing.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Chemical decomposition brought about by bacteria without the addition of oxygen.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The destruction or dissolution of bacterial cells.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Bac*te`ri*o*lyt"ic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><hw>bacteriophage</hw> <pos>n. sing. & pl.</pos> <def>a virus which infects bacteria; -- also colloquially called <altname>phage</altname> in laboratory jargon.</def> <note>Bacteriophages are of many varieties, generally specific for one or a narrow range of bacterial species, and almost every bacterium is susceptible to at least one bacteriophage. They may have DNA or RNA as their genetic component. Certain types of bacteriophage, called <styp><col><b>temperate bacteriophage</b></col></styp>, may infect but not kill their host bacteria, residing in and replicating either as a plasmid or integrated into the host genome. Under certain conditions, a resident temperate phage may become induced to multiply rapidly and vegetatively, killing and lysing its host bacterium, and producing multiple progeny. The <stype>lambda phage</stype> of <spn>Eschericia coli</spn>, much studied in biochemical and genetic research, is of the temperate type.</note><br/

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