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authorSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-29 22:20:27 (GMT)
committer Sergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-29 22:20:27 (GMT)
commitbd6548fbc168f347e3bd02ac58831657eef256f4 (patch) (side-by-side diff)
tree6112bac3783774aab09c8506fe3828334d59daeb /CIDE.T
parent4424077e52ae8b42ed409e5eb2ee6b305cfbb58e (diff)
downloadgcide-bd6548fbc168f347e3bd02ac58831657eef256f4.tar.gz
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-<p><-- Begin file 20 of 26: Letter T (Version 0.46)
-
- This file is part 20 of the GNU version of
- The Collaborative International Dictionary of English
- Also referred to as GCIDE
- * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
-
-GCIDE is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
-it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
-the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
-any later version.
-
-GCIDE is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
-GNU General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
-along with this copy of GCIDE; see the file COPYING. If not, write
-to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
- * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
-
- This dictionary was derived from the
- Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
- Version published 1913
- by the C. & G. Merriam Co.
- Springfield, Mass.
- Under the direction of
- Noah Porter, D.D., LL.D.
-
- and from
- WordNet, a semantic network created by
- the Cognitive Science Department
- of Princeton University
- under the direction of
- Prof. George Miller
-
- and is being updated and supplemented by
- an open coalition of volunteer collaborators from
- around the world.
-
- This electronic dictionary is the starting point for an
-ongoing project to develop a modern on-line comprehensive encyclopedic
-dictionary, by the efforts of all individuals willing to help build a
-large and freely available knowledge base. Contributions of data,
-time, and effort are requested from any person willing to assist creation
-of a comprehensive and organized knowledge base for free access on the
-internet. Anyone willing to assist in any way in constructing such a
-knowledge base should contact:
-
- Patrick Cassidy pc@worldsoul.org
- 735 Belvidere Ave. Office: (908)668-5252
- Plainfield, NJ 07062
- (908) 561-3416
-
- Last edit January 17, 2002.
-
- --></p>
-
-<p><centered><point26>T.</point26></centered></p>
-
-<p><hw>T</hw> <pr>(t<emac/)</pr>, <def>the twentieth letter of the English alphabet, is a nonvocal consonant. With the letter <xex>h</xex> it forms the digraph <xex>th</xex>, which has two distinct sounds, as in <xex>th</xex>in, <xex>th</xex>en. See <xex>Guide to Pronunciation</xex>, <sect/<sect/262-264, and also <sect/<sect/153, 156, 169, 172, 176, 178-180.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>The letter derives its name and form from the Latin, the form of the Latin letter being further derived through the Greek from the Ph<oe/nician. The ultimate origin is probably Egyptian. It is etymologically most nearly related to <xex>d</xex>, <xex>s</xex>, <xex>th</xex>; as in <xex>t</xex>ug, <xex>d</xex>uke; <xex>t</xex>wo, <xex>d</xex>ual, L. <xex>d</xex>uo; re<xex>s</xex>in, L. re<xex>s</xex>ina, Gr. <grk>"rhti`nh</grk>, ten<xex>t</xex>, ten<xex>s</xex>e, a., <xex>t</xex>enuous, <xex>th</xex>in; nos<xex>t</xex>ril, <xex>th</xex>rill. See <er>D</er>, <er>S</er>.<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>T bandage</b></col> <fld>(Surg.)</fld>, <cd>a bandage shaped like the letter <universbold>T</universbold>, and used principally for application to the groin, or perineum.</cd> -- <col><b>T cart</b></col>, <cd>a kind of fashionable two seated wagon for pleasure driving.</cd> -- <col><b>T iron</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A rod with a short crosspiece at the end, -- used as a hook.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>Iron in bars, having a cross section formed like the letter <universbold>T</universbold>, -- used in structures.</cd> -- <col><b>T rail</b></col>, <cd>a kind of rail for railroad tracks, having no flange at the bottom so that a section resembles the letter <universbold>T</universbold>.</cd> -- <col><b>T square</b></col>, <cd>a ruler having a crosspiece or head at one end, for the purpose of making parallel lines; -- so called from its shape. It is laid on a drawing board and guided by the crosspiece, which is pressed against the straight edge of the board. Sometimes the head is arranged to be set at different angles.</cd> -- <col><b>To a T</b></col>, <cd>exactly, perfectly; <as>as, to suit <ex>to a T</ex></as>.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To take.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Cursor Mundi.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ Used by Chaucer to represent a peculiarity of the Northern dialect.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A heap. See <er>Tas</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The flap or latchet of a shoe fastened with a string or a buckle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A tag. See <er>Tag</er>, 2.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A loop for pulling or lifting something.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A border of lace or other material, worn on the inner front edge of ladies' bonnets.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A loose pendent part of a lady's garment; esp., one of a series of pendent squares forming an edge or border.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>a small projecting piece of a file folder, file card, or similar sheet used in a filing system, on which a notation is written to permit convenient search for the folder, card, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>a bill or check for some purchase, as in a restaurant; <as>as, the salesman will pick up the <ex>tab</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <def>a key on a typewriter or computer keyboard which advances the carriage or curser to the next (preset) tab position; -- used especially to type or print text or numbers in columns.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bac"co</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tobacco.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta*ba"nus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., horsefly.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of blood sucking flies, including the horseflies.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"ard</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tabard</ets>, <ets>tabart</ets>; cf. Sp. & Pg. <ets>tabardo</ets>, It. <ets>tabarro</ets>, W. <ets>tabar</ets>, LGr. <grk>tampa`rion</grk>, LL. <ets>tabardum</ets>.]</ety> <def>A sort of tunic or mantle formerly worn for protection from the weather. When worn over the armor it was commonly emblazoned with the arms of the wearer, and from this the name was given to the garment adopted for heralds.</def> <altsp>[Spelt also <asp>taberd</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In a <qex>tabard</qex> he [the Plowman] rode upon a mare.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"ard*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who wears a tabard.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A scholar on the foundation of Queen's College, Oxford, England, whose original dress was a tabard.</def> <rj><au>Nares.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"a*ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tabby</er>.]</ety> <def>A stout silk having satin stripes, -- used for furniture.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bas"co sauce</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[So named after <etsep>Tabasco</etsep>, a river and state of Mexico.]</ety> <def>A kind of very pungent sauce made from red peppers.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab`a*sheer"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Per. <ets>tab\'besh\'c6r</ets>: cf. Skr. <ets>tvakksh\'c6r\'be</ets>, <ets>tvaksh\'c6r\'be</ets>.]</ety> <def>A concretion in the joints of the bamboo, which consists largely or chiefly of pure silica. It is highly valued in the East Indies as a medicine for the cure of bilious vomitings, bloody flux, piles, and various other diseases.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"bi*net</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tabby</er>.]</ety> <def>A fabric like poplin, with a watered surface.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabinet</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"by</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tabbies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>tabis</ets> (cf. It. <ets>tab\'8d</ets>, Sp. & Pg. <ets>tab\'a1</ets>, LL. <ets>attabi</ets>), fr. Ar. <ets>'att\'beb\'c6</ets>, properly the name of a quarter of Bagdad where it was made, the quarter being named from the prince <etsep>Attab</etsep>, great grandson of Omeyya. Cf. <er>Tobine</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of waved silk, usually called <altname>watered silk</altname>, manufactured like taffeta, but thicker and stronger. The watering is given to it by calendering.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A mixture of lime with shells, gravel, or stones, in equal proportions, with an equal proportion of water. When dry, this becomes as hard as rock.</def> <rj><au>Weale.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A brindled cat; hence, popularly, any cat.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>An old maid or gossip.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Byron.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"by</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having a wavy or watered appearance; <as>as, a <ex>tabby</ex> waistcoat</as>.</def> <rj><au>Pepys.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Brindled; diversified in color; <as>as, a <ex>tabby</ex> cat</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tabby moth</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the grease moth. See under <er>Grease</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"by</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabbied</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabbying</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To water; to cause to look wavy, by the process of calendering; to calender; <as>as, to <ex>tabby</ex> silk, mohair, ribbon, etc.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab`e*fac"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tabefy</er>.]</ety> <def>A wasting away; a gradual losing of flesh by disease.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"e*fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabefied</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabefying</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>tabere</ets> to waste away + <ets>-fy</ets>: cf. L. <ets>tabefacere</ets> to melt.]</ety> <def>To cause to waste gradually, to emaciate.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Harvey.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bel"lion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tabellio</ets>, fr. <ets>tabella</ets> a tablet, a writing, document, dim. of <ets>tabula</ets> a board: cf. F. <ets>tabellion</ets>. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <def>A secretary or notary under the Roman empire; also, a similar officer in France during the old monarchy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ber</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Tabor</er>.</def> <rj><au>Nahum ii. 7.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"erd</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tabard</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"er*na*cle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>tabernaculum</ets>, dim. of <ets>taberna</ets> nut. See <er>Tabern</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A slightly built or temporary habitation; especially, a tent.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Dwelling in <qex>tabernacles</qex> with Isaac and Jacob.</q> <rj><qau>Heb. xi. 9.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Orange trees planted in the ground, and secured in winter with a wooden <qex>tabernacle</qex> and stoves.</q> <rj><qau>Evelyn.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Jewish Antiq.)</fld> <def>A portable structure of wooden framework covered with curtains, which was carried through the wilderness in the Israelitish exodus, as a place of sacrifice and worship.</def> <rj><au>Ex. xxvi.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Hence, the Jewish temple; sometimes, any other place for worship.</def> <rj><au>Acts xv. 16.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Figuratively: The human body, as the temporary abode of the soul.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Shortly I must put off this my <qex>tabernacle</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>2 Pet. i. 14.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Any small cell, or like place, in which some holy or precious things was deposited or kept.</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>The ornamental receptacle for the pyx, or for the consecrated elements, whether a part of a building or movable.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>A niche for the image of a saint, or for any sacred painting or sculpture.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>Hence, a work of art of sacred subject, having a partially architectural character, as a solid frame resting on a bracket, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>A tryptich for sacred imagery.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(e)</sd> <def>A seat or stall in a choir, with its canopy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A boxlike step for a mast with the after side open, so that the mast can be lowered to pass under bridges, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Feast of Tabernacles</b></col> <fld>(Jewish Antiq.)</fld>, <cd>one of the three principal festivals of the Jews, lasting seven days, during which the people dwelt in booths formed of the boughs of trees, in commemoration of the habitation of their ancestors in similar dwellings during their pilgrimage in the wilderness.</cd> -- <col><b>Tabernacle work</b></col>, <cd>rich canopy work like that over the head of niches, used over seats or stalls, or over sepulchral monuments.</cd> <au>Oxf. Gloss.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"er*na*cle</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabernacled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabernacling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To dwell or reside for a time; to be temporary housed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He assumed our nature, and <qex>tabernacled</qex> among us in the flesh.</q> <rj><qau>Dr. J. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab`er*nac"u*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to a tabernacle, especially the Jewish tabernacle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Formed in latticework; latticed.</def> <rj><au>T. Warton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to huts or booths; hence, common; low.</def> \'bdHorribly <xex>tabernacular</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>De Quincey.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"bes</hw> <pr>(t<amac/"b<emac/z)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., a wasting disease.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Progressive emaciation of the body, accompanied with hectic fever, with no well-marked local symptoms.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>\'d8Tabes dorsalis</b></col> <pr>(t<amac/"b<emac/z d<ocir/r*s<amac/"l<icr/s)</pr> <ety>[NL., tabes of the back]</ety>, <cd>locomotor ataxia; -- sometimes called simply <xex>tabes</xex>.</cd> -- <col><b>\'d8Tabes mesenterica</b></col> <pr>(<?/)</pr> <ety>[NL., mesenteric tabes]</ety>, <cd>a wasting disease of childhood characterized by chronic inflammation of the lymphatic glands of the mesentery, attended with caseous degeneration.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bes"cent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tabescens</ets> wasting, p. pr. of <ets>tabescere</ets>.]</ety> <def>Withering, or wasting away.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bet"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to tabes; of the nature of tabes; affected with tabes; tabid.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>One affected with tabes.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"id</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tabidus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tabide</ets>. See <er>Tabes</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Affected by tabes; tabetic.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In <qex>tabid</qex> persons, milk is the bset restorative.</q> <rj><qau>Arbuthnot.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Tab"id*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tab"id*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ta*bif"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Ta*bif"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tabes</ets> + L. <ets>facere</ets> to make.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Producing tabes; wasting; tabefying.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"inet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tabbinet</er>.</def> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"la*ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tablature</ets> ancient mode of musical notation. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Paint.)</fld> <def>A painting on a wall or ceiling; a single piece comprehended in one view, and formed according to one design; hence, a picture in general.</def> <rj><au>Shaftesbury.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>An ancient mode of indicating musical sounds by letters and other signs instead of by notes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The chimes of bells are so rarely managed that I went up to that of Sir Nicholas, where I found who played all sorts of compositions from the <qex>tablature</qex> before him as if he had fingered an organ.</q> <rj><qau>Evelyn.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Division into plates or tables with intervening spaces; <as>as, the <ex>tablature</ex> of the cranial bones</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>tabula</ets> a board, tablet, a painting. Cf. <er>Tabular</er>, <er>Taffrail</er>, <er>Tavern</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A smooth, flat surface, like the side of a board; a thin, flat, smooth piece of anything; a slab.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A bagnio paved with fair <qex>tables</qex> of marble.</q> <rj><qau>Sandys.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A thin, flat piece of wood, stone, metal, or other material, on which anything is cut, traced, written, or painted; a tablet</def>; <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>a memorandum book.</def> \'bdThe names . . . written on his <xex>tables</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>And the Lord said unto Moses, Hew thee two <qex>tables</qex> of stone like unto the first, and I will write upon these <qex>tables</qex> the words that were in the first <qex>tables</qex>, which thou brakest.</q> <rj><qau>Ex. xxxiv. 1.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And stand there with your <qex>tables</qex> to glean<br/
-The golden sentences.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any smooth, flat surface upon which an inscription, a drawing, or the like, may be produced.</def> \'bdPainted in a <xex>table</xex> plain.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The opposite walls are painted by Rubens, which, with that other of the Infanta taking leave of Don Philip, is a most incomparable <qex>table</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Evelyn.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>St. Antony has a <qex>table</qex> that hangs up to him from a poor peasant.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Hence, in a great variety of applications: A condensed statement which may be comprehended by the eye in a single view; a methodical or systematic synopsis; the presentation of many items or particulars in one group; a scheme; a schedule.</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Bibliog.)</fld> <def>A view of the contents of a work; a statement of the principal topics discussed; an index; a syllabus; a synopsis; <as>as, a <ex>table</ex> of contents</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A list of substances and their properties; especially, the a list of the elementary substances with their atomic weights, densities, symbols, etc.</def>
-<-- periodic table --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>Any collection and arrangement in a condensed form of many particulars or values, for ready reference, as of weights, measures, currency, specific gravities, etc.; also, a series of numbers following some law, and expressing particular values corresponding to certain other numbers on which they depend, and by means of which they are taken out for use in computations; <as>as, <ex>tables</ex> of logarithms, sines, tangents, squares, cubes, etc.; annuity <ex>tables</ex>; interest <ex>tables</ex>; astronomical <ex>tables</ex>, etc.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <fld>(Palmistry)</fld> <def>The arrangement or disposition of the lines which appear on the inside of the hand.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Mistress of a fairer <qex>table</qex><br/
-Hath not history for fable.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>An article of furniture, consisting of a flat slab, board, or the like, having a smooth surface, fixed horizontally on legs, and used for a great variety of purposes, as in eating, writing, or working.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>We may again<br/
-Give to our <qex>tables</qex> meat.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The nymph the <qex>table</qex> spread.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>Hence, food placed on a table to be partaken of; fare; entertainment; <as>as, to set a good <ex>table</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>The company assembled round a table.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I drink the general joy of the whole <qex>table</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>One of the two, external and internal, layers of compact bone, separated by diplo\'89, in the walls of the cranium.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>9.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A stringcourse which includes an offset; esp., a band of stone, or the like, set where an offset is required, so as to make it decorative. See <er>Water table</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>10.</sn> <fld>(Games)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The board on the opposite sides of which backgammon and draughts are played.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>One of the divisions of a backgammon board; <as>as, to play into the right-hand <ex>table</ex></as>.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>The games of backgammon and of draughts.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>This is the ape of form, monsieur the nice,<br/
-That, when he plays at <qex>tables</qex>, chides the dice.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>11.</sn> <fld>(Glass Manuf.)</fld> <def>A circular plate of crown glass.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A circular plate or <qex>table</qex> of about five feet diameter weighs on an average nine pounds.</q> <rj><qau>Ure.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>12.</sn> <fld>(Jewelry)</fld> <def>The upper flat surface of a diamond or other precious stone, the sides of which are cut in angles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>13.</sn> <fld>(Persp.)</fld> <def>A plane surface, supposed to be transparent and perpendicular to the horizon; -- called also <altname>perspective plane</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>14.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>The part of a machine tool on which the work rests and is fastened.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Bench table</b></col>, <col><b>Card table</b></col>, <col><b>Communion table</b></col>, <col><b>Lord's table</b></col></mcol>, <cd>etc. See under <er>Bench</er>, <er>Card</er>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Raised table</b></col> <fld>(Arch. & Sculp.)</fld>, <cd>a raised or projecting member of a flat surface, large in proportion to the projection, and usually rectangular, -- especially intended to receive an inscription or the like.</cd> -- <col><b>Roller table</b></col> <fld>(Horology)</fld>, <cd>a flat disk on the arbor of the balance of a watch, holding the jewel which rolls in and out of the fork at the end of the lever of the escapement.</cd> -- <col><b>Round table</b></col>. <cd>See Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.</cd> -- <col><b>Table anvil</b></col>, <cd>a small anvil to be fastened to a table for use in making slight repairs.</cd> -- <col><b>Table base</b></col>. <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <cd>Same as <er>Water table</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Table bed</b></col>, <cd>a bed in the form of a table.</cd> -- <col><b>Table beer</b></col>, <cd>beer for table, or for common use; small beer.</cd> -- <col><b>Table bell</b></col>, <cd>a small bell to be used at table for calling servants.</cd> -- <col><b>Table cover</b></col>, <cd>a cloth for covering a table, especially at other than mealtimes.</cd> -- <col><b>Table diamond</b></col>, <cd>a thin diamond cut with a flat upper surface.</cd> -- <col><b>Table linen</b></col>, <cd>linen tablecloth, napkins, and the like.</cd> -- <col><b>Table money</b></col> <fld>(Mil. or Naut.)</fld>, <cd>an allowance sometimes made to officers over and above their pay, for table expenses.</cd> -- <col><b>Table rent</b></col> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld>, <cd>rent paid to a bishop or religious, reserved or appropriated to his table or housekeeping.</cd> <au>Burrill.</au> -- <col><b>Table shore</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a low, level shore.</cd> -- <col><b>Table talk</b></col>, <cd>conversation at table, or at meals.</cd> -- <col><b>Table talker</b></col>, <cd>one who talks at table.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Table tipping</b></col>, <col><b>Table turning</b></col></mcol>, <cd>certain movements of tables, etc., attributed by some to the agency of departed spirits, and by others to the development of latent vital or spriritual forces, but more commonly ascribed to the muscular force of persons in connection with the objects moved, or to physical force applied otherwise.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Tables of a girder</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Tables of a chord</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Engin.)</fld>, <cd>the upper and lower horizontal members.</cd> -- <col><b>To lay on the table</b></col>, <cd>in parliamentary usage, to lay, as a report, motion, etc., on the table of the presiding officer, -- that is, to postpone the consideration of, by a vote; -- also called to <altname>table</altname> . It is a tactic often used with the intention of postponing consideration of a motion indefinitely, that is, to kill the motion.</cd> -- <col><b>To serve tables</b></col> <fld>(Script.)</fld>, <cd>to provide for the poor, or to distribute provisions for their wants.</cd> <au>Acts vi. 2.</au> -- <col><b>To turn the tables</b></col>, <cd>to change the condition or fortune of contending parties; -- a metaphorical expression taken from the vicissitudes of fortune in gaming.</cd> -- <col><b>Twelve tables</b></col> <fld>(Rom. Antiq.)</fld>, <cd>a celebrated body of Roman laws, framed by decemvirs appointed 450 years before Christ, on the return of deputies or commissioners who had been sent to Greece to examine into foreign laws and institutions. They consisted partly of laws transcribed from the institutions of other nations, partly of such as were altered and accommodated to the manners of the Romans, partly of new provisions, and mainly, perhaps, of laws and usages under their ancient kings.</cd> <au>Burrill.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1467 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble</hw> <pr>(t<amac/"b'l)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabled</conjf> <pr>(t<amac/"b'ld)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabling</conjf> <pr>(t<amac/"bling)</pr>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To form into a table or catalogue; to tabulate; <as>as, to <ex>table</ex> fines</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To delineate, as on a table; to represent, as in a picture.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tabled</qex> and pictured in the chambers of meditation.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To supply with food; to feed.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Carp.)</fld> <def>To insert, as one piece of timber into another, by alternate scores or projections from the middle, to prevent slipping; to scarf.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To lay or place on a table, as money.</def> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>In parliamentary usage, to lay on the table; to postpone, by a formal vote, the consideration of (a bill, motion, or the like) till called for, or indefinitely.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>To enter upon the docket; <as>as, to <ex>table</ex> charges against some one</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To make board hems in the skirts and bottoms of (sails) in order to strengthen them in the part attached to the boltrope.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To live at the table of another; to board; to eat.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdHe . . . was driven from the society of men to <xex>table</xex> with the beasts.\'b8 <rj><au>South.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta`bleau"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tableaux</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F., dim. fr. L. <ets>tabula</ets> a painting. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A striking and vivid representation; a picture.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A representation of some scene by means of persons grouped in the proper manner, placed in appropriate postures, and remaining silent and motionless.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Solitaire)</fld> <def>The arrangement, or layout, of cards.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta`bleau" vi`vant"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tableaux vivants</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Tableau</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 2.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"ble*book`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tablet; a notebook.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Put into your <qex>tablebook</qex> whatever you judge worthy.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble*cloth`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A cloth for covering a table, especially one with which a table is covered before the dishes, etc., are set on for meals.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"ble d'h\'93te"</hw> <pr>(t<adot/"bl' d<omac/t`)</pr>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tables d'h\'93te</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F., literally, table of the landlord.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A common table for guests at a hotel; an ordinary.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Now, commonly, a meal, usually of several preselected and fixed courses, in a restaurant, hotel, or the like, for which one pays a fixed price. Sometimes, a meal with optional courses for which one pays a fixed price irrespective of what one orders; but the latter is usuallyt referred to as a <contr>pris fixe</contr> meal or a <contr>a la carte</contr> meal. Often used adjectively; <as>as, a <ex>table-d'h\'93te</ex> meal</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"ble-land`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A broad, level, elevated area of land; a plateau.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The toppling crags of Duty scaled,<br/
-Are close upon the shining <qex>table-lands</qex><br/
-To which our God himself is moon and sun.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"ble*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tablemen</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>A man at draughts; a piece used in playing games at tables. See <er>Table</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 10.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A table.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tablements</qex> and chapters of pillars.</q> <rj><qau>Holland.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who boards.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One who boards others for hire.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"ble*spoon`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A spoon of the largest size commonly used at the table; -- distinguished from <xex>teaspoon</xex>, <xex>dessert spoon</xex>, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ble*spoon`ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tablespoonfuls</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>As much as a tablespoon will hold; enough to fill a tablespoon. It is usually reckoned as one half of a fluid ounce, or four fluid drams.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"blet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tablette</ets>, dim. of <ets>table</ets>. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A small table or flat surface.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A flat piece of any material on which to write, paint, draw, or engrave; also, such a piece containing an inscription or a picture.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Hence, a small picture; a miniature.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>A kind of pocket memorandum book.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A flattish cake or piece; <as>as, <ex>tablets</ex> of arsenic were formerly worn as a preservative against the plague</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Pharm.)</fld> <def>A solid kind of electuary or confection, commonly made of dry ingredients with sugar, and usually formed into little flat squares; -- called also <altname>lozenge</altname>, and <altname>troche</altname>, especially when of a round or rounded form.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"ble*ware`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Ware, or articles collectively, for use during meals, including, for example, <examp>dishes</examp>, <examp>plates</examp>, <examp>bowls</examp>, <examp>knives</examp>, <examp>forks</examp>, and <examp>spoons</examp>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Table work</hw>. <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>Typesetting of tabular nmatter, or the type matter set in tabular form.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A forming into tables; a setting down in order.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Carp.)</fld> <def>The letting of one timber into another by alternate scores or projections, as in shipbuilding.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A broad hem on the edge of a sail.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Board; support.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Trence in English (1614).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Act of playing at tables. See <er>Table</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 10.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tabling house</b></col>, <cd>a gambling house.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Northbrooke.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"loid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[A table-mark.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A compressed portion of one or more drugs or chemicals, or of food, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a newspaper with pages about half the size of a standard-sized newspaper, especially one that has relatively short or condensed articles and a large porortion of pictorial matter.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"loid</hw> <pr>(t<acr/b"loid)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Compressed or condensed, as into a tabloid; administrated in or as in tabloids, or small condensed bits; <as>as, a <ex>tabloid</ex> form of imparting information</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>of or pertaining to a tabloid newspaper or the type of story typically contained in one, such as lurid or sensationalistic stories of scandal, crime, or violence.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*boo"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A total prohibition of intercourse with, use of, or approach to, a given person or thing under pain of death, -- an interdict of religious origin and authority, formerly common in the islands of Polynesia; interdiction.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabu</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*boo"</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabooed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabooing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To put under taboo; to forbid, or to forbid the use of; to interdict approach to, or use of; <as>as, to <ex>taboo</ex> the ground set apart as a sanctuary for criminals</as>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabu</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*boo"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabu</asp> and <asp>tapu</asp>.]</altsp> <ety>[Polynesian <ets>tabu</ets>, <ets>tapu</ets>, sacred, under restriction, a prohibition.]</ety> <def>Set apart or sacred by religious custom among certain races of Polynesia, New Zealand, etc., and forbidden to certain persons or uses; hence, prohibited under severe penalties; interdicted; <as>as, food, places, words, customs, etc., may be <ex>taboo</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tabor</ets>, <ets>tabour</ets>, F. <ets>tambour</ets>; cf. Pr. <ets>tabor</ets>, <ets>tanbor</ets>, Sp. & Pg. <ets>tambor</ets>, <ets>atambor</ets>, It. <ets>tamburo</ets>; all fr. Ar. & Per. <ets>tamb<?/r</ets> a kind of lute, or giutar, or Per. <ets>tab\'c6r</ets> a drum. Cf. <er>Tabouret</er>, <er>Tambour</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small drum used as an accompaniment to a pipe or fife, both being played by the same person.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabour</asp>, and <asp>taber</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bor</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabored</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taboring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>taborer</ets>.]</ety> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabour</asp>.]</altsp> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To play on a tabor, or little drum.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To strike lightly and frequently.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bor</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To make (a sound) with a tabor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bor*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who plays on the tabor.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"o*ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Dim. of <ets>tabor</ets>. Cf. <er>Tabret</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small tabor.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tabouret</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"o*rine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tabourin</ets>, F. <ets>tambourin</ets>. See <er>Tabor</er>, and cf. <er>Tambourine</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A small, shallow drum; a tabor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bor*ite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Eccl. Hist.)</fld> <def>One of certain Bohemian reformers who suffered persecution in the fifteenth century; -- so called from <xex>Tabor</xex>, a hill or fortress where they encamped during a part of their struggles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"bour</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Tabor</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"ou*ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., dim. of OF. <ets>tabor</ets>, <ets>tabour</ets>, drum. See <er>Tabor</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Same as <er>Taboret</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A seat without arms or back, cushioned and stuffed: a high stool; -- so called from its resemblance to a drum.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>An embroidery frame.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Right of the tabouret</b></col>, <cd>the privilege of sitting on a tabouret in the presence of the severeign, formerly granted to certain ladies of high rank at the French court.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"rere</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A taborer.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A taboret.</def> <rj><au>Young.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*bu"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Taboo</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tab"u*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tabul\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A table; a tablet.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the transverse plants found in the calicles of certain corals and hydroids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tabula rasa</b></col> <pr>(<?/)</pr> <ety>[L.]</ety>, <cd>a smoothed tablet; hence, figuratively, the mind in its earliest state, before receiving impressions from without; -- a term used by Hobbes, Locke, and others, in maintaining a theory opposed to the doctrine of <xex>innate ideas</xex>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"u*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tabularis</ets>, fr. <ets>tabula</ets> a board, table. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <def>Having the form of, or pertaining to, a table (in any of the uses of the word).</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>Having a flat surface; <as>as, a <ex>tabular</ex> rock</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>Formed into a succession of flakes; laminated.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Nodules . . . that are <qex>tabular</qex> and plated.</q> <rj><qau>Woodward.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>Set in squares.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>Arranged in a schedule; <as>as, <ex>tabular</ex> statistics</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(e)</sd> <def>Derived from, or computed by, the use of tables; <as>as, <ex>tabular</ex> right ascension</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tabular difference</b></col> <fld>(Math.)</fld>, <cd>the difference between two consecutive numbers in a table, sometimes printed in its proper place in the table.</cd> -- <col><b>Tabular spar</b></col> <fld>(Min.)</fld>, <cd>wollastonite.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab`u*lar*i*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of tabularizing, or the state of being tabularized; formation into tables; tabulation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"u*lar*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabularized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabularizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To tabulate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tab`u*la"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>tabulatus</ets> floored.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An artificial group of stony corals including those which have transverse septa in the calicles. The genera <gen>Pocillopora</gen> and Favosites are examples.</def>
-<-- ## note that Pocillopora is italicised but not listed separately in this dictionary. Favosites is not italicised, and has an entry as a headword. Is that the difference between italicisation or not for genus names? --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab"u*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tabulated</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tabulating</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>tabula</ets> a table. See <er>Tabular</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To form into a table or tables; to reduce to tables or synopses.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A philosophy is not worth the having, unless its results may be <qex>tabulated</qex>, and put in figures.</q> <rj><qau>I. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To shape with a flat surface.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tab`u*la"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of forming into a table or tables; <as>as, the <ex>tabulation</ex> of statistics</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tack</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A kind of customary payment by a tenant; -- a word used in old records.</def> <rj><au>Cowell. Burrill.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tac"a*ma*hac`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tac`a*ma*ha"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A bitter balsamic resin obtained from tropical American trees of the genus <gen>Elaphrium</gen> (<spn>Elaphrium tomentosum</spn> and <spn>Elaphrium Tacamahaca</spn>), and also from East Indian trees of the genus <gen>Calophyllum</gen>; also, the resinous exhudation of the balsam poplar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Any tree yielding tacamahac resin, especially, in North America, the balsam poplar, or balm of Gilead (<spn>Populus balsamifera</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*caud"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tacaud</ets>. See <er>Tomcod</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The bib, or whiting pout.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tac`-au-tac"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. <ets>riposter du tac au tac</ets> to parry (where <ets>tac</ets> imitates the sound made by the steel).]</ety> <fld>(Fencing)</fld> <def>The parry which is connected with a riposte; also, a series of quick attacks and parries in which neither fencer gains a point.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tace</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The cross, or church, of St. Antony. See <xex>Illust.</xex> (6), under <er>Cross</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def> <rj><au>Mollett.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tace</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tasse</er>.</def> <rj><au>Fairholt.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"cet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. impers.</pos> <ety>[L., it is silent, 3d pers.pr. of <ets>tacere</ets> to be silent.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>It is silent; -- a direction for a vocal or instrumental part to be silent during a whole movement.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tache</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tack</er> a kind of nail.]</ety> <def>Something used for taking hold or holding; a catch; a loop; a button.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ex. xxvi. 6.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tache</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tache</ets> spot. See <er>Techy</er>.]</ety> <def>A spot, stain, or blemish.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Warner.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach*hy"drite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <grk>"y`dwr</grk> water. So named from its ready deliquescence.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A hydrous chloride of calcium and magnesium occurring in yellowish masses which rapidly deliquesce upon exposure. It is found in the salt mines at <city>Stassfurt</city>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tach"i*na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tachin\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>tachino`s</grk>, for <grk>tachy`s</grk> swift.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of numerous species of Diptera belonging to <gen>Tachina</gen> and allied genera. Their larv\'91 are external parasites of other insects.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chis"to*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`chistos</grk>, superl. of <grk>tachy`s</grk> swift + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>An apparatus for exposing briefly to view a screen bearing letters or figures. It is used in studying the range of attention, or the power of distinguishing separate objects in a single impression.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach"o*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`chos</grk> speed + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <def>A recording or registering tachometer; also, its autographic record.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`chos</grk> swiftness, speed (fr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick) + <ets>-meter</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tachom\'8atre</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for measuring the velocity, or indicating changes in the velocity, of a moving body or substance.</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>An instrument for measuring the velocity of running water in a river or canal, consisting of a wheel with inclined vanes, which is turned by the current. The rotations of the wheel are recorded by clockwork.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>An instrument for showing at any moment the speed of a revolving shaft, consisting of a delicate revolving conical pendulum which is driven by the shaft, and the action of which by change of speed moves a pointer which indicates the speed on a graduated dial.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>An instrument for measuring the velocity of the blood; a h\'91matachometer.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chom"e*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Measurement by a tachometer; the science or use of tachometers.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach"y*di*dax`y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <grk>di`daxis</grk> teaching.]</ety> <def>A short or rapid method of instructing.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tach`y*glos"sa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <grk>glw^ssa</grk> tongue.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of monotremes which comprises the spiny ant-eaters of Australia and New Guinea. See <xex>Illust.</xex> under <er>Echidna</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach"y*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An example of tachygraphy; esp., an ancient Greek or Roman tachygraphic manuscript.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chyg"ra*pher</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ a fast writer.]</ety> <def>One who writes shorthand; a stenographer; esp., an ancient Greek or Roman notary.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tach`y*graph"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tach`y*graph"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tachygraphique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to tachygraphy; written in shorthand.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chyg"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <ets>-graphy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tachygraphie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The art or practice of rapid writing; shorthand writing; stenography.</def> <rj><au>I. Taylor (The Alphabet).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach"y*lyte</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <grk>ly`ein</grk> to dissolve.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A vitreous form of basalt; -- so called because decomposable by acids and readily fusible.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chym"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tachy-</ets> + <ets>-meter</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Surveying)</fld> <def>An instrument, esp. a transit or theodolite with stadia wires, for determining quickly the distances, bearings, and elevations of distant objects.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A speed indicator; a tachometer.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*chym"e*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The science or use of the tachymeter.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ta`chy*met"ric</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tach"y*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tachy`s</grk> quick + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <def>An early form of animated-picture machine, devised in 1889 by <person>Otto Ansch\'81tz</person> of <city>Berlin</city>, in which the chronophotographs were mounted upon the periphery of a rotating wheel.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac"it</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tacitus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>tacere</ets> to be silent, to pass over in silence; akin to Goth. <ets><thorn/ahan</ets> to be silent, Icel. <ets><thorn/egja</ets>, OHG. <ets>dag\'c7n</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tacite</ets>. Cf. <er>Reticent</er>.]</ety> <def>Done or made in silence; implied, but not expressed; silent; <as>as, <ex>tacit</ex> consent is consent by silence, or by not interposing an objection</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tac"it*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tacit</qex> and secret theft of abusing our brother in civil contracts.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac"i*turn</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taciturnus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>taciturne</ets>. See <er>Tacit</er>.]</ety> <def>Habitually silent; not given to converse; not apt to talk or speak.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tac"i*turn*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Silent; reserved.</syn> <usage> <er>Taciturn</er>, <er>Silent</er>. <xex>Silent</xex> has reference to the act; <xex>taciturn</xex>, to the habit. A man may be <xex>silent</xex> from circumstances; he is <xex>taciturn</xex> from disposition. The loquacious man is at times <xex>silent</xex>; one who is <xex>taciturn</xex> may now and then make an effort at conversation.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac`i*tur"ni*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taciturnitas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>taciturnit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>Habitual silence, or reserve in speaking.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The cause of Addison's <qex>taciturnity</qex> was a natural diffidence in the company of strangers.</q> <rj><qau>V. Knox.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>taciturnity</qex> and the short answers which gave so much offense.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tack</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From an old or dialectal form of F. <ets>tache</ets>. See <er>Techy</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A stain; a tache.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <ety>[Cf. L. <ets>tactus</ets>.]</ety> <def>A peculiar flavor or taint; <as>as, a musty <ex>tack</ex></as>.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Drayton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tack</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tak</ets>, <ets>takke</ets>, a fastening; akin to D. <ets>tak</ets> a branch, twig, G. <ets>zacke</ets> a twig, prong, spike, Dan. <ets>takke</ets> a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. <ets>tagg</ets> prickle, point, Icel. <ets>t\'beg</ets> a willow twig, Ir. <ets>taca</ets> a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. <ets>tacaid</ets>, Armor. & Corn. <ets>tach</ets>; perhaps akin to E. <ets>take</ets>. Cf. <er>Attach</er>, <er>Attack</er>, <er>Detach</er>, <er>Tag</er> an end, <er>Zigzag</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A small, short, sharp-pointed nail, usually having a broad, flat head.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is attached; a supplement; an appendix. See <er>Tack</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 3.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Some <qex>tacks</qex> had been made to money bills in King Charles's time.</q> <rj><qau>Bp. Burnet.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1468 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is closehauled (see <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Ship</er>); also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The part of a sail to which the tack is usually fastened; the foremost lower corner of fore-and-aft sails, as of schooners (see <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Sail</er>).</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>The direction of a vessel in regard to the trim of her sails; <as>as, the starboard <ex>tack</ex>, or port <ex>tack</ex></as>; -- the former when she is closehauled with the wind on her starboard side; hence, the run of a vessel on one tack; also, a change of direction; <as>as, to take a different <ex>tack</ex>; -- often used metaphorically</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Scots Law)</fld> <def>A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Confidence; reliance.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tack of a flag</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a line spliced into the eye at the foot of the hoist for securing the flag to the halyards.</cd> -- <col><b>Tack pins</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>belaying pins; -- also called <altname>jack pins</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>To haul the tacks aboard</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to set the courses.</cd> -- <col><b>To hold tack</b></col>, <cd>to last or hold out.</cd> <au>Milton.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tacked</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tacking</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. OD. <ets>tacken</ets> to touch, take, seize, fix, akin to E. <ets>take</ets>. See <er>Tack</er> a small nail.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To fasten or attach.</def> \'bdIn hopes of getting some commendam <xex>tacked</xex> to their sees.\'b8 <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>And <qex>tacks</qex> the center to the sphere.</q> <rj><qau>Herbert.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Especially, to attach or secure in a slight or hasty manner, as by stitching or nailing; <as>as, to <ex>tack</ex> together the sheets of a book; to <ex>tack</ex> one piece of cloth to another; to <ex>tack</ex> on a board or shingle; to <ex>tack</ex> one piece of metal to another by drops of solder.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>In parliamentary usage, to add (a supplement) to a bill; to append; -- often with <xex>on</xex> or <xex>to</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>tack</ex> on a non-germane appropriation to a bill</as>.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To change the direction of (a vessel) when sailing closehauled, by putting the helm alee and shifting the tacks and sails so that she will proceed to windward nearly at right angles to her former course.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ In tacking, a vessel is brought to point at first directly to windward, and then so that the wind will blow against the other side.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To change the direction of a vessel by shifting the position of the helm and sails; also (as said of a vessel), to have her direction changed through the shifting of the helm and sails. See <er>Tack</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 4.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Monk, . . . when he wanted his ship to <qex>tack</qex> to larboard, moved the mirth of his crew by calling out, \'bdWheel to the left.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tacks.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"et</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Dim. of <ets>tack</ets> a small nail.]</ety> <def>A small, broad-headed nail.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"ey</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tacky</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A union of securities given at different times, all of which must be redeemed before an intermediate purchaser can interpose his claim.</def> <rj><au>Bouvier.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ The doctrine of <xex>tacking</xex> is not recognized in American law.</note> <rj><au>Kent.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"kle</hw> <pr>(?; sometimes improperly pronounced ?, especially by seamen)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>takel</ets>, akin to LG. & D. <ets>takel</ets>, Dan. <ets>takkel</ets>, Sw. <ets>tackel</ets>; perhaps akin to E. <ets>taw</ets>, v. t., or to <ets>take</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Apparatus for raising or lowering heavy weights, consisting of a rope and pulley blocks; sometimes, the rope and attachments, as distinct from the block, in which case the full appratus is referred to as a <altname>block and tackle</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Any instruments of action; an apparatus by which an object is moved or operated; gear; <as>as, fishing <ex>tackle</ex>, hunting <ex>tackle</ex></as>; formerly, specifically, weapons.</def> \'bdShe to her <xex>tackle</xex> fell.\'b8 <rj><au>Hudibras.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ In Chaucer, it denotes usually an arrow or arrows.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>The rigging and apparatus of a ship; also, any purchase where more than one block is used.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Fall and tackle</b></col>. <cd>See the Note under <er>Pulley</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Fishing tackle</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Fishing</er>, <pos>a.</pos></cd> -- <col><b>Ground tackle</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>anchors, cables, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Gun tackle</b></col>, <cd>the apparatus or appliances for hauling cannon in or out.</cd> -- <col><b>Tackle fall</b></col>, <cd>the rope, or rather the end of the rope, of a tackle, to which the power is applied.</cd> -- <col><b>Tack tackle</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a small tackle to pull down the tacks of the principal sails.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Tackle board</b></col>, <col><b>Tackle post</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Ropemaking)</fld>, <cd>a board, frame, or post, at the end of a ropewalk, for supporting the spindels, or whirls, for twisting the yarns.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>tac"kle</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Football)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An act of tackling{4}; <as>as, brought down by a <ex>tackle</ex> by a lineman</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Football)</fld> <def>One of two linemen on a football team, occupying a position between the guard and an end; also, the position played by such a tackle.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"kle</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tackled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tackling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. LG. <ets>takeln</ets> to equip. See <er>Tackle</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To supply with tackle.</def> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To fasten or attach, as with a tackle; to harness; <as>as, to <ex>tackle</ex> a horse into a coach or wagon</as>.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To seize; to lay hold of; to grapple; <as>as, a wrestler <ex>tackles</ex> his antagonist; a dog <ex>tackles</ex> the game.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The greatest poetess of our day has wasted her time and strength in <qex>tackling</qex> windmills under conditions the most fitted to insure her defeat.</q> <rj><qau>Dublin Univ. Mag.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Football)</fld> <def>To cause the ball carrier to fall to the ground, thus ending the forward motion of the ball and the play.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To begin to deal with; <as>as, to <ex>tackle</ex> the problem</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"kled</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Made of ropes tacked together.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>My man shall be with thee,<br/
-And bring thee cords made like a <qex>tackled</qex> stair.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"kling</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Furniture of the masts and yards of a vessel, as cordage, sails, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Instruments of action; <as>as, fishing <ex>tackling</ex></as>.</def> <rj><au>Walton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The straps and fixures adjusted to an animal, by which he draws a carriage, or the like; harness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tacks"man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tacksmen</plw> <pr>(?)</pr>.</plu> <fld>(Scots Law)</fld> <def>One who holds a tack or lease from another; a tenant, or lessee.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The <qex>tacksmen</qex>, who formed what may be called the \'bdpeerage\'b8 of the little community, must be the captains.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Techy</er>, <er>Tack</er> a spot.]</ety> <def>Sticky; adhesive; raw; -- said of paint, varnish, etc., when not well dried.</def> <mark>[U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tack"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncert.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Dowdy, shabby, or neglected in appearance; unkempt.</def> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In poor taste; appearing cheap; gaudy; unstylish. Broadly used to describe objects whose style is disapproved of by the speaker.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Tactless; in poor taste; -- used to describe behavior.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tack"y</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tackey</asp>.]</altsp> <def>An ill-conditioned, ill-fed, or neglected horse; also, a person in a like condition.</def> <mark>[Southern U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*con"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>Designating, or pertaining to, the series of rocks forming the <etsep>Taconic</etsep> mountains in Western New England. They were once supposed to be older than the Cambrian, but later proved to belong to the Lower Silurian and Cambrian.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tact</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tactus</ets> a touching, touch, fr. <ets>tangere</ets>, <ets>tactum</ets>, to touch: cf. F. <ets>tact</ets>. See <er>Tangent</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The sense of touch; feeling.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Did you suppose that I could not make myself sensible to <qex>tact</qex> as well as sight?</q> <rj><qau>Southey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Now, sight is a very refined <qex>tact</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>J. Le Conte.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The stroke in beating time.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Sensitive mental touch; peculiar skill or faculty; nice perception or discernment; ready power of appreciating and doing what is required by circumstances.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>He had formed plans not inferior in grandeur and boldness to those of Richelieu, and had carried them into effect with a <qex>tact</qex> and wariness worthy of Mazarin.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>A <qex>tact</qex> which surpassed the <qex>tact</qex> of her sex as much as the <qex>tact</qex> of her sex surpassed the <qex>tact</qex> of ours.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"ta*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being touched; tangible.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdThey [women] being created to be both tractable and <xex>tactable</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Massinger.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tact"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of tact; characterized by a discerning sense of what is right, proper, or judicious.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tac"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tac"tic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>taktiko`s</grk>. See <er>tactics</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to military or naval tactics; hence, pertaining to, or characterized by, planning or maneuvering for the short term; -- contrasted with <contr>strategic</contr>, planning for the long term.</def><br/ -- <wordforms><wf>Tac"tic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tactics</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac*ti"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tacticien</ets>.]</ety> <def>One versed in tactics; hence, a skillful maneuverer; an adroit manager.</def>
-<-- as, a skilled parliamentary tactician. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"tics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>taktika`</grk> pl., and <grk>taktikh`</grk> (sc. <grk>te`chnh</grk>, sing., fr. <grk>taktiko`s</grk> fit for ordering or arranging, fr. <grk>ta`ssein</grk>, <grk>ta`ttein</grk>, to put in order, to arrange: cf. F. <ets>tactique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The science and art of disposing military and naval forces in order for battle, and performing military and naval evolutions. It is divided into <xex>grand tactics</xex>, or the tactics of battles, and <xex>elementary tactics</xex>, or the tactics of instruction.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, any system or method of procedure.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"tile</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tactilis</ets>, fr. <ets>tangere</ets>, <ets>tactum</ets>, to touch: cf. F. <ets>tactile</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the organs, or the sense, of touch; perceiving, or perceptible, by the touch; capable of being touched; <as>as, <ex>tactile</ex> corpuscles; <ex>tactile</ex> sensations.</as></def> \'bd<xex>Tactile</xex> sweets.\'b8 <au>Beaumont.</au> \'bd<xex>Tactile</xex> qualities.\'b8 <au>Sir M. Hale.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tactile</b></col><cd> sense <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, the sense of touch, or pressure sense. See <er>Touch</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The delicacy of the <qex>tactile</qex> sense varies on different parts of the skin; it is geatest on the forehead, temples and back of the forearm.</q> <rj><qau>H. N. Martin.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac*til"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tactilit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>The quality or state of being tactile; perceptibility by touch; tangibleness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tac"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tactio</ets>, from <ets>tangere</ets>, <ets>tactum</ets>, to touch.]</ety> <def>The act of touching; touch; contact; tangency.</def> \'bdExternal <xex>taction</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Chesterfield.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tact"less</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Destitute of tact.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tac"tu*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tact</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the sense, or the organs, of touch; derived from touch.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>In the lowest organisms we have a kind of <qex>tactual</qex> sense diffused over the entire body.</q> <rj><qau>Tyndall.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tad"pole`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tadde</ets> toad (AS. <ets>t\'bedie</ets>, <ets>t\'bedige</ets>) + <ets>poll</ets>; properly, a toad that is or seems all head. See <er>Toad</er>, and <er>Poll</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The young aquatic larva of any amphibian. In this stage it breathes by means of external or internal gills, is at first destitute of legs, and has a finlike tail. Called also <altname>polliwig</altname>, <altname>polliwog</altname>, <altname>porwiggle</altname>, or <altname>purwiggy</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The hooded merganser.</def> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tadpole fish</b></col>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Forkbeard</er> <sd>(a)</sd>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91"di*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L.]</ety> <def>See <er>Tedium</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tael</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Malay <ets>ta<icr/l</ets>, a certain weight, probably fr. Hind. <ets>tola</ets>, Skr. <ets>tul\'be</ets> a balance, weight, <ets>tul</ets> to weigh.]</ety> <def>A denomination of money, in China, worth nearly six shillings sterling, or about a dollar and forty cents; also, a weight of one ounce and a third.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tale</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Taen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Ta'en</hw> }</mhw>, <def><pos>p. p.</pos> of <er>Ta</er>, to take, or a contraction of <er>Taken</er>.</def> <mark>[Poetic & Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Burns.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91"ni*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>T\'91ni\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a ribbon, a tapeworm.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of intestinal worms which includes the common tapeworms of man. See <er>Tapeworm</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A band; a structural line; -- applied to several bands and lines of nervous matter in the brain.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>The fillet, or band, at the bottom of a Doric frieze, separating it from the architrave.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>T\'91"ni*a*cide`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> Also <hw>Te"ni*a*cide`</hw> }</mhw>. <ety>[<ets>T\'91nia</ets> + <ets>-cide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A remedy to destroy tapeworms.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91*ni"a*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>T\'91nioidea</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>T\'91"ni*a*fuge`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> Also <hw>Te"ni*a*fuge`</hw> }</mhw>. <ety>[<ets>T\'91nia</ets> + L. <ets>fugare</ets> to drive away.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A remedy to expel tapeworms.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>T\'91*ni"a*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> Also \'d8<hw>Te*ni"a*sis</hw> }</mhw>. <ety>[NL. See <er>T\'91nia</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Ill health due to t\'91nia, or tapeworms.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91`ni*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>taenia</ets> a ribbon.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of Ctenophora including those which have a long, ribbonlike body. The Venus's girdle is the most familiar example.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91*nid"i*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>T\'91nidia</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., dim. fr. L. <ets>taenia</ets> a ribbon.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The chitinous fiber forming the spiral thread of the trache\'91 of insects. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Trachea</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91`ni*o*glos"sa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>taini`a</grk> a ribbon + <grk>glw^ssa</grk> a tongue.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An extensive division of gastropod mollusks in which the odontophore is long and narrow, and usually bears seven rows of teeth. It includes a large number of families both marine and fresh-water.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>T\'91`ni*o*glos"sate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the T\'91nioglossa.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>T\'91"ni*oid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>T\'91nia</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Ribbonlike; shaped like a ribbon.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Like or pertaining to T\'91nia.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91`ni*oi"de*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The division of cestode worms which comprises the tapeworms. See <er>Tapeworm</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91*ni"o*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>T\'91niol\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., dim. of <ets>taenia</ets> a ribbon.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the radial partitions which separate the internal cavities of certain medus\'91.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>T\'91`ni*o*so"mi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>taini`a</grk> ribbon + <grk>sw^ma</grk> body.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of fishes remarkable for their long and compressed form. The ribbon fishes are examples. See <cref>Ribbon fish</cref>, under <er>Ribbon</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Taf"fer*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>See <er>Taffrail</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Taf"fe*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Taf"fe*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>taffetas</ets>, It. <ets>taffet\'85</ets>, from Per. <ets>t\'beftah</ets>, originally, twisted, woven, from <ets>t\'beftan</ets> to twist, to spin.]</ety> <def>A fine, smooth stuff of silk, having usually the wavy luster called <xex>watering</xex>. The term has also been applied to different kinds of silk goods, from the 16th century to modern times.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Lined with <qex>taffeta</qex> and with sendal.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taff"rail</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[D. <ets>tafereel</ets> a panel, picture, fr. <ets>tafel</ets> table, fr. L. <ets>tabula</ets>. See <er>Table</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>The upper part of a ship's stern, which is flat like a table on the top, and sometimes ornamented with carved work; the rail around a ship's stern.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tafferel</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taf"fy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prov. E. <ets>taffy</ets> toffy.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of candy made of molasses or brown sugar boiled down and poured out in shallow pans.</def> <altsp>[Written also, in England, <asp>toffy</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Flattery; soft phrases.</def> <mark>[Slang]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taf"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. & Sp. <ets>tafia</ets>, It. <ets>taffia</ets>; fr. Malay <ets>t\'bef\'c6a</ets> a spirit distilled from molasses. Cf. <er>Ratafia</er>.]</ety> <def>A variety of rum.</def> <mark>[West Indies]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tag</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Probably akin to <ets>tack</ets> a small nail; cf. Sw. <ets>tagg</ets> a prickle, point, tooth.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Any slight appendage, as to an article of dress; something slight hanging loosely; specifically, a direction card, or label.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A metallic binding, tube, or point, at the end of a string, or lace, to stiffen it.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The end, or catchword, of an actor's speech; cue.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Something mean and paltry; the rabble.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tag and rag</b></col>, <cd>the lowest sort; the rabble.</cd> <au>Holinshed.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A sheep of the first year.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tagged</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tagging</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To fit with, or as with, a tag or tags.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He learned to make long-<qex>tagged</qex> thread laces.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>His courteous host . . . <br/
-<qex>Tags</qex> every sentence with some fawning word.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To join; to fasten; to attach.</def> <rj><au>Bolingbroke.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To follow closely after; esp., to follow and touch in the game of tag. See <er>Tag</er>, a play.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To follow closely, as it were an appendage; -- often with <xex>after</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>tag</ex> after a person</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Tag</er>, <pos>v.</pos>; cf. <er>Tag</er>, an end.]</ety> <def>A child's play in which one runs after and touches another, and then runs away to avoid being touched.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*gal"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One of a Malayan race, mainly of central Luzon, next to the Visayans the most numerous of the native peoples of the Philippines. Nearly all are Christians and many are highly educated.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The language of the Tagals; Tagalog.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*ga"log</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>Any member of a certain tribe which is one of the leading and most civilized of those native of the Philippine Islands.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The language of the Tagalogs. It belongs to the Malay family of languages and is one of the most highly developed members of the family.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"belt`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Far.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tagsore</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag day</hw>. <def>A day on which contributions to some public or private charity or fund are solicited promiscuously on the street, and tags given to contributors to wear as an evidence of their having contributed. Such solicitation is now subject to legal restriction in various places.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who, or that which, appends or joins one thing to another.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is pointed like a tag.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Hedgehogs' or procupines' small <qex>taggers</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Cotton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>Sheets of tin or other plate which run below the gauge.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A device for removing taglocks from sheep.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- [Colloq.] One who spray-paints a distinctive logo on a wall or other property not his own. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A little tag.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tagl"ia</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., a cutting, a pulley, from <ets>tagliare</ets> to cut. See <er>Tailor</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A peculiar combination of pulleys.</def> <rj><au>Brande & C.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tagl`ia*co"tain</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to <xex>Tagliacozzi</xex>, a Venetian surgeon; <as>as, the <ex>Tagliacotian</ex> operation, a method of rhinoplasty described by him</as>.</def> <altsp>[Also <asp>Taliacotian</asp>, and <asp>Tagliacozzian</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tagl*io"ni</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of outer coat, or overcoat; -- said to be so named after a celebrated Italian family of professional dancers.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He ought certainly to exchange his <qex>taglioni</qex>, or comfortable greatcoat, for a cuirass of steel.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"lock`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An entangled lock, as of hair or wool.</def> <rj><au>Nares.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"ni*cate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The white-lipped peccary.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"-rag`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tag</er> an end, and <er>Rag</er>.]</ety> <def>The lowest class of people; the rabble. Cf. <cref>Rag, tag, and bobtail</cref>, under <er>Bobtail</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>If the <qex>tag-rag</qex> people did not clap him and hiss him, I am no true man.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag sale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the price <ets>tag</ets> usually attached to each item.]</ety> <def>A sale of usually used items (such as furniture, clothing, household items or bric-a-brac), conducted by one or a small group of individuals, at a location which is not a normal retail establishment.</def> <note>Frequently it is held in the private home or in a yard attached to a private home belonging to the seller. Similar to a <cref>yard sale</cref> or <cref>garage sale</cref>. Compare <contr>flea market</contr>, where used items are sold by many individuals in a place rented for the purpose.</note><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"sore`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Far.)</fld> <def>Adhesion of the tail of a sheep to the wool from excoriation produced by contact with the feces; -- called also <altname>tagbelt</altname>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tag"tail`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A worm which has its tail conspicuously colored.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person who attaches himself to another against the will of the latter; a hanger-on.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tag"u*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name in the East Indies.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large flying squirrel (<spn>Pteromys petuarista</spn>). Its body becomes two feet long, with a large bushy tail nearly as long.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1469 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta`gui*ca"ti</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The white-lipped peccary.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ha</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The African rufous-necked weaver bird (<spn>Hyphantornis texor</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*ha"leb</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A fox (<spn>Vulpes Niloticus</spn>) of Northern Africa.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*hi"ti*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Tahiti, an island in the Pacific Ocean.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native inhabitant of Tahiti.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tahr</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Thar</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai</hw> <pr>(t<aum/"<esl/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Designating, or pertaining to, the chief linguistic stock of Indo-China, including the peoples of Siamese and Shan speech. It includes the Thai language.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A member of one of the tribes of the Tai stock.</def></p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>Tais</qex> first appeared in history in Yunnan, and from thence they migrated into Upper Burma. The earliest swarms appear to have entered that tract about two thousand years ago, and were small in number.</q> <rj><qau>Census of India, 1901.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tail</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>taille</ets> a cutting. See <er>Entail</er>, <er>Tally</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Limitation; abridgment.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Estate in tail</b></col>, <cd>a limited, abridged, or reduced fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded; -- called also <altname>estate tail</altname>.</cd> <au>Blackstone.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tail</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>Limited; abridged; reduced; curtailed; <as>as, estate <ex>tail</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>t\'91gel</ets>, <ets>t\'91gl</ets>; akin to G. <ets>zagel</ets>, Icel. <ets>tagl</ets>, Sw. <ets>tagel</ets>, Goth. <ets>tagl</ets> hair. \'fb59.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The terminal, and usually flexible, posterior appendage of an animal.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The tail of mammals and reptiles contains a series of movable vertebr\'91, and is covered with flesh and hairs or scales like those of other parts of the body. The tail of existing birds consists of several more or less consolidated vertebr\'91 which supports a fanlike group of quills to which the term <xex>tail</xex> is more particularly applied. The tail of fishes consists of the tapering hind portion of the body ending in a caudal fin. The term <xex>tail</xex> is sometimes applied to the entire abdomen of a crustacean or insect, and sometimes to the terminal piece or pygidium alone.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Any long, flexible terminal appendage; whatever resembles, in shape or position, the tail of an animal, as a catkin.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Doretus writes a great praise of the distilled waters of those <qex>tails</qex> that hang on willow trees.</q> <rj><qau>Harvey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Hence, the back, last, lower, or inferior part of anything, -- as opposed to the <ant>head</ant>, or the superior part.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The Lord will make thee the head, and not the <qex>tail</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Deut. xxviii. 13.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A train or company of attendants; a retinue.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>\'bdAh,\'b8 said he, \'bdif you saw but the chief with his <qex>tail</qex> on.\'b8</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>The side of a coin opposite to that which bears the head, effigy, or date; the reverse; -- rarely used except in the expression \'bdheads or tails,\'b8 employed when a coin is thrown up for the purpose of deciding some point by its fall.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The distal tendon of a muscle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A downy or feathery appendage to certain achenes. It is formed of the permanent elongated style.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A portion of an incision, at its beginning or end, which does not go through the whole thickness of the skin, and is more painful than a complete incision; -- called also <altname>tailing</altname>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>One of the strips at the end of a bandage formed by splitting the bandage one or more times.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>9.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A rope spliced to the strap of a block, by which it may be lashed to anything.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>10.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The part of a note which runs perpendicularly upward or downward from the head; the stem.</def> <rj><au>Moore (Encyc. of Music).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>11.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>Same as <er>Tailing</er>, 4.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>12.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>The bottom or lower portion of a member or part, as a slate or tile.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>13.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>See <er>Tailing</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 5.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>14.</sn> <fld>(Astronomy)</fld> <def>the long visible stream of gases, ions, or dust particles extending from the head of a comet in the direction opposite to the sun.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>15.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Rope Making)</fld> <def>In some forms of rope-laying machine, pieces of rope attached to the iron bar passing through the grooven wooden top containing the strands, for wrapping around the rope to be laid.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>16.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>A tailed coat; a tail coat.</def> <mark>[Colloq. or Dial.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>17.</sn> <fld>(A\'89ronautics)</fld> <def>In airplanes, an airfoil or group of airfoils used at the rear to confer stability.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>18.</sn> <def>the buttocks.</def> <mark>[slang or vulgar]</mark><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>19.</sn> <def>sexual intercourse, or a woman used for sexual intercourse; <as>as, to get some <ex>tail</ex>; to find a piece of <ex>tail</ex></as>. See also <er>tailing{3}</er>.</def> <mark>[slang and vulgar]</mark><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tail beam</b></col>. <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <cd>Same as <er>Tailpiece</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail coverts</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the feathers which cover the bases of the tail quills. They are sometimes much longer than the quills, and form elegant plumes. Those above the quills are called the <stype>upper tail coverts</stype>, and those below, the <stype>under tail coverts</stype>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail end</b></col>, <cd>the latter end; the termination; <as>as, the <ex>tail end</ex> of a contest</as>.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> -- <col><b>Tail joist</b></col>. <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <cd>Same as <er>Tailpiece</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail of a comet</b></col> <fld>(Astron.)</fld>, <cd>a luminous train extending from the nucleus or body, often to a great distance, and usually in a direction opposite to the sun.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail of a gale</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>the latter part of it, when the wind has greatly abated.</cd> <au>Totten.</au> -- <col><b>Tail of a lock</b></col> (on a canal), <cd>the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail of the trenches</b></col> <fld>(Fort.)</fld>, <cd>the post where the besiegers begin to break ground, and cover themselves from the fire of the place, in advancing the lines of approach.</cd> -- <col><b>Tail spindle</b></col>, <cd>the spindle of the tailstock of a turning lathe; -- called also <altname>dead spindle</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>To turn tail</b></col>, <cd>to run away; to flee.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Would she <qex>turn tail</qex> to the heron, and fly quite out another way; but all was to return in a higher pitch.</q> <rj><qau>Sir P. Sidney.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To follow or hang to, like a tail; to be attached closely to, as that which can not be evaded.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Nevertheless his bond of two thousand pounds, wherewith he was <qex>tailed</qex>, continued uncanceled, and was called on the next Parliament.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To pull or draw by the tail.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Hudibras.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>To tail in</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To tail on</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Arch.)</fld>, <cd>to fasten by one of the ends into a wall or some other support; <as>as, <ex>to tail in</ex> a timber</as>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>To hold by the end; -- said of a timber when it rests upon a wall or other support; -- with <xex>in</xex> or <xex>into</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To swing with the stern in a certain direction; -- said of a vessel at anchor; <as>as, this vessel <ex>tails</ex> down stream</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tail on</b></col>. <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <cd>See <cref>Tally on</cref>, under <er>Tally</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>See <er>Tallage</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"-bay`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>One of the joists which rest one end on the wall and the other on a girder; also, the space between a wall and the nearest girder of a floor. Cf. <er>Case-bay</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The part of a canal lock below the lower gates.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"block`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A block with a tail. See <er>Tail</er>, 9.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"board`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The board at the rear end of a cart or wagon, which can be removed or let down, for convenience in loading or unloading.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tailed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having a tail; having (such) a tail or (so many) tails; -- chiefly used in composition; <as>as, bob<ex>tailed</ex>, long<ex>tailed</ex>, etc.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Snouted and <qex>tailed</qex> like a boar.</q> <rj><qau>Grew.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>The part of a projecting stone or brick inserted in a wall.</def> <rj><au>Gwilt.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tail</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 8 <sd>(a)</sd>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Sexual intercourse.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>The lighter parts of grain separated from the seed threshing and winnowing; chaff.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>The refuse part of stamped ore, thrown behind the tail of the buddle or washing apparatus. It is dressed over again to secure whatever metal may exist in it. Called also <altname>tails</altname>.</def> <rj><au>Pryce.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>A prolongation of current in a telegraph line, due to capacity in the line and causing signals to run together.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taille</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tally</er>, <er>Tailor</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A tally; an account scored on a piece of wood.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Whether that he paid or took by <qex>taille</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(O. F. Law)</fld> <def>Any imposition levied by the king, or any other lord, upon his subjects.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>taille</qex>, as it still subsists in France, may serve as an example of those ancient tallages. It was a tax upon the profits of the farmer, which they estimate by the stock that he has upon the farm.</q> <rj><qau>A. Smith.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The French name for the tenor voice or part; also, for the tenor viol or viola.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"less</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having no tail.</def> <rj><au>H. Spencer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"lie</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Scots Law)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tailzie</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"lor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tailleor</ets>, F. <ets>tailleur</ets>, fr. OF. <ets>taillier</ets>, F. <ets>tailler</ets> to cut, fr. L. <ets>talea</ets> a rod, stick, a cutting, layer for planting. Cf. <er>Detail</er>, <er>Entail</er>, <er>Retail</er>, <er>Tally</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One whose occupation is to cut out and make men's garments; also, one who cuts out and makes ladies' outer garments.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Well said, good woman's <qex>tailor</qex> . . . I would thou wert a man's <qex>tailor</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The mattowacca; -- called also <altname>tailor herring</altname>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The silversides.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The goldfish.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Salt-water tailor</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the bluefish.</cd> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark> <au>Bartlett.</au> -- <col><b>Tailor bird</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>any one of numerous species of small Asiatic and East Indian singing birds belonging to <gen>Orthotomus</gen>, <gen>Prinia</gen>, and allied genera. They are noted for the skill with which they sew leaves together to form nests. The common Indian species are <spn>Orthotomus longicauda</spn>, which has the back, scapulars, and upper tail coverts yellowish green, and the under parts white; and the golden-headed tailor bird (<spn>Orthotomus coronatus</spn>), which has the top of the head golden yellow and the back and wings pale olive-green.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"lor</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tailored</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tailoring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To practice making men's clothes; to follow the business of a tailor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>These <qex>tailoring</qex> artists for our lays<br/
-Invent cramped rules.</q> <rj><qau>M. Green.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"lor*ess</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A female tailor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"lor*ing</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>The business or the work of a tailor or a tailoress.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"lor-made`</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Made by a tailor or according to a tailor's fashion; -- said specif. of women's garments made with certain closeness of fit, simplicity of ornament, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>made or as if made specifically for the particular purpose at hand; -- used metaphorically.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"piece`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A piece at the end; an appendage.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>One of the timbers which tail into a header, in floor framing. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Header</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>An ornament placed at the bottom of a short page to fill up the space, or at the end of a book.</def> <rj><au>Savage.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A piece of ebony or other material attached to the lower end of a violin or similar instrument, to which the strings are fastened.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Locks)</fld> <def>A piece for transmitting motion from the hub of a lock to the latch bolt.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>The part of a telescope containing the adjusting device for the eyepiece, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"pin"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>The center in the spindle of a turning lathe.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"race`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>See <er>Race</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 6.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mining)</fld> <def>The channel in which tailings, suspended in water, are conducted away.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"stock`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The sliding block or support, in a lathe, which carries the dead spindle, or adjustable center. The <contr>headstock</contr> supports the live spindle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"-wa`ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Water in a tailrace.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tail"zie</hw> <pr>(-z<icr/ <or/ -y<icr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tailler</ets> to cut. See <er>Tail</er> a limitation.]</ety> <fld>(Scots Law)</fld> <def>An entailment or deed whereby the legal course of succession is cut off, and an arbitrary one substituted.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tailzee</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tain</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tein</ets>, <ets>teyne</ets>; cf. Icel. <ets>teinn</ets> a twig, akin to AS. <ets>t\'ben</ets>, Goth. <ets>tains</ets>.]</ety> <def>Thin tin plate; also, tin foil for mirrors.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>atteinte</ets> a blow, bit, stroke. See <er>Attaint</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A thrust with a lance, which fails of its intended effect.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>This <qex>taint</qex> he followed with his sword drawn from a silver sheath.</q> <rj><qau>Chapman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An injury done to a lance in an encounter, without its being broken; also, a breaking of a lance in an encounter in a dishonorable or unscientific manner.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tainted</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tainting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To thrust ineffectually with a lance.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To injure, as a lance, without breaking it; also, to break, as a lance, but usually in an unknightly or unscientific manner.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Do not fear; I have<br/
-A staff to <qex>taint</qex>, and bravely.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To hit or touch lightly, in tilting.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They <qex>tainted</qex> each other on the helms and passed by.</q> <rj><qau>Ld. Berners.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>teint</ets>, p. p. of <ets>teindre</ets> to dye, tinge, fr. L. <ets>tingere</ets>, <ets>tinctum</ets>. See <er>Tinge</er>, and cf. <er>Tint</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To imbue or impregnate with something extraneous, especially with something odious, noxious, or poisonous; hence, to corrupt; to infect; to poison; <as>as, putrid substance <ex>taint</ex> the air</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fig.: To stain; to sully; to tarnish.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>His unkindness may defeat my life,<br/
-But never <qex>taint</qex> my love.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To contaminate; defile; pollute; corrupt; infect; disease; vitiate; poison.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To be infected or corrupted; to be touched with something corrupting.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I can not <qex>taint</qex> with fear.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To be affected with incipient putrefaction; <as>as, meat soon <ex>taints</ex> in warm weather</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Tincture; hue; color; tinge.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Infection; corruption; deprivation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He had inherited from his parents a scrofulous <qex>taint</qex>, which it was beyond the power of medicine to remove.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A blemish on reputation; stain; spot; disgrace.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>Aphetic form of <er>Attaint</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Free from taint or infection; pure.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint"less*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a taintless manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tain"ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>teinture</ets>. See <er>Taint</er> to stain, and cf. <er>Tincture</er>.]</ety> <def>Taint; tinge; difilement; stain; spot.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taint"worm`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A destructive parasitic worm or insect larva.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tai"ping"</hw>, <it>or</it> <hw>Tae"ping"</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Chin. <ets>t'aip'ing</ets> great peace.]</ety> <fld>(Chinese Hist.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to or designating a dynasty with which one Hung-Siu-Chuen, a half-religious, half-political enthusiast, attempted to supplant the Manchu dynasty by the <col><b>Taiping rebellion</b></col>, incited by him in 1850 and suppressed by General Gordon about 1864.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tai"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tayra</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tairn</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tarn</er>.</def> <rj><au>Coleridge.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tait</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small nocturnal and arboreal Australian marsupial (<spn>Tarsipes rostratus</spn>) about the size of a mouse. It has a long muzzle, a long tongue, and very few teeth, and feeds upon honey and insects. Called also <altname>noolbenger</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ta*ja\'87"u</hw>, <hw>Ta*jas"su</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pg. <ets>taja\'87\'a3</ets>, from Braz. <ets>taya\'87\'a3</ets> a hog or swine.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The common, or collared, peccary.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taj Ma*hal"</hw> <pr>(t<aum/j m<adot/*h<aum/l")</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[Corruption of Per. <ets>Mumt\'bez-i-Ma<hsdot/al</ets>, lit., the distinguished one of the palace, fr. Ar.]</ety> <def>A marble mausoleum built at <city>Agra</city>, <country>India</country>, by the Mogul Emperor <person>Shah Jahan</person>, in memory of his favorite wife. In beauty of design and rich decorative detail it is one of the best examples of Saracenic architecture, and specifically of Mogul architecture.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take</hw> <pr>(t<amac/k)</pr>, <mark>obs.</mark> <pos>p. p.</pos> <mord>of <er>Take</er></mord>. <def>Taken.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1470 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp.</pos> <conjf>Took</conjf> <pr>(t<oocr/k)</pr>; <pos>p. p.</pos> <conjf>Taken</conjf> <pr>(t<amac/k'n)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taking</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Icel. <ets>taka</ets>; akin to Sw. <ets>taga</ets>, Dan. <ets>tage</ets>, Goth. <ets>t\'c7kan</ets> to touch; of uncertain origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey.</def> <specif>Hence, specifically:</specif> --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> an army, a city, or a ship</as>; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>This man was <qex>taken</qex> of the Jews.</q> <rj><qau>Acts xxiii. 27.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Men in their loose, unguarded hours they <qex>take</qex>;<br/
-Not that themselves are wise, but others weak.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They that come abroad after these showers are commonly <qex>taken</qex> with sickness.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>There he blasts the tree and <qex>takes</qex> the cattle<br/
-And makes milch kine yield blood.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Neither let her <qex>take</qex> thee with her eyelids.</q> <rj><qau>Prov. vi. 25.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Cleombroutus was so <qex>taken</qex> with this prospect, that he had no patience.</q> <rj><qau>Wake.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, -- a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, -- which <qex>took</qex> me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions.</q> <rj><qau>Moore.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> the road to the right</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was <qex>taken</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>1 Sam. xiv. 42.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The violence of storming is the course which God is forced to <qex>take</qex> for the destroying . . . of sinners.</q> <rj><qau>Hammond.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; <as>as, it <ex>takes</ex> so much cloth to make a coat; it <ex>takes</ex> five hours to get to Boston from New York by car</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>This man always <qex>takes</qex> time . . . before he passes his judgments.</q> <rj><qau>I. Watts.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(e)</sd> <def>To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a picture of a person</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Beauty alone could beauty <qex>take</qex> so right.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(f)</sd> <def>To draw; to deduce; to derive.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The firm belief of a future judgment is the most forcible motive to a good life, because <qex>taken</qex> from this consideration of the most lasting happiness and misery.</q> <rj><qau>Tillotson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(g)</sd> <def>To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; -- used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a resolution; I <ex>take</ex> the liberty to say</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(h)</sd> <def>To lead; to conduct; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a child to church</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(i)</sd> <def>To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; <as>as, he <ex>took</ex> the book to the bindery; he <ex>took</ex> a dictionary with him</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>He <qex>took</qex> me certain gold, I wot it well.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(k)</sd> <def>To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; -- with <xex>from</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> the breath from one; to <ex>take</ex> two from four</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept.</def> <specif>Specifically:</specif> --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Ye shall <qex>take</qex> no satisfaction for the life of a murderer.</q> <rj><qau>Num. xxxv. 31.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Let not a widow be <qex>taken</qex> into the number under threescore.</q> <rj><qau>1 Tim. v. 10.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> food or wine</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a hedge or fence</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a joke; he will <ex>take</ex> an affront from no man</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sd>(e)</sd> <def>To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a thing for granted; this I <ex>take</ex> to be man's motive; to <ex>take</ex> men for spies</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>You <qex>take</qex> me right.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Charity, <qex>taken</qex> in its largest extent, is nothing else but the science love of God and our neighbor.</q> <rj><qau>Wake.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>[He] <qex>took</qex> that for virtue and affection which was nothing but vice in a disguise.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>You'd doubt his sex, and <qex>take</qex> him for a girl.</q> <rj><qau>Tate.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(f)</sd> <def>To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; -- used in general senses; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a form or shape</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I <qex>take</qex> thee at thy word.</q> <rj><qau>Rowe.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Yet thy moist clay is pliant to command; . . . <br/
-Not <qex>take</qex> the mold.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; <as>as, to <ex>take</ex> a group or a scene</as>.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To give or deliver (a blow to); to strike; hit; <as>as, he <ex>took</ex> me in the face; he <ex>took</ex> me a blow on the head.</as></def> <mark>[Obs. exc. Slang or Dial.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>To be taken aback</b></col>, <col><b>To take advantage of</b></col>, <col><b>To take air</b></col>, etc.</mcol> <cd>See under <er>Aback</er>, <er>Advantage</er>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>To take aim</b></col>, <cd>to direct the eye or weapon; to aim.</cd> -- <col><b>To take along</b></col>, <cd>to carry, lead, or convey.</cd> -- <col><b>To take arms</b></col>, <cd>to commence war or hostilities.</cd> -- <col><b>To take away</b></col>, <cd>to carry off; to remove; to cause deprivation of; to do away with; <as>as, a bill for <ex>taking away</ex> the votes of bishops</as>.</cd> \'bdBy your own law, I <xex>take</xex> your life <xex>away</xex>.\'b8 <au>Dryden.</au> -- <col><b>To take breath</b></col>, <cd>to stop, as from labor, in order to breathe or rest; to recruit or refresh one's self.</cd> -- <col><b>To take care</b></col>, <cd>to exercise care or vigilance; to be solicitous.</cd> \'bdDoth God <xex>take care</xex> for oxen?\'b8 <au>1 Cor. ix. 9.</au> -- <col><b>To take care of</b></col>, <cd>to have the charge or care of; to care for; to superintend or oversee.</cd> -- <col><b>To take down</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To reduce; to bring down, as from a high, or higher, place; <as>as, <ex>to take down</ex> a book</as>; hence, to bring lower; to depress; to abase or humble; <as>as, <ex>to take down</ex> pride, or the proud</as>.</cd> \'bdI never attempted to be impudent yet, that I was not <xex>taken down</xex>.\'b8 <au>Goldsmith.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To swallow; <as>as, <ex>to take down</ex> a potion</as>.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To pull down; to pull to pieces; <as>as, <ex>to take down</ex> a house or a scaffold</as>.</cd> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To record; to write down; <as>as, <ex>to take down</ex> a man's words at the time he utters them</as>.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To take effect</b></col>, <col><b>To take fire</b></col></mcol>. <cd>See under <er>Effect</er>, and <er>Fire</er>.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To take ground to the right</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>To take ground to the left</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Mil.)</fld>, <cd>to extend the line to the right or left; to move, as troops, to the right or left.</cd> -- <col><b>To take heart</b></col>, <cd>to gain confidence or courage; to be encouraged.</cd> -- <col><b>To take heed</b></col>, <cd>to be careful or cautious.</cd> \'bd<xex>Take heed</xex> what doom against yourself you give.\'b8 <au>Dryden.</au> -- <col><b>To take heed to</b></col>, <cd>to attend with care, <as>as, <ex>take heed to</ex> thy ways</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take hold of</b></col>, <cd>to seize; to fix on.</cd> -- <col><b>To take horse</b></col>, <cd>to mount and ride a horse.</cd> -- <col><b>To take in</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To inclose; to fence.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To encompass or embrace; to comprise; to comprehend.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To draw into a smaller compass; to contract; to brail or furl; <as>as, <ex>to take in</ex> sail</as>.</cd> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To cheat; to circumvent; to gull; to deceive.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <sd>(e)</sd> <cd>To admit; to receive; <as>as, a leaky vessel will <ex>take in</ex> water</as>.</cd> <sd>(f)</sd> <cd>To win by conquest.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>For now Troy's broad-wayed town<br/
-He shall <qex>take in</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chapman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(g)</sd> <cd>To receive into the mind or understanding.</cd> \'bdSome bright genius can <xex>take in</xex> a long train of propositions.\'b8 <au>I. Watts.</au> <sd>(h)</sd> <cd>To receive regularly, as a periodical work or newspaper; to take.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> -- <col><b>To take in hand</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Hand</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take in vain</b></col>, <cd>to employ or utter as in an oath.</cd> \'bdThou shalt not <xex>take</xex> the name of the Lord thy God <xex>in vain</xex>.\'b8 <au>Ex. xx. 7.</au> -- <col><b>To take issue</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Issue</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take leave</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Leave</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 2.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>To take a newspaper</b></col>, <col><b>magazine</b></col>, or the like</mcol>, <cd>to receive it regularly, as on paying the price of subscription.</cd> -- <col><b>To take notice</b></col>, <cd>to observe, or to observe with particular attention.</cd> -- <col><b>To take notice of</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Notice</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take oath</b></col>, <cd>to swear with solemnity, or in a judicial manner.</cd> -- <col><b>To take on</b></col>, <cd>to assume; to take upon one's self; <as>as, <ex>to take on</ex> a character or responsibility</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take one's own course</b></col>, <cd>to act one's pleasure; to pursue the measures of one's own choice.</cd> -- <col><b>To take order for</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Order</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take order with</b></col>, <cd>to check; to hinder; to repress.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Bacon.</au> -- <col><b>To take orders</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To receive directions or commands.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Eccl.)</fld> <cd>To enter some grade of the ministry. See <er>Order</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 10.</cd> -- <col><b>To take out</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To remove from within a place; to separate; to deduct.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To draw out; to remove; to clear or cleanse from; <as>as, <ex>to take out</ex> a stain or spot from cloth</as>.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To produce for one's self; <as>as, <ex>to take out</ex> a patent</as>.</cd> <-- "produce"?? better, "obtain" --> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To put an end to; <as>as, <ex>to take</ex> the conceit <ex>out</ex> of a man</as>.</cd> <sd>(e)</sd> <cd>To escort; <as>as, <ex>to take out</ex> to dinner</as>.</cd><-- usu. paying the expenses --> -- <col><b>To take over</b></col>, <cd>to undertake; to take the management of.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> <au>Cross (Life of G. Eliot).</au> -- <col><b>To take part</b></col>, <cd>to share; <as>as, they <ex>take part</ex> in our rejoicing</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take part with</b></col>, <cd>to unite with; to join with.</cd><-- take part in = participate in --> -- <mcol><col><b>To take place</b></col>, <col><b>root</b></col>, <col><b>sides</b></col>, <col><b>stock</b></col>, etc.</mcol> <cd>See under <er>Place</er>, <er>Root</er>, <er>Side</er>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>To take the air</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Falconry)</fld> <cd>To seek to escape by trying to rise higher than the falcon; -- said of a bird.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>See under <er>Air</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take the field</b></col>. <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Field</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take thought</b></col>, <cd>to be concerned or anxious; to be solicitous.</cd> <au>Matt. vi. 25, 27.</au> -- <col><b>To take to heart</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Heart</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take to task</b></col>, <cd>to reprove; to censure.</cd> -- <-- <col><b>to take to the air</b></col>, <cd>to take off.</cd> --> <col><b>To take up</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To lift; to raise.</cd> <au>Hood.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To buy or borrow; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> goods to a large amount; <ex>to take up</ex> money at the bank</as>.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To begin; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> a lamentation</as>.</cd> <au>Ezek. xix. 1.</au> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To gather together; to bind up; to fasten or to replace; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> raveled stitches</as></cd>; specifically <fld>(Surg.)</fld>, <cd>to fasten with a ligature.</cd> <sd>(e)</sd> <cd>To engross; to employ; to occupy or fill; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> the time; <ex>to take up</ex> a great deal of room</as>.</cd> <sd>(f)</sd> <cd>To take permanently.</cd> \'bdArnobius asserts that men of the finest parts . . . <xex>took up</xex> their rest in the Christian religion.\'b8 <au>Addison.</au> <sd>(g)</sd> <cd>To seize; to catch; to arrest; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> a thief; <ex>to take up</ex> vagabonds</as>.</cd> <sd>(h)</sd> <cd>To admit; to believe; to receive.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The ancients <qex>took up</qex> experiments upon credit.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sd>(i)</sd> <cd>To answer by reproof; to reprimand; to berate.</cd><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>One of his relations <qex>took</qex> him <qex>up</qex> roundly.</q> <rj><qau>L'Estrange.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sd>(k)</sd> <cd>To begin where another left off; to keep up in continuous succession; to take up (a topic, an activity).</cd><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Soon as the evening shades prevail,<br/
-The moon <qex>takes up</qex> the wondrous tale.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- The second volume takes up where the first left off. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(l)</sd> <cd>To assume; to adopt as one's own; to carry on or manage; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> the quarrels of our neighbors; <ex>to take up</ex> current opinions</as>.</cd> \'bdThey <xex>take up</xex> our old trade of conquering.\'b8 <au>Dryden.</au> <sd>(m)</sd> <cd>To comprise; to include.</cd> \'bdThe noble poem of Palemon and Arcite . . . <xex>takes up</xex> seven years.\'b8 <au>Dryden.</au> <sd>(n)</sd> <cd>To receive, accept, or adopt for the purpose of assisting; to espouse the cause of; to favor.</cd> <au>Ps. xxvii. 10.</au> <sd>(o)</sd> <cd>To collect; to exact, as a tax; to levy; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> a contribution</as>.</cd> \'bd<xex>Take up</xex> commodities upon our bills.\'b8 <au>Shak.</au> <sd>(p)</sd> <cd>To pay and receive; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> a note at the bank</as>.</cd> <sd>(q)</sd> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <cd>To remove, as by an adjustment of parts; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> lost motion, as in a bearing</as>; also, to make tight, as by winding, or drawing; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> slack thread in sewing</as>.</cd> <sd>(r)</sd> <cd>To make up; to compose; to settle; <as>as, <ex>to take up</ex> a quarrel</as>.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Shak.</au> -- (s) <cd>To accept from someone, as a wager or a challenge; <as>as, J. <ex>took</ex> M. <ex>up</ex> on his challenge</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take up arms</b></col>. <cd>Same as <cref>To take arms</cref>, above.</cd> -- <col><b>To take upon one's self</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To assume; to undertake; <as>as, he <ex>takes upon himself</ex> to assert that the fact is capable of proof</as>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To appropriate to one's self; to allow to be imputed to, or inflicted upon, one's self; <as>as, <ex>to take upon one's self</ex> a punishment</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take up the gauntlet</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Gauntlet</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; <as>as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not <ex>take</ex></as>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When flame <qex>taketh</qex> and openeth, it giveth a noise.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In impressions from mind to mind, the impression <qex>taketh</qex>, but is overcome . . . before it work any manifest effect.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To please; to gain reception; to succeed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake,<br/
-And hint he writ it, if the thing should <qex>take</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; -- usually with <xex>to</xex>; <as>as, the fox, being hard pressed, <ex>took</ex> to the hedge</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To admit of being pictured, as in a photograph; <as>as, his face does not <ex>take</ex> well</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To take after</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To learn to follow; to copy; to imitate; <as>as, he <ex>takes after</ex> a good pattern</as>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To resemble; <as>as, the son <ex>takes after</ex> his father</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To take in with</b></col>, <cd>to resort to.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Bacon.</au> -- <col><b>To take on</b></col>, <cd>to be violently affected; to express grief or pain in a violent manner.</cd> -- <col><b>To take to</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To apply one's self to; to be fond of; to become attached to; <as>as, <ex>to take to</ex> evil practices</as>.</cd> \'bdIf he does but <xex>take to</xex> you, . . . you will contract a great friendship with him.\'b8 <au>Walpole.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To resort to; to betake one's self to.</cd> \'bdMen of learning, who <xex>take to</xex> business, discharge it generally with greater honesty than men of the world.\'b8 <au>Addison.</au> -- <col><b>To take up</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To stop.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdSinners at last <xex>take up</xex> and settle in a contempt of religion.\'b8 <au>Tillotson.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To reform.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Locke.</au> -- <col><b>To take up with</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To be contended to receive; to receive without opposition; to put up with; <as>as, <ex>to take up with</ex> plain fare</as>.</cd> \'bdIn affairs which may have an extensive influence on our future happiness, we should not <xex>take up with</xex> probabilities.\'b8 <au>I. Watts.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To lodge with; to dwell with.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>L'Estrange.</au> -- <col><b>To take with</b></col>, <cd>to please.</cd> <au>Bacon.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That which is taken, such as the quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch, or the amouont of money collected during one event; <as>as, the box-office <ex>take</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take"-in`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Imposition; fraud.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tak"en</hw> <pr>(t<amac/k"'n)</pr>, <def><pos>p. p.</pos> of <er>Take</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw><hw>Take"off`</hw>, <hw>Take"-off`</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An imitation, especially in the way of caricature; -- used with <ptcl>of</ptcl> or <ptcl>on</ptcl>; <as>as, the comedian did a hilarious <ex>takeoff</ex> on the president</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The spot at which one takes off; specif., the place from which a jumper rises in leaping.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>take-off</qex> should be selected with great care, and a pit of large dimensions provided on the landing side.</q> <rj><qau>Encyc. of Sport.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The beginning of a leap from a surface or a flight into the air, especially the process or event of an airplane leaving the ground and beginning its flight; <as>as, the <ex>takeoff</ex> of flight CA123 was scheduled for 3:00 PM</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take" off`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>to begin a leap from a surface or a flight into the air; especially, (of a bird or an airplane) to leave the ground and begin to fly; <as>as, flight CA123 <ex>took off</ex> on schedule at 3:00 PM</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To begin a period of accelerating growth or development; <as>as, the economy <ex>took off</ex> in the third quarter</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To begin a journey; to depart.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take" off`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To remove, as from the surface or outside; to remove from the top of anything; <as>as, <ex>to take off</ex> a load; <ex>to take off</ex> one's hat, coat or other article of clothing; to <ex>take off</ex> a coat of paint from a surface</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To cut off; <as>as, <ex>to take off</ex> the head, or a limb</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To destroy; <as>as, <ex>to take off</ex> life</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To remove; to invalidate; <as>as, <ex>to take off</ex> the force of an argument</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To withdraw; to call or draw away.</def> <au>Locke.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>To swallow; <as>as, <ex>to take off</ex> a glass of wine</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>To purchase; to take in trade.</def> \'bdThe Spaniards having no commodities that we will <xex>take off</xex>.\'b8 <au>Locke.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <def>To copy; to reproduce.</def> \'bd<xex>Take off</xex> all their models in wood.\'b8 <au>Addison.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>9.</sn> <def>To imitate; to mimic; to personate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>10.</sn> <def>To find place for; to dispose of; <as>as, more scholars than preferments can <ex>take off</ex>.</as></def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <au>Bacon.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>11.</sn> <def>To discount or deduct (from a price); <as>the dealer <ex>took off</ex> twenty percent on remaining toys</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>take"o*ver</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Business, Finance)</fld> <def>The acquisition of ownership of one company by another company, usually by purchasing a controlling percentage of its stock or by exchanging stock of the purchasing company for that of the purchased company. It is a <stype>hostile takeover</stype> if the management of the company being taken over is opposed to the deal. A hostile takeover is sometimes organized by a <er>corporate raider</er>.</def><br/
-<syn><b>Syn. --</b> acquisition, buyout</syn><br/
-[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tak"er</hw> <pr>(t<amac/k"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who takes or receives; one who catches or apprehends.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>take` the heat"</hw> <pr>(t<amac/k`<th/<ucr/*h<emac/t")</pr>, <pos>phr.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To be assigned or to accept the blame for some misdeed; <as>as, Mary broke the vase, but she acted innocent and young Johnny had to <ex>take the heat</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To withstand high temperature; <as>as, the new radios can <ex>take the heat</ex> of a black car parked in the sun in Death Valley</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <specif>Hence:</specif> <def>To endure stressful conditions, expecially without signs of difficulty or complaint; <as>as, if you can't <ex>take the heat</ex>, stay out of the kitchen</as>,</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Take"-up`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>That which takes up or tightens; specifically, a device in a sewing machine for drawing up the slack thread as the needle rises, in completing a stitch.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tak"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Apt to take; alluring; attracting.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Subtile in making his temptations most <qex>taking</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Infectious; contageous.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Tak"ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tak"ing*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tak"ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of gaining possession; a seizing; seizure; apprehension.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Agitation; excitement; distress of mind.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>What a <qex>taking</qex> was he in, when your husband asked who was in the basket!</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Malign influence; infection.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tak"ing-off`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Removal; murder. See <cref>To take off</cref> <sd>(c)</sd>, under <er>Take</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The deep damnation of his <qex>taking-off</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Print.)</fld> <def>The removal of sheets from the press.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Act of presenting a take-off, or burlesque imitation.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"a*poin</hw> <pr>(t<acr/l"<adot/*poin)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small African monkey (<spn>Cercopithecus talapoin</spn> <it>or</it> <spn>Miopithecus talapoin</spn>) -- called also <altname>melarhine</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"a*poin</hw> <pr>(t<acr/l"<adot/*poin)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pg. <ets>talapoi</ets>, <ets>talapoin</ets>, name for Buddhist priest, fr. Siamese <ets>t<lsquo/ama p<lsquo/r<acr/</ets>; <ets>t<lsquo/ama</ets>, honorific title + <ets>p<lsquo/r<acr/</ets> priest.]</ety> <def>A Buddhist monk or priest.</def> <mark>[Ceylon & Indo-China]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta*la"ri*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., from <ets>talaris</ets> pertaining to the ankles, fr. <ets>talus</ets> ankle.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Myth.)</fld> <def>Small wings or winged shoes represented as fastened to the ankles, -- chiefly used as an attribute of Mercury.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"bot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A sort of dog, noted for quick scent and eager pursuit of game.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Wase (1654).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The figure of a dog is borne in the arms of the <xex>Talbot</xex> family, whence, perhaps, the name.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"bo*type</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Photog.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Calotype</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Talc</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>talc</ets>; cf. Sp. & It. <ets>talco</ets>, LL. <ets>talcus</ets>; all fr. Ar. <ets>talq</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A soft mineral of a soapy feel and a greenish, whitish, or grayish color, usually occurring in foliated masses. It is hydrous silicate of magnesia. <stype>Steatite</stype>, or <stype>soapstone</stype>, is a compact granular variety.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Indurated talc</b></col>, <cd>an impure, slaty talc, with a nearly compact texture, and greater hardness than common talc; -- called also <altname>talc slate</altname>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tal*cose"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Talc"ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>talqueux</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to talc; composed of, or resembling, talc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"cum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Talc</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tael</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>talu</ets> number, speech, narrative; akin to D. <ets>taal</ets> speech, language, G. <ets>zahl</ets> number, OHG. <ets>zala</ets>, Icel. <ets>tal</ets>, <ets>tala</ets>, number, speech, Sw. <ets>tal</ets>, Dan. <ets>tal</ets> number, <ets>tale</ets> speech, Goth. <ets>talzjan</ets> to instruct. Cf. <er>Tell</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, <er>Toll</er> a tax, also <er>Talk</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That which is told; an oral relation or recital; any rehearsal of what has occured; narrative; discourse; statement; history; story.</def> \'bdThe <xex>tale</xex> of Troy divine.\'b8 <au>Milton.</au> \'bdIn such manner rime is Dante's <xex>tale</xex>.\'b8 <au>Chaucer.</au><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>We spend our years as a <qex>tale</qex> that is told.</q> <rj><qau>Ps. xc. 9.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A number told or counted off; a reckoning by count; an enumeration; a count, in distinction from measure or weight; a number reckoned or stated.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The ignorant, . . . who measure by <qex>tale</qex>, and not by weight.</q> <rj><qau>Hooker.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And every shepherd tells his <qex>tale</qex>,<br/
-Under the hawthornn in the dale.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In packing, they keep a just <qex>tale</qex> of the number.</q> <rj><qau>Carew.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A count or declaration.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tell tale of</b></col>, <cd>to make account of.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Therefore little <qex>tale</qex> hath he <qex>told</qex><br/
-<qex>Of</qex> any dream, so holy was his heart.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Anecdote; story; fable; incident; memoir; relation; account; legend; narrative.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To tell stories.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer. Gower.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale"bear`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who officiously tells tales; one who impertinently or maliciously communicates intelligence, scandal, etc., and makes mischief.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Spies and <qex>talebearers</qex>, encouraged by her father, did their best to inflame her resentment.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale"bear`ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Telling tales officiously.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale"bear`ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of informing officiously; communication of sectrts, scandal, etc., maliciously.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"led</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Jewish Antiq.)</fld> <def>A kind of quadrangular piece of cloth put on by the Jews when repeating prayers in the synagogues.</def> <rj><au>Crabb.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tale"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of stories.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Thomson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal`e*gal"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of Australian birds which includes the brush turkey. See <er>Brush turkey</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ent</hw> <pr>(t<acr/l"<ecit/nt)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>talentum</ets> a talent (in sense 1), Gr. <grk>talanton</grk> a balance, anything weighed, a definite weight, a talent; akin to <grk>tlh^nai</grk> to bear, endure, <grk>tolna^n</grk>, L. <ets>tolerare</ets>, <ets>tollere</ets>, to lift up, sustain, endure. See <er>Thole</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, <er>Tolerate</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of money equal to 60 min\'91 or 6,000 drachm\'91. The Attic talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver money, its value was \'9c243 15s. sterling, or about $1,180.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Rowing vessel whose burden does not exceed five hundred <qex>talents</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Jowett (Thucid.).</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Among the Hebrews, a weight and denomination of money. For silver it was equivalent to 3,000 shekels, and in weight was equal to about 93<?/ lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver, it has been variously estimated at from \'9c340 to \'9c396 sterling, or about $1,645 to $1,916. For gold it was equal to 10,000 gold shekels.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Inclination; will; disposition; desire.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>They rather counseled you to your <qex>talent</qex> than to your profit.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (<au>Matt. xxv. 14-30</au>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>He is chiefly to be considered in his three different <qex>talents</qex>, as a critic, a satirist, and a writer of odes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>His <qex>talents</qex>, his accomplishments, his graceful manners, made him generally popular.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Ability; faculty; gift; endowment. See <er>Genius</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"ent*ed</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Furnished with talents; possessing skill or talent; mentally gifted.</def> <rj><au>Abp. Abbot (1663).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ This word has been strongly objected to by Coleridge and some other critics, but, as it would seem, upon not very good grounds, as the use of <xex>talent</xex> or <xex>talents</xex> to signify mental ability, although at first merely metaphorical, is now fully established, and <xex>talented</xex>, as a formative, is just as analogical and legitimate as <xex>gifted</xex>, <xex>bigoted</xex>, <xex>moneyed</xex>, <xex>landed</xex>, <xex>lilied</xex>, <xex>honeyed</xex>, and numerous other adjectives having a participal form, but derived directly from nouns and not from verbs.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"les</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., pl. of <ets>talis</ets> such (persons).]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>Persons added to a jury, commonly from those in or about the courthouse, to make up any deficiency in the number of jurors regularly summoned, being like, or <xex>such</xex> as, the latter.</def> <au>Blount. Blackstone.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <pos>syntactically sing.</pos> <def>The writ by which such persons are summoned.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tales book</b></col>, <cd>a book containing the names of such as are admitted of the tales.</cd> <au>Blount.</au> <au>Craig.</au> -- <col><b>\'d8Tales de circumstantibus</b></col> <ety>[L.]</ety>, <cd>such, or the like, from those standing about.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tales"man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Talesmen</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>A person called to make up a deficiency in the number of jurors when a tales is awarded.</def> <rj><au>Wharton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tale"tell`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tells tales or stories, especially in a mischievous or officious manner; a talebearer; a telltale; a tattler.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tale"wise`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a way of a tale or story.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"ia*co`tian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>See <er>Tagliacotian</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal`i*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Retaliation.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Just heav'n this <qex>taliation</qex> did decree.</q> <rj><qau>Beaumont.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"li*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>talio</ets>, perh. fr. <ets>talis</ets> such. Cf. <er>Retaliation</er>.]</ety> <def>Retaliation.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Holinshed.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"i*pes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>talus</ets> an ankle + <ets>pes</ets>, <ets>pedis</ets>, a foot; cf. L. <ets>talipedare</ets> to be weak in the feet, properly, to walk on the ankles.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The deformity called <altname>clubfoot</altname>. See <er>Clubfoot</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ Several varieties are distinguished; as, <stype>Talipes varus</stype>, in which the foot is drawn up and bent inward; <stype>T. valgus</stype>, in which the foot is bent outward; <stype>T. equinus</stype>, in which the sole faces backward and the patient walks upon the balls of the toes; and <stype>T. calcaneus</stype> (called also <stype>talus</stype>), in which the sole faces forward and the patient walks upon the heel.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"i*pot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>t\'belp\'bet</ets> the leaf of the tree.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A beautiful tropical palm tree (<spn>Corypha umbraculifera</spn>), a native of Ceylon and the Malabar coast. It has a trunk sixty or seventy feet high, bearing a crown of gigantic fan-shaped leaves which are used as umbrellas and as fans in ceremonial processions, and, when cut into strips, as a substitute for writing paper.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- p. 1471 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"is*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Talismans</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Sp., from Ar. <ets>tilism</ets>, <ets>tilsam</ets>, a magical image, pl. <ets>tilsam\'ben</ets>, fr. Gr. <?/ tribute, tax, LGr., an initiation, incantation, from <?/ to complete, perform, to play taxes, to make perfect, to initiate, especially in the mysteries, fr. <?/ completion, end.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A magical figure cut or engraved under certain superstitious observances of the configuration of the heavens, to which wonderful effects are ascribed; the seal, figure, character, or image, of a heavenly sign, constellation, or planet, engraved on a sympathetic stone, or on a metal corresponding to the star, in order to receive its influence.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, something that produces extraordinary effects, esp. in averting or repelling evil; an amulet; a charm; <as>as, a <ex>talisman</ex> to avert diseases</as>.</def> <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tal`is*man"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tal`is*man"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>talismanique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a talisman; having the properties of a talisman, or preservative against evils by occult influence; magical.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Talked</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Talking</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. LG. <ets>talk</ets> talk, gabble, Prov. G. <ets>talken</ets> to speak indistinctly; or OD. <ets>tolken</ets> to interpret, MHG. <ets>tolkan</ets> to interpret, to tell, to speak indistinctly, Dan. <ets>tolke</ets> to interpret, Sw. <ets>tolka</ets>, Icel. <ets>t<?/lka</ets> to interpret, <ets>t<?/lkr</ets> an interpreter, Lith. <ets>tulkas</ets> an interpreter, <ets>tulkanti</ets>, <ets>tulk\'d3ti</ets>, to interpret, Russ. <ets>tolkovate</ets> to interpret, to talk about; or perhaps fr. OE. <ets>talien</ets> to speak (see <er>Tale</er>, <pos>v. i.</pos> & <pos>n.</pos>).]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To utter words; esp., to converse familiarly; to speak, as in familiar discourse, when two or more persons interchange thoughts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I will buy with you, sell with you, <qex>talk</qex> with you, walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat with you.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To confer; to reason; to consult.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Let me <qex>talk</qex> with thee of thy judgments.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. xii. 1.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To prate; to speak impertinently.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>To talk of</b></col>, <cd>to relate; to tell; to give an account of; <as>as, authors <ex>talk of</ex> the wonderful remains of Palmyra</as>.</cd> \'bdThe natural histories of Switzerland <xex>talk</xex> much <xex>of</xex> the fall of these rocks, and the great damage done.\'b8 <au>Addison.</au> -- <col><b>To talk to</b></col>, <cd>to advise or exhort, or to reprove gently; <as>as, I will <ex>talk to</ex> my son respecting his conduct</as>.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To speak freely; to use for conversing or communicating; <as>as, to <ex>talk</ex> French</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To deliver in talking; to speak; to utter; to make a subject of conversation; <as>as, to <ex>talk</ex> nonsense; to <ex>talk</ex> politics</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To consume or spend in talking; -- often followed by <xex>away</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>talk</ex> away an evening</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To cause to be or become by talking.</def> \'bdThey would <xex>talk</xex> themselves mad.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>To talk over</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To talk about; to have conference respecting; to deliberate upon; to discuss; <as>as, to <ex>talk over</ex> a matter or plan</as>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To change the mind or opinion of by talking; to convince; <as>as, to <ex>talk over</ex> an opponent</as>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of talking; especially, familiar converse; mutual discourse; that which is uttered, especially in familiar conversation, or the mutual converse of two or more.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>In various <qex>talk</qex> the instructive hours they passed.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Their <qex>talk</qex>, when it was not made up of nautical phrases, was too commonly made up of oaths and curses.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Report; rumor; <as>as, to hear <ex>talk</ex> of war</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I hear a <qex>talk</qex> up and down of raising our money.</q> <rj><qau>Locke.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Subject of discourse; <as>as, his achievment is the <ex>talk</ex> of the town</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Conversation; colloquy; discourse; chat; dialogue; conference; communication. See <er>Conversation</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk"a*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Given to much talking.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Garrulous; loquacious. See <er>Garrulous</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Talk"a*tive*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Talk"a*tive*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who talks; especially, one who is noted for his power of conversing readily or agreeably; a conversationist.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>There probably were never four <qex>talkers</qex> more admirable in four different ways than Johnson, Burke, Beauclerk, and Garrick.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A loquacious person, male or female; a prattler; a babbler; also, a boaster; a braggart; -- used in contempt or reproach.</def> <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Talk"ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That talks; able to utter words; <as>as, a <ex>talking</ex> parrot</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Given to talk; loquacious.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The hawthorn bush, with seats beneath the shade,<br/
-For <qex>talking</qex> age and whispering lovers made.</q> <rj><qau>Goldsmith.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tall</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Taller</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tallest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>tal</ets> seemly, elegant, docile (?); of uncertain origin; cf. AS. un-<ets>tala</ets>, un-<ets>tale</ets>, bad, Goth. un<ets>tals</ets> indocile, disobedient, uninstructed, or W. & Corn. <ets>tal</ets> high, Ir. <ets>talla</ets> meet, fit, proper, just.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>High in stature; having a considerable, or an unusual, extension upward; long and comparatively slender; having the diameter or lateral extent small in proportion to the height; <as>as, a <ex>tall</ex> person, tree, or mast</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Two of far nobler shape, erect and <qex>tall</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Brave; bold; courageous.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>As <qex>tall</qex> a trencherman<br/
-As e'er demolished a pye fortification.</q> <rj><qau>Massinger.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>His companions, being almost in despair of victory, were suddenly recomforted by Sir William Stanley, which came to succors with three thousand <qex>tall</qex> men.</q> <rj><qau>Grafton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Fine; splendid; excellent; also, extravagant; excessive.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Slang]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- High; lofty.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Tall</er>, <er>High</er>, <er>Lofty</er>. <xex>High</xex> is the generic term, and is applied to anything which is elevated or raised above another thing. <xex>Tall</xex> specifically describes that which has a small diameter in proportion to its height; hence, we speak of a <xex>tall</xex> man, a <xex>tall</xex> steeple, a <xex>tall</xex> mast, etc., but not of a <xex>tall</xex> hill. <xex>Lofty</xex> has a special reference to the expanse above us, and denotes an imposing height; <as>as, a <ex>lofty</ex> mountain; a <ex>lofty</ex> room</as>. <xex>Tall</xex> is now properly applied only to physical objects; <xex>high</xex> and <xex>lofty</xex> have a moral acceptation; <as>as, <ex>high</ex> thought, purpose, etc.</as>; <xex>lofty</xex> aspirations; a <xex>lofty</xex> genius. <xex>Lofty</xex> is the stronger word, and is usually coupled with the grand or admirable.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tal"lage</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tal"li*age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>taillage</ets>. See <er>Taille</er>, and cf. <er>Tailage</er>.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A certain rate or tax paid by barons, knights, and inferior tenants, toward the public expenses.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tailage</asp>, <asp>taillage</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ When paid out of knight's fees, it was called <stype>scutage</stype>; when by cities and burghs, <stype>tallage</stype>; when upon lands not held by military tenure, <stype>hidage</stype>.</note> <rj><au>Blackstone.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"lage</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To lay an impost upon; to cause to pay tallage.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tall"boy`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of long-stemmed wineglass or cup.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A piece of household furniture common in the eighteenth century, usually in two separate parts, with larger drawers above and smaller ones below and raised on legs fifteen inches or more in height; -- called also <altname>highboy</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A long sheet-metal pipe for a chimney top.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"li*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who keeps tally.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"lis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Tallith</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"lith</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NHeb. <ets>tall\'c6th</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Jewish Costume)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>An undergarment worn by orthodox Jews, covering the chest and the upper part of the back. It has an opening for the head, and has tassels, called <part>zizith</part>, on its four corners.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A tasseled shawl or scarf worn over the head or thrown round the shoulders while at prayer.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tall"ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tall; height of stature.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"low</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>taluh</ets>, <ets>talugh</ets>; akin to OD. <ets>talgh</ets>, D. <ets>talk</ets>, G., Dan. and Sw. <ets>talg</ets>, Icel. <ets>t\'d3lgr</ets>, <ets>t\'d3lg</ets>, <ets>t\'d3lk</ets>; and perhaps to Goth. <ets>tulgus</ets> firm.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The suet or fat of animals of the sheep and ox kinds, separated from membranous and fibrous matter by melting.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ The solid consistency of tallow is due to the large amount of stearin it contains. See <er>Fat</er>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The fat of some other animals, or the fat obtained from certain plants, or from other sources, resembling the fat of animals of the sheep and ox kinds.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tallow candle</b></col>, <cd>a candle made of tallow.</cd> -- <col><b>Tallow catch</b></col>, <cd>a keech.</cd> See <er>Keech</er>. <mark>[Obs.]</mark> -- <col><b>Tallow chandler</b></col>, <cd>one whose occupation is to make, or to sell, tallow candles.</cd> -- <col><b>Tallow chandlery</b></col>, <cd>the trade of a tallow chandler; also, the place where his business is carried on.</cd> -- <col><b>Tallow tree</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a tree (<spn>Stillingia sebifera</spn>) growing in China, the seeds of which are covered with a substance which resembles tallow and is applied to the same purposes.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tal"low</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tallowed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tallowing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To grease or smear with tallow.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To cause to have a large quantity of tallow; to fatten; <as>as, <ex>tallow</ex> sheep</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An animal which produces tallow.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low-face`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who has a sickly, pale complexion.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low-faced`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having a sickly complexion; pale.</def> <rj><au>Burton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act, or art, of causing animals to produce tallow; also, the property in animals of producing tallow.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low*ish</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having the qualities of tallow.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"low*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of the nature of tallow; resembling tallow; greasy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tall"wood`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tally</er>.]</ety> <def>Firewood cut into billets of a certain length.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <mark>[Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tallies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[OE. <ets>taile</ets>, <ets>taille</ets>, F. <ets>taille</ets> a cutting, cut tally, fr. <ets>tailler</ets> to cut, but influenced probably by <ets>taill\'82</ets>, p. p. of <ets>tailler</ets>. See <er>Tailor</er>, and cf. <er>Tail</er> a limitation, <er>Taille</er>, <er>Tallage</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number; later, one of two books, sheets of paper, etc., on which corresponding accounts were kept.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ In purshasing and selling, it was once customary for traders to have two sticks, or one stick cleft into two parts, and to mark with a score or notch, on each, the number or quantity of goods delivered, -- the seller keeping one stick, and the purchaser the other. Before the use of writing, this, or something like it, was the only method of keeping accounts; and <xex>tallies</xex> were received as evidence in courts of justice. In the English exchequer were <xex>tallies</xex> of loans, one part being kept in the exchequer, the other being given to the creditor in lieu of an obligation for money lent to government.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, any account or score kept by notches or marks, whether on wood or paper, or in a book; especially, one kept in duplicate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>One thing made to suit another; a match; a mate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They were framed the <qex>tallies</qex> for each other.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A notch, mark, or score made on or in a tally; <as>as, to make or earn a <ex>tally</ex> in a game</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A tally shop. See <cref>Tally shop</cref>, below.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tally shop</b></col>, <cd>a shop at which goods or articles are sold to customers on account, the account being kept in corresponding books, one called the <xex>tally</xex>, kept by the buyer, the other the <xex>counter tally</xex>, kept by the seller, and the payments being made weekly or otherwise by agreement. The trade thus regulated is called <xex>tally trade</xex>.</cd> <au>Eng. Encyc.</au> -- <col><b>To strike tallies</b></col>, <cd>to act in correspondence, or alike.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Fuller.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tallied</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tallying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tialler</ets> to cut. See <er>Tally</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To score with correspondent notches; hence, to make to correspond; to cause to fit or suit.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>They are not so well <qex>tallied</qex> to the present juncture.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>To check off, as parcels of freight going inboard or outboard.</def> <rj><au>W. C. Russell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tally on</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to dovetail together.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To be fitted; to suit; to correspond; to match.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I found pieces of tiles that exactly <qex>tallied</qex> with the channel.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Your idea . . . <qex>tallies</qex> exactly with mine.</q> <rj><qau>Walpole.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To make a tally; to score; <as>as, to <ex>tally</ex> in a game</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tally on</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to man a rope for hauling, the men standing in a line or tail.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tall</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>Stoutly; with spirit.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly*ho`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>interj. & n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The huntsman's cry to incite or urge on his hounds.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A tallyho coach.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tallyho coach</b></col>, <cd>a pleasure coach. See under <er>Coach</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ly*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tallymen</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who keeps the tally, or marks the sticks.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One who keeps a tally shop, or conducts his business as tally trade.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Talmas</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Prob. so called from <ets>Talma</ets>, a French actor.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A kind of large cape, or short, full cloak, forming part of the dress of ladies.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A similar garment worn formerly by gentlemen.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"mud</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Chald. <ets>talm<umac/d</ets> instruction, doctrine, fr. <ets>lamad</ets> to learn, <ets>limmad</ets> to teach.]</ety> <def>The body of the Jewish civil and canonical law not comprised in the Pentateuch.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The <xex>Talmud</xex> consists of two parts, the <xex>Mishna</xex>, or text, and the <xex>Gemara</xex>, or commentary. Sometimes, however, the name <xex>Talmud</xex> is restricted, especially by Jewish writers, to the Gemara. There are two Talmuds, the <xex>Palestinian</xex>, commonly, but incorrectly, called the <xex>Talmud of Jerusalem</xex>, and the <xex>Babylonian Talmud</xex>. They contain the same Mishna, but different Gemaras. The Babylonian Talmud is about three times as large as the other, and is more highly esteemed by the Jews.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tal*mud"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tal*mud"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>talmudique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the Talmud; contained in the Talmud; <as>as, <ex>Talmudic</ex> Greek; <ex>Talmudical</ex> phrases.</as></def> <rj><au>Lightfoot.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"mud*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The teachings of the Talmud, or adherence to them.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"mud*ist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>talmudiste</ets>.]</ety> <def>One versed in the Talmud; one who adheres to the teachings of the Talmud.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal`mud*is"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Resembling the Talmud; Talmudic.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tal"on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., heel, spur, LL. <ets>talo</ets>, fr. L. <ets>talus</ets> the ankle, heel.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The claw of a predaceous bird or animal, especially the claw of a bird of prey.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of certain small prominences on the hind part of the face of an elephant's tooth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A kind of molding, concave at the bottom and convex at the top; -- usually called an <altname>ogee</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ When the concave part is at the top, it is called an <stype>inverted talon</stype>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>The shoulder of the bolt of a lock on which the key acts to shoot the bolt.</def> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ta*look"</hw>, <hw>Ta*luk"</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>ta'lluq</ets>.]</ety> <def>A large estate; esp., one constituting a revenue district or dependency the native proprietor of which is responsible for the collection and payment of the public revenue due from it.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ta*look"dar</hw>, <hw>Ta*luk"dar</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind., fr. Per. <ets>ta'lluqd\'ber</ets>.]</ety> <def>A proprietor of a talook.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tal"pa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., mole.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of small insectivores including the common European mole.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tali</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., the ankle, the ankle bone.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The astragalus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A variety of clubfoot (<spn>Talipes calcaneus</spn>). See the Note under <er>Talipes</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"lus</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>A slope; the inclination of the face of a work.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>A sloping heap of fragments of rock lying at the foot of a precipice.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam`a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tamable; tamableness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being tamed, subdued, or reclaimed from wildness or savage ferociousness.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tam"a*ble*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*ma"le</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tamal</asp>, <asp>tomale</asp>.]</altsp> <ety>[Amer. Sp. <ets>tamal</ets>, of Mex. origin.]</ety> <def>A Mexican dish made of crushed corn (cornmeal) mixed with minced meat, seasoned with red pepper, dipped in oil, and steamed.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*man"du</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp., from the native name: cf. F. <ets>tamandua</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small ant-eater (<spn>Tamandua tetradactyla</spn>) native of the tropical parts of South America.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ It has five toes on the fore feet, an elongated snout, small ears, and short woolly hair. Its tail is stout and hairy at the base, tapering, and covered with minute scales, and is somewhat prehensile at the end. Called also <altname>tamandua</altname>, <altname>little ant-bear</altname>, <altname>fourmilier</altname>, and <altname>cagouare</altname>.
- The collared, or striped, tamandu (<stype><spn>Tamandua bivittata</spn></stype>) is considered a distinct species by some writers, but by others is regarded as only a variety.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta`ma*noir"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The ant-bear.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"a*rack</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The American larch; also, the larch of Oregon and British Columbia (<spn>Larix occidentalis</spn>). See <er>Hackmatack</er>, and <er>Larch</er>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The black pine (<spn>Pinus Murrayana</spn>) of Alaska, California, etc. It is a small tree with fine-grained wood.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"a*ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tamarice</ets>. See <er>Tamarisk</er>.]</ety> <def>A shrub or tree supposed to be the tamarisk, or perhaps some kind of heath.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>He shall be like <qex>tamaric</qex> in the desert, and he shall not see when good shall come.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. xvii. 6 (Douay version).</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"a*rin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name in Cayenne.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of small squirrel-like South American monkeys of the genus <gen>Midas</gen>, especially <spn>Midas ursulus</spn>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1472 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"a*rind</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>tamarindo</ets>, or Sp. <ets>tamarindo</ets>, or Pg. <ets>tamarindo</ets>, <ets>tamarinho</ets>, from Ar. <ets>tamarhind\'c6</ets>, literally, Indian date; <ets>tamar</ets> a dried date + <ets>Hind</ets> India: cf. F. <ets>tamarin</ets>. Cf. <er>Hindu</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A leguminous tree (<spn>Tamarindus Indica</spn>) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tamarind fish</b></col>, <cd>a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit.</cd> -- <col><b>Velvet tamarind</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A West African leguminous tree (<spn>Codarium acutifolium</spn>).</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone.</cd> -- <col><b>Wild tamarind</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the <spn>Lysiloma latisiliqua</spn> of Southern Florida, and the <spn>Pithecolobium filicifolium</spn> of the West Indies.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"a*risk</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tamariscus</ets>, also <ets>tamarix</ets>, <ets>tamarice</ets>, Skr. <ets>tam\'bela</ets>, <ets>tam\'belaka</ets>, a tree with a very dark bark; cf. <ets>tamas</ets> darkness: cf. F. <ets>tamarisc</ets>, <ets>tamarix</ets>, <ets>tamaris</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Any shrub or tree of the genus <gen>Tamarix</gen>, the species of which are European and Asiatic. They have minute scalelike leaves, and small flowers in spikes. An Arabian species (<spn>Tamarix mannifera</spn>) is the source of one kind of manna.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tamarisk salt tree</b></col>, <cd>an East Indian tree (<spn>Tamarix orientalis</spn>) which produces an incrustation of salt.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"bac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Metal.)</fld> <def>See <er>Tombac</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"bour</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A kind of small flat drum; a tambourine.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A small frame, commonly circular, and somewhat resembling a tambourine, used for stretching, and firmly holding, a portion of cloth that is to be embroidered; also, the embroidery done upon such a frame; -- called also, in the latter sense, <altname>tambour work</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Drum</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 2<sd>(d)</sd>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>A work usually in the form of a redan, to inclose a space before a door or staircase, or at the gorge of a larger work. It is arranged like a stockade.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>A shallow metallic cup or drum, with a thin elastic membrane supporting a writing lever. Two or more of these are connected by an India rubber tube, and used to transmit and register the movements of the pulse or of any pulsating artery.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam"bour</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tamboured</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tambouring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To embroider on a tambour.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam*bour"a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A stringed musical instrument resembling a lute but lacking frets, with a small round body and a long neck, used to produce an accompaniment for singing; -- called also <altname>tambur</altname>, <altname>tambour</altname>, and <altname>tampur</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>tambura</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam`bou`rin"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tambourine</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A tambourine.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>An old Proven\'87al dance of a lively character, common on the stage.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam`bour*ine"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tambourin</ets>; cf. It. <ets>tamburino</ets>. See <er>Tambour</er>, and cf. <er>Tamborine</er>.]</ety> <def>A small drum, especially a shallow drum with only one skin, played on with the hand, and having bells at the sides; a timbrel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tam`bour*ine"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A South American wild dove (<spn>Tympanistria tympanistria</spn>), mostly white, with black-tiped wings and tail. Its resonant note is said to be ventriloquous.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"breet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The duck mole.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam`bu*rin"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tambourine</er>.</def> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>entamer</ets> to cut into, to broach.]</ety> <def>To broach or enter upon; to taste, as a liquor; to divide; to distribute; to deal out.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>In the time of famine he is the Joseph of the country, and keeps the poor from starving. Then he <qex>tameth</qex> his stacks of corn, which not his covetousness, but providence, hath reserved for time of need.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tamer</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tamest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>tam</ets>; akin to D. <ets>tam</ets>, G. <ets>zahm</ets>, OHG. <ets>zam</ets>, Dan. & Sw. <ets>tam</ets>, Icel. <ets>tamr</ets>, L. <ets>domare</ets> to tame, Gr. <?/, Skr. <ets>dam</ets> to be tame, to tame, and perhaps to E. <ets>beteem</ets>. \'fb61. Cf. <er>Adamant</er>, <er>Diamond</er>, <er>Dame</er>, <er>Daunt</er>, <er>Indomitable</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Reduced from a state of native wildness and shyness; accustomed to man; domesticated; domestic; <as>as, a <ex>tame</ex> deer, a <ex>tame</ex> bird</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Crushed; subdued; depressed; spiritless.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q><qex>Tame</qex> slaves of the laborious plow.</q> <rj><qau>Roscommon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Deficient in spirit or animation; spiritless; dull; flat; insipid; <as>as, a <ex>tame</ex> poem; <ex>tame</ex> scenery</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Gentle; mild; meek. See <er>Gentle</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tamed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taming</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>tamian</ets>, <ets>temian</ets>, akin to D. <ets>tammen</ets>, <ets>temmen</ets>, G. <ets>z\'84hmen</ets>, OHG. <ets>zemmen</ets>, Icel. <ets>temja</ets>, Goth. ga<ets>tamjan</ets>. See <er>Tame</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To reduce from a wild to a domestic state; to make gentle and familiar; to reclaim; to domesticate; <as>as, to <ex>tame</ex> a wild beast</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>They had not been <qex>tamed</qex> into submission, but baited into savegeness and stubbornness.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To subdue; to conquer; to repress; <as>as, to <ex>tame</ex> the pride or passions of youth</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Tamable.</def> <rj><au>Bp. Wilkins.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Incapable of being tamed; wild; untamed; untamable.</def> <au>Bp. Hall.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Tame"less*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tame manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tame"ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tame.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tames or subdues.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*mer*lane"</hw> <pr>(t<acr/*m<etil/r*l<amac/n")</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>A Tatar conquerer, also called <altname>Timur</altname> or <altname>Timour</altname> (t<emac/*m<ocir/r") or <altname>Timur Bey</altname>, also <altname>Timur-Leng</altname> ('Timur the Lame'), which was corrupted to <ex>Tamerlane</ex>. He was born in Central Asia, 1333: died 1405. Though he claimed descent from Jenghiz Khan, it is believed that he was in fact descended from a follower of the Khan. He became a ruler about 1370 of a realm whose capital was Samarkand; conquered Persia, Central Asia, and in 1398 a great part of India, including Delhi; waged war with the Turkish <person>Sultan Bajazet I.</person> (Beyazid), whom he defeated at Ancyra in 1402 and took prisoner; and died while preparing to invade China. He is the <asp>Tamerlaine</asp> of the plays.</def><br/
-[<source>Century Dict. 1906</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Just at the moment when the Sultan (Bajazet) seemed to have attained the pinnacle of his ambition, when his authority was unquestioningly obeyed over the greater part of the Byzantine Empire in Europe and Asia, when the Christian states were regarding him with terror as the scourge of the world, another and greater scourge came to quell him, and at one stroke all the vast fabric of empire which B<amac/yez<imac/d had so triumphantly erected was shattered to the ground. This terrible conquerer was Tim<umac/r the Tatar, or as we call him, \'bdTamerlane\'b8. Tim<umac/r was of Turkish race, and was born near Samarkand in 1333. He was consequently an old man of 70 when he came to encounter B<amac/yez<imac/d in 1402. It had taken him many years to establish his authority over a portion of the numerous divisions into which the immense empire of Chingiz Khan had fallen after the death of that stupendous conqueror. Tim<umac/r was but a petty chief among many others: but at last he won his way and became ruler of Samarkand and the whole province of Transoxiana, or 'Beyond the River' (M<amac/-war<amac/-n-nahr) as the Arabs called the country north of the Oxus. Once fairly established in this province, Tim<umac/r began to overrun the surrounding lands, and during thirty years his ruthless armies spread over the provinces of Asia, from Dehli to Damascus, and from the Sea of Aral to the Persian Gulf. The subdivision of the Moslem Empire into numerous petty kingdoms rendered it powerless to meet the overwhelming hordes which Tim<umac/r brought down from Central Asia. One and all, the kings and princes of Persia and Syria succumbed, and Tim<umac/r carried his banners triumphantly as far as the frontier of Egypt, where the brave Mamluk Sultans still dared to defy him. He had so far left B<amac/yez<imac/d unmolested; partly because he was too powerful to be rashly provoked, and partly because Tim<umac/r respected the Sultan's valorous deeds against the Christians: for Tim<umac/r, though a wholesale butcher, was very conscientious in matters of religion, and held that B<amac/yez<imac/d's fighting for the Faith rightly covered a multitude of sins.</q> <rj><qau>Poole, Story of Turkey, p. 63</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Century Dict. 1906</source>]</p>
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-
-
-<p><note>Timour (t<imac/*m<oomac/r"), Timur, or TAMERLANE, was the second of the great conquerers whom central Asia sent forth in the middle ages, and was born at Kesh, about 40 miles southeast of Samarkand, April 9, 1336. His father was a Turkish chieftain and his mother claimed descent from the great Genghis-Khan. When he became tribal chieftain, Timour helped the Amir Hussein to drive out the Kalmucks. Turkestan was thereupon divided between them, but soon war broke out between the two chiefs, and the death of Hussein in battle made Timour master of all Turkestan. He now began his career of conquest, overcoming the Getes, Khiva and Khorassin, after storming Herat. His ever-widening circle of possessions soon embraced Persia, Mesopotamia, Georgia, and the Mongol state, Kiptchak. He threatened Moscow, burned Azoo, captured Delhi, overran Syria, and stormed Bagdad, which had revolted. At last, July 20,1402, Timour met the Sultan Bajazet of the Ottoman Turks, on the plains of Angora, captured him and routed his army, thus becoming master of the Turkish empire. He took but a short rest at his capital, Samarkand, and in his eagerness to conquer China, led his army of 200,000 across the Jaxartes on the ice, and pushed rapidly on for 300 miles, when his death, Feb. 18, 1405, saved the independence of China. Though notorious for his acts of cruelty -- he may have slaughtered 80,000 in Delhi -- he was a patron of the arts. In his reign of 35 years, this chief of a small tribe, dependent on the Kalmucks, became the ruler of the vast territory stretching from Moscow to the Ganges. A number of writings said to have been written by Timour have been preserved in Persian, one of which, the <booki>Institutions</booki>, has been translated into English.</note> <au>The Student's Cyclopedia, 1897.</au><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"mi*as</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a distributer.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of ground squirrels, including the chipmunk.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"mil</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to the Tamils, or to their language.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>Tamul</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"mil</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Written also <ets>Tamul</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld> <def>One of a Dravidian race of men native of Northern Ceylon and Southern India.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The Tamil language, the most important of the Dravidian languages. See <er>Dravidian</er>, <pos>a.</pos></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*mil"i*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <def>Tamil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tam"ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tam"i*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tamis</ets> a sort of sieve. Cf. <er>Stamin</er>, <er>Temse</er>.]</ety> <def>A kind of woolen cloth; tammy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"is</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., a kind of sieve.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A sieve, or strainer, made of a kind of woolen cloth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The cloth itself; tammy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tamis bird</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a Guinea fowl.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"kin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tampion.</def> <rj><au>Johnson (Dict.).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tammies</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of woolen, or woolen and cotton, cloth, often highly glazed, -- used for curtains, sieves, strainers, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A sieve, or strainer, made of this material; a tamis.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam`-o'-shan"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[So named after <etsep>Tam o'Shanter</etsep>, a character in Burns's poem of the same name.]</ety> <def>A kind of Scotch cap of wool, worsted, or the like, having a round, flattish top much wider than the band which fits the head, and usually having a tassel in the center.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*mox"i*fen</hw> <pr>(t<acr/*m<ocr/k"s<icr/*f<ecr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a chemical compound (<chform>C26H29NO</chform>) which is non-steroidal but physiogically active as an estrogen antagonist. It is used to treat postmenopausal breast cancer. Chemically it is <chname>1-p-dimethylaminoethoxyphenyl-trans-1,2-diphenyl-but-1-ene</chname>. It can be obtained as a white crystalline powder.</def> <au>[MI11]</au><br/
-<syn><b>Syn. --</b> Kessar; Noltam; Nolvadex; Tamofen; Tamoxasta; Terimon; Xynoplex.</syn>
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tamp</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tamped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tamping</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tamponner</ets> to plug or stop. See <er>Tampion</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>In blasting, to plug up with clay, earth, dry sand, sod, or other material, as a hole bored in a rock, in order to prevent the force of the explosion from being misdirected.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To drive in or down by frequent gentle strokes; <as>as, to <ex>tamp</ex> earth so as to make a smooth place</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"pan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A venomous South African tick.</def> <rj><au>Livingstone.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"pe*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tampion</er>.</def> <rj><au>Farrow.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tamp"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who tamps; specifically, one who prepares for blasting, by filling the hole in which the charge is placed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An instrument used in tamping; a tamping iron.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tampered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tampering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[A corruption of <ets>temper</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To meddle; to be busy; to try little experiments; <as>as, to <ex>tamper</ex> with a disease</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>'T is dangerous <qex>tampering</qex> with a muse.</q> <rj><qau>Roscommon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To meddle so as to alter, injure, or vitiate a thing.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To deal unfairly; to practice secretly; to use bribery.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Others <qex>tampered</qex><br/
-For Fleetwood, Desborough, and Lambert.</q> <rj><qau>Hudibras.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"per*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tampers; one who deals unfairly.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tam*pi"co fi"ber</hw> <it>or</it> <hw>Tam*pi"co fi"bre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>. <def>A tough vegetable fiber used as a substitute for bristles in making brushes. The piassava and the ixtle are both used under this name.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tamp"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of one who tamps; specifically, the act of filling up a hole in a rock, or the branch of a mine, for the purpose of blasting the rock or exploding the mine.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The material used in tamping. See <er>Tamp</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 1.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tamping iron</b></col>, <cd>an iron rod for beating down the earthy substance in tamping for blasting.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"pi*on</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tampon</ets>, <ets>tapon</ets>, <ets>tape</ets>, of Dutch or German origin. See <er>Tap</er> a pipe or plug, and cf. <er>Tamp</er>, <er>Tampop</er>, <er>Tompion</er>.]</ety> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tampeon</asp>, and <asp>tompion</asp>.]</altsp> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A wooden stopper, or plug, as for a cannon or other piece of ordnance, when not in use.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A plug for upper end of an organ pipe.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"poe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The edible fruit of an East Indian tree (<spn>Baccaurea Malayana</spn>) of the Spurge family. It somewhat resembles an apple.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"pon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tampion</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>A plug introduced into a natural or artificial cavity of the body in order to arrest hemorrhage, absorb secretions (as from menstruation), or for the application of medicine.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"pon</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>To plug with a tampon.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"poon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tampion</er>.]</ety> <def>The stopper of a barrel; a bung.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"-tam`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind.; of imitative origin.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A kind of drum used in the East Indies and other Oriental countries; -- called also <altname>tom-tom</altname>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A gong. See <er>Gong</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 1.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta"mul</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a. & n.</pos> <def>Tamil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tam"worth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <etsep>Tamworth</etsep>, Staffordshire, England.]</ety> <def>One of a long-established English breed of large pigs. They are red, often spotted with black, with a long snout and erect or forwardly pointed ears, and are valued as bacon producers.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Chin.]</ety> <def>See <er>Picul</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tan</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tan</ets>, perhaps fr. Armor. <ets>tann</ets> an oak, oak bar; or of Teutonic origin; cf. G. <ets>tanne</ets> a fir, OHG. <ets>tanna</ets> a fir, oak, MHG. <ets>tan</ets> a forest. Cf. <er>Tawny</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The bark of the oak, and some other trees, bruised and broken by a mill, for tanning hides; -- so called both before and after it has been used. Called also <altname>tan bark</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A yellowish-brown color, like that of tan.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A brown color imparted to the skin by exposure to the sun; <as>as, hands covered with <ex>tan</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tan bed</b></col> <fld>(Hort.)</fld>, <cd>a bed made of tan; a bark bed.</cd> -- <col><b>Tan pickle</b></col>, <cd>the liquor used in tanning leather.</cd> -- <col><b>Tan spud</b></col>, <cd>a spud used in stripping bark for tan from trees.</cd> -- <col><b>Tan stove</b></col>. <cd>See <cref>Bark stove</cref>, under <er>Bark</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tan vat</b></col>, <cd>a vat in which hides are steeped in liquor with tan.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tan</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of the color of tan; yellowish-brown.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Black and tan</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Black</er>, <pos>a.</pos></cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tan</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tanned</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tanning</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>tanner</ets>, LL. <ets>tannare</ets>. See <er>Tan</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To convert (the skin of an animal) into leather, as by usual process of steeping it in an infusion of oak or some other bark, whereby it is impregnated with tannin, or tannic acid (which exists in several species of bark), and is thus rendered firm, durable, and in some degree impervious to water.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ The essential result in tanning is due to the fact that the tannins form, with gelatins and albuminoids, a series of insoluble compounds which constitute leather. Similar results may be produced by the use of other reagents in place of tannin, as alum, and some acids or chlorides, which are employed in certain processes of tanning.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To make brown; to imbrown, as by exposure to the rays of the sun; <as>as, to <ex>tan</ex> the skin</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To thrash or beat; to flog; to switch; <as>as, to <ex>tan</ex> a disobedient child's hide</as>.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To get or become tanned.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Banxring</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"a*ger</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>tanagra</ets>, probably fr. Brazilian <ets>tangara</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of numerous species of bright-colored singing birds belonging to <gen>Tanagra</gen>, <gen>Piranga</gen>, and allied genera. The scarlet tanager (<spn>Piranga erythromelas</spn>) and the summer redbird (<spn>Piranga rubra</spn>) are common species of the United States.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"a*grine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the tanagers.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"a*groid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tanager</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Tanagrine.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw><hw>Tanak</hw>, <hw>Tanakh</hw></mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the initial (Hebrew) letters of <ets>T</ets>orah, <ets>N</ets>evi'im, and <ets>K</ets>ethubim.]</ety> <def>a term used among Jews for the Hebrew Bible; the Old Testament.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>Tanach</asp>.]</altsp> <note>Although Christians use the term \'bdOld Testament\'b8, this term implies the superseding force of the \'bdNew Testament\'b8, not recognized as revelation by the Jewish faith.</note><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The Hebrew Bible is divided into three parts: (1) The <er>Torah</er>, \'bdLaw,\'b8 or Pentateuch. (2) The Prophets . . . (3) The Kethubim, or the \'bdWritings,\'b8 generally termed <er>Hagiographa</er>.</q> <rj><qau>C. H. H. Wright.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta*na"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An Asiatic wild dog (<spn>Canis procyonoides</spn>), native of Japan and adjacent countries. It has a short, bushy tail. Called also <altname>raccoon dog</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"dem</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv. & a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tandem</ets> at length (of time only), punningly taken as meaning, lengthwise.]</ety> <def>One after another; -- said especially of horses harnessed and driven one before another, instead of abreast.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"dem</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A team of horses harnessed one before the other.</def> \'bdHe drove <xex>tandems</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A tandem bicycle or other vehicle.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Tandem bicycle</b></col> <it>or</it> <col><b>Tandem tricycle</b></col></mcol>, <cd>one for two persons in which one rider sits before the other.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"dem cart</hw>. <def>A kind of two-wheeled vehicle with seats back to back, the front one somewhat elevated.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tandem engine</hw>. <def>A steam engine having two or more steam cylinders in line, with a common piston rod.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tandem system</hw>. <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>same as <er>Cascade system</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ng)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. <ets>tang</ets> seaweed, Sw. <ets>t\'86ng</ets>, Icel. <ets><thorn/ang</ets>. Cf. <er>Tangle</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A coarse blackish seaweed (<spn>Fuscus nodosus</spn>).</def> <rj><au>Dr. Prior.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tang sparrow</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the rock pipit.</cd> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Probably fr. OD. <ets>tanger</ets> sharp, tart, literally, pinching; akin to E. <ets>tongs</ets>. \'fb59. See <er>Tong</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A strong or offensive taste; especially, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself; <as>as, wine or cider has a <ex>tang</ex> of the cask</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fig.: A sharp, specific flavor or tinge. Cf. <er>Tang</er> a twang.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Such proceedings had a strong <qex>tang</qex> of tyranny.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A cant of philosophism, and a <qex>tang</qex> of party politics.</q> <rj><qau>Jeffrey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <ety>[Probably of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. <ets>tangi</ets> a projecting point; akin to E. <ets>tongs</ets>. See <er>Tongs</er>.]</ety> <def>A projecting part of an object by means of which it is secured to a handle, or to some other part; anything resembling a tongue in form or position.</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>The part of a knife, fork, file, or other small instrument, which is inserted into the handle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>The projecting part of the breech of a musket barrel, by which the barrel is secured to the stock.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>The part of a sword blade to which the handle is fastened.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(d)</sd> <def>The tongue of a buckle.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Of imitative origin. Cf. <er>Twang</er>. This word has become confused with <ets>tang</ets> tatse, flavor.]</ety> <def>A sharp, twanging sound; an unpleasant tone; a twang.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw> <pr>(t<aum/ng)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Chin. <ets>T`ang</ets>.]</ety> <def>A dynasty in Chinese history, from <sc>a. d.</sc> 618 to 905, distinguished by the founding of the Imperial Academy (the Hanlin), by the invention of printing, and as marking a golden age of literature.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tanged</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tanging</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To cause to ring or sound loudly; to ring.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Let thy tongue <qex>tang</qex> arguments of state.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tang bees</b></col>, <cd>to cause a swarm of bees to settle, by beating metal to make a din.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To make a ringing sound; to ring.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Let thy tongue <qex>tang</qex> arguments of state.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ga*lung</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An East Indian civet (<spn>Viverra tangalunga</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ge*lo</hw> <pr>(t<acr/n"j<esl/*l<omac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tang</ets>erine + pom<ets>elo</ets>.]</ety> <def>A hybrid between the tangerine orange and the grapefruit, or pomelo; also, the fruit.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gence</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tangency.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gen*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tangent; a contact or touching.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tangens</ets>, <ets>-entis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>tangere</ets> to touch; akin to Gr. <?/ having seized: cf. F. <ets>tangente</ets>. Cf. <er>Attain</er>, <er>Contaminate</er>, <er>Contingent</er>, <er>Entire</er>, <er>Tact</er>, <er>Taste</er>, <er>Tax</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>A tangent line curve, or surface; specifically, that portion of the straight line tangent to a curve that is between the point of tangency and a given line, the given line being, for example, the axis of abscissas, or a radius of a circle produced. See <cref>Trigonometrical function</cref>, under <er>Function</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Artificial tangent</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Logarithmic tangent</b></col></mcol>, <cd>the logarithm of the natural tangent of an arc.</cd> -- <col><b>Natural tangent</b></col>, <cd>a decimal expressing the length of the tangent of an arc, the radius being reckoned unity.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangent galvanometer</b></col> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <cd>a form of galvanometer having a circular coil and a short needle, in which the tangent of the angle of deflection of the needle is proportional to the strength of the current.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangent of an angle</b></col>, <cd>the natural tangent of the arc subtending or measuring the angle.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangent of an arc</b></col>, <cd>a right line, as <it>ta</it>, touching the arc of a circle at one extremity <it>a</it>, and terminated by a line <it>ct</it>, passing from the center through the other extremity <it>o</it>.</cd></cs>
-<-- references are to a figure showing the tangent of an arc --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gent</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tangens</ets>, <ets>-entis</ets>, p. pr.]</ety> <def>Touching; touching at a single point</def>; specifically <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>meeting a curve or surface at a point and having at that point the same direction as the curve or surface; -- said of a straight line, curve, or surface; <as>as, a line <ex>tangent</ex> to a curve; a curve <ex>tangent</ex> to a surface; <ex>tangent</ex> surfaces.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tangent plane</b></col> <fld>(Geom.)</fld>, <cd>a plane which touches a surface in a point or line.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangent scale</b></col> <fld>(Gun.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of breech sight for a cannon.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangent screw</b></col> <fld>(Mach.)</fld>, <cd>an endless screw; a worm.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1473 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*gen"tal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>Tangential.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*gen"tial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Geom.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to a tangent; in the direction of a tangent.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tangential force</b></col> <fld>(Mech.)</fld>, <cd>a force which acts on a moving body in the direction of a tangent to the path of the body, its effect being to increase or diminish the velocity; -- distinguished from a <xex>normal force</xex>, which acts at right angles to the tangent and changes the direction of the motion without changing the velocity.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangential stress</b></col>. <fld>(Engin.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Shear</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 3.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*gen"tial*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In the direction of a tangent.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tangent spoke</hw>. <def>A tension spoke of a bicycle or similar wheel, secured tangentially to the hub.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tangent wheel</hw>. <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A worm or worm wheel; a tangent screw.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A wheel with tangent spokes.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ger*ine`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A kind of orange, much like the mandarin, but of deeper color and higher flavor. It is said to have been produced in America from the mandarin.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tangierine</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang"fish`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The common harbor seal.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tan*ghin"i*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The ordeal tree. See under <er>Ordeal</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan`gi*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tanggibilit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>The quality or state of being tangible.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gi*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tangibilis</ets>, fr. <ets>tangere</ets> to touch: cf. F. <ets>tangible</ets>. See <er>Tangent</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Perceptible to the touch; tactile; palpable.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Capable of being possessed or realized; readily apprehensible by the mind; real; substantial; evident.</def> \'bdA <xex>tangible</xex> blunder.\'b8 <rj><au>Byron.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Direct and <qex>tangible</qex> benefit to ourselves and others.</q> <rj><qau>Southey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Tan"gi*ble*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos> -- <wf>Tan"gi*bly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tangled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tangling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[A frequentative fr. <ets>tang</ets> seaweed; hence, to twist like seaweed. See <er>Tang</er> seaweed, and cf. <er>Tangle</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To unite or knit together confusedly; to interweave or interlock, as threads, so as to make it difficult to unravel the knot; to entangle; to ravel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To involve; to insnare; to entrap; <as>as, to be <ex>tangled</ex> in lies</as>.</def> \'bd<xex>Tangled</xex> in amorous nets.\'b8 <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When my simple weakness strays,<br/
-<qex>Tangled</qex> in forbidden ways.</q> <rj><qau>Crashaw.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gle</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To be entangled or united confusedly; to get in a tangle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gle</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <ety>[Cf. Icel. <ets><thorn/\'94ngull</ets>. See <er>Tang</er> seaweed.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Any large blackish seaweed, especially the <spn>Laminaria saccharina</spn>. See <er>Kelp</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Coral and sea fan and <qex>tangle</qex>, the blooms and the palms of the ocean.</q> <rj><qau>C. Kingsley.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <ety>[From <er>Tangle</er>, <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <def>A knot of threads, or other thing, united confusedly, or so interwoven as not to be easily disengaged; a snarl; <as>as, hair or yarn in <ex>tangles</ex>; a <ex>tangle</ex> of vines and briers. Used also figuratively.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>An instrument consisting essentially of an iron bar to which are attached swabs, or bundles of frayed rope, or other similar substances, -- used to capture starfishes, sea urchins, and other similar creatures living at the bottom of the sea.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Blue tangle</b></col>. <fld>(Bot.)</fld>S<cd>ee <er>Dangleberry</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tangle picker</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the turnstone.</cd> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gle*fish`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The sea adder, or great pipefish of Europe.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gling*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tangling manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Entangled; intricate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Covered with tangle, or seaweed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Prone, helpless, on the <qex>tangly</qex> beach he lay.</q> <rj><qau>Falconer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"go</hw> <pr>(t<acr/<nsm/"g<omac/; <it>Sp.</it> t<aum/<nsm/"g<omac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>Tangos</plw> <pr>(-g<omac/z)</pr></plu>. <ety>[Sp., a certain dance.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A difficult dance in two-four time characterized by graceful posturing, frequent pointing positions, and a great variety of steps, including the cross step and turning steps. The dance is of Spanish origin, and is believed to have been in its original form a part of the fandango.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Any of various popular forms derived from this.</def> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>a musical tune appropriate for this dance.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gram</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Trangram</er>.]</ety> <def>A Chinese toy made by cutting a square of thin wood, or other suitable material, into seven pieces, as shown in the cut, these pieces being capable of combination in various ways, so as to form a great number of different figures. It is now often used in primary schools as a means of instruction.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tangue</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The tenrec.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"gun</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A piebald variety of the horse, native of Thibet.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tang"whaup</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The whimbrel.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"i*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>An aroid plant (<spn>Caladium sagitt\'91folium</spn>), the leaves of which are boiled and eaten in the West Indies.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tannier</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ir. <ets>tanaiste</ets>, <ets>tanaise</ets>, second, the second person in rank, the presumptive or apparent heir to a prince.]</ety> <def>In Ireland, a lord or proprietor of a tract of land or of a castle, elected by a family, under the system of tanistry.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>This family [the O'Hanlons] were <qex>tanists</qex> of a large territory within the present county of Armagh.</q> <rj><qau>M. A. Lower.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ist*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tanist</er>.]</ety> <def>In Ireland, a tenure of family lands by which the proprietor had only a life estate, to which he was admitted by election.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The primitive intention seems to have been that the inheritance should descend to the oldest or most worthy of the blood and name of the deceased. This was, in reality, giving it to the strongest; and the practice often occasioned bloody feuds in families, for which reason it was abolished under James I.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"nite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A firm composition of emery and a certain kind of cement, used for making grinding wheels, slabs, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank</hw> <pr>(t<acr/<nsm/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small Indian dry measure, averaging 240 grains in weight; also, a Bombay weight of 72 grains, for pearls.</def> <rj><au>Simmonds.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank</hw> <pr>(t<acr/<nsm/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Pg. <ets>tanque</ets>, L. <ets>stangum</ets> a pool; or perhaps of East Indian origin. Cf. <er>Stank</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A large basin or cistern; an artificial receptacle for liquids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A pond, pool, or small lake, natural or artificial.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>We stood in the afterglow on the bank of the <qex>tank</qex> and saw the ducks come home.</q> <rj><qau>F. Remington.</qau></rj></p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tanks</qex> are full and the grass is high.</q> <rj><qau>Lawson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>a heavily armored combat vehicle which moves on caterpillar treads, rather than wheels. It typically carries a cannon and a heavy machine, and sometimes other weapons. It is the main distinguishing weapon of an <partof>armored division</partof>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>a jail cell for temporarily holding prisoners, as in a police station.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tank engine</b></col>, <cd>a locomotive which carries the water and fuel it requires, thus dispensing with a tender.</cd> -- <col><b>Tank iron</b></col>, <cd>plate iron thinner than boiler plate, and thicker than sheet iron or stovepipe iron.</cd> -- <col><b>Tank worm</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a small nematoid worm found in the water tanks of India, supposed by some to be the young of the Guinea worm.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ka</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A kind of boat used in Canton. It is about 25 feet long and is often rowed by women. Called also <altname>tankia</altname>.</def> <rj><au>S. W. Williams.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank"age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act or process of putting or storing in tanks.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fees charged for storage in tanks.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The capacity or contents of a tank or tanks.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Agric.)</fld> <def>Waste matter from tanks; esp., the dried nitrogenous residue from tanks in which fat has been rendered, used as a fertilizer.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank"ard</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tanquart</ets>; cf. OD. <ets>tanckaert</ets>; of uncertain origin.]</ety> <def>A large drinking vessel, especially one with a cover.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Marius was the first who drank out of a silver <qex>tankard</qex>, after the manner of Bacchus.</q> <rj><qau>Arbuthnot.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ki*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>See <er>Tanka</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tinkling.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tank ship</hw>, <hw>Tank vessel</hw> }</mhw>. <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A vessel fitted with tanks for the carrying of oil or other liquid in bulk; -- called also <altname>tanker</altname>. A tank ship of very large capacity is called a <stype>supertanker</stype>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank" top`</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a sleeveless and collarless shirt with wide shoulder straps and no front opening, often close-fitting and low-cut.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tank war"fare</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>combat between tanks of opposing armies.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One tanned by the sun.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Hot summer's <qex>tanlings</qex> and<br/
-The shrinking slaves of winter.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"na*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>That may be tanned.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"nage</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tanning; the act, operation, or result of tanning.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They should have got his cheek fresh <qex>tannage</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>R. Browning.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tannate</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tannic acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ner</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One whose occupation is to tan hides, or convert them into leather by the use of tan.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ner</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Etym. uncertain.]</ety> <def>A sixpence.</def> <mark>[Slang, Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ner*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tanneries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tannerie</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A place where the work of tanning is carried on.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The art or process of tanning.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Carlyle.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"nic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to tan; derived from, or resembling, tan; <as>as, <ex>tannic</ex> acid</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tannic acid</b></col>. <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>An acid obtained from nutgalls as a yellow amorphous substance, <chform>C14H10O9</chform>, having an astringent taste, and forming with ferric salts a bluish-black compound, which is the basis of common ink. Called also <altname>tannin</altname>, and <altname>gallotannic acid</altname>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>By extension, any one of a series of astringent substances resembling tannin proper, widely diffused through the vegetable kingdom, as in oak bark, willow, catechu, tea, coffee, etc.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ni*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Tanier</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ni*gen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tann</ets>in + <ets>-gen</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Pharm.)</fld> <def>A compound obtained as a yellowish gray powder by the action of acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride or ordinary tannic acid. It is used as an intestinal astringent, and locally in rhinitis and pharyngitis.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"nin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tannin</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Same as <cref>Tannic acid</cref>, under <er>Tannic</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ning</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or process of converting skins into leather. See <er>Tan</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, 1.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"rec</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tenrec</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tansaye</ets>, F. <ets>tanaise</ets>; cf. It. & Sp. <ets>tanaceto</ets>, NL. <ets>tanacetum</ets>, Pg. <ets>atanasia</ets>, <ets>athanasia</ets>, Gr. <grk>'aqanasi`a</grk> immortality, fr. <grk>'aqa`natos</grk> immortal; <grk>'a</grk> priv. + <grk>qa`natos</grk> death.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Any plant of the composite genus <gen>Tanacetum</gen>. The common tansy (<spn>Tanacetum vulgare</spn>) has finely divided leaves, a strong aromatic odor, and a very bitter taste. It is used for medicinal and culinary purposes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A dish common in the seventeenth century, made of eggs, sugar, rose water, cream, and the juice of herbs, baked with butter in a shallow dish.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Pepys.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Double tansy</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a variety of the common tansy with the leaves more dissected than usual.</cd> -- <col><b>Tansy mustard</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a plant (<spn>Sisymbrium canescens</spn>) of the Mustard family, with tansylike leaves.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Taint</er> tincture.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small scarlet arachnid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tantalic acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*tal"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to tantalum; derived from, or containing, tantalum; specifically, designating any one of a series of acids analogous to nitric acid and the polyacid compounds of phosphorus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*lism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tantalize</er>.]</ety> <def>A punishment like that of Tantalus; a teasing or tormenting by the hope or near approach of good which is not attainable; tantalization.</def> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Is not such a provision like <qex>tantalism</qex> to this people?</q> <rj><qau>Josiah Quincy.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*lite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tantalite</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A heavy mineral of an iron-black color and submetallic luster. It is essentially a tantalate of iron.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan`ta*li*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of tantalizing, or state of being tantalized.</def> <rj><au>Gayton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*lize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tantalized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tantalizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[From <er>Tantalus</er>: cf. F. <ets>tantaliser</ets>.]</ety> <def>To tease or torment by presenting some good to the view and exciting desire, but continually frustrating the expectations by keeping that good out of reach; to tease; to torment.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Thy vain desires, at strife<br/
-Within themselves, have <qex>tantalized</qex> thy life.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To tease; vex; irritate; provoke.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Tantalize</er>, <er>Disappoint</er>. To <xex>disappoint</xex> is literally to <xex>do away</xex> with what was (or was taken to be) <xex>appointed</xex>; hence the peculiar pain from hopes thus dashed to the ground. To <xex>tantalize</xex>, a much stronger term, describes a most distressing form of disappointment, as in the case of Tantalus, the Phrygian king. To <xex>tantalize</xex> is to visit with the bitterest disappointment -- to torment by exciting hopes or expectations which can never be realized.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*li`zer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tantalizes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*li`zing*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tantalizing or teasing manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. So named on account of the perplexity and difficulty encounterd by its discoverer (Ekeberg) in isolating it. See <er>Tantalus</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare nonmetallic element found in certain minerals, as tantalite, samarskite, and fergusonite, and isolated as a dark powder which becomes steel-gray by burnishing. Symbol Ta. Atomic weight 182.0. Formerly called also <altname>tantalium</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*lus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <grk>Ta`ntalos</grk>.]</ety> <fld>(Gr. Myth.)</fld> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A Phrygian king who was punished in the lower world by being placed in the midst of a lake whose waters reached to his chin but receded whenever he attempted to allay his thirst, while over his head hung branches laden with choice fruit which likewise receded whenever he stretched out his hand to grasp them.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of wading birds comprising the wood ibises.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tantalus's cup</b></col> <fld>(Physics)</fld>, <cd>a philosophical toy, consisting of a cup, within which is the figure of a man, and within the figure a siphon, the longer arm of which passes down through the bottom of the cup, and allows the escape of any liquid that may be poured in, when it reaches as high as the bend of the siphon, which is just below the level of the mouth of the figure in the cup.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*mount`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tant</ets> so much (L. <ets>tantus</ets>) + E. <ets>amount</ets>.]</ety> <def>Equivalent in value, signification, or effect.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A usage nearly <qex>tantamount</qex> to constitutional right.</q> <rj><qau>Hallam.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The certainty that delay, under these circumstances, was <qex>tantamount</qex> to ruin.</q> <rj><qau>De Quincey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"ta*mount`</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To be tantamount or equivalent; to amount.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*tiv"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[Said to be from the note of a hunting horn.]</ety> <def>Swiftly; speedily; rapidly; -- a fox-hunting term; <as>as, to ride <ex>tantivy</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*tiv"y</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A rapid, violent gallop; an impetuous rush.</def> <rj><au>Cleverland.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan*tiv"y</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To go away in haste.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"tra</hw> <pr>(t<acr/n"tr<adot/; t<ucr/n"tr<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Skr.]</ety> <fld>(Hinduism)</fld> <def>A ceremonial treatise related to Puranic and magic literature; esp., one of the sacred works of the worshipers of Sakti.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tan"tric</wf> <pr>(t<acr/n"tr<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"trism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The system of doctrines and rites taught in the tantras.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tan"trist</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"trum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A whim; an affected air.</def> <mark>[Colloq. and archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Thackeray.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A display of ill-humor, especially a demonstration of rage or frustration by shouting or violent physical movements, such as the stamping of feet; called also <altname>temper tantrum</altname>. It is usually associated with children, but is sometimes seen in adults.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <mark>[fig.]</mark> <def>A display of anger expressed by irrationally striking out at innocent targets or inanimate objects; <as>as, the governor was so insulted by the article, he threw a temper <ex>tantrum</ex> and cancelled the ceremony</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tan"yard`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An inclosure where the tanning of leather is carried on; a tannery.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tan`y*stom"a*ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ to stretch + <?/, <?/, mouth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A division of dipterous insects in which the proboscis is large and contains lancelike mandibles and maxill\'91. The horseflies and robber flies are examples.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"o*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One of the popular religions of China, sanctioned by the state.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ta"o*ist</wf>, <pos>a. & n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tao`tai"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Chin. <ets>tao</ets> circuit + <ets>t'ai</ets>, a title of respect.]</ety> <def>In China, an official at the head of the civil and military affairs of a circuit, which consists of two or more <xex>fu</xex>, or territorial departments; -- called also, by foreigners, <altname>intendant of circuit</altname>. Foreign consuls and commissioners associated with taotais as superintendants of trade at the treaty ports are ranked with the taotai.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tapped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tapping</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>taper</ets> to strike; of Teutonic origin; cf. dial. G. <ets>tapp</ets>, <ets>tapps</ets>, a blow, <ets>tappe</ets> a paw, fist, G. <ets>tappen</ets> to grope.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To strike with a slight or gentle blow; to touch gently; to rap lightly; to pat; <as>as, to <ex>tap</ex> one with the hand or a cane</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To put a new sole or heel on; <as>as, to <ex>tap</ex> shoes</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tape</ets>. See <er>Tap</er> to strike.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A gentle or slight blow; a light rap; a pat.</def> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A piece of leather fastened upon the bottom of a boot or shoe in repairing or renewing the sole or heel.</def>
-<-- a piece of metal so fastened, used to reduce wear on the shoe, or for the purpose of tap dancing. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>A signal, by drum or trumpet, for extinguishing all lights in soldiers' quarters and retiring to bed, -- usually given about a quarter of an hour after tattoo.</def> <rj><au>Wilhelm.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To strike a gentle blow.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>t\'91ppa</ets>, akin to D. <ets>tap</ets>, G. <ets>zapfen</ets>, OHG. <ets>zapfo</ets>, Dan. <ets>tap</ets>, Sw. <ets>tapp</ets>, Icel. <ets>tappi</ets>. Cf. <er>Tampion</er>, <er>Tip</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A hole or pipe through which liquor is drawn.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A plug or spile for stopping a hole pierced in a cask, or the like; a faucet.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Liquor drawn through a tap; hence, a certain kind or quality of liquor; <as>as, a liquor of the same <ex>tap</ex></as>.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A place where liquor is drawn for drinking; a taproom; a bar.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A tool for forming an internal screw, as in a nut, consisting of a hardened steel male screw grooved longitudinally so as to have cutting edges.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>On tap</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>Ready to be drawn; <as>as, ale <ex>on tap</ex></as>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>Broached, or furnished with a tap; <as>as, a barrel <ex>on tap</ex></as>.</cd> -- <col><b>Plug tap</b></col> <fld>(Mech.)</fld>, <cd>a screw-cutting tap with a slightly tapering end.</cd> -- <col><b>Tap bolt</b></col>, <cd>a bolt with a head on one end and a thread on the other end, to be screwed into some fixed part, instead of passing through the part and receiving a nut. See <xex>Illust.</xex> under <er>Bolt</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tap cinder</b></col> <fld>(Metal.)</fld>, <cd>the slag of a puddling furnace.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To pierce so as to let out, or draw off, a fluid; <as>as, to <ex>tap</ex> a cask, a tree, a tumor, a keg of beer, etc.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, to draw resources from (a reservoir) in any analogous way; <as>as, to <ex>tap</ex> someone's knowledge of the Unix system; to <ex>tap</ex> the treasury.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To draw, or cause to flow, by piercing.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He has been <qex>tapping</qex> his liquors.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>To form an internal screw in (anything) by means of a tool called a <xex>tap</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>tap</ex> a nut, a pipe, or tubing</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>to connect a listening device to (a telephone or telegraph line) secretly, for the purpose of hearing private conversations; also, to obtain or record (information) by tapping; -- a technique used by law enforcement agencies investigating suspected criminals. In the United States it is illegal without a court order permitting it.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta"pa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of cloth prepared by the Polynesians from the inner bark of the paper mulberry; -- sometimes called also <altname>kapa</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Tap`a*de"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Tap`a*de"ro</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos>} <altsp>[Also <asp>tapidero</asp>.]</altsp> <ety>[Sp. <ets>tapadera</ets> lid, cover.]</ety> <def>One of the leather hoods which cover the stirrups of a Mexican saddle.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta`pa*yax"in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A Mexican spinous lizard (<spn>Phrynosoma orbiculare</spn>) having a head somewhat like that of a toad; -- called also <altname>horned toad</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>t\'91ppe</ets> a fillet. Cf. <er>Tapestry</er>, <er>Tippet</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A narrow fillet or band of cotton or linen; a narrow woven fabric used for strings and the like; <as>as, curtains tied with <ex>tape</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A tapeline; also, a metallic ribbon so marked as to serve as a tapeline; <as>as, a steel <ex>tape</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Red tape</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Red</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tape grass</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a plant (<spn>Vallisneria spiralis</spn>) with long ribbonlike leaves, growing in fresh or brackish water; -- called also <altname>fresh-water eelgrass</altname>, and, in Maryland, <altname>wild celery</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tape needle</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Bodkin</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Taped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taping</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To furnish with tape; to fasten, tie, bind, or the like, with tape;</def> <specif>specif.</specif> <fld>(Elec.)</fld>, <def>to cover (a wire) with insulating tape.</def></p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>to record on audio tape or video tape; -- either directly, at the scene of the action tape, or indirectly, as from a broadcast of the action.</def> \'bdI was busy when that episode was on TV, but I <ex>taped</ex> it and watched it later.\'b8<br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape deck</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>an electroinic device for recording and playing back sounds on magnetic tape; usually it needs to be connected to an amplifier system for playback.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape"line`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A painted tape, marked with linear dimensions, as inches, feet, etc., and often inclosed in a case, -- used for measuring.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>tapur</ets>, <ets>tapor</ets>, <ets>taper</ets>; cf. Ir. <ets>tapar</ets>, W. <ets>tampr</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A small wax candle; a small lighted wax candle; hence, a small light.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Get me a <qex>taper</qex> in my study, Lucius.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A tapering form; gradual diminution of thickness in an elongated object; <as>as, the <ex>taper</ex> of a spire</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1474 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Supposed to be from <ets>taper</ets>, n., in allusion to its form.]</ety> <def>Regularly narrowed toward the point; becoming small toward one end; conical; pyramidical; <as>as, <ex>taper</ex> fingers</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tapered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tapering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To become gradually smaller toward one end; <as>as, a sugar loaf <ex>tapers</ex> toward one end</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To make or cause to taper.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape recorder</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>an electroinic device for recording and playing back sounds on magnetic tape; it often has an integrated microphone, amplifier, and speaker, and in such cases requires no additional equipment other than the magnetic tape for recording or playback.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape recording</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a recording of sound or video on magnetic tape.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>the process of recording sound or video on magnetic tape.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"pered</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Lighted with a taper or tapers; <as>as, a <ex>tapered</ex> choir</as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>T. Warton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per*ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Becoming gradually smaller toward one end.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ta"per*ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"per*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being taper; tapering form; taper.</def> <rj><au>Shenstone.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"es*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tapestries</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[F. <ets>tapissere</ets>, fr. <ets>tapisser</ets> to carpet, to hang, or cover with tapestry, fr. <ets>tapis</ets> a carpet, carpeting, LL. <ets>tapecius</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tapete</ets> carpet, tapestry, Gr. <?/, <?/. Cf. <er>Tapis</er>, <er>Tippet</er>.]</ety> <def>A fabric, usually of worsted, worked upon a warp of linen or other thread by hand, the designs being usually more or less pictorial and the stuff employed for wall hangings and the like. The term is also applied to different kinds of embroidery.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tapestry carpet</b></col>, <cd>a kind of carpet, somewhat resembling Brussels, in which the warp is printed before weaving, so as to produce the figure in the cloth.</cd> -- <col><b>Tapestry moth</b></col>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <cd>Same as <cref>Carpet moth</cref>, under <er>Carpet</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"es*try</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tapestried</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tapestrying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To adorn with tapestry, or as with tapestry.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The Trosachs wound, as now, between gigantic walls of rock <qex>tapestried</qex> with broom and wild roses.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"es*try bee"tle</hw>. <def>A small black dermestoid beetle (<spn>Attagenus piceus</spn>) whose larva feeds on tapestry, carpets, silk, fur, flour, and various other goods.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"et</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tapete</ets>. See <er>Tapestry</er>.]</ety> <def>Worked or figured stuff; tapestry.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"e*ti</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tapetis</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Braz.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small South American hare (<spn>Lepus Braziliensis</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta*pe"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from L. <ets>tapete</ets> a carpet, a tapestry.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>An area in the pigmented layer of the choroid coat of the eye in many animals, which has an iridescent or metallic luster and helps to make the eye visible in the dark. Sometimes applied to the whole layer of pigmented epithelium of the choroid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tape"worm`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of numerous species of cestode worms belonging to T\'91nia and many allied genera. The body is long, flat, and composed of numerous segments or proglottids varying in shape, those toward the end of the body being much larger and longer than the anterior ones, and containing the fully developed sexual organs. The head is small, destitute of a mouth, but furnished with two or more suckers (which vary greatly in shape in different genera), and sometimes, also, with hooks for adhesion to the walls of the intestines of the animals in which they are parasitic. The larv\'91 (see <er>Cysticercus</er>) live in the flesh of various creatures, and when swallowed by another animal of the right species develop into the mature tapeworm in its intestine. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ Three species are common parasites of man: the <stype>pork tapeworm</stype> (<spn>T\'91nia solium</spn>), the larva of which is found in pork; the <stype>beef tapeworm</stype> (<spn>T\'91nia mediocanellata</spn>), the larva of which lives in the flesh of young cattle; and the <stype>broad tapeworm</stype> (<spn>Bothriocephalus latus</spn>) which is found chiefly in the inhabitants of the mountainous regions of Europe and Asia. See also <er>Echinococcus</er>, <er>Cysticercus</er>, <er>Proglottis</er>, and 2d <er>Measles</er>, 4.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"house`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A house where liquors are retailed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Taph*ren"chy*ma</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ a trench + <ets>enchyma</ets>, as in <ets>parenchyma</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Bothrenchyma</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"i*nage</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tapish</er>.]</ety> <def>A lurking or skulking.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Gower.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap`i*o"ca</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Braz. <ets>tapioka</ets>: cf. Pg., Sp. & F. <ets>tapioca</ets>.]</ety> <def>A coarsely granular substance obtained by heating, and thus partly changing, the moistened starch obtained from the roots of the cassava. It is much used in puddings and as a thickening for soups. See <er>Cassava</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"pir</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Braz. <ets>tapy'ra</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tapir</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of large odd-toed ungulates belonging to <gen>Tapirus</gen>, <gen>Elasmognathus</gen>, and allied genera. They have a long prehensile upper lip, short ears, short and stout legs, a short, thick tail, and short, close hair. They have three toes on the hind feet, and four toes on the fore feet, but the outermost toe is of little use.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The best-known species are the Indian tapir (<spn>Tapirus Indicus</spn>), native of the <geog>East Indies</geog> and <geog>Malacca</geog>, which is black with a broad band of white around the middle, and the common American tapir (<spn>Tapirus Americanus</spn>), which, when adult, is dull brown. Several others species inhabit the Andes and Central America.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tapir tiger</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the wallah.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"pir*oid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tapir</ets> + <ets>-oid</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Allied to the tapir, or the Tapir family.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"pis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tapestry</er>.]</ety> <def>Tapestry; formerly, the cover of a council table.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>On the tapis</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Upon the tapis</b></col></mcol>, <cd>on the table, or under consideration; <as>as, to lay a motion in Parliament <ex>on the tapis</ex></as>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"is</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To cover or work with figures like tapestry.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"is*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tapissier</ets>.]</ety> <def>A maker of tapestry; an upholsterer.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[F. se <ets>tapir</ets> to squat.]</ety> <def>To lie close to the ground, so as to be concealed; to squat; to crouch; hence, to hide one's self.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tappis</asp>, <asp>tappish</asp>, <asp>tappice</asp>.]</altsp> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>As a hound that, having roused a hart,<br/
-Although he <qex>tappish</qex> ne'er so soft.</q> <rj><qau>Chapman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"lash`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Bad small beer; also, the refuse or dregs of liquor.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>taplash</qex> of strong ale and wine.</q> <rj><qau>Taylor (1630).</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"lings</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>The strong double leathers by which the two parts of a flail are united.</def> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Ta*po"a ta"fa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small carnivorous marsupial (<spn>Phascogale penicillata</spn>) having long, soft fur, and a very long tail with a tuft of long hairs at the end; -- called also <altname>brush-tailed phascogale</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"pen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An obstruction, or indigestible mass, found in the intestine of bears and other animals during hibernation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The lesser spotted woodpecker (<spn>Dendrocopus minor</spn>); -- called also <altname>tapperer</altname>, <altname>tabberer</altname>, <altname>little wood pie</altname>, <altname>barred woodpecker</altname>, <altname>wood tapper</altname>, <altname>hickwall</altname>, and <altname>pump borer</altname>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"pes*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tapster</er>.]</ety> <def>A female tapster.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"pet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A lever or projection moved by some other piece, as a cam, or intended to tap or touch something else, with a view to produce change or regulate motion.</def> <rj><au>G. Francis.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tappet motion</b></col>, <cd>a valve motion worked by tappets from a reciprocating part, without an eccentric or cam, -- used in steam pumps, etc.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"pet rod</hw>. <fld>(Mech.)</fld> <def>A rod carrying a tappet or tappets, as one for closing the valves in a Cornish pumping engine.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tap"pice</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tap"pis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>See <er>Tapish</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"pit hen`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <sn>1.</sn> <def>A hen having a tuft of feathers on her head.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A measuring pot holding one quart (according to some, three quarts); -- so called from a knob on the lid, thought to resemble a crested hen.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap*poon"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>tamp\'a2n</ets> a stopper.]</ety> <fld>(Irrigation)</fld> <def>A piece of wood or sheet metal fitted into a ditch to dam up the water so as to overflow a field.</def> <mark>[U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"room`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A room where liquors are kept on tap; a barroom.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The ambassador was put one night into a miserable <qex>taproom</qex>, full of soldiers smoking.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"root`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The root of a plant which penetrates the earth directly downward to a considerable depth without dividing.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tap"ster</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>t\'91ppestre</ets> a female tapster. See <er>Tap</er> a plug, pipe, and <er>-ster</er>.]</ety> <def>One whose business is to tap or draw ale or other liquor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"qua-nut`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A Central American name for the ivory nut.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Abbrev. from <ets>tarpaulin</ets>.]</ety> <def>A sailor; a seaman.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark> <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>terre</ets>, <ets>tarre</ets>, AS. <ets>teru</ets>, <ets>teoru</ets>; akin to D. <ets>teer</ets>, G. <ets>teer</ets>, <ets>theer</ets>, Icel. <ets>tjara</ets>, Sw. <ets>tj\'84ra</ets>, Dan. <ets>ti\'91re</ets>, and to E. <ets>tree</ets>. \'fb63. See <er>Tree</er>.]</ety> <def>A thick, black, viscous liquid obtained by the distillation of wood, coal, etc., and having a varied composition according to the temperature and material employed in obtaining it.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Coal tar</b></col>. <cd>See in the Vocabulary.</cd> -- <col><b>Mineral tar</b></col> <fld>(Min.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of soft native bitumen.</cd> -- <col><b>Tar board</b></col>, <cd>a strong quality of millboard made from junk and old tarred rope.</cd> <au>Knight.</au> -- <col><b>Tar water</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A cold infusion of tar in water, used as a medicine.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>The ammoniacal water of gas works.</cd> -- <col><b>Wood tar</b></col>, <cd>tar obtained from wood. It is usually obtained by the distillation of the wood of the pine, spruce, or fir, and is used in varnishes, cements, and to render ropes, oakum, etc., impervious to water.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tarred</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tarring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To smear with tar, or as with tar; <as>as, to <ex>tar</ex> ropes; to <ex>tar</ex> cloth.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tar and feather a person</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Feather</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos></cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"a*nis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taranis</ets>, from the Celtic; cf. W. & Corn. <ets>taran</ets> thunder.]</ety> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>A Celtic divinity, regarded as the evil principle, but confounded by the Romans with Jupiter.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar`an*tass"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Russ. <ets>tarantas'</ets>.]</ety> <def>A low four-wheeled carriage used in Russia. The carriage box rests on two long, springy poles which run from the fore to the hind axletree. When snow falls, the wheels are taken off, and the body is mounted on a sledge.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar`an*tel"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A rapid and delirious sort of Neapolitan dance in 6-8 time, which moves in whirling triplets; -- so called from a popular notion of its being a remedy against the poisonous bite of the <xex>tarantula</xex>. Some derive its name from Taranto in Apulia.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Music suited to such a dance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ant*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It. <ets>tarantismo</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tarentisme</ets>. See <er>Tarantula</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A nervous affection producing melancholy, stupor, and an uncontrollable desire to dance. It was supposed to be produced by the bite of the tarantula, and considered to be incapable of cure except by protracted dancing to appropriate music.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tarentism</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*ran"tu*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Tarantulas</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>, L. <plw>Tarantul\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. It. <ets>tarantola</ets>, fr. L. <ets>Tarentum</ets>, now <ets>Taranto</ets>, in the south of Italy.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of large spiders, popularly supposed to be very venomous, especially the European species (<spn>Tarantula apuli\'91</spn>). The tarantulas of Texas and adjacent countries are large species of Mygale.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tarentula</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tarantula killer</b></col>, <cd>a very large wasp (<spn>Pompilus formosus</spn>), which captures the Texan tarantula (<spn>Mygale Hentzii</spn>) and places it in its nest as food for its young, after paralyzing it by a sting.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*ran"tu*la`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Bitten by a tarantula; affected with tarantism.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*bog"an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Toboggan</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*boosh"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>tarb<?/sh</ets>; perhaps from Per. <ets>sar-posh</ets> headdress: cf. F. <ets>tarbouch</ets>.]</ety> <def>A red cap worn by Turks and other Eastern nations, sometimes alone and sometimes swathed with linen or other stuff to make a turban. See <er>Fez</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*da"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tardatio</ets>, fr. <ets>tardare</ets>, <ets>tardatum</ets>, to retard, delay, fr. <ets>tardus</ets> slow.]</ety> <def>The act of retarding, or delaying; retardation.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar`di*gra"da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Tardigrade</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A tribe of edentates comprising the sloths. They are noted for the slowness of their movements when on the ground. See <er>Sloth</er>, 3.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order of minute aquatic arachnids; -- called also <altname>bear animalcules</altname>, <altname>sloth animalcules</altname>, and <altname>water bears</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"di*grade</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tardigradus</ets>; <ets>tardus</ets> slow + <ets>gradi</ets> to step: cf. F. <ets>tardigrade</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Moving or stepping slowly; slow-paced.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>G. Eliot.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the Tardigrada.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"di*grade</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Tardigrada.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"di*gra`dous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Moving slowly; slow-paced.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"di*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tardy manner; slowly.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"di*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tardy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar`di*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tardiness.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>To instruct them to avoid all snares of <qex>tarditation</qex>, in the Lord's affairs.</q> <rj><qau>Herrick.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"di*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tarditas</ets>.]</ety> <def>Slowness; tardiness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir K. Digby.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar"do</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>Slow; -- a direction to perform a passage slowly.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar"do</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp., slow, L. <ets>tardus</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A sloth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"dy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tardier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tardiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[F. <ets>tardif</ets>, fr. (assumed) LL. <ets>tardivus</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tardus</ets> slow.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Moving with a slow pace or motion; slow; not swift.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>And check the <qex>tardy</qex> flight of time.</q> <rj><qau>Sandys.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q><qex>Tardy</qex> to vengeance, and with mercy brave.</q> <rj><qau>Prior.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Not being inseason; late; dilatory; -- opposed to <xex>prompt</xex>; <as>as, to be <ex>tardy</ex> in one's payments</as>.</def> <rj><au>Arbuthnot.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The <qex>tardy</qex> plants in our cold orchards placed.</q> <rj><qau>Waller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Unwary; unready.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Hudibras.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Criminal; guilty.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Collier.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Slow; dilatory; tedious; reluctant. See <er>Slow</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"dy</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To make tardy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tare</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <mark>obs.</mark> <pos>imp.</pos> <mord>of <er>Tear</er></mord>. <def>Tore.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tare</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Prov. E. <ets>tare</ets> brisk, eager, OE. <ets>tarefitch</ets> the wild vetch.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A weed that grows among wheat and other grain; -- alleged by modern naturalists to be the <spn>Lolium temulentum</spn>, or darnel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Didst not thou sow good seed in thy field? From whence then hath it <qex>tares</qex>?</q> <rj><qau>Matt. xiii. 27.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The \'bddarnel\'b8 is said to be the <qex>tares</qex> of Scripture, and is the only deleterious species belonging to the whole order.</q> <rj><qau>Baird.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A name of several climbing or diffuse leguminous herbs of the genus <gen>Vicia</gen>; especially, the <spn>Vicia sativa</spn>, sometimes grown for fodder.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tare</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tare</ets>; cf. Pr., Sp., Pg., & It. <ets>tara</ets>; all fr. Ar. <ets>tarah</ets> thrown away, removed, fr. <ets>taraha</ets> to reject, remove.]</ety> <fld>(Com.)</fld> <def>Deficientcy in the weight or quantity of goods by reason of the weight of the cask, bag, or whatever contains the commodity, and is weighed with it; hence, the allowance or abatement of a certain weight or quantity which the seller makes to the buyer on account of the weight of such cask, bag, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tare</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tared</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taring</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To ascertain or mark the tare of (goods).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tared</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Weighed; determined; reduced to equal or standard weight; <as>as, <ex>tared</ex> filter papers, used in weighing precipitates</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*ren"te</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tarente</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A harmless lizard of the Gecko family (<spn>Platydactylus Mauritianicus</spn>) found in Southern Europe and adjacent countries, especially among old walls and ruins.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"ent*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tarantism</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*ren"tu*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Tarantula</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Targe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. Cf. <er>Target</er>.]</ety> <def>A shield or target.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Poetic]</mark> \'bdA buckler on a <xex>targe</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"get</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>targette</ets>, dim. of OF. & F. <ets>targe</ets>, of Teutonic origin; cf. AS. <ets>targe</ets>, OD. <ets>targie</ets>, G. <ets>zarge</ets> a frame, case, border, OHG. <ets>zarga</ets>, Icel. <ets>targa</ets> shield.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark; <as>as, he made a good <ex>target</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Surveying)</fld> <def>The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Railroad)</fld> <def>A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A thin cut; a slice; specif., of lamb, a piece consisting of the neck and breast joints.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A tassel or pendent; also, a shred; tatter.</def> <mark>[Obs. Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>A goal for an activity; <as>as, the <ex>target</ex> of this year's fundraising drive is 2 million dollars</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <def>A metallic object toward which a beam of electrons is aimed in a tube designed to generate X-rays; when the electrons strike the <ex>target,</ex> the impact causes emission of X-rays.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>9.</sn> <def>Any object toward which a beam of photons, a laser beam, an electron beam, or a beam of atomic or subatomic particles is aimed.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>10.</sn> <def>A person who is the subject of criticism or ridicule.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"get date</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The date set as a goal for completion of some activity.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"get language</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>the language into which a text is to be translated; -- correlative of <inv>source language</inv>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1475 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"get*ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Furnished, armed, or protected, with a target.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar`get*eer"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who is armed with a target or shield.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>targetier</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"gum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Targums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>. Heb. <plw>Targumim</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Chald. <ets>targ<umac/m</ets> interpretation, fr. <ets>targ\'c7m</ets> to interpret. Cf. <er>Truchman</er>, and <er>Dragoman</er>.]</ety> <def>A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or dialect.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"gum*ist</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The writer of a Targum; one versed in the Targums.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"heel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a native or resident of North Carolina; -- used as a nickname.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"heel state</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>North Carolina; -- used as a nickname.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"iff</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tarif</ets>; cf. Sp. & Pg. <ets>tarifa</ets>, It. <ets>tariffa</ets>; all fr. Ar. <ets>ta'r\'c6f</ets> information, explanation, definition, from <ets>'arafa</ets>, to know, to inform, explain.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A schedule, system, or scheme of duties imposed by the government of a country upon goods imported or exported; <as>as, a revenue <ex>tariff</ex>; a protective <ex>tariff</ex>; Clay's compromise <ex>tariff</ex>. (U. S. 1833).</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ The United States and Great Britain impose no duties on exports; hence, in these countries the <ex>tariff</ex> refers only to imports.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ A tariff may be imposed solely for, and with reference to, the production of revenue (called a <col><b>revenue tariff</b></col>, or <col><b>tariff for revenue</b></col>, or for the artificial fostering of home industries (<col><b>a projective tariff</b></col>), or as a means of coercing foreign governments, as in case of <col><b>retaliatory tariff</b></col>.</note><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The duty, or rate of duty, so imposed; <as>as, the <ex>tariff</ex> on wool; a <ex>tariff</ex> of two cents a pound.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any schedule or system of rates, changes, etc.; <as>as, a <ex>tariff</ex> of fees, or of railroad fares</as>.</def> <rj><au>Bolingbroke.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"iff</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tariffed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tariffing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To make a list of duties on, as goods.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The siskin.</def> <mark>[Prov.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The common tern; -- called also <altname>tarret</altname>, and <altname>tarrock</altname>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"la*tan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of thin, transparent muslin, used for dresses.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tarn</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>terne</ets>, Icel. <ets>tj\'94rn</ets>.]</ety> <def>A mountain lake or pool.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A lofty precipice in front,<br/
-A silent <qex>tarn</qex> below.</q> <rj><qau>Wordsworth.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"nish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tarnished</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tarnishing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>ternir</ets>, fr. OHG. <ets>tarnen</ets> to darken, to conceal, hide; akin to OS. <ets>dernian</ets> to hide, AS. <ets>dernan</ets>, <ets>dyrnan</ets>, OHG. <ets>tarni</ets> hidden, OS. <ets>derni</ets>, AS. <ets>derne</ets>, <ets>dyrne</ets>. Cf. <er>Dern</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, and see <er>-ish</er>.]</ety> <def>To soil, or change the appearance of, especially by an alternation induced by the air, or by dust, or the like; to diminish, dull, or destroy the luster of; to sully; <as>as, to <ex>tarnish</ex> a metal; to <ex>tarnish</ex> gilding; to <ex>tarnish</ex> the purity of color</as>.</def> \'bd<xex>Tarnished</xex> lace.\'b8 <au>Fuller.</au> Used also figuratively; <as>as, to <ex>tarnish</ex> one's honor</as>.<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To sully; stain; dim.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"nish</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To lose luster; to become dull; <as>as, gilding will <ex>tarnish</ex> in a foul air</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Till thy fresh glories, which now shine so bright,<br/
-Grow stale and <qex>tarnish</qex> with our daily sight.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"nish</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The quality or state of being tarnished; stain; soil; blemish.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>A thin film on the surface of a metal, usually due to a slight alteration of the original color; <as>as, the steel <ex>tarnish</ex> in columbite</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"nish*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, tarnishes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"ro</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the Polynesian name.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A name for several aroid plants (<spn>Colocasia antiquorum</spn>, var. <varn>esculenta</varn>, <spn>Colocasia macrorhiza</spn>, etc.), and their rootstocks. They have large ovate-sagittate leaves and large fleshy tuberous rootstocks, which are cooked and used for food in tropical countries.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ot</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.; cf. It. <ets>tarocco</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A game of cards; -- called also <altname>taroc</altname>.</def> <rj><au>Hoyle.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>any of a set of 22 playing cards which bear allegorical images representing various objects or influences affecting human life, and widely used in fortunetelling; they are also used as trumps in the game of taroc. Various images are used by different artists to represent the themes of each card.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"pan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A wild horse found in the region of the Caspian Sea.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*pau"lin</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tar</ets> + <ets>palling</ets> a covering, pall to cover. See <er>Pall</er> a covering.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A piece of canvas covered with tar or a waterproof composition, used for covering the hatches of a ship, hammocks, boats, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A hat made of, or covered with, painted or tarred cloth, worn by sailors and others.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Hence, a sailor; a seaman; a tar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>To a landsman, these <qex>tarpaulins</qex>, as they were called, seemed a strange and half-savage race.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*pe"ian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Tarpeius</ets>, prop., pertaining to <etsep>Tarpeia</etsep>.]</ety> <def>Pertaining to or designating a rock or peak of the Capitoline hill, Rome, from which condemned criminals were hurled.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"pon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tarpum</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"pum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A very large marine fish (<spn>Megapolis Atlanticus</spn>) of the Southern United States and the West Indies. It often becomes six or more feet in length, and has large silvery scales. The scales are a staple article of trade, and are used in fancywork. Called also <altname>tarpon</altname>, <altname>sabalo</altname>, <altname>savanilla</altname>, <altname>silverfish</altname>, and <altname>jewfish</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"quin*ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a Tarquin, a king of ancient Rome; proud; haughty; overbearing.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"race</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Trass</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ra*gon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>taragona</ets>, Ar. <ets>tarkh<?/n</ets>; perhaps fr. Gr. <?/ a dragon, or L. <ets>draco</ets>; cf. L. <ets>dracunculus</ets> tarragon. Cf. <er>Dragon</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the genus <gen>Artemisa</gen> (<spn>Artemisa dracunculus</spn>), much used in France for flavoring vinegar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ras</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Trass</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tarre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tarien</ets>, <ets>terien</ets>, to irritate, provoke, AS. <ets>tergan</ets> to pull, pluck, torment; probably akin to E. <ets>tear</ets>, v. t. \'fb63. Cf. <er>Tarry</er>, <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <def>To set on, as a dog; to incite.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ri*ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act or time of tarrying; delay; lateness.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And after two days' <qex>tarriance</qex> there, returned.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ri*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, tarries.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ri*er</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A kind of dig; a terrier.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"rock</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Greenland <ets>tattarock</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The young of the kittiwake gull before the first molt.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The common guillemot.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <sd>(c)</sd> <def>The common tern.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Tar</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>Consisting of, or covered with, tar; like tar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tarried</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tarrying</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>tarien</ets> to irritate (see <er>Tarre</er>); but with a change of sense probably due to confusion with OE. <ets>targen</ets> to delay, OF. <ets>targier</ets>, fr. (assumed) LL. <ets>tardicare</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tardare</ets> to make slow, to tarry, fr. <ets>tardus</ets> slow. Cf. <er>Tardy</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To stay or remain behind; to wait.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tarry</qex> ye for us, until we come again.</q> <rj><qau>Ex. xxiv. 14.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To delay; to put off going or coming; to loiter.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Come down unto me, <qex>tarry</qex> not.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xic. 9.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>One <qex>tarried</qex> here, there hurried one.</q> <rj><qau>Emerson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To stay; to abide; to continue; to lodge.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tarry</qex> all night, and wash your feet.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xix. 2.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To abide; continue; lodge; await; loiter.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ry</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To delay; to defer; to put off.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tarry</qex> us here no longer than to-morrow.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To wait for; to stay or stop for.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He that will have a cake out of the wheat must needs <qex>tarry</qex> the grinding.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He plodded on, . . . <qex>tarrying</qex> no further question.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"ry</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Stay; stop; delay.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>E. Lodge.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"sal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the tarsus (either of the foot or eye).</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A tarsal bone or cartilage; a tarsale.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tarsal tetter</b></col> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>an eruptive disease of the edges of the eyelids; a kind of bleareye.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"sal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tercel</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar*sa"le</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tarsalia</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>One of the bones or cartilages of the tarsus; esp., one of the series articulating with the metatarsals.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tarse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tassel</er>, <er>Tiercel</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Falconry)</fld> <def>The male falcon.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tarse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tarse</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>tarsus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*sec"to*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tarsus</ets> + Gr. <?/ to cut out.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The operation of excising one or more of the bones of the tarsus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"sel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A male hawk. See <er>Tercel</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar"si</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <def><pos>pl.</pos> of <er>Tarsus</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ \'d8<hw>Tar"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, \'d8<hw>Tar`si*a*tu"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <def>A kind of mosaic in woodwork, much employed in Italy in the fifteenth century and later, in which scrolls and arabesques, and sometimes architectural scenes, landscapes, fruits, flowers, and the like, were produced by inlaying pieces of wood of different colors and shades into panels usually of walnut wood.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"si*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tarsier</ets>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Tarsius</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar"si*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Tarsus</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of nocturnal lemurine mammals having very large eyes and ears, a long tail, and very long proximal tarsal bones; -- called also <altname>malmag</altname>, <altname>spectral lemur</altname>, <altname>podji</altname>, and <altname>tarsier</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"so-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A combining form used in anatomy to indicate <xex>connection with</xex>, or <xex>relation to</xex>, <xex>the tarsus</xex>; <as>as, <ex>tarso</ex>metatarsus</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar`so*met`a*tar"sal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to both the tarsus and metatarsus; <as>as, the <ex>tarsometatarsal</ex> articulations</as>.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to the tarsometatarsus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tar`so*met`a*tar"sus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tarsometatarsi</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The large bone next the foot in the leg of a bird. It is formed by the union of the distal part of the tarsus with the metatarsus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*sor"rha*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tarsus</ets> + Gr. <grk>"rafh`</grk> seam, fr. <?/ to sew.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>An operation to diminish the size of the opening between eyelids when enlarged by surrounding cicatrices.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*sot"o*my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tarsus</ets> + Gr. <?/ to cut.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>The operation of cutting or removing the tarsal cartilages.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"sus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tarsi</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ the flat of the foot, the edge of the eyelid. Cf. 2d <er>Tarse</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The ankle; the bones or cartilages of the part of the foot between the metatarsus and the leg, consisting in man of seven short bones.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A plate of dense connective tissue or cartilage in the eyelid of man and many animals; -- called also <altname>tarsal cartilage</altname>, and <altname>tarsal plate</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The foot of an insect or a crustacean. It usually consists of form two to five joints.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tart</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>teart</ets>. \'fb63. Cf. <er>Tear</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Sharp to the taste; acid; sour; <as>as, a <ex>tart</ex> apple</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fig.: Sharp; keen; severe; <as>as, a <ex>tart</ex> reply; <ex>tart</ex> language; a <ex>tart</ex> rebuke.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Why art thou <qex>tart</qex>, my brother?</q> <rj><qau>Bunyan.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tart</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tarte</ets>, F. <ets>tarte</ets>; perhaps originally the same word as <ets>tourte</ets>, LL. <ets>torta</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tortus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>torquere</ets> to twist, bend, wind, because tarts were originally made of a twisted shape. Cf. <er>Torture</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>A species of small open pie, or piece of pastry, containing jelly or conserve; a sort of fruit pie.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"tan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tiretane</ets> linsey-woolsey, akin to Sp. <ets>tirita\'a4a</ets> a sort of thin silk; cf. Sp. <ets>tiritar</ets> to shiver or shake with cold.]</ety> <def>Woolen cloth, checkered or crossbarred with narrow bands of various colors, much worn in the Highlands of Scotland; hence, any pattern of tartan; also, other material of a similar pattern.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>MacCullummore's heart will be as cold as death can make it, when it does not warm to the <qex>tartan</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The sight of the <qex>tartan</qex> inflamed the populace of London with hatred.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tan</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tartane</ets>, or Sp., Pg., or It. <ets>tartana</ets>; all perhaps of Arabic origin.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A small coasting vessel, used in the Mediterranean, having one mast carrying large leteen sail, and a bowsprit with staysail or jib.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tartre</ets> (cf. Pr. <ets>tartari</ets>, Sp., Pg., & It. <ets>tartaro</ets>, LL. <ets>tartarum</ets>, LGr. <?/); perhaps of Arabic origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A reddish crust or sediment in wine casks, consisting essentially of crude cream of tartar, and used in marking pure cream of tartar, tartaric acid, potassium carbonate, black flux, etc., and, in dyeing, as a mordant for woolen goods; -- called also <altname>argol</altname>, <altname>wine stone</altname>, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A correction which often incrusts the teeth, consisting of salivary mucus, animal matter, and phosphate of lime.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Cream of tartar</b></col>. <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Cream</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tartar emetic</b></col> <fld>(Med. Chem.)</fld>, <cd>a double tartrate of potassium and basic antimony. It is a poisonous white crystalline substance having a sweetish metallic taste, and used in medicine as a sudorific and emetic.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <ety>[Per. <ets>T\'bet\'ber</ets>, of Tartar origin.]</ety> <def>A native or inhabitant of Tartary in Asia; a member of any one of numerous tribes, chiefly Moslem, of Turkish origin, inhabiting the Russian Europe; -- written also, more correctly but less usually, <altname>Tatar</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A person of a keen, irritable temper.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To catch a tartar</b></col>, <cd>to lay hold of, or encounter, a person who proves too strong for the assailant.</cd> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"tar</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Tartary in Asia, or the Tartars.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar"tar</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tartare</ets>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Tartarus</er>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*a`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Tartrated.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tar*ta"re*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tar*ta"re*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tartareus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tartar\'82en</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to Tartarus; hellish.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*ta"re*ous</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. 1st <er>Tartarous</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Consisting of tartar; of the nature of tartar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Having the surface rough and crumbling; <as>as, many lichens are <ex>tartareous</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tar*ta"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tar*tar"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Tartary in Asia, or the Tartars.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tartarian lamb</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>Scythian lamb. See <er>Barometz</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*ta"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The name of some kinds of cherries, <as>as the Black <ex>Tartarian</ex>, or the White <ex>Tartarian</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*tar"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to tartar; derived from, or resembling, tartar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tartaric acid</b></col>. <fld>(a)</fld> <cd>An acid widely diffused throughout the vegetable kingdom, as in grapes, mountain-ash berries, etc., and obtained from tartar as a white crystalline substance, <chform>C2H2(OH)2.(CO2H)2</chform>, having a strong pure acid taste. It is used in medicine, in dyeing, calico printing, photography, etc., and also as a substitute for lemon juice. Called also <altname>dextro-tartaric acid</altname>.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>By extension, any one of the series of isomeric acids (racemic acid, levotartaric acid, inactive tartaric acid) of which tartaric acid proper is the type.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Old Chem.)</fld> <def>Potassium carbonate, obtained by the incineration of tartar.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tartarized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tartarizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tartariser</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>To impregnate with, or subject to the action of, tartar.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tartarized antimony</b></col> <fld>(Med. Chem.)</fld>, <cd>tartar emetic.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To cause to resemble the Tartars and their civilization, as by conquest.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tartareux</ets>.]</ety> <def>Containing tartar; consisting of tartar, or partaking of its qualities; tartareous.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tar*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Resembling, or characteristic of, a Tartar; ill-natured; irritable.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The <qex>Tartarous</qex> moods of common men.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"ta*rum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>See 1st <er>Tartar</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"ta*rus</hw> <pr>(t<aum/r"t<adot/*r<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <grk>Ta`rtaros</grk>.]</ety> <fld>(Class. Myth.)</fld> <def>The infernal regions, described in the Iliad as situated as far below Hades as heaven is above the earth, and by later writers as the place of punishment for the spirits of the wicked. By the later poets, also, the name is often used synonymously with <altname>Hades</altname>, or the Lower World in general.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"ta*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tartarus.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1476 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*ti"ni's tones`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[From <ets>Tartini</ets>, an Italian violinist, who discovered them in 1754.]</ety> <def>See the Note under <er>Tone</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tart"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Somewhat tart.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tart"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small tart.</def> <rj><au>V. Knox.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tart"ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tart manner; with acidity.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tart"ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tart.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Acrimony; sourness; keenness; poignancy; severity; asperity; acerbity; harshness. See <er>Acrimony</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*tral"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Tartar</er> the chemical compound.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a white amorphous deliquescent substance, <chform>C8H10O11</chform>; -- called also <altname>ditartaric</altname>, <altname>tartrilic</altname>, or <altname>tartrylic acid</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*tram"ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tartramic acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*tram"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tarto-</ets> + <ets>amic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid which is the primary acid amide derivative of tartaric acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tar*tram"ide</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tarto-</ets> + <ets>amide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An acid amide derivative of tartaric acid, obtained as a white crystalline substance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"trate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tartrate</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tartaric acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tra`ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Med. Chem.)</fld> <def>Containing, or derived from, tartar; combined with tartaric acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tra*zine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tart</ets>aric + hyd<ets>razine</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>An artificial dyestuff obtained as an orange-yellow powder, and regarded as a phenyl hydrazine derivative of tartaric and sulphonic acids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*trel"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Tartar</er> the chemical compound.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of, pertaining to, or designating, an anhydride, <chform>C4H4O5</chform>, of tartaric acid, obtained as a white crystalline deliquescent substance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tro-</hw>. <def>A combining form (also used adjectively) used in chemistry to denote <xex>the presence of tartar</xex> or <xex>of some of its compounds</xex> or <xex>derivatives</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tro*nate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tartronic acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar*tron"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tartro-</ets> + mal<ets>onic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of, pertaining to, or designating, an organic acid (called also <xex>hydroxy malonic acid</xex>) obtained, by reducing mesoxalic acid, as a white crystalline substance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"tro*nyl</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tartron</ets>ic + <ets>-yl</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A hypothetical radical constituting the characteristic residue of tartronic acid and certain of its derivatives.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar`tro*vin"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tartro-</ets> + <ets>vinic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of, pertaining to, or designating, a certain acid composed of tartaric acid in combination with ethyl, and now called <xex>ethyltartaric acid</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tar*tuffe"</hw>, <hw>Tar*tufe"</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tartufe</ets>.]</ety> <def>A hypocritical devotee. See the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tar*tuff"ish</hw>, <hw>Tar*tuf"ish</hw>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Like a tartuffe; precise; hypocritical.</def> <rj><au>Sterne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tar"weed`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A name given to several resinous-glandular composite plants of California, esp. to the species of <gen>Grindelia</gen>, <gen>Hemizonia</gen>, and <gen>Madia</gen>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>A heap.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdThe <xex>tas</xex> of bodies slain.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To tassel.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdA purse of leather <xex>tassed</xex> with silk.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas"co</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Sp. <ets>tasconio</ets>.]</ety> <def>A kind of clay for making melting pots.</def> <rj><au>Percy Smith.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ta*sim"er</hw> <pr>(t<adot/*s<icr/m"<esl/*t<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`sis</grk> stretching, extension (from <grk>tei`nein</grk> to stretch) + <ets>-meter</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An instrument for detecting or measuring minute extensions or movements of solid bodies. It consists essentially of a small rod, disk, or button of carbon, forming part of an electrical circuit, the resistance of which, being varied by the changes of pressure produced by the movements of the object to be measured, causes variations in the strength of the current, which variations are indicated by a sensitive galvanometer. It is also used for measuring minute changes of temperature.</def> <rj><au>T. A. Edison.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task</hw> <pr>(t<adot/sk)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>taske</ets>, OF. <ets>tasque</ets>, F. <ets>t\'83che</ets>, for <ets>tasche</ets>, LL. <ets>tasca</ets>, <ets>taxa</ets>, fr. L. <ets>taxare</ets> to rate, appraise, estimate. See <er>Tax</er>, <pos>n.</pos> & <pos>v.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Labor or study imposed by another, often in a definite quantity or amount.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Ma <qex>task</qex> of servile toil.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Each morning sees some <qex>task</qex> begin,<br/
-Each evening sees it close.</q> <rj><qau>Longfellow.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Business; employment; undertaking; labor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>His mental powers were equal to greater <qex>tasks</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Atterbury.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>To take to task</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Take</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Work; labor; employment; business; toil; drudgery; study; lesson; stint.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tasked</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tasking</conjf>.]</vmorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To impose a task upon; to assign a definite amount of business, labor, or duty to.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>There <qex>task</qex> thy maids, and exercise the loom.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To oppress with severe or excessive burdens; to tax.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To charge; to tax, as with a fault.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Too impudent to <qex>task</qex> me with those errors.</q> <rj><qau>Beau. & Fl.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who imposes a task.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One who performs a task, as a day-laborer.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A laborer who receives his wages in kind.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task"mas`ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who imposes a task, or burdens another with labor; one whose duty is to assign tasks; an overseer.</def> <rj><au>Ex. i. 11.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>All is, if I have grace to use it so,<br/
-As ever in my great <qex>Taskmaster's</qex> eye.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task wage</hw>. <fld>(Polit. Econ.)</fld> <def>A wage paid by the day, or some fixed period, on condition that a minimum task be performed. When the workman is paid in proportion for excess over the minimum, the wage is one for piece-work.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Task"work`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Work done as a task; also, work done by the job; piecework.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas"let</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tasse</er> a piece of armor.]</ety> <def>A piece of armor formerly worn to guard the thighs; a tasse.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas*ma"ni*an</hw> <pr>(t<acr/z*m<amac/"n<icr/*<ait/n)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Tasmania, or Van Diemen's Land.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of Tasmania;</def> <specif>specifically</specif> <fld>(Ethnol.)</fld>, <def>in the plural, the race of men that formerly inhabited Tasmania, but is now extinct.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tasmanian cider tree</b></col>. <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <cd>See the Note under <er>Eucalyptus</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tasmanian devil</b></col>. <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Devil</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tasmanian wolf</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a savage carnivorous marsupial; -- called also <altname>zebra wolf</altname>. See <cref>Zebra wolf</cref>, under <er>Wolf</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tasse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tassette</ets>.]</ety> <def>A piece of armor for the thighs, forming an appendage to the ancient corselet.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ Usually the <xex>tasse</xex> was a plate of iron swinging from the cuirass, but the skirts of sliding splints were also called by this name.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas"sel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Falconry)</fld> <def>A male hawk. See <er>Tercel</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas"sel</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Teasel</er>.]</ety> <def>A kind of bur used in dressing cloth; a teasel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tas"sel</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE., a fastening of a mantle, OF. <ets>tassel</ets> a fastening, clasp, F. <ets>tasseau</ets> a bracket, Fr. L. <ets>taxillus</ets> a little die, dim. of <ets>talus</ets> a die of a longish shape, rounded on two sides and marked only on the other four, a knuckle bone.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A pendent ornament, attached to the corners of cushions, to curtains, and the like, ending in a tuft of loose threads or cords.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The flower or head of some plants, esp. when pendent.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>And the maize field grew and ripened, Till it stood in all the splendor<br/
-Of its garments green and yellow,<br/
-Of its <qex>tassels</qex> and its plumage.</q> <rj><qau>Longfellow.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A narrow silk ribbon, or the like, sewed to a book to be put between the leaves.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A piece of board that is laid upon a wall as a sort of plate, to give a level surface to the ends of floor timbers; -- rarely used in the United States.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tassel flower</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a name of several composite plants of the genus <gen>Cineraria</gen>, especially the <spn>Cineraria sconchifolia</spn>, and of the blossoms which they bear.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tas"sel</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tasseled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr> or <conjf>Tasselled</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tasseling</conjf> or <conjf>Tasselling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To put forth a tassel or flower; <as>as, maize <ex>tassels</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tas"sel</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To adorn with tassels.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tas"set</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tasse</er>.]</ety> <def>A defense for the front of the thigh, consisting of one or more iron plates hanging from the belt on the lower edge of the corselet.</def><-- same as tasse? --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tast"a*ble</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st"<adot/*b'l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of worthy of being tasted; savory; relishing.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taste</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tasted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tasting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>tasten</ets> to feel, to taste, OF. <ets>taster</ets>, F. <ets>tater</ets> to feel, to try by the touch, to try, to taste, (assumed) LL. <ets>taxitare</ets>, fr. L. <ets>taxare</ets> to touch sharply, to estimate. See <er>Tax</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To try by the touch; to handle; <as>as, to <ex>taste</ex> a bow</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chapman.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Taste</qex> it well and stone thou shalt it find.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To try by the touch of the tongue; to perceive the relish or flavor of (anything) by taking a small quantity into a mouth. Also used figuratively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When the ruler of the feast had <qex>tasted</qex> the water that was made wine.</q> <rj><qau>John ii. 9.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When Commodus had once <qex>tasted</qex> human blood, he became incapable of pity or remorse.</q> <rj><qau>Gibbon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To try by eating a little; to eat a small quantity of.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I <qex>tasted</qex> a little of this honey.</q> <rj><qau>1 Sam. xiv. 29.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To become acquainted with by actual trial; to essay; to experience; to undergo.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He . . . should <qex>taste</qex> death for every man.</q> <rj><qau>Heb. ii. 9.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To partake of; to participate in; -- usually with an implied sense of relish or pleasure.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Thou . . . wilt <qex>taste</qex><br/
-No pleasure, though in pleasure, solitary.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taste</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To try food with the mouth; to eat or drink a little only; to try the flavor of anything; <as>as, to <ex>taste</ex> of each kind of wine</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To have a smack; to excite a particular sensation, by which the specific quality or flavor is distinguished; to have a particular quality or character; <as>as, this water <ex>tastes</ex> brackish; the milk <ex>tastes</ex> of garlic</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton reason<br/
-Shall to the king <qex>taste</qex> of this action.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To take sparingly.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>For age but <qex>tastes</qex> of pleasures, youth devours.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To have perception, experience, or enjoyment; to partake; <as>as, to <ex>taste</ex> of nature's bounty</as>.</def> <rj><au>Waller.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The valiant never <qex>taste</qex> of death but once.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taste</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of tasting; gustation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A particular sensation excited by the application of a substance to the tongue; the quality or savor of any substance as perceived by means of the tongue; flavor; <as>as, the <ex>taste</ex> of an orange or an apple; a bitter <ex>taste</ex>; an acid <ex>taste</ex>; a sweet <ex>taste</ex>.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The one of the five senses by which certain properties of bodies (called their <xex>taste</xex>, <xex>savor</xex>, <xex>flavor</xex>) are ascertained by contact with the organs of taste.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ Taste depends mainly on the contact of soluble matter with the terminal organs (connected with branches of the glossopharyngeal and other nerves) in the papill\'91 on the surface of the tongue. The base of the tongue is considered most sensitive to bitter substances, the point to sweet and acid substances.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Intellectual relish; liking; fondness; -- formerly with <xex>of</xex>, now with <xex>for</xex>; <as>as, he had no <ex>taste</ex> for study</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I have no <qex>taste</qex><br/
-Of popular applause.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>The power of perceiving and relishing excellence in human performances; the faculty of discerning beauty, order, congruity, proportion, symmetry, or whatever constitutes excellence, particularly in the fine arts and belles-letters; critical judgment; discernment.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>Manner, with respect to what is pleasing, refined, or in accordance with good usage; style; <as>as, music composed in good <ex>taste</ex>; an epitaph in bad <ex>taste</ex>.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Essay; trial; experience; experiment.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <def>A small portion given as a specimen; a little piece tasted or eaten; a bit.</def> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>9.</sn> <def>A kind of narrow and thin silk ribbon.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Savor; relish; flavor; sensibility; gout.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Taste</er>, <er>Sensibility</er>, <er>Judgment</er>. Some consider <xex>taste</xex> as a mere <xex>sensibility</xex>, and others as a simple exercise of <xex>judgment</xex>; but a union of both is requisite to the existence of anything which deserves the name. An original sense of the beautiful is just as necessary to \'91sthetic judgments, as a sense of right and wrong to the formation of any just conclusions on moral subjects. But this \'bdsense of the beautiful\'b8 is not an arbitrary principle. It is under the guidance of reason; it grows in delicacy and correctness with the progress of the individual and of society at large; it has its laws, which are seated in the nature of man; and it is in the development of these laws that we find the true \'bdstandard of taste.\'b8</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>What, then, is <qex>taste</qex>, but those internal powers,<br/
-Active and strong, and feelingly alive<br/
-To each fine impulse? a discerning sense<br/
-Of decent and sublime, with quick disgust<br/
-From things deformed, or disarranged, or gross<br/
-In species? This, nor gems, nor stores of gold,<br/
-Nor purple state, nor culture, can bestow,<br/
-But God alone, when first his active hand<br/
-Imprints the secret bias of the soul.</q> <rj><qau>Akenside.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Taste buds</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Taste goblets</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>the flask-shaped end organs of taste in the epithelium of the tongue. They are made up of modified epithelial cells arranged somewhat like leaves in a bud.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taste"ful</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st"f<usdot/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having a high relish; savory.</def> \'bd<xex>Tasteful</xex> herbs.\'b8 <rj><au>Pope.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Having or exhibiting good taste; in accordance with good taste; tasty; <as>as, a <ex>tasteful</ex> drapery</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Taste"ful*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Taste"ful*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taste"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having no taste; insipid; flat; <as>as, <ex>tasteless</ex> fruit</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Destitute of the sense of taste; or of good taste; <as>as, a <ex>tasteless</ex> age</as>.</def> <rj><au>Orrery.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Not in accordance with good taste; <as>as, a <ex>tasteless</ex> arrangement of drapery; a <ex>tasteless</ex> remark</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Taste"less*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Taste"less*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tast"er</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who tastes; especially, one who first tastes food or drink to ascertain its quality.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Thy tutor be thy <qex>taster</qex>, ere thou eat.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That in which, or by which, anything is tasted, as, a dram cup, a cheese taster, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of a peculiar kind of zooids situated on the polyp-stem of certain Siphonophora. They somewhat resemble the feeding zooids, but are destitute of mouths. See <er>Siphonophora</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tast"i*ly</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st"<icr/*l<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tasty manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tast"ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of perceiving or tasting by the organs of taste; the faculty or sense by which we perceive or distinguish savors.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tas"to</hw> <pr>(t<aum/s"t<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A key or thing touched to produce a tone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>\'d8Tasto solo</b></col>, <cd>single touch; -- in old music, a direction denoting that the notes in the bass over or under which it is written should be performed alone, or with no other chords than unisons and octaves.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tast"y</hw> <pr>(t<amac/st"<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tastier</adjf> <pr>(t<amac/st"<icr/*<etl/r)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tastiest</adjf>.]</amorph> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Having a good taste; -- applied to persons; <as>as, a <ex>tasty</ex> woman</as>. See <er>Taste</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 5.</def><-- not used in that sense now. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Being in conformity to the principles of good taste; elegant; <as>as, <ex>tasty</ex> furniture; a <ex>tasty</ex> dress.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>t\'bet</ets>.]</ety> <def>Gunny cloth made from the fiber of the <spn>Corchorus olitorius</spn>, or jute.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>tatt<?/</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A pony.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*tau"pa</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A South American tinamou (<spn>Crypturus tataupa</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tatch</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tache</ets> spot. See <er>Techy</er>.]</ety> <def>A spot or stain; also, a trick.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Elyot.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tath</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <mark>obs.</mark> <def><pos>3d pers. sing. pres.</pos> of <er>Ta</er>, to take.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tath</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Prov. E.; of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. <ets>ta<?/</ets> dung, <ets>ta<?/a</ets> the grass of a manured pasture, <ets>te<?/ja</ets> to manure. \'fb58. Cf. <er>Ted</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Dung, or droppings of cattle.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The luxuriant grass growing about the droppings of cattle in a pasture.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tath</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To manure (land) by pasturing cattle on it, or causing them to lie upon it.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng. & Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*tou"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tatouay</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The giant armadillo (<spn>Priodontes gigas</spn>) of tropical South America. It becomes nearly five feet long including the tail. It is noted for its burrowing powers, feeds largely upon dead animals, and sometimes invades human graves.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ou*ay</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Of Brazilian origin; cf. Pg. <ets>tatu</ets>, F. <ets>tatou</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An armadillo (<spn>Xenurus unicinctus</spn>), native of the tropical parts of South America. It has about thirteen movable bands composed of small, nearly square, scales. The head is long; the tail is round and tapered, and nearly destitute of scales; the claws of the fore feet are very large. Called also <altname>tatouary</altname>, and <altname>broad-banded armadillo</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ou*hou</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tatouay</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The peba.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tatt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <def>To make (anything) by tatting; to work at tatting; <as>as, <ex>tatted</ex> edging</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1477 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tat"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets><?/a<?/<?/\'c6</ets>, <ets>t\'bet\'c6</ets>.]</ety> <def>A bamboo frame or trellis hung at a door or window of a house, over which water is suffered to trickle, in order to moisten and cool the air as it enters.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who makes tatting.</def> <rj><au>Caulfield & S. (Doct. of Needlework).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>t\'94tur</ets>, <ets>t\'94ttur</ets>, pl. <ets>t\'94trar</ets>, <ets><?/\'94ttrar</ets>; cf. Norw. <ets>totra</ets>, pl. <ets>totror</ets>, LG. <ets>taltern</ets> tatters. \'fb240.]</ety> <def>A rag, or a part torn and hanging; -- chiefly used in the plural.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Tear a passion to <qex>tatters</qex>, to very rags.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ter</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tattered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To rend or tear into rags; -- used chiefly in the past participle as an adjective.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Where waved the <qex>tattered</qex> ensigns of Ragfair.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat`ter*de*mal"ion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Tatter</ets> + OF. <ets>desmaillier</ets> to break the meshes of, to tear: cf. OF. <ets>maillon</ets> long clothes, swadding clothes, F. <ets>maillot.</ets> See <er>Tatter</er>, and <er>Mail</er> armor.]</ety> <def>A ragged fellow; a ragamuffin.</def> <rj><au>L'Estrange.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ter*sall's</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A famous horse market in London, established in 1766 by Richard Tattersall, also used as the headquarters of credit betting on English horse races; hence, a large horse market elsewhere.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ting</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kind of lace made from common sewing thread, with a peculiar stitch.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tatting shuttle</b></col>, <cd>the shuttle on which the thread used in tatting is wound.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"tle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tattled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tattling</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Akin to OE. <ets>tateren</ets>, LG. <ets>tateln</ets>, D. <ets>tateren</ets> to stammer, and perhaps to E. <ets>titter</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To prate; to talk idly; to use many words with little meaning; to chat.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tattling</qex> quality of age, which is always narrative.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To tell tales; to communicate secrets; to be a talebearer; <as>as, a <ex>tattling</ex> girl</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"tle</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Idle talk or chat; trifling talk; prate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>[They] told the <qex>tattle</qex> of the day.</q> <rj><qau>Swift.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"tler</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who tattles; an idle talker; one who tells tales.</def> <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of large, long-legged sandpipers belonging to the genus <gen>Totanus</gen>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The common American species are the greater tattler, or telltale (<spn>Totanus melanoleucus</spn>), the smaller tattler, or lesser yellowlegs (<spn>Totanus flavipes</spn>), the solitary tattler (<spn>Totanus solitarius</spn>), and the semipalmated tattler, or willet. The first two are called also <altname>telltale</altname>, <altname>telltale spine</altname>, <altname>telltale tattler</altname>, <altname>yellowlegs</altname>, <altname>yellowshanks</altname>, and <altname>yelper.</altname></note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"tler*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Idle talk or chat; tittle-tattle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"tling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Given to idle talk; apt to tell tales.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tat"tling*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat*too"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Earlier <ets>taptoo</ets>, D. <ets>taptoe</ets>; <ets>tap</ets> a tap, faucet + <ets>toe</ets> to, shut (<it>i. e.</it>, the taps, or drinking houses, shut from the soldiers).]</ety> <fld>(Mil.)</fld> <def>A beat of drum, or sound of a trumpet or bugle, at night, giving notice to soldiers to retreat, or to repair to their quarters in garrison, or to their tents in camp.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>The Devil's tattoo</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Devil</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat*too"</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tattooed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tattooing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Of Polynesian origin; cf. New Zealand <ets>ta</ets> to tattoo, <ets>tatu</ets> puncturation (in Otaheite).]</ety> <def>To color, as the flesh, by pricking in coloring matter, so as to form marks or figures which can not be washed out.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat*too"</hw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tattoos</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>An indelible mark or figure made by puncturing the skin and introducing some pigment into the punctures; -- a mode of ornamentation practiced by various barbarous races, both in ancient and modern times, and also by some among civilized nations, especially by sailors.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tat"ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>Tatties</plw> <pr>(#)</pr></plu>. <ety>[Hind. <ets><tsdot/a<tsdot/<tsdot/<imac/</ets>.]</ety> <def>A mat or screen of fibers, as of the kuskus grass, hung at a door or window and kept wet to moisten and cool the air as it enters.</def> <mark>[India]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*tu"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tatou</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta*tu"si*id</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any armadillo of the family <fam>Tatusiid\'91</fam>, of which the peba and mule armadillo are examples. Also used adjectively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau</hw> <pr>(tou)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tay^</grk>.]</ety> <def>The nineteenth letter (<TAU/, <tau/) of the Greek alphabet, equivalent to English <it>t</it>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tay^</grk> the letter <tau/ (English <er>T</er>).]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The common American toadfish; -- so called from a marking resembling the Greek letter <ex>tau</ex> (<tau/).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tau cross</b></col>. <cd>See <xex>Illust.</xex> 6, of <er>Cross</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taught</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>See <er>Taut</er>.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taught</hw>, <def><pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> of <er>Teach</er>.</def> <ety>[AS. imp. <ets>t<aemac/hte</ets>, p. p. <ets>get<aemac/ht</ets>.]</ety> <note>See <er>Teach</er>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>tant</ets> so great, F. <ets>tant</ets> so much, L. <ets>tantus</ets> of such size, so great, so much.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>Very high or tall; <as>as, a ship with <ex>taunt</ex> masts</as>.</def> <rj><au>Totten.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Taunted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taunting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Earlier, to tease; probably fr. OF. <ets>tanter</ets> to tempt, to try, for <ets>tenter</ets>. See <er>Tempt</er>.]</ety> <def>To reproach with severe or insulting words; to revile; to upbraid; to jeer at; to flout.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When I had at my pleasure <qex>taunted</qex> her.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To deride; ridicule; mock; jeer; flout; revile. See <er>Deride</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Upbraiding language; bitter or sarcastic reproach; insulting invective.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>With scoffs, and scorns, and contemelious <qex>taunts</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>With sacrilegious <qex>taunt</qex> and impious jest.</q> <rj><qau>Prior.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who taunts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt"ing</hw>, <def><pos>a. & n.</pos> from <er>Taunt</er>, <pos>v.</pos></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Every kind of insolent and <qex>taunting</qex> reflection.</q> <rj><qau>Burke.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt"ing*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a taunting manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taunt"ress</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A woman who taunts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tau"pie</hw>, <hw>Taw"pie</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Icel. <ets>t\'d3pi</ets> fool, Dan. <ets>taabe</ets>, Sw. <ets>t\'86p</ets>.]</ety> <def>A foolish or thoughtless young person, esp. a slothful or slovenly woman.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Burns.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taur</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Taurus</ets>.]</ety> <def>The constellation Taurus.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`ri*cor"nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tauricornis</ets>; <ets>taurus</ets> a bull + <ets>cornu</ets> a horn.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having horns like those of a bull.</def> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau"rid</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Taurus</ets> + 1st <ets>-id</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>Any of a group of meteors appearing November 20-23; -- so called because they appear to radiate from a point in Taurus.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`ri*dor"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Toreador</er>.]</ety> <def>A bullfighter; a toreador.</def> <rj><au>Sir W. Scott.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau"ri*form</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tauriformis</ets>; <ets>taurus</ets> a bull + <ets>-form</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tauriforme</ets>.]</ety> <def>Having the form of a bull.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau"rine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taurinus</ets>, fr. <ets>taurus</ets> a bull. See <er>Taurus</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the genus Taurus, or cattle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau"rine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[So named because it was discovered in the bile of the ox. See <er>Taurus</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>A chemical compound occurring in small quantity in the juices of muscle, in the lungs, and elsewhere, but especially in the bile, where it is found as a component part of taurocholic acid, from which it can be prepared by decomposition of the acid. It crystallizes in colorless, regular six-sided prisms, and is especially characterized by containing both nitrogen and sulphur, being chemically amido-isethionic acid, <chform>C2H7NSO3</chform>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`ro*cho"late</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of taurocholic acid; <as>as, sodium <ex>taurocholate</ex>, which occurs in human bile</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`ro*chol"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Taur</ets>ine + <ets>cholic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol. Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or designating, a conjugate acid (called <xex>taurocholic acid</xex>) composed of taurine and cholic acid, present abundantly in human bile and in that of carnivora. It is exceedingly deliquescent, and hence appears generally as a thick, gummy mass, easily soluble in water and alcohol. It has a bitter taste.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tau"ro*col</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tau`ro*col"la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. <ets>taurocolla</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>tayro`kolla</grk>; <grk>tay^ros</grk> a bull + <grk>ko`lla</grk> glue: cf. F. <ets>taurocolle</ets>.]</ety> <def>Glue made from a bull's hide.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`ro*ma"chi*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tauromachy</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to bullfights.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A bullfighter.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*rom"a*chy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tayromachi`a</grk>; <grk>tay^ros</grk> bull + <grk>ma`chh</grk> fight.]</ety> <def>Bullfighting.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tau"rus</hw> <pr>(t<add/"r<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., akin to Gr. <grk>tay^ros</grk>, and E. <ets>steer</ets>. See <er>Steer</er> a young ox.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The Bull; the second in order of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the 20th of April; -- marked thus [<taurus/] in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, containing the well-known clusters called the Pleiades and the Hyades, in the latter of which is situated the remarkably bright Aldebaran.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of ruminants comprising the common domestic cattle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*ryl"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taurus</ets> a bull + E. phen<ets>ylic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Pertaining to, or designating, an acid found of a urine of neat cattle, and probably identical with <xex>cresol</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taut</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Dan. <ets>t\'91t</ets>; akin to E. <ets>tight</ets>. See <er>Tight</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>Tight; stretched; not slack; -- said esp. of a rope that is tightly strained.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Snug; close; firm; secure.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Taut hand</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a sailor's term for an officer who is severe in discipline.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*taug"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tautog</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`te*gor"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ to speak. Cf. <er>Allegory</er>.]</ety> <def>Expressing the same thing with different words; -- opposed to <xex>allegorical</xex>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Coleridge.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau"to*chrone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ time: cf. F. <ets>tautochrone</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>A curved line, such that a heavy body, descending along it by the action of gravity, will always arrive at the lowest point in the same time, wherever in the curve it may begin to fall; <as>as, an inverted cycloid with its base horizontal is a <ex>tautochrone</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*toch"ro*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>Occupying the same time; pertaining to, or having the properties of, a tautochrone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tau*tog"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[The pl. of <ets>taut</ets>, the American Indian name, translated by Roger Williams <ets>sheep's heads</ets>, and written by him <ets>tauta\'a3og</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An edible labroid fish (<spn>Haitula onitis</spn>, or <spn>Tautoga onitis</spn>) of the Atlantic coast of the United States. When adult it is nearly black, more or less irregularly barred, with greenish gray. Called also <altname>blackfish</altname>, <altname>oyster fish</altname>, <altname>salt-water chub</altname>, and <altname>moll</altname>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tautaug</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tau`to*log"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Tautological.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`to*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tautologique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Involving tautology; having the same signification; <as>as, <ex>tautological</ex> expression</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tau`to*log"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tautological echo</b></col>, <cd>an echo that repeats the same sound or syllable many times.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*tol"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who uses tautological words or phrases.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*tol"o*gize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tautologized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tautologizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To repeat the same thing in different words.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*tol"o*gous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ to speak.]</ety> <def>Repeating the same thing in different words; tautological.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Tooke.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*tol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tautologia</ets>, Gr. <?/: cf. F. <ets>tautologie</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>A repetition of the same meaning in different words; needless repetition of an idea in different words or phrases; a representation of anything as the cause, condition, or consequence of itself, as in the following lines: --<br/
-<br/
-<q>The dawn is overcast, the morning lowers,<br/
-And heavily in clouds brings on the day.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Repetition.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Tautology</er>, <er>Repetition</er>. There may be frequent <xex>repetitions</xex> (as in legal instruments) which are warranted either by necessity or convenience; but <xex>tautology</xex> is always a fault, being a sameness of expression which adds nothing to the sense or the sound.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`to*mer"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Relating to, or characterized by, tautomerism.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*tom"er*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ part.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>The condition, quality, or relation of metameric substances, or their respective derivatives, which are more or less interchangeable, according as one form or the other is the more stable. It is a special case of metamerism; thus, the lactam and the lactim compounds exhibit <xex>tautomerism</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tau`to*ou"si*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tau`to*ou"si*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ being, essence.]</ety> <def>Having the same essence; being identically of the same nature.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cudworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tau`to*phon"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or characterized by, tautophony; repeating the same sound.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau*toph"o*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + <?/ voice.]</ety> <def>Repetition of the same sound.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tau`to*zon"al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/; <?/, for <?/ <?/ the same + E. <ets>zonal</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Crystallog.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the same zone; <as>as, <ex>tautozonal</ex> planes</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tav"ern</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>taverne</ets>, F. <ets>taverne</ets>, from L. <ets>taberna</ets> a hut, booth, tavern. Cf. <er>Table</er>, <er>Tabernacle</er>.]</ety> <def>A public house where travelers and other transient guests are accomodated with rooms and meals; an inn; a hotel; especially, in modern times, a public house licensed to sell liquor in small quantities.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tav"ern*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tavernier</ets>, L. <ets>tabernarius</ets>.]</ety> <def>One who keeps a tavern.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer. Camden.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tav"ern*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A feasting at taverns.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdThe misrule of our <xex>tavernings</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Bp. Hall.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tav"ern*man</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tavernmen</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>The keeper of a tavern; also, a tippler.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Taw</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tow.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tew</er> to tow, <er>Tow</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>To push; to tug; to tow.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Drayton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tawed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tawing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>tawen</ets>, <ets>tewen</ets>, AS. <ets>t\'bewian</ets> to prepare; cf. D. <ets>touwen</ets>, Goth. <ets>t\'c7wa</ets> order, <ets>taujan</ets> to do, and E. <ets>tool</ets>. \'fb64. Cf. 1st <er>Tew</er>, <er>Tow</er> the coarse part of flax.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To prepare or dress, as hemp, by beating; to tew; hence, to beat; to scourge.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To dress and prepare, as the skins of sheep, lambs, goats, and kids, for gloves, and the like, by imbuing them with alum, salt, and other agents, for softening and bleaching them.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. AS. <ets>t\'bew</ets> instrument.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A large marble to be played with; also, a game at marbles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A line or mark from which the players begin a game of marbles.</def> <mark>[Colloq. U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"dri*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tawdry manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"dri*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Quality or state of being tawdry.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A clumsy person makes his ungracefulness more ungraceful by <qex>tawdriness</qex> of dress.</q> <rj><qau>Richardson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"dry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tawdrier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tawdriest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[Said to be corrupted from <ets>Saint Audrey</ets>, or <ets>Auldrey</ets>, meaning <ets>Saint Ethelreda</ets>, implying therefore, originally, bought at the fair of St. Audrey, where laces and gay toys of all sorts were sold. This fair was held in Isle Ely, and probably at other places, on the day of the saint, which was the 17th of October.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Bought at the festival of St. Audrey.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And gird in your waist,<br/
-For more fineness, with a <qex>tawdry</qex> lace.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Very fine and showy in colors, without taste or elegance; having an excess of showy ornaments without grace; cheap and gaudy; <as>as, a <ex>tawdry</ex> dress; <ex>tawdry</ex> feathers; <ex>tawdry</ex> colors.</as></def><-- tacky? --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He rails from morning to night at essenced fops and <qex>tawdry</qex> courtiers.</q> <rj><qau>Spectator.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"dry</hw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tawdries</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>A necklace of a rural fashion, bought at St. Audrey's fair; hence, a necklace in general.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Of which the Naiads and the blue Nereids make<br/
-Them <qex>tawdries</qex> for their necks.</q> <rj><qau>Drayton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who taws; a dresser of white leather.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"er*y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A place where skins are tawed.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"ni*ness</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tawny.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taw"ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tawnier</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tawniest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[F. <ets>tann\'82</ets>, p. p. of <ets>tanner</ets> to tan. See <er>Tan</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos> & <pos>n.</pos> Cf. <er>Tenn\'82</er>.]</ety> <def>Of a dull yellowish brown color, like things tanned, or persons who are sunburnt; <as>as, <ex>tawny</ex> Moor or Spaniard; the <ex>tawny</ex> lion</as>.</def> \'bdA leopard's <xex>tawny</xex> and spotted hide.\'b8 <rj><au>Longfellow.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Taws</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Taw</er> to beat.]</ety> <def>A leather lash, or other instrument of punishment, used by a schoolmaster.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tawes</asp>, <asp>tawis</asp>, and <asp>tawse</asp>.]</altsp> <mark>[Scot.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Never use the <qex>taws</qex> when a gloom can do the turn.</q> <rj><qau>Ramsay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>taxe</ets>, fr. <ets>taxer</ets> to tax, L. <ets>taxare</ets> to touch, sharply, to feel, handle, to censure, value, estimate, fr. <ets>tangere</ets>, <ets>tactum</ets>, to touch. See <er>Tangent</er>, and cf. <er>Task</er>, <er>Taste</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A charge, especially a pecuniary burden which is imposed by authority.</def> Specifically: --<br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(a)</sd> <def>A charge or burden laid upon persons or property for the support of a government.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A farmer of <qex>taxes</qex> is, of all creditors, proverbially the most rapacious.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(b)</sd> <def>Especially, the sum laid upon specific things, as upon polls, lands, houses, income, etc.; <as>as, a land <ex>tax</ex>; a window <ex>tax</ex>; a <ex>tax</ex> on carriages, and the like</as>.</def> <note>Taxes are <stype>annual</stype> or <stype>perpetual</stype>, <stype>direct</stype> or <stype>indirect</stype>, etc.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sd>(c)</sd> <def>A sum imposed or levied upon the members of a society to defray its expenses.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A task exacted from one who is under control; a contribution or service, the rendering of which is imposed upon a subject.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A disagreeable or burdensome duty or charge; <as>as, a heavy <ex>tax</ex> on time or health</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Charge; censure.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Clarendon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>A lesson to be learned; a task.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tax cart</b></col>, <cd>a spring cart subject to a low tax.</cd> <mark>[Eng.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Impost; tribute; contribution; duty; toll; rate; assessment; exaction; custom; demand.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1478 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ks)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Taxed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Taxing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>taxer</ets>. See <er>Tax</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To subject to the payment of a tax or taxes; to impose a tax upon; to lay a burden upon; especially, to exact money from for the support of government.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>We are more heavily <qex>taxed</qex> by our idleness, pride, and folly than we are <qex>taxed</qex> by government.</q> <rj><qau>Franklin.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>To assess, fix, or determine judicially, the amount of; <as>as, to <ex>tax</ex> the cost of an action in court</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To charge; to accuse; also, to censure; -- often followed by <xex>with</xex>, rarely by <xex>of</xex> before an indirect object; <as>as, to <ex>tax</ex> a man with pride</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I <qex>tax</qex> you, you elements, with unkindness.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Men's virtues I have commended as freely as I have <qex>taxed</qex> their crimes.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Fear not now that men should <qex>tax</qex> thine honor.</q> <rj><qau>M. Arnold.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax`a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being taxable; taxableness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Capable of being taxed; liable by law to the assessment of taxes; <as>as, <ex>taxable</ex> estate; <ex>taxable</ex> commodities</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>That may be legally charged by a court against the plaintiff of defendant in a suit; <as>as, <ex>taxable</ex> costs</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Tax"a*ble*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos> -- <wf>Tax"a*bly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax`as*pid"e*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ an arrangement + <?/, <?/, shield.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the posterior tarsal scales, or scutella, rectangular and arranged in regular rows; -- said of certain birds.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>taxation</ets>, L. <ets>taxatio</ets> a valuing, estimation, from L. <ets>taxare</ets>. See <er>Tax</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of laying a tax, or of imposing taxes, as on the subjects of a state, by government, or on the members of a corporation or company, by the proper authority; the raising of revenue; also, a system of raising revenue.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>The act of taxing, or assessing a bill of cost.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Tax; sum imposed.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Daniel.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Charge; accusation.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax certificate</hw>. <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>The certificate issued to the purchaser of land at a tax sale certifying to the sale and the payment of the consideration thereof, and entitling the purchaser upon certain conditions and at a certain time thereafter to a deed or instrument of conveyance (called a <xex>tax deed</xex>) of the land, to be executed by the proper officer.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"el</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The American badger.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tax`e*op"o*da</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ (?) + <ets>-poda</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>An order of extinct Mammalia found in the Tertiary formations.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who taxes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of two officers chosen yearly to regulate the assize of bread, and to see the true gauge of weights and measures is observed.</def> <mark>[Camb. Univ., Eng.]</mark> <altsp>[Written also <asp>taxor</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"gath`er*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who collects taxes or revenues.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tax"gath`er*ing</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"i*arch</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ and <?/; <?/ a division of an army, a brigade (from <?/ to arrange, array) + to rule.]</ety> <fld>(Gr. Antiq.)</fld> <def>An Athenian military officer commanding a certain division of an army.</def> <rj><au>Milford.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"i*corn</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taxus</ets> a yew + <ets>cornu</ets> a horn: cf. F. <ets>taxicorne</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of a family of beetles (<fam>Taxicornes</fam>) whose antenn\'91 are largest at the tip. Also used adjectively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax`i*der"mic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>taxidermique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the art of preparing and preserving the skins of animals.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"i*der`mist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A person skilled in taxidermy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"i*der`my</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ an arranging, arrangement (fr. <?/ to arrange) + <?/ a skin, from <?/ to skin: cf. F. <ets>taxidermie</ets>. See <er>Tactics</er>, <er>Tear</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <def>The art of preparing, preserving, and mounting the skins of animals so as to represent their natural appearance, as for cabinets.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>taximeter</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a meter in a taxi that registers the fare (based on the length of the ride).</def><br/
-[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"ine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taxus</ets> a yew.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A poisonous alkaloid of bitter taste extracted from the leaves and seeds of the European yew (<spn>Taxus baccata</spn>). Called also <altname>taxia</altname>. The usual preparation is a mixture of compounds. Taxine A has the chemical formula: <chform>C35H47NO10</chform>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tax"is</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>ta`xis</grk> a division or arrangement, fr. <grk>ta`ssein</grk> to arrange.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>Manipulation applied to a hernial tumor, or to an intestinal obstruction, for the purpose of reducing it.</def> <rj><au>Dunglison.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In technical uses, as in architecture, biology, grammar, etc., arrangement; order; ordonnance.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>a reflexive movement by a motile organism by which it moves or orients itself in relation to some source of stimulation; <as>as, chemo<ex>taxis</ex>, the motion toward or away from gradients of certain chemical compounds</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>-tax"is</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>combining form for <er>taxis{3}</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>tax"i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>same as <er>taxicab</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>any vehicle that carries passengers for a fare, as a water <ex>taxi</ex>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>tax"i*cab</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>an automobile with a professional driver which can be hired to carry passengers; -- also called a <altname>taxi</altname>, and informally called a <altname>cab</altname> or a <altname>hack</altname>. The driver of a taxicab is referred to as a <er>cab driver</er> or <er>cabbie</er>, and sometimes as a <er>chauffeur</er> or <er>hackie</er>.</def> <note>Taxicabs may be engaged by a prior appointment made, e.g. by telephone, or they may <perf>cruise</perf> for passengers, i.e. they may drive in city streets and stop to <perf>pick up pasengers</perf> when they are signalled by a prospective passenger. The act of signalling a taxicab (usually by a wave of the arm) is often called <col><b>to hail a cab</b></col> or <col><b>to flag down a cab</b></col>.</note><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Free from taxation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`xis</grk> arrangement + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Taxonomy</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"on</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ks"<ocr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>taxa</plw> or <plw>taxons</plw>.</plu> <def>a taxonomic group, or the name of a taxonomic grouping.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax`o*nom"ic</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ks`<ocr/*n<ocr/m"<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or involving, taxonomy, or the laws and principles of classification; classificatory.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax*on"o*mist</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ks*<ocr/n"<osl/*m<icr/st)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in taxonomy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax*on"o*my</hw> <pr>(t<acr/ks*<ocr/n"<osl/*m<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>ta`xis</grk> an arrangement, order + <grk>no`mos</grk> a law.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>That division of the natural sciences which treats of the classification of animals and plants, primarily by consideration of their natural relationships with respect to their structure or genetic origin; the laws or principles of classification; systematics.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A systematic arrangement of objects or concepts showing the relations between them, especially one including a hierarchical arrangement of types in which categories of objects are classified as subtypes of more abstract categories, starting from one or a small number of top categories, and descending to more specific types through an arbitrary number of levels. An <partof><er>ontology</er></partof> usually contains a <ex>taxonomy</ex> as one of the important principles of organization.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"or</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Taxer</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 2.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tax"pay`er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who is assessed and pays a tax.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tay"lor-White" proc`ess</hw>. <fld>(Metal.)</fld> <def>A process (invented about 1899 by <person>Frederick W. Taylor</person> and <person>Maunsel B. White</person>) for giving toughness to self-hardening steels. The steel is heated almost to fusion, cooled to a temperature of from 700\'f8 to 850\'f8 C. in molten lead, further cooled in oil, reheated to between 370\'f8 and 670\'f8 C., and cooled in air.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tay"ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A South American carnivore (<spn>Galera barbara</spn>) allied to the grison. The tail is long and thick. The length, including the tail, is about three feet.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>taira</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tay"-Sachs Disease</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A rare hereditary disease affecting lipid metabolism in humans, due to a deficiency of hexosaminidase. It occurs in infants and children, and causes death before the onset of adulthood. It occurs most commonly of people of Jewish origin from easter Europe. It is characterized by accumulation of lipids in nervous tissue, causes a red spot on the retina, and eventual blindness and paralysis before death.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ta"zel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The teasel.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Taz"za</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <def>An ornamental cup or vase with a large, flat, shallow bowl, resting on a pedestal and often having handles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>T" cart`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>See under <er>T</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>T" cell`</hw> <pr>(t<emac/"s<ecr/l`)</pr> <ety>[From <ets>T</ets>hymus, the site of maturation of T-cells.]</ety> <def>A type of white blood cell that circulates in the blood and lymph, and provides cell-mediated immunity for the organism, protecting against infecting cells or the body's own malignant cells; also called <altname>T lymphocyte</altname>. There are several types of T cells. They develop, as do B cells, from progenitor cells in the bone marrow, but are distinguished from B-cells (B-lymphocytes) by their site of differentiation; T-cells mature in the thymus and B-cells in the bone marrow (in birds in the Bursa of Fabricius). They also have different antigen receptors from those of B-cells. T-cells differentiate into cells that can directly kill infecting cells (cell-mediated immunity, cytotoxity) or activate other cells of the immune system (helper T cells), whereas B-cells differentiate on activation into antibody-secreting plasma cells. Helper T cells interact with B-cells by secreting lymphokines that stimulate the B cell which have detected a foreign antigen to enter the cell cycle and develop, by repeated mitosis, into a clone of cells with identical receptors, and then to secrete antibodies to that specific antigen.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Tcha*wy"tcha</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The quinnat salmon.</def> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tchick</hw> <pr>(ch<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Imitative.]</ety> <def>A slight sound such as that made by pressing the tongue against the roof of the mouth and explosively sucking out the air at one side, as in urging on a horse.</def> -- <def2><pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To make a tchick.</def></def2><-- = cluck? click? --><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>tchotch"ke</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <ety>[Yiddish <ets>tshatshke</ets>, trinket, from Pol. <ets>czaczko</ets>. <au>MW10.</au>]</ety> <def>a knickknack or trinket; a decorative item or souvenir of little value.</def> <altsp>[Also spelled <asp>chotchke</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>T connection</hw>. <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>The connection of two coils diagrammatically as a letter <universbold>T</universbold>, chiefly used as a connection for passing transformers. When the three free ends are connected to a source of three-phase current, two-phase current may be derived from the secondary circuits. The reverse arrangement may be used to transform from two-phase.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>T"-connected</wf>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea</hw> <pr>(t<emac/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Chin. <ets>tsh\'be</ets>, Prov. Chin. <ets>te</ets>: cf. F. <ets>th\'82</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The prepared leaves of a shrub, or small tree (<spn>Thea Chinensis</spn> <it>or</it> <spn>Camellia Chinensis</spn>). The shrub is a native of China, but has been introduced to some extent into some other countries.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ <xex>Teas</xex> are classed as <xex>green</xex> or <xex>black</xex>, according to their color or appearance, the kinds being distinguished also by various other characteristic differences, as of taste, odor, and the like. The color, flavor, and quality are dependent upon the treatment which the leaves receive after being gathered. The leaves for green tea are heated, or roasted slightly, in shallow pans over a wood fire, almost immediately after being gathered, after which they are rolled with the hands upon a table, to free them from a portion of their moisture, and to twist them, and are then quickly dried. Those intended for black tea are spread out in the air for some time after being gathered, and then tossed about with the hands until they become soft and flaccid, when they are roasted for a few minutes, and rolled, and having then been exposed to the air for a few hours in a soft and moist state, are finally dried slowly over a charcoal fire. The operation of roasting and rolling is sometimes repeated several times, until the leaves have become of the proper color. The principal sorts of green tea are Twankay, the poorest kind; Hyson skin, the refuse of Hyson; Hyson, Imperial, and Gunpowder, fine varieties; and Young Hyson, a choice kind made from young leaves gathered early in the spring. Those of black tea are Bohea, the poorest kind; Congou; Oolong; Souchong, one of the finest varieties; and Pekoe, a fine-flavored kind, made chiefly from young spring buds. See <er>Bohea</er>, <er>Congou</er>, <cref>Gunpowder tea</cref>, under <er>Gunpowder</er>, <er>Hyson</er>, <er>Oolong</er>, and <er>Souchong</er>.</note> <rj><au>K. Johnson.</au> <au>Tomlinson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ \'bdNo knowledge of . . . [tea] appears to have reached Europe till after the establishment of intercourse between Portugal and China in 1517. The Portuguese, however, did little towards the introduction of the herb into Europe, and it was not till the Dutch established themselves at Bantam early in 17th century, that these adventurers learned from the Chinese the habit of tea drinking, and brought it to Europe.\'b8</note> <rj><au>Encyc. Brit.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A decoction or infusion of tea leaves in boiling water; <as>as, <ex>tea</ex> is a common beverage</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any infusion or decoction, especially when made of the dried leaves of plants; <as>as, sage <ex>tea</ex>; chamomile <ex>tea</ex>; catnip <ex>tea</ex>.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>The evening meal, at which tea is usually served; supper.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Arabian tea</b></col>, <cd>the leaves of <spn>Catha edulis</spn>; also <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, the plant itself. See <er>Kat</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Assam tea</b></col>, <cd>tea grown in Assam, in India, originally brought there from China about the year 1850.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Australian tea</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Botany Bay tea</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a woody climbing plant (<spn>Smilax glycyphylla</spn>).</cd> -- <col><b>Brazilian tea</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>The dried leaves of <spn>Lantana pseodothea</spn>, used in Brazil as a substitute for tea.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>The dried leaves of <spn>Stachytarpheta mutabilis</spn>, used for adulterating tea, and also, in <country>Austria</country>, for preparing a beverage.</cd> -- <col><b>Labrador tea</b></col>. <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Labrador</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>New Jersey tea</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>an American shrub, the leaves of which were formerly used as a substitute for tea; redroot. See <er>Redroot</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>New Zealand tea</b></col>. <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>New Zealand</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Oswego tea</b></col>. <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Oswego tea</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Paraguay tea</b></col>, <cd>mate. See 1st <er>Mate</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea board</b></col>, <cd>a board or tray for holding a tea set.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea bug</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>an hemipterous insect which injures the tea plant by sucking the juice of the tender leaves.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea caddy</b></col>, <cd>a small box for holding tea.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea chest</b></col>, <cd>a small, square wooden case, usually lined with sheet lead or tin, in which tea is imported from China.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea clam</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a small quahaug.</cd> <mark>[Local, U. S.]</mark> -- <col><b>Tea garden</b></col>, <cd>a public garden where tea and other refreshments are served.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea plant</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>any plant, the leaves of which are used in making a beverage by infusion; specifically, <spn>Thea Chinensis</spn>, from which the tea of commerce is obtained.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea rose</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a delicate and graceful variety of the rose (<spn>Rosa Indica</spn>, var. <varn>odorata</varn>), introduced from China, and so named from its scent. Many varieties are now cultivated.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea service</b></col>, <cd>the appurtenances or utensils required for a tea table, -- when of silver, usually comprising only the teapot, milk pitcher, and sugar dish.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea set</b></col>, <cd>a tea service.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea table</b></col>, <cd>a table on which tea furniture is set, or at which tea is drunk.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea taster</b></col>, <cd>one who tests or ascertains the quality of tea by tasting.</cd> -- <col><b>Tea tree</b></col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>the tea plant of China. See <spn>Tea plant</spn>, above.</cd><-- In Australia and New Zealand, tea tree refers to a tree or tall shrib, Leptospermum scoparium, having white bell-shaped flowers. The leaves are used to prepare an infusion; an oil, tea tree oil, is also derived, and claimed to have therapeutic properties, as for healing burns of the skin. --> -- <col><b>Tea urn</b></col>, <cd>a vessel generally in the form of an urn or vase, for supplying hot water for steeping, or infusing, tea.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To take or drink tea.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea"ber`ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The checkerberry.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach</hw> <pr>(t<emac/ch)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Taught</conjf> <pr>(t<add/t)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teaching</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>techen</ets>, imp. <ets>taughte</ets>, <ets>tahte</ets>, AS. <ets>t<aemac/cean</ets>, imp. <ets>t<aemac/hte</ets>, to show, teach, akin to <ets>t\'becn</ets> token. See <er>Token</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To impart the knowledge of; to give intelligence concerning; to impart, as knowledge before unknown, or rules for practice; to inculcate as true or important; to exhibit impressively; <as>as, to <ex>teach</ex> arithmetic, dancing, music, or the like; to <ex>teach</ex> morals.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>If some men <qex>teach</qex> wicked things, it must be that others should practice them.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To direct, as an instructor; to manage, as a preceptor; to guide the studies of; to instruct; to inform; to conduct through a course of studies; <as>as, to <ex>teach</ex> a child or a class</as>.</def> \'bdHe <xex>taught</xex> his disciples.\'b8 <rj><au>Mark ix. 31.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The village master <qex>taught</qex> his little school.</q> <rj><qau>Goldsmith.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To accustom; to guide; to show; to admonish.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I shall myself to herbs <qex>teach</qex> you.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>They have <qex>taught</qex> their tongue to speak lies.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. ix. 5.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ This verb is often used with two objects, one of the person, the other of the thing; <as>as, he <ex>taught</ex> me Latin grammar</as>. In the passive construction, either of these objects may be retained in the objective case, while the other becomes the subject; <as>as, I was <ex>taught</ex> Latin grammar by him; Latin grammar was <ex>taught</ex> me by him</as>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To instruct; inform; inculcate; tell; guide; counsel; admonish. See the Note under <er>Learn</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To give instruction; to follow the business, or to perform the duties, of a preceptor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>And gladly would he learn, and gladly <qex>teach</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The priests thereof <qex>teach</qex> for hire.</q> <rj><qau>Micah iii. 11.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being taught; apt to learn; also, willing to receive instruction; docile.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>We ought to bring our minds free, unbiased, and <qex>teachable</qex>, to learn our religion from the Word of God.</q> <rj><qau>I. Watts.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach"a*ble*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Willingness to be taught.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teache</hw> <pr>(t<emac/ch)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Amer. Sp. <ets>tacha</ets>, <ets>tacho</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Sugar Manuf.)</fld> <def>Any one of the series of boilers or evaporating pans in which the cane juice is concentrated in making sugar; especially, the last boiler of the series.</def> <rj><au>Ure.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note>The 1890 edition had the following etymology for <ex>teache</ex>: <ety>[Cf. Ir. <ets>teaghaim</ets>, Gael. <ets>teasaich</ets>, to heat.]</ety>. Presumably a speculation which proved incorrect?</note></p>
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-<p><hw>Teach"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who teaches or instructs; one whose business or occupation is to instruct others; an instructor; a tutor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One who instructs others in religion; a preacher; a minister of the gospel; sometimes, one who preaches without regular ordination.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The <qex>teachers</qex> in all the churches assembled.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Raleigh.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach"ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act or business of instructing; also, that which is taught; instruction.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Education; instruction; breeding. See <er>Education</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teach"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Not teachable.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Shelley.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea"cup`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small cup from which to drink tea.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea"cup`ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Teacupfuls</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <def>As much as a teacup can hold; enough to fill a teacup.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tead</hw>, <hw>Teade</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(t<emac/d)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taeda</ets>, <ets>teda</ets>.]</ety> <def>A torch.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdA burning <xex>teade</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea"gle</hw> <pr>(t<emac/"g'l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Tackle</er>.]</ety> <def>A hoisting apparatus; an elevator; a crane; a lift.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teague</hw> <pr>(t<emac/g)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. W. <ets>taeog</ets>, <ets>taeawg</ets>, <ets>taiawg</ets>, adj., rustic, rude, n., a vassal, villain, peasant, clown, Ir. <ets>thuatach</ets> rural, boorish.]</ety> <def>An Irishman; -- a term used in contempt.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teak</hw> <pr>(t<emac/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Malayalam <ets>tekku</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A tree of East Indies (<spn>Tectona grandis</spn>) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>teek</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>African teak</b></col>, <cd>a tree (<spn>Oldfieldia Africana</spn>) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also <altname>African oak</altname>.</cd> -- <col><b>New Zeland teak</b></col>, <cd>a large tree (<spn>Vitex littoralis</spn>) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tea"ket`tle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A kettle in which water is boiled for making tea, coffee, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teal</hw> <pr>(t<emac/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tele</ets>; akin to D. <ets>teling</ets> a generation, production, teal, <ets>telen</ets> to breed, produce, and E. <ets>till</ets> to cultivate. The English word probably once meant, a brood or flock. See <er>Till</er> to cultivate.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus <gen>Anas</gen> and the subgenera <gen>Querquedula</gen> and <gen>Nettion</gen>. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ The common European teal (<spn>Anas crecca</spn>) and the European blue-winged teal, or garganey (<spn>Anas querquedula</spn> or <spn>Anas circia</spn>), are well-known species. In America the blue-winged teal (<spn>Anas discors</spn>), the green-winged teal (<spn>Anas Carolinensis</spn>), and the cinnamon teal (<spn>Anas cyanoptera</spn>) are common species, valued as game birds. See <er>Garganey</er>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Goose teal</b></col>, <cd>a goslet. See <er>Goslet</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Teal duck</b></col>, <cd>the common European teal.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Team</hw> <pr>(t<emac/m)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tem</ets>, <ets>team</ets>, AS. <ets>te\'a0m</ets>, offspring, progeny, race of descendants, family; akin to D. <ets>toom</ets> a bridle, LG. <ets>toom</ets> progeny, team, bridle, G. <ets>zaum</ets> a bridle, <ets>zeugen</ets> to beget, Icel. <ets>taumr</ets> a rein, bridle, Dan. <ets>t\'94mme</ets>, Sw. <ets>t\'94m</ets>, and also to E. <ets>tow</ets> to drag, <ets>tug</ets> to draw. <root/64. See <er>Tug</er>, and cf. <er>Teem</er> to bear.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A group of young animals, especially of young ducks; a brood; a litter.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>A <qex>team</qex> of ducklings about her.</q> <rj><qau>Holland.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, a number of animals moving together.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>A long <qex>team</qex> of snowy swans on high.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Two or more horses, oxen, or other beasts harnessed to the same vehicle for drawing, as to a coach, wagon, sled, or the like.</def> \'bdA <xex>team</xex> of dolphins.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>To take his <qex>team</qex> and till the earth.</q> <rj><qau>Piers Plowman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>It happened almost every day that coaches stuck fast, until a <qex>team</qex> of cattle could be procured from some neighboring farm to tug them out of the slough.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>A number of persons associated together in any work; a gang; especially, a number of persons selected to contend on one side in a match, or a series of matches, in a cricket, football, rowing, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A flock of wild ducks.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping, and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes, and villains, and their offspring, or suit, that is, goods and chattels, and appurtenances thereto.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- p. 1479 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Team</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To engage in the occupation of driving a team of horses, cattle, or the like, as in conveying or hauling lumber, goods, etc.; to be a teamster.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- <col><b>team up</b></col>, <cd>to form one or more teams, either for a common endeavor, or to compete in a contest.</cd> --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Team</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To convey or haul with a team; <as>as, to <ex>team</ex> lumber</as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Thoreau.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Teamed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Yoked in, or as in, a team.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Let their <qex>teamed</qex> fishes softly swim.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Team"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act or occupation of driving a team, or of hauling or carrying, as logs, goods, or the like, with a team.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Manuf.)</fld> <def>Contract work.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Knight.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Team"ster</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who drives a team.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Team"work`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Work done by a team, as distinguished from that done by personal labor.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Work done by a number of associates, usually each doing a clearly defined portion, but all subordinating personal prominence to the efficiency of the whole; <as>as, the <ex>teamwork</ex> of a football eleven or a gun crew</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Is the <qex>teamwork</qex> system employed, or does one workman make the whole cigar?</q> <rj><qau>U. S. Consular Repts.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"pot`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A vessel with a spout, in which tea is made, and from which it is poured into teacups.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"poy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Hind. <ets>tip\'bei</ets>; Hind. <ets>tin</ets> there + Per. <ets>p\'bee</ets> foot.]</ety> <def>An ornamental stand, usually with three legs, having caddies for holding tea.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear</hw> <pr>(t<emac/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>te\'a0r</ets>; akin to G. <ets>z\'84rhe</ets>, OHG. <ets>zahar</ets>, OFries. & Icel. <ets>t\'ber</ets>, Sw. <ets>t\'86r</ets>, Dan. <ets>taare</ets>, Goth. <ets>tagr</ets>, OIr. <ets>d\'c7r</ets>, W. <ets>dagr</ets>, OW. <ets>dacr</ets>, L. <ets>lacrima</ets>, <ets>lacruma</ets>, for older <ets>dacruma</ets>, Gr. <grk>da`kry</grk>, <grk>da`kryon</grk>, <grk>da`kryma</grk>. \'fb59. Cf. <er>Lachrymose</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>A drop of the limpid, saline fluid secreted, normally in small amount, by the lachrymal gland, and diffused between the eye and the eyelids to moisten the parts and facilitate their motion. Ordinarily the secretion passes through the lachrymal duct into the nose, but when it is increased by emotion or other causes, it overflows the lids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And yet for thee ne wept she never a <qex>tear</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter; also, a solid, transparent, tear-shaped drop, as of some balsams or resins.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Let Araby extol her happy coast,<br/
-Her fragrant flowers, her trees with precious <qex>tears</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>That which causes or accompanies tears; a lament; a dirge.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdSome melodous <xex>tear</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Milton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Glass Manuf.)</fld> <def>A partially vitrified bit of clay in glass.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ <xex>Tear</xex> is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, <xex>tear</xex>-distilling, <xex>tear</xex>-drop, <xex>tear</xex>-filled, <xex>tear</xex>-stained, and the like.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tears of St. Lawrence</b></col>, <cd>the Perseid shower of meteors, seen every year on or about the eve of <person>St. Lawrence</person>, August 9th.</cd> -- <col><b>Tears of wine</b></col>, <cd>drops which form and roll down a glass above the surface of strong wine. The phenomenon is due to the evaporation of alcohol from the surface layer, which, becoming more watery, increases in surface tension and creeps up the sides until its weight causes it to break.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear</hw> <pr>(t<acir/r)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp.</pos> <conjf>Tore</conjf> <pr>(t<omac/r)</pr>, ((<mark>Obs.</mark> <conjf>Tare</conjf>) <pr>(t<acir/r)</pr>; <pos>p. p.</pos> <conjf>Torn</conjf> <pr>(t<omac/rn)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tearing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>teren</ets>, AS. <ets>teran</ets>; akin to OS. far<ets>terian</ets> to destroy, D. <ets>teren</ets> to consume, G. <ets>zerren</ets> to pull, to tear, <ets>zehren</ets> to consume, Icel. <ets>t\'91ra</ets>, Goth. <ets>gata\'a1ran</ets> to destroy, Lith. <ets>dirti</ets> to flay, Russ. <ets>drate</ets> to pull, to tear, Gr. <grk>de`rein</grk> to flay, Skr. <ets>dar</ets> to burst. \'fb63. Cf. <er>Darn</er>, <er>Epidermis</er>, <er>Tarre</er>, <er>Tirade</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To separate by violence; to pull apart by force; to rend; to lacerate; <as>as, to <ex>tear</ex> cloth; to <ex>tear</ex> a garment; to <ex>tear</ex> the skin or flesh.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tear</qex> him to pieces; he's a conspirator.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Hence, to divide by violent measures; to disrupt; to rend; <as>as, a party or government <ex>torn</ex> by factions</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To rend away; to force away; to remove by force; to sunder; <as>as, a child <ex>torn</ex> from its home</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The hand of fate<br/
-Hath <qex>torn</qex> thee from me.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To pull with violence; <as>as, to <ex>tear</ex> the hair</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To move violently; to agitate.</def> \'bdOnce I loved <xex>torn</xex> ocean's roar.\'b8 <rj><au>Byron.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tear a cat</b></col>, <cd>to rant violently; to rave; -- especially applied to theatrical ranting.</cd> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Shak.</au> -- <col><b>To tear down</b></col>, <cd>to demolish violently; to pull or pluck down.</cd> -- <col><b>To tear off</b></col>, <cd>to pull off by violence; to strip.</cd> -- <col><b>To tear out</b></col>, <cd>to pull or draw out by violence; <as>as, <ex>to tear out</ex> the eyes</as>.</cd> -- <col><b>To tear up</b></col>, <cd>to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; <as>as, <ex>to tear up</ex> a floor; <ex>to tear up</ex> the foundation of government or order</as>.</cd></cs><-- tear sheet, (a) a sheet usu. with performations, intended to be torn from a book or booklet to be used for some purpose. (b) any sheet torn from a publication. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To divide or separate on being pulled; to be rent; <as>as, this cloth <ex>tears</ex> easily</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To move and act with turbulent violence; to rush with violence; hence, to rage; to rave.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The act of tearing, or the state of being torn; a rent; a fissure.</def> <rj><au>Macaulay.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Wear and tear</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Wear</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tears or rends anything; also, one who rages or raves with violence.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"-fall`ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Shedding tears; tender.</def> <mark>[Poetic]</mark> \'bd<xex>Tear-falling</xex> pity.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Abounding with tears; weeping; shedding tears; <as>as, <ex>tearful</ex> eyes</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tear"ful*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tear"ful*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Shedding no tears; free from tears; unfeeling.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tear"less*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tear"less*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"pit`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A cavity or pouch beneath the lower eyelid of most deer and antelope; the lachrymal sinus; larmier. It is capable of being opened at pleasure and secretes a waxy substance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"-thumb`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A name given to several species of plants of the genus Polygonum, having angular stems beset with minute reflexed prickles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tear"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Wet with tears; tearful.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Consisting of tears, or drops like tears.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"-sau`cer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A small saucer in which a teacup is set.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tease</hw> <pr>(t<emac/z)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teased</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teasing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>t<?/san</ets> to pluck, tease; akin to OD. <ets>teesen</ets>, MHG. <ets>zeisen</ets>, Dan. <ets>t\'91se</ets>, <ets>t\'91sse</ets>. \'fb58. Cf. <er>Touse</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To comb or card, as wool or flax.</def> \'bd<xex>Teasing</xex> matted wool.\'b8 <rj><au>Wordsworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To stratch, as cloth, for the purpose of raising a nap; teasel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>To tear or separate into minute shreds, as with needles or similar instruments.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To vex with importunity or impertinence; to harass, annoy, disturb, or irritate by petty requests, or by jests and raillery; to plague.</def> <rj><au>Cowper.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He . . . suffered them to <qex>tease</qex> him into acts directly opposed to his strongest inclinations.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To vex; harass: annoy; disturb; irritate; plague; torment; mortify; tantalize; chagrin.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Tease</er>, <er>Vex</er>. To <xex>tease</xex> is literally to pull or scratch, and implies a prolonged annoyance in respect to little things, which is often more irritating, and harder to bear, than severe pain. <xex>Vex</xex> meant originally to seize and bear away hither and thither, and hence, to disturb; <as>as, to <ex>vex</ex> the ocean with storms</as>. This sense of the term now rarely occurs; but <xex>vex</xex> is still a stronger word than <xex>tease</xex>, denoting the disturbance or anger created by minor provocations, losses, disappointments, etc. We are <xex>teased</xex> by the buzzing of a fly in our eyes; we are <xex>vexed</xex> by the carelessness or stupidity of our servants.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Not by the force of carnal reason,<br/
-But indefatigable <qex>teasing</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Hudibras.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In disappointments, where the affections have been strongly placed, and the expectations sanguine, particularly where the agency of others is concerned, sorrow may degenerate into <qex>vexation</qex> and chagrin.</q> <rj><qau>Cogan.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tease tenon</b></col> <fld>(Joinery)</fld>, <cd>a long tenon at the top of a post to receive two beams crossing each other one above the other.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tease</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who teases or plagues.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"sel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tesel</ets>, AS. <ets>t<aemac/sel</ets>, <ets>t<aemac/sl</ets>, the fuller's herb. See <er>Tease</er>.]</ety> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tassel</asp>, <asp>tazel</asp>, <asp>teasle</asp>, <asp>teazel</asp>, and <asp>teazle</asp>.]</altsp> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A plant of the genus <gen>Dipsacus</gen>, of which one species (<spn>Dipsacus fullonum</spn>) bears a large flower head covered with stiff, prickly, hooked bracts. This flower head, when dried, is used for raising a nap on woolen cloth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ Small teasel is <spn>Dipsacus pilosus</spn>, wild teasel is <spn>Dipsacus sylvestris</spn>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A bur of this plant.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Any contrivance intended as a substitute for teasels in dressing cloth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Teasel frame</b></col>, <cd>a frame or set of iron bars in which teasel heads are fixed for raising the nap on woolen cloth.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"sel</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teaseled</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr> or <conjf>Teaselled</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teaseling</conjf> or <conjf>Teaselling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To subject, as woolen cloth, to the action of teasels, or any substitute for them which has an effect to raise a nap.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"sel*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who uses teasels for raising a nap on cloth.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>teaseller</asp>, <asp>teasler</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"sel*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The cutting and gathering of teasels; the use of teasels.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>teaselling</asp>, <asp>teazling</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teas"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who teases or vexes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A jager gull.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>A shunt winding on field magnets for maintaining their magnetism when the main circuit is open.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"sle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v. t.</pos> <def>See <er>Teasel</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"spoon`</hw> <pr>(t<emac/"sp<oomac/n`)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A small spoon used in stirring and sipping tea, coffee, etc., and for other purposes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>same as <er>teaspoonful</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"spoon`ful</hw> <pr>(t<emac/"sp<oomac/n`f<usdot/l)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Teaspoonfuls</plw> <pr>(t<emac/"sp<oomac/n`f<usdot/lz)</pr> or <plw>Teaspoonsful</plw>.</plu> <def>As much as teaspoon will hold; enough to fill a teaspoon. In cooking, it is usually estimated as 4.9 milliliters, which is <frac16/ of a fluid ounce, or <frac13/ of a tablespoonful. In cooking recipes it may be abbreviated as <abbr>t.</abbr></def> <note>In the 1890 dictionary, it was defined as a fluid dram or one quarter of a tablespoonful.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teat</hw> <pr>(t<emac/t)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tete</ets>, <ets>titte</ets>, AS. <ets>tit</ets>, <ets>titt</ets>; akin to LG. & OD. <ets>titte</ets>, D. <ets>tet</ets>, G. <ets>zitze</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tette</ets>, probably of Teutonic origin.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The protuberance through which milk is drawn from the udder or breast of a mammal; a nipple; a pap; a mammilla; a dug; a tit.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A small protuberance or nozzle resembling the teat of an animal.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teat"ed</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having protuberances resembling the teat of an animal.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teathe</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Tath</er>.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teat"ish</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Peevish; tettish; fretful; -- said of a child. See <er>Tettish</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Beau. & Fl.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teaze"-hole`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Corrupted fr. F. <ets>tisard</ets> fire door.]</ety> <fld>(Glass Works)</fld> <def>The opening in the furnaces through which fuel is introduced.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"zel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v. t.</pos> <def>See <er>Teasel</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"zer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Corrupted fr. F. <ets>tiser</ets> to feed a fire.]</ety> <def>The stoker or fireman of a furnace, as in glass works.</def> <rj><au>Tomlinson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tea"zle</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v. t.</pos> <def>See <er>Teasel</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"beth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Heb.]</ety> <def>The tenth month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year, answering to a part of December with a part of January.</def> <rj><au>Esther ii. 16.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"i*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a techy manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"i*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being techy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Technical.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Technical</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The method of performance in any art; technical skill; artistic execution; technique.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They illustrate the method of nature, not the <qex>technic</qex> of a manlike Artificer.</q> <rj><qau>Tyndall.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>Technical terms or objects; things pertaining to the practice of an art or science.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, fr. <?/ an art, probably from the same root as <?/, <?/, to bring forth, produce, and perhaps akin to E. <ets>text</ets>: cf. F. <ets>technique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the useful or mechanic arts, or to any science, business, or the like; specially appropriate to any art, science, or business; <as>as, the words of an indictment must be <ex>technical</ex></as>.</def> <rj><au>Blackstone.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`ni*cal"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Technicalities</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The quality or state of being technical; technicalness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That which is technical, or peculiar to any trade, profession, sect, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>technicalities</qex> of the sect.</q> <rj><qau>Palfrey.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic*al*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a technical manner; according to the signification of terms as used in any art, business, or profession.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic*al*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being technical; technicality.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nic*als</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <def>Those things which pertain to the practical part of an art, science, or profession; technical terms; technics.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech*ni"cian</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a person trained or skilled in the technical details of a particular art or science, especially one skilled at operating, maintaining, or repairing equipment, in contrast to the theory or informational content of a craft; -- formerly also called a <er>technicist</er>.</def> <note>In computer software companies, individuals skilled at the details of using programs and employed to help customers to install or use software or troubleshoot software problems for are also called <ex>technicians</ex>.</note><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"ni*cist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in technics or in one or more of the practical arts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`ni*co*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Technological; technical.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Dr. J. Scott.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`ni*col"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Technology.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`ni*col"or</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[a treadmark]</ety> <def>the name of one process used for color cinematography; -- also used attributively.</def> <mark>[trademark]</mark> <br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The doctrine of arts in general; such branches of learning as respect the arts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The study of a particular art.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"ni*phone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ art + <ets>-phone</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Music)</fld> <def>A dumb gymnastic apparatus for training the hands of pianists and organists, as to a legato touch.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`nique"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The method or manner of performance in any art; -- also called <altname>technic</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The body of technical methods and procedures used in a science or craft.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>the detailed movements used for executing an artistic performance; technical skill; artistic execution; <as>as, a pianist's fingering <ex>technique</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"nism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Technicality.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"no</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a form of music primarily created by computer sound synthizers rather than by musicians playing instruments.</def> <mark>[slang]</mark> <br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"no*bab`ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>technical jargon incomprehensible to non-specialists; -- sometimes used derogatorily of discussions using unnecessarily technical terminology and intended to impress or confuse, rather than inform, the listener.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>tech*noc"ra*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>government by technical specialists.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>tech"no*crat</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a technical specialist exercising governmental or managerial authority.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a proponent of technocracy.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p> -- <wordforms><wf>technocratic</wf>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech*nog"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ art, skill, craft + <ets>graph</ets>.]</ety> <def>Description of the arts and crafts of tribes and peoples.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tech`no*graph"ic</wf>, <wf>Tech`no*graph"ic*al</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`no*log"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Technological.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech`no*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>technologique</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to technology.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech*nol"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in technology; one who treats of arts, or of the terms of arts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tech*nol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ an art + <ets>-logy</ets>; cf. Gr. <?/ systematic treatment: cf. F. <ets>technologie</ets>.]</ety> <def>Industrial science; the science of systematic knowledge of the industrial arts, especially of the more important manufactures, as spinning, weaving, metallurgy, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ <xex>Technology</xex> is not an independent science, having a set of doctrines of its own, but consists of applications of the principles established in the various physical sciences (chemistry, mechanics, mineralogy, etc.) to manufacturing processes. <rj><au>Internat. Cyc.</au></rj>
-</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tech"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[From OE. <ets>tecche</ets>, <ets>tache</ets>, a habit, bad habit, vice, OF. <ets>tache</ets>, <ets>teche</ets>, a spot, stain, blemish, habit, vice, F. <ets>tache</ets> a spot, blemish; probably akin to E. <ets>tack</ets> a small nail. See <er>Tack</er> a small nail, and cf. <er>Touchy</er>.]</ety> <def>Peevish; fretful; irritable.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tec`ti*branch</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Tectibranchiata. Also used adjectively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tec`ti*bran"chi*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Tectibranchiata</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tec`ti*bran`chi*a"ta</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>tectus</ets> (p. p. of <ets>tegere</ets> to cover) + Gr. <?/ a gill.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An order, or suborder, of gastropod Mollusca in which the gills are usually situated on one side of the back, and protected by a fold of the mantle. When there is a shell, it is usually thin and delicate and often rudimentary. The aplysias and the bubble shells are examples.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tec`ti*bran"chi*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tectus</ets> (p. p. of <ets>tegere</ets> to cover) + E. <ets>branchiate</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having the gills covered by the mantle; of or pertaining to the Tectibranchiata.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A tectibranchiate mollusk.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tect"ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tectus</ets> covered, fr. <ets>tegere</ets> to cover.]</ety> <def>Covertly; privately; secretly.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Holinshed.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tec*tol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ a carpenter + <ets>-logy</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>A division of morphology created by Haeckel; the science of organic individuality constituting the purely structural portion of morphology, in which the organism is regarded as composed of organic individuals of different orders, each organ being considered an individual. See <er>Promorphology</er>, and <er>Morphon</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tec*ton"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tectonicus</ets>, Gr. <?/, fr. <?/, <?/, a carpenter, builder.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to building or construction; architectural.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Structural.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Geol. & Phys. Geog.)</fld> <def>Of, pert. to, or designating, the rock structures and external forms resulting from the deformation of the earth's crust; <as>as, <ex>tectonic</ex> arches or valleys; <ex>tectonic</ex> plates</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tec*ton"ics</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The science, or the art, by which implements, vessels, dwellings, or other edifices, are constructed, both agreeably to the end for which they are designed, and in conformity with artistic sentiments and ideas.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Geol. & Phys. Geog.)</fld> <def>the branch of geology concerned with the rock structures and external forms resulting from the deformation of the earth's crust; also, similar studies of other planets. Also called <altname>structural geology</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>plate tectonics</b></col> <cd>a geological theory which considers the earth's crust as divided into a number of large relatively rigid plates, which move relatively independently on the more plastic asthenosphere under the influence of magmatic upwellings, so as to drift apart, slide past, or collide with each other, causing the formation, breakup, or merging of continents, and causing volcanism, the building of mountain ranges, and the subduction of one plate beneath another. In recent decades a large body of data have accumulated to support the theory and provide some details of the mechanisms at work. One set of supporting observations consists of data showing that the continents have slowly moved relative to each other over long periods of time, a phenomenon called <er>continental drift</er>. Africa and South America, for example, have apparently moved apart from a connected configuration at about 2 to 3 cm per year over tens of millions of years.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tec*to"ri*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tectorius</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to covering; -- applied to a membrane immediately over the organ of Corti in the internal ear.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tec"tri*ces</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. L. <ets>tegere</ets>, <ets>tectum</ets>, to cover.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The wing coverts of a bird. See <er>Covert</er>, and <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Bird</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"cum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Tucum</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tedded</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tedding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Prob. fr. Icel. <ets>te<?/ja</ets> to spread manure, fr. <ets>ta<?/</ets> manure; akin to MHG. <ets>zetten</ets> to scatter, spread. \'fb58. Cf. <er>Teathe</er>.]</ety> <def>To spread, or turn from the swath, and scatter for drying, as new-mowed grass; -- chiefly used in the past participle.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The smell of grain or <qex>tedded</qex> grass.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tedded</qex> hay and corn sheaved in one field.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ted"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A machine for stirring and spreading hay, to expedite its drying.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ted"der</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. \'fb64. See <er>Tether</er>.]</ety> <def>Same as <er>Tether</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ted"der</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teddered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teddering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>Same as <er>Tether</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te*des"co</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos>; <plu>pl. <plw>Tedeschi</plw> <pr>(#)</pr></plu>. <ety>[It., of Germanic origin. See <er>Dutch</er>.]</ety> <def>German; -- used chiefly of art, literature, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te` De"um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <ety>[L., from <ets>te</ets> (accus. of <ets>tu</ets> thou) + <ets>Deum</ets>, accus. of <ets>Deus</ets> God. See <er>Thou</er>, and <er>Deity</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An ancient and celebrated Christian hymn, of uncertain authorship, but often ascribed to St. Ambrose; -- so called from the first words \'bd<xex>Te Deum laudamus</xex>.\'b8 It forms part of the daily matins of the Roman Catholic breviary, and is sung on all occasions of thanksgiving. In its English form, commencing with words, \'bdWe praise thee, O God,\'b8 it forms a part of the regular morning service of the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal Church in America.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A religious service in which the singing of the hymn forms a principal part.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A musical setting of the <er>Te Deum{1}</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tedge</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Founding)</fld> <def>The gate of a mold, through which the melted metal is poured; runner, geat.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`di*os"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tediousness.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"di*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taediosus</ets>, fr. <ets>taedium</ets>. See <er>Tedium</er>.]</ety> <def>Involving tedium; tiresome from continuance, prolixity, slowness, or the like; wearisome.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Te"di*ous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Te"di*ous*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I see a man's life is a <qex>tedious</qex> one.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I would not be <qex>tedious</qex> to the court.</q> <rj><qau>Bunyan.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Wearisome; fatiguing. See <er>Irksome</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1480 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"di*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>taedium</ets>, fr. <ets>taedet</ets> it disgusts, it wearies one.]</ety> <def>Irksomeness; wearisomeness; tediousness.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>t\'91dium</asp>.]</altsp> <rj><au>Cowper.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>To relieve the <qex>tedium</qex>, he kept plying them with all manner of bams.</q> <rj><qau>Prof. Wilson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tedium</qex> of his office reminded him more strongly of the willing scholar, and his thoughts were rambling.</q> <rj><qau>Dickens.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Icel. <ets>tj\'be</ets> to show, mark.]</ety> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The mark aimed at in curling and in quoits.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The nodule of earth, or a short peg stuck into the ground, from which the ball is struck at the beginning of play for each hole in golf.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A short piece of pipe having a lateral outlet, used to connect a line of pipe with a pipe at a right angle with the line; -- so called because it resembles the letter <er>T</er> in shape.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The letter T, t; also, something shaped like, or resembling in form, the letter <universbold>T</universbold>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teeing</conjf>.]</vmorph> <fld>(Golf)</fld> <def>To place (the ball) on a tee; also called to <altname>tee up</altname>.</def><-- also . See tee off. --><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teeing ground</hw>. <fld>(Golf)</fld> <def>The space from within which the ball must be struck in beginning the play for each hole.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee" i`ron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>See <cref>T iron</cref>, under <er>T</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teek</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>See <er>Teak</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Sesame.</def> <altsp>[Sometimes written <asp>til</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Teel oil</b></col>, <cd>sesame oil.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teel"seed`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The seed of sesame.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Icel. <ets>t\'91ma</ets> to empty, from <ets>t\'d3mr</ets> empty; akin to Dan. <ets>t\'94mme</ets> to empty, Sw. <ets>t\'94mma</ets>. See <er>Toom</er> to empty.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To pour; -- commonly followed by <xex>out</xex>; <as>as, to <ex>teem</ex> out ale</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Swift.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Steel Manuf.)</fld> <def>To pour, as steel, from a melting pot; to fill, as a mold, with molten metal.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tame</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, and cf. <er>Beteem</er>.]</ety> <def>To think fit.</def> <mark>[Obs. or R.]</mark> <rj><au>G. Gifford.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teemed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teeming</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>temen</ets>, AS. <ets>t\'c7man</ets>, <ets>t<?/man</ets>, from <ets>te\'a0m</ets>. See <er>Team</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To bring forth young, as an animal; to produce fruit, as a plant; to bear; to be pregnant; to conceive; to multiply.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>If she must <qex>teem</qex>,<br/
-Create her child of spleen.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To be full, or ready to bring forth; to be stocked to overflowing; to be prolific; to abound.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>His mind <qex>teeming</qex> with schemes of future deceit to cover former villainy.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The young, brimful of the hopes and feeling which <qex>teem</qex> in our time.</q> <rj><qau>F. Harrison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To produce; to bring forth.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>That [grief] of an hour's age doth hiss the speaker;<br/
-Each minute <qex>teems</qex> a new one.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who teems, or brings forth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pregnant; prolific.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Brimful.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ainsworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem"ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Prolific; productive.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Teeming</qex> buds and cheerful appear.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teem"less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Not fruitful or prolific; barren; <as>as, a <ex>teemless</ex> earth</as>.</def> <mark>[Poetic]</mark> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>tene</ets>, AS. <ets>te\'a2na</ets> reproach, wrong, fr. <ets>te\'a2n</ets> to accuse; akin to G. <ets>zeihen</ets>, Goth. ga<ets>teihan</ets> to tell, announce, L. <ets>dicere</ets> to say. See <er>Token</er>.]</ety> <def>Grief; sorrow; affiction; pain.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer. Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>With public toil and private <qex>teen</qex><br/
-Thou sank'st alone.</q> <rj><qau>M. Arnold.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>te\'a2nian</ets>, <ets>t<?/nan</ets>, to slander, vex. \'fb64. See <er>Teen</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <def>To excite; to provoke; to vex; to affict; to injure.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Piers Plowman.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tine</er> to shut.]</ety> <def>To hedge or fence in; to inclose.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a <er>teenager</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen"age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The longer wood for making or mending fences.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen"age`</hw> <pr>(t<emac/n"<amac/j)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>of or pertaining to a teenager; being in one's teens; <as>as, a busload of <ex>teenage</ex> football fans; <ex>teenage</ex> inexperience</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen"ag`er</hw> <pr>(t<emac/n"<amac/j`<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>a person whose age is in the teens, i.e. one between the ages of 13 to 19 inclusive.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teend</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t. & i.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tinder</er>.]</ety> <def>To kindle; to burn.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Herrick.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen"ful</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Full of teen; harmful; grievous; grieving; afflicted.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Piers Plowman.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teens</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Ten</er>.]</ety> <def>The years of one's age having the termination <xex>-teen</xex>, beginning with thirteen and ending with nineteen; <as>as, a girl in her <ex>teens</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Very small; tiny.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teen"y</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Teen</er> grief.]</ety> <def>Fretful; peevish; pettish; cross.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*ong"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The mino bird.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tinsmith's stake, or small anvil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tees"wa`ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the river <ets>Tees</ets>, northern England.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A breed of cattle formerly bred in England, but supposed to have originated in Holland and to have been the principal stock from which the shorthorns were derived.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An old English breed of sheep allied to the Leicester.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"tan</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A pipit.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"tee</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp. <ets>tit\'a1</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of small, soft-furred South American monkeys belonging to <gen>Callithrix</gen>, <gen>Chrysothrix</gen>, and allied genera; <as>as, the collared <ex>teetee</ex> (<spn>Callithrix torquatus</spn>), and the squirrel <ex>teetee</ex> (<spn>Chrysothrix sciurea</spn>)</as>. Called also <altname>pinche</altname>, <altname>titi</altname>, and <altname>saimiri</altname>. See <cref>Squirrel monkey</cref>, under <er>Squirrel</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A diving petrel of Australia (<spn>Halodroma wrinatrix</spn>).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i. & t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teetered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teetering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Prov. E. <ets>titter</ets> to tremble, to seesaw; cf. Icel. <ets>titra</ets> to tremble, OHG. <ets>zittar\'d3n</ets>, G. <ets>zittern</ets>.]</ety> <def>To move up and down on the ends of a balanced plank, or the like, as children do for sport; to seesaw; to titter; to titter-totter.</def> <mark>[U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>[The bobolink] alit upon the flower, and <qex>teetered</qex> up and down.</q> <rj><qau>H. W. Beecher.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"ter-tail`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The spotted sandpiper. See the Note under <er>Sandpiper</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teeth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>, <def><pos>pl.</pos> of <er>Tooth</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teeth</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Teethed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Teething</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To breed, or grow, teeth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teeth"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The process of the first growth of teeth, or the phenomena attending their issue through the gums; dentition.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*to"tal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Entire; total.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*to"tal*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One pledged to entire abstinence from all intoxicating drinks.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*to"tal*ism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The principle or practice of entire abstinence, esp. from intoxicating drinks.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*to"tal*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>Entirely; totally.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee*to"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[For T-<ets>totum</ets>. It was used for playing games of chance, and was four-sided, one side having the letter <b>T</b> on it, standing for Latin <ets>totum</ets> all, meaning, take all that is staked, whence the name. The other three sides each had a letter indicating an English or Latin word; as <b>P</b> meaning put down, <b>N</b> nothing or L. <ets>nil</ets>, <b>H</b> half. See <er>Total</er>.]</ety> <def>A child's toy, somewhat resembling a top, and twirled by the fingers.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The staggerings of the gentleman . . . were like those of a <qex>teetotum</qex> nearly spent.</q> <rj><qau>Dickens.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee-to"-tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Teetotaler</er>.]</ety> <def>A workingmen's resort conducted under religious influences as a counteractant to the drinking saloon.</def> <mark>[Colloq. or Cant]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"tuck</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The rock pipit.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"uck</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The lapwing.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tee"wit</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The pewit.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A sheep in its second year; also, a doe in its second year.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Teg"men</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tegmina</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., fr. <ets>tegere</ets>, <ets>tectum</ets>, to cover.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A tegument or covering.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The inner layer of the coating of a seed, usually thin and delicate; the endopleura.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the elytra of an insect, especially of certain Orthoptera.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Tectrices</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg*men"tal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to a tegument or tegmentum; <as>as, the <ex>tegmental</ex> layer of the epiblast; the <ex>tegmental</ex> cells of the taste buds.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Teg*men"tum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tegmenta</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a covering.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A covering; -- applied especially to the bundles of longitudinal fibers in the upper part of the crura of the cerebrum.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*guex"in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A large South American lizard (<spn>Tejus teguexin</spn>). It becomes three or four feet long, and is blackish above, marked with yellowish spots of various sizes. It feeds upon fruits, insects, reptiles, young birds, and birds' eggs. The closely allied species <spn>Tejus rufescens</spn> is called <altname>red teguexin</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Teg"u*la</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tegul\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a tile, dim. fr. <ets>tegere</ets> to cover.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A small appendage situated above the base of the wings of Hymenoptera and attached to the mesonotum.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg"u*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>tegularis</ets>, from L. <ets>tegula</ets> a tile. See <er>Tile</er>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a tile; resembling a tile, or arranged like tiles; consisting of tiles; <as>as, a <ex>tegular</ex> pavement</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Teg"u*lar*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg`u*la"ted</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Composed of small plates, as of horn or metal, overlapping like tiles; -- said of a kind of ancient armor.</def> <rj><au>Fairholt.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg"u*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tegumentum</ets>, from <ets>tegere</ets> to cover. See <er>Thatch</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, and cf. <er>Detect</er>, <er>Protect</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A cover or covering; an integument.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Especially, the covering of a living body, or of some part or organ of such a body; skin; hide.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teg`u*men"ta*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82gumentaire</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a tegument or teguments; consisting of teguments; serving as a tegument or covering.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te-hee"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & interj.</pos> <def>A tittering laugh; a titter.</def> \'bd'<xex>Te-hee</xex>,' quoth she.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te-hee"</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To titter; to laugh derisively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>She cried, \'bdCome, come; you must not look grave upon me.\'b8 Upon this, I <qex>te-heed</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Madame D'Arblay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teil</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>teil</ets>, <ets>til</ets>, L. <ets>tilia</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The lime tree, or linden; -- called also <altname>teil tree</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teind</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. Icel. <ets>t\'c6und</ets>. See <er>Tithe</er>.]</ety> <def>A tithe.</def> <mark>[Scot.]</mark> <rj><au>Jamieson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teine</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Teyne</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tein"land</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>Land granted by the crown to a thane or lord.</def> <rj><au>Burrill.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tei"no*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ to extend + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An instrument formed by combining prisms so as to correct the chromatic aberration of the light while linear dimensions of objects seen through the prisms are increased or diminished; -- called also <altname>prism telescope</altname>.</def> <rj><au>Sir D. Brewster.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Teint</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>teint</ets>, <ets>teinte</ets>. See <er>Tint</er>.]</ety> <def>Tint; color; tinge, See <er>Tint</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Time shall . . . embrown the <qex>teint</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tein"ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tincture</er>.]</ety> <def>Color; tinge; tincture.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tek</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A Siberian ibex.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tel`a*mo"nes</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L., pl. of <ets>telamo</ets> or <ets>telamon</ets>, Gr. <?/ a bearer, fr. <?/ to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Atlantes</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tel*an`gi*ec"ta*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ end + <?/ vessel + <?/ extension.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Dilatation of the capillary vessels.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*an`gi*ec"ta*sy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Telangiectasis.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"lar*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a weblike manner.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bd<xex>Telarly</xex> interwoven.\'b8 <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"la*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>telaris</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tela</ets> a web. See <er>Toil</er> a snare.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a web; hence, spinning webs; retiary.</def> \'bdPictures of <xex>telary</xex> spiders.\'b8 <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*au"to*gram</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A message transmitted and recorded by a teleautograph.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*au"to*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>autograph</ets>.]</ety> <def>A facsimile telegraph for reproducing writing, pictures, maps, etc. In the transmitter the motions of the pencil are communicated by levers to two rotary shafts, by which variations in current are produced in two separate circuits. In the receiver these variations are utilized by electromagnetic devices and levers to move a pen as the pencil moves.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`au*tog"ra*phist</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos><-- superseded by FAX --></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*chi"ro*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <grk>chei`r</grk>, <grk>cheiro`s</grk>, hand + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for telegraphically transmitting and receiving handwritten messages, as photographically by a beam of light from a mirror.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*du</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An East Indian carnivore (<spn>Mydaus meliceps</spn>) allied to the badger, and noted for the very offensive odor that it emits, somewhat resembling that of a skunk. It is a native of the high mountains of Java and Sumatra, and has long, silky fur. Called also <altname>stinking badger</altname>, and <altname>stinkard</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*le"ga</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Russ. <ets>telyega</ets>.]</ety> <def>A rude four-wheeled, springless wagon, used among the Russians.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leg"o*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + root of Gr. <?/ to be born.]</ety> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>The supposed influence of a father upon offspring subsequent to his own, begotten of the same mother by another father.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Te*leg"o*nous</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*gram</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far + <ets>-gram</ets>.]</ety> <def>A message sent by telegraph; a telegraphic dispatch.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ \'bdA friend desires us to give notice that he will ask leave, at some convenient time, to introduce a new word into the vocabulary. It is <xex>telegram</xex>, instead of <xex>telegraphic dispatch</xex>, or <xex>telegraphic communication</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Albany [N. Y.] Evening Journal (April 6, 1852).</au></rj>
-</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*gram*mic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to, or resembling, a telegram; laconic; concise; brief.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far, far off (cf. Lith. <ets>toli</ets>) + <ets>-graph</ets>: cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82graphe</ets>. See <er>Graphic</er>.]</ety> <def>An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical action.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The instruments used are classed as <xex>indicator</xex>, <xex>type-printing</xex>, <xex>symbol-printing</xex>, or <xex>chemical-printing telegraphs</xex>, according as the intelligence is given by the movements of a pointer or indicator, as in Cooke & Wheatstone's (the form commonly used in England), or by impressing, on a fillet of paper, letters from types, as in House's and Hughe's, or dots and marks from a sharp point moved by a magnet, as in Morse's, or symbols produced by electro-chemical action, as in Bain's. In the offices in the United States the recording instrument is now little used, the receiving operator reading by ear the combinations of long and short intervals of sound produced by the armature of an electro-magnet as it is put in motion by the opening and breaking of the circuit, which motion, in registering instruments, traces upon a ribbon of paper the lines and dots used to represent the letters of the alphabet. See <xex>Illustration</xex> in Appendix.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Acoustic telegraph</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Acoustic</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Dial telegraph</b></col>, <cd>a telegraph in which letters of the alphabet and numbers or other symbols are placed upon the border of a circular dial plate at each station, the apparatus being so arranged that the needle or index of the dial at the receiving station accurately copies the movements of that at the sending station.</cd> -- <mcol><col><b>Electric telegraph</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Electro-magnetic telegraph</b></col></mcol>, <cd>a telegraph in which an operator at one station causes words or signs to be made at another by means of a current of electricity, generated by a battery and transmitted over an intervening wire.</cd> -- <col><b>Facsimile telegraph</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Facsimile</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Indicator telegraph</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Indicator</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Pan-telegraph</b></col>, <cd>an electric telegraph by means of which a drawing or writing, as an autographic message, may be exactly reproduced at a distant station.</cd> -- <col><b>Printing telegraph</b></col>, <cd>an electric telegraph which automatically prints the message as it is received at a distant station, in letters, not signs.</cd> -- <col><b>Signal telegraph</b></col>, <cd>a telegraph in which preconcerted signals, made by a machine, or otherwise, at one station, are seen or heard and interpreted at another; a semaphore.</cd> -- <col><b>Submarine telegraph cable</b></col>, <cd>a telegraph cable laid under water to connect stations separated by a body of water.</cd> -- <col><b>Telegraph cable</b></col>, <cd>a telegraphic cable consisting of several conducting wires, inclosed by an insulating and protecting material, so as to bring the wires into compact compass for use on poles, or to form a strong cable impervious to water, to be laid under ground, as in a town or city, or under water, as in the ocean.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Telegraphed</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Telegraphing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>t\'82l\'82graphier</ets>.]</ety> <def>To convey or announce by telegraph.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leg"ra*pher</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who sends telegraphic messages; a telegraphic operator; a telegraphist.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>telegraphese</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>language characterized by terseness and ellipsis as in telegrams.</def><br/
-[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*graph"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82graphique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to the telegraph; made or communicated by a telegraph; <as>as, <ex>telegraphic</ex> signals; <ex>telegraphic</ex> art; <ex>telegraphic</ex> intelligence.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>having only the essential information; brief; concise; terse; -- of communications, by analogy with the style of telegrams, which are short to avoid unnecessary expense.</def> <note>a <ex>telegraphic</ex> communication should have enough information to allow comprehension of the content, though it may leave out normally included words. If so much is left out that the communication becomes difficult or impossible to understand, it may be called <contr>cryptic</contr>. \'bdSighted sub. Sank same.\'b8 is a <ex>telegraphic</ex> message.</note><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*graph"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Telegraphic.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*graph"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leg"ra*phist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One skilled in telegraphy; a telegrapher.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Telegraph plant</hw> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <def>A tick trefoil (<spn>Meibomia gyrans</spn> formerly <spn>Desmodium gyrans</spn>), native of the East Indies; it is a leguminous plant whose lateral leaflets jerk up and down like the arms of a semaphore, and also rotate on their axes.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leg"ra*phone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>-graph</ets> + <?/ sound.]</ety> <def>An instrument for recording and reproducing sound by local magnetization of a steel wire, disk, or ribbon, moved against the pole of a magnet connected electrically with a telephone receiver, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*graph"o*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>-graph</ets> + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for telegraphically transmitting a picture and reproducing its image as a positive or negative. The transmitter includes a camera obscura and a row of minute selenium cells. The receiver includes an oscillograph, relay, equilibrator, and an induction coil the sparks from which perforate a paper with tiny holes that form the image. It is now (1999) obsolete, having been replaced by telefax and internet transmission of images.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leg"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82graphie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The science or art of constructing, or of communicating by means of, telegraphs; <as>as, submarine <ex>telegraphy</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*gu"</hw>, <pos>prop. a. & n.</pos> <def>same as <er>Telugu</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*hy`dro*ba*rom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>hydrobarometer</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for indicating the level of water in a distant tank or reservior.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e-i*con"o*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>iconograph</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An instrument essentially the same as the telemetrograph.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A form of facsimile telegraph.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>tel`e*ki*ne"sis</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/l`<ucr/*k<icr/*n<emac/"s<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>the ability to move objects by means of thought alone, without physical means; -- an ability claimed by certain persons, such as mediums.</def> <note>the existence of this ability is disbelieved by most scientists.</note><br/
-<syn><b>Syn. --</b> psychokinesis</syn><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`-el-A*mar"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar., hill of Amarna.]</ety> <def>A station on the Nile in Egypt, midway between Thebes and Memphis, forming the site of the ancient city of Akhetaton, capital of <person>Amenophis IV.</person> (<persfn>Akhenaton</persfn>, or <person>Amenhotep IV.</person>, of the 18th dynasty, king 1353-1336 B. C.), whose archive chamber was discovered there during extensive excavations in 1887-1888. A collection of about 300 clay tablets (called the <mcol><col><b>Tel-el-Amarna tablets</b></col>, <it>or</it> the <col><b>Amarna tablets</b></col></mcol>) was found here, forming the diplomatic correspondence (<col><b>Tel-el-Amarna letters</b></col>) of <person>Amenophis IV.</person> and his father, <person>Amenophis III.</person>, with the kings of Asiatic countries (such as Babylonia, Assyria, and Palestine), written in cuneiform characters. It is an important source of our knowledge of Asia from about 1400 to 1370 <sc>b. c.</sc>. The name of the site is also spelled <asp>Tell-el-Amarna</asp>, <asp>Tell el Amarna</asp>, and <asp>Tel Amarna</asp>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*lec"tric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>electric</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to transmission, as of music, to a distance by electricity.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*lec"tro*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>electro-</ets> + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <def>Any apparatus for making distant objects visible by the aid of electric transmission.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>telemarketing</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>the use of the telephone as an interactive medium for promotion; calling potential customers by telephone for the purpose of selling something; -- applied especially to calls made to persons who have not previously contacted the seller.</def><br/
-<syn><b>Syn. --</b> teleselling.</syn><br/
-[<source>WordNet 1.5</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*me*chan"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>mechanic</ets>.]</ety> <def>Designating, or pert. to, any device for operating mechanisms at a distance.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*mech"a*nism</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ma"chus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <def>The son of Odysseus and Penelope, as told in Homer's Oddysey.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*me`te*or"o*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>meteorograph</ets>.]</ety> <def>Any apparatus recording meteorological phenomena at a distance from the measuring apparatus, as by electricity or by compressed air; esp., an apparatus recording conditions at many distant stations at a central office.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*me`te*or*o*graph"ic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*lem"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far + <ets>-meter</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An instrument used for measuring the distance of an object from an observer; <as>as, a telescope with a micrometer for measuring the apparent diameter of an object whose real dimensions are known</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A measuring instrument which sends the information obtained from its sensors by radio to a distant station, usually to be recorded there; also, the complete system including measuring instrument, transmitter, and receiver. Such instruments are used, for example, to measure conditions in space or in other locations difficult of access for humans observers, or merely to allow one observer to monitor conditions in many places simultaneously.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*met"ro*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <grk>me`tron</grk> measure + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <def>A combination of the camera lucida and telescope for drawing and measuring distant objects.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*me*trog"ra*phy</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> -- <wf>Tel`e*met`ro*graph"ic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*lem"e*try</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The science or process of making remote measurements and sending the data by radio; the use of a telemeter.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*mo"tor</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>motor</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A hydraulic device by which the movement of the wheel on the bridge operates the steering gear at the stern.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>telencephalon</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>the anterior division of the forebrain; the cerebrum and related parts of the hypothalamus.</def><br/
-[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*en"er*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>energy</ets>.]</ety> <def>Display of force or energy at a distance, or without contact; now more commonly called <altname>telekinesis</altname>; -- applied to mediumistic phenomena.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`en*er"gic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*len"gi*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <?/ near + <ets>-scope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Optics)</fld> <def>An instrument of such focal length that it may be used as an observing telescope for objects close at hand or as a long-focused microscope.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te`le*o*ceph"a*li</hw> <pr>(t<emac/`l<esl/*<osl/*s<ecr/f"<adot/*l<imac/ <it>or</it> t<ecr/`l<esl/*<osl/*s<ecr/f"<adot/*l<imac/)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>te`leos</grk> complete + <grk>kefalh`</grk> head.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An extensive order of bony fishes including most of the common market species, as bass, salmon, cod, perch, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*o*log"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82ologique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to teleology, or the doctrine of design.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>showing evidence of design or purpose, especially in natural phenomena.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p> -- <wordforms><wf>Te`le*o*log"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*ol"o*gist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Biol.)</fld> <def>One versed in teleology.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*ol"o*gy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, <grk>teleos</grk>, the end or issue + <ets>-logy</ets>: cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82ologie</ets>.]</ety> <def>The doctrine of the final causes of things</def>; specif. <fld>(Biol.)</fld>, <def>the doctrine of design, which assumes that the phenomena of organic life, particularly those of evolution, are explicable only by purposive causes, and that they in no way admit of a mechanical explanation or one based entirely on biological science; the doctrine of adaptation to purpose.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"le*o*phore`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>teleos</grk> complete + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Gonotheca</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*or*gan"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>teleos</grk> complete + E. <ets>organic</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>Vital; <as>as, <ex>teleorganic</ex> functions</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*o*saur"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of fossil suarians belonging to Teleosaurus and allied genera. These reptiles are related to the crocodiles, but have biconcave vertebr\'91.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te`le*o*sau"rus</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ complete, perfect + <?/ a lizard.]</ety> <fld>(Paleon.)</fld> <def>A genus of extinct crocodilian reptiles of the Jurassic period, having a long and slender snout.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te"le*ost</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ complete + <?/ bone.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the Teleosti. Also used adjectively.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*os"te*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the teleosts.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>A teleostean fish.</def></def2><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te`le*os"te*i</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ complete + <?/ bone.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A subclass of fishes including all the ordinary bony fishes as distinguished from the ganoids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1481 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te"le*os`to*mi</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ complete + <?/ mouth.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An extensive division of fishes including the ordinary fishes (Teleostei) and the ganoids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te`le*o*zo"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having tissued composed of cells.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*le*o*zo"\'94n</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A metazoan.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*lep"a*thy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + <?/, <?/, to suffer.]</ety> <def>The sympathetic affection of one mind by the thoughts, feelings, or emotions of another at a distance, without communication through the ordinary channels of sensation.</def> <note>The existence of this ability has not been proven scientifically.</note>-- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*path"ic</wf>, <pos>a.</pos> -- <wf>Te*lep"a*thist</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*pheme</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ afar + <?/ a saying.]</ety> <def>A message by a telephone.</def> <mark>[Recent]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*phone</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + <?/ sound.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An instrument for reproducing sounds, especially articulate speech, at a distance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The ordinary telephone consists essentially of a device by which currents of electricity, produced by sounds through the agency of certain mechanical devices and exactly corresponding in duration and intensity to the vibrations of the air which attend them, are transmitted to a distant station, and there, acting on suitable mechanism, reproduce similar sounds by repeating the vibrations. The necessary variations in the electrical currents are usually produced by means of a microphone attached to a thin diaphragm upon which the voice acts, and are intensified by means of an induction coil. In the <xex>magnetic telephone</xex>, or <xex>magneto-telephone</xex>, the diaphragm is of soft iron placed close to the pole of a magnet upon which is wound a coil of fine wire, and its vibrations produce corresponding vibrable currents in the wire by induction. The <xex>mechanical</xex>, or <xex>string</xex>, <xex>telephone</xex> is a device in which the voice or sound causes vibrations in a thin diaphragm, which are directly transmitted along a wire or string connecting it to a similar diaphragm at the remote station, thus reproducing the sound. It does not employ electricity.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*phone</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To convey or announce by telephone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*phone ex*change"</hw>. <def>A central office in which the wires of telephones from local subscribers may be connected by switches to other local telephones or to long-distance lines, to permit transmission of conversation or data.</def> <note>In the late 1990's the traditional copper wires connecting local telephones to the telephone exchange have begun to be replaced with optical fiber connections.</note><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*phon"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82l\'82phonique</ets>. See <er>Telephone</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Conveying sound to a great distance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to the telephone; by the telephone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*phon"ic*al*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>By telephonic means or processes; by the use of the telephone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leph"o*ny</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or process of reproducing sounds at a distance, as with the telephone.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*phote</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <grk>fw^s</grk>, <grk>fwto`s</grk>, light.]</ety> <def>A telelectric apparatus for producing images of visible objects at a distance.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*pho"to</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>of or relating to photography with a <er>telephoto lens</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>of or pertaining to a <er>telephoto lens</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>telephoto</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>a <er>telephoto lens</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a photograph taken using a <er>telephoto lens</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*pho"to*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>photograph</ets>.]</ety> <def>a photograph transmitted and reproduced by telephotography.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>a photograph made with a telephoto lens.</def><br/
-<syn><b>Syn. --</b> telephoto.</syn><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> + <source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*pho`to*graph"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Designating, or pertaining to, the process of telephotography.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*pho*tog"ra*phy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The photography of distant objects in more enlarged form than is possible by the ordinary means, usually by a camera provided with a <er>telephoto lens</er> or mounted in place of the eyepiece of a telescope, so that the real or a magnified image falls on the sensitive plate.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Art or process of electrically transmitting and reproducing photographic or other pictures at a distance, especially by methods similar to those used in electric telegraphy.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Less properly, phototelegraphy.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*pho"to lens</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>a special compound camera lens with a long effective focal length but used in a camera with a short focal length, allowing large images to be obtained of distant objects when used in a camera in place of an ordinary lens; -- called also <altname>telephotographic lens</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*po*lar"i*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + E. <ets>polariscope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Opt.)</fld> <def>A polariscope arranged to be attached to a telescope.</def> <rj><au>Lockyer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ryth"in</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ end + E. <ets>erythrin</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A red crystalline compound related to, or produced from, erythrin. So called because regarded as the end of the series of erythrin compounds.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ viewing afar, farseeing; <?/ far, far off + <?/ a watcher, akin to <?/ to view: cf. F. <ets>t\'82lescope</ets>. See <er>Telegraph</er>, and <er>-scope</er>.]</ety> <def>An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the heavenly bodies.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ A telescope assists the eye chiefly in two ways; first, by enlarging the visual angle under which a distant object is seen, and thus magnifying that object; and, secondly, by collecting, and conveying to the eye, a larger beam of light than would enter the naked organ, thus rendering objects distinct and visible which would otherwise be indistinct and or invisible. Its essential parts are the <xex>object glass</xex>, or <xex>concave mirror</xex>, which collects the beam of light, and forms an image of the object, and the <xex>eyeglass</xex>, which is a microscope, by which the image is magnified.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Achromatic telescope</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Achromatic</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Aplanatic telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope having an aplanatic eyepiece.</cd> -- <col><b>Astronomical telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope which has a simple eyepiece so constructed or used as not to reverse the image formed by the object glass, and consequently exhibits objects inverted, which is not a hindrance in astronomical observations.</cd> -- <col><b>Cassegrainian telescope</b></col>, <cd>a reflecting telescope invented by <etsep>Cassegrain</etsep>, which differs from the Gregorian only in having the secondary speculum convex instead of concave, and placed nearer the large speculum. The Cassegrainian represents objects inverted; the Gregorian, in their natural position. The Melbourne telescope (see <xex>Illust.</xex> under <cref>Reflecting telescope</cref>, below) is a Cassegrainian telescope.</cd> -- <col><b>Dialytic telescope</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Dialytic</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Equatorial telescope</b></col>. <cd>See the Note under <er>Equatorial</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Galilean telescope</b></col>, <cd>a refracting telescope in which the eyeglass is a concave instead of a convex lens, as in the common opera glass. This was the construction originally adopted by <etsep>Galileo</etsep>, the inventor of the instrument. It exhibits the objects erect, that is, in their natural positions.</cd> -- <col><b>Gregorian telescope</b></col>, <cd>a form of reflecting telescope. See under <er>Gregorian</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Herschelian telescope</b></col>, <cd>a reflecting telescope of the form invented by Sir William <etsep>Herschel</etsep>, in which only one speculum is employed, by means of which an image of the object is formed near one side of the open end of the tube, and to this the eyeglass is applied directly.</cd> -- <col><b>Newtonian telescope</b></col>, <cd>a form of reflecting telescope. See under <er>Newtonian</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Photographic telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope specially constructed to make photographs of the heavenly bodies.</cd> -- <col><b>Prism telescope</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Teinoscope</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Reflecting telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope in which the image is formed by a speculum or mirror (or usually by two speculums, a large one at the lower end of the telescope, and the smaller one near the open end) instead of an object glass. See <cref>Gregorian, Cassegrainian, Herschelian, <and/ Newtonian, telescopes</cref>, above.</cd> -- <col><b>Refracting telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope in which the image is formed by refraction through an object glass.</cd> -- <col><b>Telescope carp</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>the telescope fish.</cd> -- <col><b>Telescope fish</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>a monstrous variety of the goldfish having very protuberant eyes.</cd> -- <col><b>Telescope fly</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>any two-winged fly of the genus <gen>Diopsis</gen>, native of Africa and Asia. The telescope flies are remarkable for having the eyes raised on very long stalks.</cd> -- <col><b>Telescope shell</b></col> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld>, <cd>an elongated gastropod (<spn>Cerithium telescopium</spn>) having numerous flattened whorls.</cd> -- <col><b>Telescope sight</b></col> <fld>(Firearms)</fld>, <cd>a slender telescope attached to the barrel, having cross wires in the eyepiece and used as a sight.</cd> -- <col><b>Terrestrial telescope</b></col>, <cd>a telescope whose eyepiece has one or two lenses more than the astronomical, for the purpose of inverting the image, and exhibiting objects erect.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Telescoped</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Telescoping</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To slide or pass one within another, after the manner of the sections of a small telescope or spyglass; to come into collision, as railway cars, in such a manner that one runs into another; to become compressed in the manner of a telescope, due to a collision or other force.</def> <mark>[Recent]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*scope</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To cause to come into collision, so as to telescope.</def> <mark>[Recent]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>to shorten or abridge significantly; <as>as, to <ex>telescope</ex> a whole semester's lectures into one week</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*scope</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/l"<esl/*sk<omac/p)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being extended or compacted, like a telescope, by the sliding of joints or parts one within the other; telescopic; <as>as, a <ex>telescope</ex> bag; <ex>telescope</ex> table, etc.; -- now more commonly replaced by the term <altname>telescoping</altname>.</as></def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Telescope bag</hw>. <def>An adjustable traveling bag consisting of two cases, the larger slipping over the other.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tel`e*scop"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tel`e*scop"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>t\'82lescopique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to a telescope; performed by a telescope.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Seen or discoverable only by a telescope; <as>as, <ex>telescopic</ex> stars</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Able to discern objects at a distance; farseeing; far-reaching; <as>as, a <ex>telescopic</ex> eye; <ex>telescopic</ex> vision</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Having the power of extension by joints sliding one within another, like the tube of a small telescope or a spyglass; especially <fld>(Mach.)</fld>, constructed of concentric tubes, either stationary, as in the <xex>telescopic</xex> boiler, or movable, as in the <xex>telescopic</xex> chimney of a war vessel, which may be put out of sight by being lowered endwise.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*scop"ic*al*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a telescopical manner; by or with the telescope.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*scop"ic sight`</hw>. <def>A sight consisting of a small telescope, as on a compass or rifle.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*scop`ing</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/l"<esl/*sk<omac/p`<icr/ng)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being extended or compacted, like a telescope, by the sliding of sections or parts one within the other; telescopic; <as>as, <ex>telescoping</ex> tripod legs; a <ex>telescoping</ex> table, etc.</as>; -- a term replacing the formerly used <altname>telescope</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*les"co*pist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who uses a telescope.</def> <rj><au>R. A. Proctor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*les"co*py</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The art or practice of using or making telescopes.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*seism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <?/ shock.]</ety> <def>A seismic movement or shock far from the recording instrument.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*seis"mic</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"e*seme</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <?/ sign.]</ety> <def>A system of apparatus for electric signals providing for automatic transmission of a definite number of different signals or calls, as in connection with hotel annunciators.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"esm</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar. <ets>tilism</ets>. See <er>Talisman</er>.]</ety> <def>A kind of amulet or magical charm.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>J. Gregory.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tel`es*mat"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tel`es*mat"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to telesms; magical.</def> <rj><au>J. Gregory.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*spec"tro*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + E. <ets>spectroscope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>A spectroscope arranged to be attached to a telescope for observation of distant objects, as the sun or stars.</def> <rj><au>Lockyer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ste"re*o*graph`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>stereograph</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for telegraphically reproducing a photograph.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tel`e*ste`re*og"ra*phy</wf> <pr>(#)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ste"re*o*scope</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + E. <ets>stereoscope</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Opt.)</fld> <def>A stereoscope adapted to view distant natural objects or landscapes; a telescopic stereoscope.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*les"tic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ fit for finishing, from <?/ to finish.]</ety> <def>Tending or relating to a purpose or an end.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cudworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*les"tich</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ the end + <?/ a line, verse.]</ety> <def>A poem in which the final letters of the lines, taken consequently, make a name. Cf. <er>Acrostic</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ther"mo*graph</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>thermo-</ets> + <ets>-graph</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A record of fluctuations of temperature made automatically at a distant station.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>An instrument, usually electrical, making such records.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`e*ther*mom"e*ter</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + E. <ets>thermometer</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>An apparatus for determining the temperature of a distant point, as by a thermoelectric circuit or otherwise.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*leu"to*spore</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ completion + E. <ets>spore</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>The thick-celled winter or resting spore of the rusts (order <ord>Uredinales</ord>), produced in late summer. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Uredospore</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"ford</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[After Thomas <etsep>Telford</etsep>, a Scotch road engineer.]</ety> <def>Designating, or pert. to, a road pavement having a surface of small stone rolled hard and smooth, distinguished from macadam road by its firm foundation of large stones with fragments of stone wedged tightly, in the interstices; <as>as, <ex>telford</ex> pavement, road, etc.</as></def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"ford*ize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Telfordized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Telfordizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <def>To furnish (a road) with a telford pavement.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`har*mon"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to telharmonium.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`har*mo"ni*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>th^le</grk> far + <ets>harmolium</ets>.]</ety> <def>An instrument for producing music (<hw>Tel*har"mo*ny</hw> [<pr><?/</pr>]), at a distant point or points by means of alternating currents of electricity controlled by an operator who plays on a keyboard. The music is produced by a receiving instrument similar or analogous to the telephone, but not held to the ear. The pitch corresponds with frequency of alternation of current.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/, from <?/ the end.]</ety> <fld>(Gram.)</fld> <def>Denoting the final end or purpose, as distinguished from <contr>ecbatic</contr>. See <er>Ecbatic</er>.</def> <rj><au>Gibbs.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/l)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Told</conjf> <pr>(t<omac/ld)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Telling</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>tellan</ets>, from <ets>talu</ets> tale, number, speech; akin to D. <ets>tellen</ets> to count, G. <ets>z\'84hlen</ets>, OHG. <ets>zellen</ets> to count, tell, say, Icel. <ets>telja</ets>, Dan. <ets>tale</ets> to speak, <ets>t\'91lle</ets> to count. See <er>Tale</er> that which is told.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To mention one by one, or piece by piece; to recount; to enumerate; to reckon; to number; to count; <as>as, to <ex>tell</ex> money</as>.</def> \'bdAn heap of coin he <xex>told</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He <qex>telleth</qex> the number of the stars.</q> <rj><qau>Ps. cxlvii. 4.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tell</qex> the joints of the body.</q> <rj><qau>Jer. Taylor.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To utter or recite in detail; to give an account of; to narrate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Of which I shall <qex>tell</qex> all the array.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And not a man appears to <qex>tell</qex> their fate.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To make known; to publish; to disclose; to divulge.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Why didst thou not <qex>tell</qex> me that she was thy wife?</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xii. 18.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To give instruction to; to make report to; to acquaint; to teach; to inform.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A secret pilgrimage,<br/
-That you to-day promised to <qex>tell</qex> me of?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To order; to request; to command.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He <qex>told</qex> her not to be frightened.</q> <rj><qau>Dickens.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>To discern so as to report; to ascertain by observing; to find out; to discover; <as>as, I can not <ex>tell</ex> where one color ends and the other begins</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>To make account of; to regard; to reckon; to value; to estimate.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I ne <qex>told</qex> no dainity of her love.</q> <rj><qau>Chaucer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ <xex>Tell</xex>, though equivalent in some respect to <xex>speak</xex> and <xex>say</xex>, has not always the same application. We say, to <xex>tell</xex> truth or falsehood, to <xex>tell</xex> a number, to <xex>tell</xex> the reasons, to <xex>tell</xex> something or nothing; but we never say, to <xex>tell</xex> a speech, discourse, or oration, or to <xex>tell</xex> an argument or a lesson. It is much used in commands; <as>as, <ex>tell</ex> me the whole story; <ex>tell</ex> me all you know</as>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tell off</b></col>, <cd>to count; to divide.</cd> <au>Sir W. Scott.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To communicate; impart; reveal; disclose; inform; acquaint; report; repeat; rehearse; recite.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To give an account; to make report.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>That I may publish with the voice of thankgiving, and <qex>tell</qex> of all thy wondrous works.</q> <rj><qau>Ps. xxvi. 7.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To take effect; to produce a marked effect; <as>as, every shot <ex>tells</ex>; every expression <ex>tells</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tell of</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To speak of; to mention; to narrate or describe.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To inform against; to disclose some fault of.</cd> -- <col><b>To tell on</b></col>, <cd>to inform against.</cd> <mark>[Archaic & Colloq.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Lest they should <qex>tell on</qex> us, saying, So did David.</q> <rj><qau>1 Sam. xxvii. 11.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>That which is told; tale; account.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I am at the end of my <qex>tell</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Walpole.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Ar.]</ety> <def>A hill or mound.</def> <rj><au>W. M. Thomson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being told.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"len</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any species of Tellina.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who tells, relates, or communicates; an informer, narrator, or describer.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of four officers of the English Exchequer, formerly appointed to receive moneys due to the king and to pay moneys payable by the king.</def> <rj><au>Cowell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>An employee of a bank who receives money paid in, and pays money out, and makes records of such transactions.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>One who is appointed to count the votes given in a legislative body, public meeting, assembly, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"er*ship</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The office or employment of a teller.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tel*li"na</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a kind of shellfish.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A genus of marine bivalve mollusks having thin, delicate, and often handsomely colored shells.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"ing</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Operating with great effect; effective; <as>as, a <ex>telling</ex> speech</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tell"ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"tale`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Telling tales; babbling.</def> \'bdThe <xex>telltale</xex> heart.\'b8 <rj><au>Poe.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tell"tale`</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who officiously communicates information of the private concerns of others; one who tells that which prudence should suppress.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A movable piece of ivory, lead, or other material, connected with the bellows of an organ, that gives notice, by its position, when the wind is exhausted.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A mechanical attachment to the steering wheel, which, in the absence of a tiller, shows the position of the helm.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A compass in the cabin of a vessel, usually placed where the captain can see it at all hours, and thus inform himself of the vessel's course.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Mach.)</fld> <def>A machine or contrivance for indicating or recording something, particularly for keeping a check upon employees, as factory hands, watchmen, drivers, check takers, and the like, by revealing to their employers what they have done or omitted.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The tattler. See <er>Tattler</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A thing that serves to disclose something or give information; a hint or indication.</def></p>
-
-<p><q>It supplies many useful links and <qex>telltales</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Saintsbury.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <fld>(Railroads)</fld> <def>An arrangement consisting of long strips, as of rope, wire, or leather, hanging from a bar over railroad tracks, in such a position as to warn freight brakemen of their approach to a low overhead bridge.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1482 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*lu"ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tellus</ets>, <ets>-uris</ets>, the earth.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the earth.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*rate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tellurate</ets>. See <er>Tellurium</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of telluric acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*ret</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A telluride.</def> <mark>[Obsoles.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*ret`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Combined or impregnated with tellurium; tellurized.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>telluretted</asp>.]</altsp> <mark>[Obsoles.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tellureted hydrogen</b></col> <fld>(Chem.)</fld>, <cd>hydrogen telluride, <chform>H2Te</chform>, a gaseous substance analogous to hydrogen sulphide; -- called also <altname>tellurhydric acid</altname>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`lur*hy"dric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of, pertaining to, or designating, hydrogen telluride, which is regarded as an acid, especially when in solution.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*lu"ri*an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tellus</ets>, <ets>-uris</ets>, the earth.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to the earth.</def> <rj><au>De Quincey.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*lu"ri*an</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A dweller on the earth.</def> <rj><au>De Quincey.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>An instrument for showing the operation of the causes which produce the succession of day and night, and the changes of the seasons.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tellurion</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*lu"ric</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tellus</ets>, <ets>-uris</ets>, the earth: cf. F. <ets>tellurique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to the earth; proceeding from the earth.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Amid these hot, <qex>telluric</qex> flames.</q> <rj><qau>Carlyle.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to tellurium; derived from, or resembling, tellurium; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with <contr>tellurous</contr> compounds; <as>as, <ex>telluric acid</ex>, which is analogous to sulphuric acid</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Telluric bismuth</b></col> <fld>(Min.)</fld>, <cd>tetradymite.</cd> -- <col><b>Telluric silver</b></col> <fld>(Min.)</fld>, <cd>hessite.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*ride</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A compound of tellurium with a more positive element or radical; -- formerly called <altname>telluret</altname>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*rism</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>An hypothesis of animal magnetism propounded by Dr. Keiser, in Germany, in which the phenomena are ascribed to the agency of a telluric spirit or influence.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>S. Thompson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*rite</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A salt of tellurous acid.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Min.)</fld> <def>Oxide of tellurium. It occurs sparingly in tufts of white or yellowish crystals.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel*lu"ri*um</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., from L. <ets>tellus</ets>, <ets>-uris</ets>, the earth.]</ety> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A rare nonmetallic element, analogous to sulphur and selenium, occasionally found native as a substance of a silver-white metallic luster, but usually combined with metals, as with gold and silver in the mineral sylvanite, with mercury in Coloradoite, etc. Symbol Te. Atomic weight 125.2.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Graphic tellurium</b></col>. <fld>(Min.)</fld> <cd>See <er>Sylvanite</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tellurium glance</b></col> <fld>(Min.)</fld>, <cd>nagyagite; -- called also <altname>black tellurium</altname>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*rize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>To impregnate with, or to subject to the action of, tellurium; -- chiefly used adjectively in the past participle; <as>as, <ex>tellurized</ex> ores</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"lu*rous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to tellurium; derived from, or containing, tellurium; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with <contr>telluric</contr> compounds; <as>as, <ex>tellurous acid</ex>, which is analogous to sulphurous acid</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`o*dy*nam"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far + E. <ets>dynamic</ets>.]</ety> <def>Relating to a system for transmitting power to a distance by means of swiftly moving ropes or cables driving grooved pulleys of large diameter.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`oo*goo"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Telugu</er>.</def> <rj><au>D. O. Allen.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te*lot"ro*cha</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Telotroch\'91</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL. See <er>Telotrochal</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>An annelid larva having telotrochal bands of cilia.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Te*lot"ro*chal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Te*lot"ro*chous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ complete + <?/ wheel, hoop.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Having both a preoral and a posterior band of cilla; -- applied to the larv\'91 of certain annelids.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"o*type</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far off + <ets>-type</ets>.]</ety> <def>An electric telegraph which prints the messages in letters and not in signs.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"pher</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/ far, far off + <grk>fe`rein</grk> to bear.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>A contrivance for the conveyance of vehicles or loads by means of electricity.</def> <rj><au>Fleeming Jenkin.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>Specif., the equipment or apparatus used in a system of electric transportation by means of carriages which are suspended on an overhead conductor, as of wire.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Telpher line</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Telpher road</b></col></mcol>, <cd>an electric line or road over which vehicles for carrying loads are moved by electric engines actuated by a current conveyed by the line.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"pher*age</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The conveyance of vehicles or loads by means of electricity.</def> <rj><au>Fleeming Jenkin.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>Specif., electric transportation of goods by means of carriages suspended on overhead conductors, as of wire, the power being conveyed to the motor carriage by the wires on which it runs. <ex>Telpherage</ex> and <xex>telpher</xex> are sometimes applied to such systems in which the motive power is not electricity.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel"son</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Telsons</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <?/ a boundary, limit.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>The terminal joint or movable piece at the end of the abdomen of Crustacea and other articulates. See <er>Thoracostraca</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`u*gu"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A Darvidian language spoken in the northern parts of the Madras presidency. In extent of use it is the next language after Hindustani (in its various forms) and Bengali.</def> <altsp>[Spelt also <asp>Teloogoo</asp>.]</altsp><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of the people speaking the Telugu language.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tel`u*gu"</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to the Telugu language, or the Telugus.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tem*blor"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Sp.]</ety> <def>An earthquake.</def> <mark>[Western U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`er*a"ri*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temerarius</ets>. See <er>Temerity</er>.]</ety> <def>Unreasonably adventurous; despising danger; rash; headstrong; audacious; reckless; heedless.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tem`er*a"ri*ous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I spake against <qex>temerarious</qex> judgment.</q> <rj><qau>Latimer.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`er*a"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temerare</ets> to defile.]</ety> <def>Temerity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*mer"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temeritas</ets>, from <ets>temere</ets> by chance, rashly; perhaps akin to Skr. <ets>tamas</ets> darkness: cf. F. <ets>t\'82m\'82rit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <def>Unreasonable contempt of danger; extreme venturesomeness; rashness; <as>as, the <ex>temerity</ex> of a commander in war</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Rashness; precipitancy; heedlessness; venturesomeness.</syn> <usage> -- <er>Temerity</er>, <er>Rashness</er>. These words are closely allied in sense, but have a slight difference in their use and application. <xex>Temerity</xex> is Latin, and <xex>rashness</xex> is Anglo-Saxon. As in many such cases, the Latin term is more select and dignified; the Anglo-Saxon more familiar and energetic. We show <xex>temerity</xex> in hasty decisions, and the conduct to which they lead. We show <xex>rashness</xex> in particular actions, as dictated by sudden impulse. It is an exhibition of <xex>temerity</xex> to approach the verge of a precipice; it is an act of <xex>rashness</xex> to jump into a river without being able to swim. <xex>Temerity</xex>, then, is an unreasonable contempt of danger; <xex>rashness</xex> is a rushing into danger from thoughtlessness or excited feeling.</usage><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>It is notorious <qex>temerity</qex> to pass sentence upon grounds uncapable of evidence.</q> <rj><qau>Barrow.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Her <qex>rush</qex> hand in evil hour<br/
-Forth reaching to the fruit, she plucked, she eat.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"er*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Temerarious.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem*pe"an</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Temple, a valley in Thessaly, celebrated by Greek poets on account of its beautiful scenery; resembling Temple; hence, beautiful; delightful; charming.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tempered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tempering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[AS. <ets>temprian</ets> or OF. <ets>temper</ets>, F. <ets>temp\'82rer</ets>, and (in sense 3) <ets>temper</ets>, L. <ets>temperare</ets>, akin to <ets>tempus</ets> time. Cf. <er>Temporal</er>, <er>Distemper</er>, <er>Tamper</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To mingle in due proportion; to prepare by combining; to modify, as by adding some new element; to qualify, as by an ingredient; hence, to soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Puritan austerity was so <qex>tempered</qex> by Dutch indifference, that mercy itself could not have dictated a milder system.</q> <rj><qau>Bancroft.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Woman! lovely woman! nature made thee<br/
-To <qex>temper</qex> man: we had been brutes without you.</q> <rj><qau>Otway.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>But thy fire<br/
-Shall be more <qex>tempered</qex>, and thy hope far higher.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>She [the Goddess of Justice] threw darkness and clouds about her, that <qex>tempered</qex> the light into a thousand beautiful shades and colors.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To fit together; to adjust; to accomodate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Thy sustenance . . . serving to the appetite of the eater, <qex>tempered</qex> itself to every man's liking.</q> <rj><qau>Wisdom xvi. 21.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Metal.)</fld> <def>To bring to a proper degree of hardness; <as>as, to <ex>temper</ex> iron or steel</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>tempered</qex> metals clash, and yield a silver sound.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To govern; to manage.</def> <mark>[A Latinism & Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>With which the damned ghosts he governeth,<br/
-And furies rules, and Tartare <qex>tempereth</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>To moisten to a proper consistency and stir thoroughly, as clay for making brick, loam for molding, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>To adjust, as the mathematical scale to the actual scale, or to that in actual use.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To soften; mollify; assuage; soothe; calm.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; due mixture of different qualities; just combination; <as>as, the <ex>temper</ex> of mortar</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Constitution of body; temperament; in old writers, the mixture or relative proportion of the four humors, blood, choler, phlegm, and melancholy.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The exquisiteness of his [Christ's] bodily <qex>temper</qex> increased the exquisiteness of his torment.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; <as>as, a calm <ex>temper</ex>; a hasty <ex>temper</ex>; a fretful <ex>temper</ex>.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Remember with what mild<br/
-And gracious <qex>temper</qex> he both heared and judged.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The consequents of a certain ethical <qex>temper</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>J. H. Newman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Calmness of mind; moderation; equanimity; composure; <as>as, to keep one's <ex>temper</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>To fall with dignity, with <qex>temper</qex> rise.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Restore yourselves to your <qex>tempers</qex>, fathers.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Heat of mind or passion; irritation; proneness to anger; -- in a reproachful sense.</def> <mark>[Colloq.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>The state of a metal or other substance, especially as to its hardness, produced by some process of heating or cooling; <as>as, the <ex>temper</ex> of iron or steel</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Middle state or course; mean; medium.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The perfect lawgiver is a just <qex>temper</qex> between the mere man of theory, who can see nothing but general principles, and the mere man of business, who can see nothing but particular circumstances.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>8.</sn> <fld>(Sugar Works)</fld> <def>Milk of lime, or other substance, employed in the process formerly used to clarify sugar.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Temper screw</b></col>, <cd>in deep well boring, an adjusting screw connecting the working beam with the rope carrying the tools, for lowering the tools as the drilling progresses.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Disposition; temperament; frame; humor; mood. See <er>Disposition</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To accord; to agree; to act and think in conformity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To have or get a proper or desired state or quality; to grow soft and pliable.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I have him already <qex>tempering</qex> between my finger and my thumb, and shortly will I seal with him.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tem"pe*ra</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It.]</ety> <fld>(Paint.)</fld> <def>A mode or process of painting; distemper.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The term is applied especially to early Italian painting, common vehicles of which were yolk of egg, yolk and white of egg mixed together, the white juice of the fig tree, and the like.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being tempered.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The fusible, hard, and <qex>temperable</qex> texture of metals.</q> <rj><qau>Emerson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*a*ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temperamentum</ets> a mixing in due proportion, proper measure, temperament: cf. F. <ets>temp\'82rament</ets>. See <er>Temper</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Internal constitution; state with respect to the relative proportion of different qualities, or constituent parts.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The common law . . . has reduced the kingdom to its just state and <qex>temperament</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Sir M. Hale.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Due mixture of qualities; a condition brought about by mutual compromises or concessions.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>However, I forejudge not any probable expedient, any <qex>temperament</qex> that can be found in things of this nature, so disputable on their side.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The act of tempering or modifying; adjustment, as of clashing rules, interests, passions, or the like; also, the means by which such adjustment is effected.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Wholesome <qex>temperaments</qex> of the rashness of popular assemblies.</q> <rj><qau>Sir J. Mackintosh.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Condition with regard to heat or cold; temperature.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Bodies are denominated \'bdhot\'b8 and \'bdcold\'b8 in proportion to the present <qex>temperament</qex> of that part of our body to which they are applied.</q> <rj><qau>Locke.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>A system of compromises in the tuning of organs, pianofortes, and the like, whereby the tones generated with the vibrations of a ground tone are mutually modified and in part canceled, until their number reduced to the actual practicable scale of twelve tones to the octave. This scale, although in so far artificial, is yet closely suggestive of its origin in nature, and this system of tuning, although not mathematically true, yet satisfies the ear, while it has the convenience that the same twelve fixed tones answer for every key or scale, C<sharp/ becoming identical with D<flat/, and so on.</def><-- = tempering --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld> <def>The peculiar physical and mental character of an individual, in olden times erroneously supposed to be due to individual variation in the relations and proportions of the constituent parts of the body, especially of the fluids, as the bile, blood, lymph, etc. Hence the phrases, bilious or choleric <xex>temperament</xex>, sanguine <xex>temperament</xex>, etc., implying a predominance of one of these fluids and a corresponding influence on the temperament.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Equal temperament</b></col> <fld>(Mus.)</fld>, <cd>that in which the variations from mathematically true pitch are distributed among all the keys alike.</cd> -- <col><b>Unequal temperament</b></col> <fld>(Mus.)</fld>, <cd>that in which the variations are thrown into the keys least used.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`per*a*men"tal</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to temperament; constitutional.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temperantia</ets>: cf. F. <ets>temp\'82rance</ets>. See <er>Temper</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate indulgence; moderation; <as>as, <ex>temperance</ex> in eating and drinking; <ex>temperance</ex> in the indulgence of joy or mirth</as>; specifically, moderation, and sometimes abstinence, in respect to using intoxicating liquors.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Moderation of passion; patience; calmness; sedateness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdA gentleman of all <xex>temperance</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He calmed his wrath with goodly <qex>temperance</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>State with regard to heat or cold; temperature.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> \'bdTender and delicate <xex>temperance</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Temperance society</b></col>, <cd>an association formed for the purpose of diminishing or stopping the use of alcoholic liquors as a beverage.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*an*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Temperance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temperatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>temperare</ets>. See <er>Temper</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Moderate; not excessive; <as>as, <ex>temperate</ex> heat; a <ex>temperate</ex> climate</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Not marked with passion; not violent; cool; calm; <as>as, <ex>temperate</ex> language</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>She is not hot, but <qex>temperate</qex> as the morn.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>That sober freedom out of which there springs<br/
-Our loyal passion for our <qex>temperate</qex> kings.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Moderate in the indulgence of the natural appetites or passions; <as>as, <ex>temperate</ex> in eating and drinking</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Be sober and <qex>temperate</qex>, and you will be healthy.</q> <rj><qau>Franklin.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Proceeding from temperance.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The <qex>temperate</qex> sleeps, and spirits light as air.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Temperate zone</b></col> <fld>(Geog.)</fld>, <cd>that part of the earth which lies between either tropic and the corresponding polar circle; -- so called because the heat is less than in the torrid zone, and the cold less than in the frigid zones.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Abstemious; sober; calm; cool; sedate.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To render temperate; to moderate; to soften; to temper.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>It inflames temperance, and <qex>temperates</qex> wrath.</q> <rj><qau>Marston.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ate*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a temperate manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ate*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being temperate; moderateness; temperance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*a*tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. L. <ets>temperativus</ets> soothing.]</ety> <def>Having power to temper.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>T. Granger.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*a*ture</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>temp\'82rature</ets>, L. <ets>temperatura</ets> due measure, proportion, temper, temperament.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Constitution; state; degree of any quality.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The best composition and <qex>temperature</qex> is, to have openness in fame and opinion, secrecy in habit, dissimulation in seasonable use, and a power to feign, if there be no remedy.</q> <rj><qau>Bacon.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Memory depends upon the consistence and the <qex>temperature</qex> of the brain.</q> <rj><qau>I. Watts.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Freedom from passion; moderation.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>In that proud port, which her so goodly graceth,<br/
-Most goodly <qex>temperature</qex> you may descry.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>Condition with respect to heat or cold, especially as indicated by the sensation produced, or by the thermometer or pyrometer; degree of heat or cold; <as>as, the <ex>temperature</ex> of the air; high <ex>temperature</ex>; low <ex>temperature</ex>; <ex>temperature</ex> of freezing or of boiling.</as></def> <note>The temperature of a liquid or a solid body as measured by a thermometer is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the consituent atoms or molecules of the body. For other states of matter such as plasma, electromagnetic radiation, or subatomic particles, an analogous measure of the average kinetic energy may be expressed as a <ex>temperature</ex>, although it could never be measured by a traditional thermometer, let alone by sensing with the skin.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source> <source>+PJC</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Mixture; compound.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Made a <qex>temperature</qex> of brass and iron together.</q> <rj><qau>Holland.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Physiol. & Med.)</fld> <def>The degree of heat of the body of a living being, esp. of the human body; also <mark>(Colloq.)</mark>, loosely, the excess of this over the normal (of the human body 98\'f8-99.5\'f8 F., in the mouth of an adult about 98.4\'f8).</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Absolute temperature</b></col>. <fld>(Physics)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Absolute</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Animal temperature</b></col> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, <cd>the nearly constant temperature maintained in the bodies of warm-blooded (<xex>homoiothermal</xex>) animals during life. The ultimate source of the heat is to be found in the potential energy of the food and the oxygen which is absorbed from the air during respiration. See <er>Homoiothermal</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Temperature sense</b></col> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, <cd>the faculty of perceiving cold and warmth, and so of perceiving differences of temperature in external objects.</cd> <au>H. N. Martin.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1483 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"pered</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Brought to a proper temper; <as>as, <ex>tempered</ex> steel</as>; having (such) a temper; -- chiefly used in composition; <as>as, a good-<ex>tempered</ex> or bad-<ex>tempered</ex> man; a well-<ex>tempered</ex> sword.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who, or that which, tempers; specifically, a machine in which lime, cement, stone, etc., are mixed with water.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per*ing</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Metal.)</fld> <def>The process of giving the requisite degree of hardness or softness to a substance, as iron and steel; especially, the process of giving to steel the degree of hardness required for various purposes, consisting usually in first plunging the article, when heated to redness, in cold water or other liquid, to give an excess of hardness, and then reheating it gradually until the hardness is reduced or drawn down to the degree required, as indicated by the color produced on a polished portion, or by the burning of oil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Tempering color</b></col>, <cd>the shade of color that indicates the degree of temper in tempering steel, as pale straw yellow for lancets, razors, and tools for metal; dark straw yellow for penknives, screw taps, etc.; brown yellow for axes, chisels, and plane irons; yellow tinged with purple for table knives and shears; purple for swords and watch springs; blue for springs and saws; and very pale blue tinged with green, too soft for steel instruments.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"per screw</hw>. <sn>1.</sn> <def>A screw link, to which is attached the rope of a rope-drilling apparatus, for feeding and slightly turning the drill jar at each stroke.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A set screw used for adjusting.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"pest</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tempeste</ets>, F. <ets>temp\'88te</ets>, (assumed) LL. <ets>tempesta</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tempestas</ets> a portion of time, a season, weather, storm, akin to <ets>tempus</ets> time. See <er>Temporal</er> of time.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>An extensive current of wind, rushing with great velocity and violence, and commonly attended with rain, hail, or snow; a furious storm.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>[We] caught in a fiery <qex>tempest</qex>, shall be hurled,<br/
-Each on his rock transfixed.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fig.: Any violent tumult or commotion; <as>as, a political <ex>tempest</ex>; a <ex>tempest</ex> of war, or of the passions</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A fashionable assembly; a drum. See the Note under <er>Drum</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, 4.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Smollett.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ <ex>Tempest</ex> is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; <as>as, <ex>tempest</ex>-beaten, <ex>tempest</ex>-loving, <ex>tempest</ex>-tossed, <ex>tempest</ex>-winged, and the like</as>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Storm; agitation; perturbation. See <er>Storm</er>.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"pest</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>tempester</ets>, F. <ets>temp\'88ter</ets> to rage.]</ety> <def>To disturb as by a tempest.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Part huge of bulk<br/
-Wallowing unwieldy, enormous in their gait,<br/
-<qex>Tempest</qex> the ocean.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"pest</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <def>To storm.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>B. Jonson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem*pes"tive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tempestivus</ets>.]</ety> <def>Seasonable; timely; <as>as, <ex>tempestive</ex> showers</as>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <au>Heywood.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Tem*pes"tive*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> <mark>[Obs.]</mark></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`pes*tiv"i*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tempestivitas</ets>.]</ety> <def>The quality, or state, of being tempestive; seasonableness.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. Browne.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem*pes"tu*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tempestuous</ets>: cf. OF. <ets>tempestueux</ets>, F. <ets>temp\'88tueux</ets>.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to a tempest; involving or resembling a tempest; turbulent; violent; stormy; <as>as, <ex>tempestuous</ex> weather; a <ex>tempestuous</ex> night; a <ex>tempestuous</ex> debate.</as></def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tem*pes"tu*ous*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tem*pes"tu*ous*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They saw the Hebrew leader,<br/
-Waiting, and clutching his <qex>tempestuous</qex> beard.</q> <rj><qau>Longfellow.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"plar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OE. <ets>templere</ets>, F. <ets>templier</ets>, LL. <ets>templarius</ets>. See <er>Temple</er> a church.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One of a religious and military order first established at Jerusalem, in the early part of the 12th century, for the protection of pilgrims and of the Holy Sepulcher. These <membof>Knights Templars</membof>, or <membof>Knights of the Temple</membof>, were so named because they occupied an apartment of the palace of Bladwin II. in Jerusalem, near the Temple.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ The order was first limited in numbers, and its members were bound by vows of chastity and poverty. After the conquest of Palestine by the Saracens, the Templars spread over Europe, and, by reason of their reputation for valor and piety, they were enriched by numerous donations of money and lands. The extravagances and vices of the later Templars, however, finally led to the suppression of the order by the Council of Vienne in 1312.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A student of law, so called from having apartments in the Temple at London, the original buildings having belonged to the Knights Templars. See <cref>Inner Temple</cref>, and <cref>Middle Temple</cref>, under <er>Temple</er>.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>One belonged to a certain order or degree among the Freemasons, called <membof>Knights Templars</membof>. Also, one of an order among temperance men, styled <membof>Good Templars</membof>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"plar</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Of or pertaining to a temple.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Solitary, family, and <qex>templar</qex> devotion.</q> <rj><qau>Coleridge.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"plate</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Templet</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"ple</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. <er>Templet</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Weaving)</fld> <def>A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"ple</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>temple</ets>, F. <ets>tempe</ets>, from L. <ets>tempora</ets>, <ets>tempus</ets>; perhaps originally, the right place, the fatal spot, supposed to be the same word as <ets>tempus</ets>, <ets>temporis</ets>, the fitting or appointed time. See <er>Temporal</er> of time, and cf. <er>Tempo</er>, <er>Tense</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"ple</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>tempel</ets>, from L. <ets>templum</ets> a space marked out, sanctuary, temple; cf. Gr. <?/ a piece of land marked off, land dedicated to a god: cf. F. <ets>t\'82mple</ets>, from the Latin. Cf. <er>Contemplate</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; <as>as, the <ex>temple</ex> of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India</as>.</def> \'bdThe <xex>temple</xex> of mighty Mars.\'b8 <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Jewish Antiq.)</fld> <def>The edifice erected at Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Jesus walked in the <qex>temple</qex> in Solomon's porch.</q> <rj><qau>John x. 23.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Hence, among Christians, an edifice erected as a place of public worship; a church.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Can he whose life is a perpetual insult to the authority of God enter with any pleasure a <qex>temple</qex> consecrated to devotion and sanctified by prayer?</q> <rj><qau>Buckminster.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Fig.: Any place in which the divine presence specially resides.</def> \'bdThe <xex>temple</xex> of his body.\'b8 <rj><au>John ii. 21.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Know ye not that ye are the <qex>temple</qex> of God, and that the spirit of God dwelleth in you?</q> <rj><qau>1 Cor. iii. 16.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The groves were God's first <qex>temples</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Bryant.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <fld>(Mormon Ch.)</fld> <def>A building dedicated to the administration of ordinances.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>A local organization of Odd Fellows.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Inner Temple</b></col>, <it>and</it> <col><b>Middle Temple</b></col></mcol>, <cd>two buildings, or ranges of buildings, occupied by two inns of court in London, on the site of a monastic establishment of the Knights Templars, called <xex>the Temple</xex>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"ple</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; <as>as, to <ex>temple</ex> a god</as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Feltham.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"pled</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Supplied with a temple or temples, or with churches; inclosed in a temple.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I love thy rocks and rills,<br/
-Thy woods and <qex>templed</qex> hills.</q> <rj><qau>S. F. Smith.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"plet</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[LL. <ets>templatus</ets> vaulted, from L. <ets>templum</ets> a small timber.]</ety> <altsp>[Spelt also <asp>template</asp>.]</altsp> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A gauge, pattern, or mold, commonly a thin plate or board, used as a guide to the form of the work to be executed; <as>as, a mason's or a wheelwright's <ex>templet</ex></as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Arch.)</fld> <def>A short piece of timber, iron, or stone, placed in a wall under a girder or other beam, to distribute the weight or pressure.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Tem"po</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[It., fr. L. <ets>tempus</ets>. See <er>Tense</er>, <pos>n.</pos>]</ety> <fld>(Mus.)</fld> <def>The rate or degree of movement in time.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>\'d8A tempo giusto</b></col> <pr>(j<oomac/s"t<osl/)</pr> <ety>[It.]</ety>, <cd>in exact time; -- sometimes, directing a return to strict time after a tempo rubato.</cd> -- <col><b>Tempo rubato</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Rubato</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temporalis</ets>, fr. <ets>tempora</ets> the temples: cf. F. <ets>temporal</ets>. See <er>Temple</er> a part of the head.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to the temple or temples; <as>as, the <ex>temporal</ex> bone; a <ex>temporal</ex> artery.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Temporal bone</b></col>, <cd>a very complex bone situated in the side of the skull of most mammals and containing the organ of hearing. It consists of an expanded <xex>squamosal</xex> portion above the ear, corresponding to the squamosal and zygoma of the lower vertebrates, and a thickened basal <xex>petrosal</xex> and <xex>mastoid</xex> portion, corresponding to the periotic and tympanic bones of the lower vertebrates.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temporalis</ets>, fr. <ets>tempus</ets>, <ets>temporis</ets>, time, portion of time, the fitting or appointed time: cf. F. <ets>temporel</ets>. Cf. <er>Contemporaneous</er>, <er>Extempore</er>, <er>Temper</er>, <pos>v. t.</pos>, <er>Tempest</er>, <er>Temple</er> a part of the head, <er>Tense</er>, <pos>n.</pos>, <er>Thing</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Of or pertaining to time, that is, to the present life, or this world; secular, as distinguished from <xex>sacred</xex> or <xex>eternal</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The things which are seen are <qex>temporal</qex>, but the things which are not seen are eternal.</q> <rj><qau>2 Cor. iv. 18.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Is this an hour for <qex>temporal</qex> affairs?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Civil or political, as distinguished from <xex>ecclesiastical</xex>; <as>as, <ex>temporal</ex> power; <ex>temporal</ex> courts</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Lords temporal</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Lord</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd> -- <col><b>Temporal augment</b></col>. <cd>See the Note under <er>Augment</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Transient; fleeting; transitory.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Anything temporal or secular; a temporality; -- used chiefly in the plural.</def> <rj><au>Dryden.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>He assigns supremacy to the pope in spirituals, and to the emperor or <qex>temporals</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Lowell.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ral"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Temporalities</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>temporalitas</ets>, in LL., possessions of the church: cf. F. <ets>temporalit\'82</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The state or quality of being temporary; -- opposed to <xex>perpetuity</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The laity; temporality.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Sir T. More.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>That which pertains to temporal welfare; material interests; especially, the revenue of an ecclesiastic proceeding from lands, tenements, or lay fees, tithes, and the like; -- chiefly used in the plural.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Supreme head, . . . under God, of the spirituality and <qex>temporality</qex> of the same church.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a temporal manner; secularly.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>South.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Worldliness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Cotgrave.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ral*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Temporality</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The laity; secular people.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Abp. Abbot.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A secular possession; a temporality.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ra"ne*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temporaneus</ets> happening at the right time, fr. <ets>tempus</ets>, <ets>temporis</ets>, time.]</ety> <def>Temporarity.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Hallywell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ra*ri*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a temporary manner; for a time.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ra*ri*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being temporary; -- opposed to <xex>perpetuity</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ra*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temporarius</ets>, fr. <ets>tempus</ets>, <ets>temporis</ets>, time: cf. F. <ets>temporaire</ets>.]</ety> <def>Lasting for a time only; existing or continuing for a limited time; not permanent; <as>as, the patient has obtained <ex>temporary</ex> relief</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Temporary</qex> government of the city.</q> <rj><qau>Motley.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>Temporary star</b></col>. <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <cd>See under <er>Star</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*rist</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A temporizer.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Why, turn a <qex>temporist</qex>, row with the tide.</q> <rj><qau>Marston.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ri*za"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>temporisation</ets>.]</ety> <def>The act of temporizing.</def> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*rize</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Temporized</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Temporizing</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>temporiser</ets>. See <er>Temporal</er> of time.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To comply with the time or occasion; to humor, or yield to, the current of opinion or circumstances; also, to trim, as between two parties.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>They might their grievance inwardly complain,<br/
-But outwardly they needs must <qex>temporize</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Daniel.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To delay; to procrastinate.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To comply; to agree.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ri`zer</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who temporizes; one who yields to the time, or complies with the prevailing opinions, fashions, or occasions; a trimmer.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>A sort of <qex>temporizers</qex>, ready to embrace and maintain all that is, or shall be, proposed, in hope of preferment.</q> <rj><qau>Burton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ri`zing*ly</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a temporizing or yielding manner.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"po*ro-</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>A combining form used in anatomy to indicate <xex>connection with</xex>, or <xex>relation to</xex>, <xex>the temple</xex>, or <xex>temporal bone</xex>; <as>as, <ex>temporo</ex>facial</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ro-au*ric"u*lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to both the temple and the ear; <as>as, the <ex>temporo-auricular</ex> nerve</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ro*fa"cial</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to both the temple and the face.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ro*ma"lar</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to both the temple and the region of the malar bone; <as>as, the <ex>temporomalar</ex> nerve</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem`po*ro*max"il*la*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>Of or pertaining to both the temple or the temporal bone and the maxilla.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Temps</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. & F., fr. L. <ets>tempus</ets>. See <er>Temporal</er> of time.]</ety> <def>Time.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Temse</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tempted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tempting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[OE. <ets>tempten</ets>, <ets>tenten</ets>, from OF. <ets>tempter</ets>, <ets>tenter</ets>, F. <ets>tenter</ets>, fr. L. <ets>tentare</ets>, <ets>temptare</ets>, to handle, feel, attack, to try, put to the test, urge, freq. from <ets>tendere</ets>, <ets>tentum</ets>, and <ets>tensum</ets>, to stretch. See <er>Thin</er>, and cf. <er>Attempt</er>, <er>Tend</er>, <er>Taunt</er>, <er>Tent</er> a pavilion, <er>Tent</er> to probe.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To put to trial; to prove; to test; to try.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>God did <qex>tempt</qex> Abraham.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xxii. 1.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Ye shall not <qex>tempt</qex> the Lord your God.</q> <rj><qau>Deut. vi. 16.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To lead, or endeavor to lead, into evil; to entice to what is wrong; to seduce.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Every man is <qex>tempted</qex> when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed.</q> <rj><qau>James i. 14.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>To endeavor to persuade; to induce; to invite; to incite; to provoke; to instigate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q><qex>Tempt</qex> not the brave and needy to despair.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Nor <qex>tempt</qex> the wrath of heaven's avenging Sire.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>To endeavor to accomplish or reach; to attempt.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Ere leave be given to <qex>tempt</qex> the nether skies.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- To entice; allure; attract; decoy; seduce.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt`a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being temptable; lability to temptation.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt"a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Capable of being tempted; liable to be tempted.</def> <rj><au>Cudworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Temp*ta"tion</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>temptation</ets>, <ets>tentation</ets>, F. <ets>tentation</ets>, L. <ets>tentatio</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of tempting, or enticing to evil; seduction.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>When the devil had ended all the <qex>temptation</qex>, he departed from him for a season.</q> <rj><qau>Luke iv. 13.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>The state of being tempted, or enticed to evil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Lead us not into <qex>temptation</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Luke xi. 4.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>That which tempts; an inducement; an allurement, especially to something evil.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Dare to be great, without a guilty crown;<br/
-View it, and lay the bright <qex>temptation</qex> down.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Temp*ta"tion*less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having no temptation or motive; <as>as, a <ex>temptationless</ex> sin</as>.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Hammond.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Temp*ta"tious</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Tempting.</def> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>One who tempts or entices; especially, Satan, or the Devil, regarded as the great enticer to evil.</def> \'bdThose who are bent to do wickedly will never want <xex>tempters</xex> to urge them on.\'b8 <rj><au>Tillotson.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>So glozed the <qex>Tempter</qex>, and his proem tuned.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt"ing</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Adapted to entice or allure; attractive; alluring; seductive; enticing; <as>as, <ex>tempting</ex> pleasures</as>.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Tempt"ing*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Tempt"ing*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tempt"ress</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A woman who entices.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>She was my <qex>temptress</qex>, the foul provoker.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Temse</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tamis</ets>, or D. <ets>tems</ets>, <ets>teems</ets>. Cf. <er>Tamine</er>.]</ety> <def>A sieve.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>tems</asp>, and <asp>tempse</asp>.]</altsp> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Halliwell.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Temse bread</b></col>, <col><b>Temsed bread</b></col>, <col><b>Temse loaf</b></col></mcol>, <cd>bread made of flour better sifted than common fluor.</cd> <mark>[Prov. Eng.]</mark></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Tem"u*lence</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Tem"u*len*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temulentia</ets>.]</ety> <def>Intoxication; inebriation; drunkenness.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> \'bdTheir <xex>temulency</xex>.\'b8 <rj><au>Jer. Taylor.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"u*lent</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>temulentus</ets>.]</ety> <def>Intoxicated; drunken.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tem"u*lent*ive</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Somewhat temulent; addicted to drink.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>R. Junius.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/n)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[AS. <ets>t\'c7n</ets>, <ets>ti\'82n</ets>, <ets>t<ymac/n</ets>, <ets>t\'c7ne</ets>; akin to OFries. <ets>tian</ets>, OS. <ets>tehan</ets>, D. <ets>tien</ets>, G. <ets>zehn</ets>, OHG. <ets>zehan</ets>, Icel. <ets>t\'c6u</ets>, Sw. <ets>tio</ets>, Dan. <ets>ti</ets>, Goth. <ets>ta\'a1hun</ets>, Lith. <ets>deszimt</ets>, Russ. <ets>desiate</ets>, W. <ets>deg</ets>, Ir. & Gael. <ets>deich</ets>, L. <ets>decem</ets>, Gr. <grk>de`ka</grk>, Skr. <ets>da\'87an</ets>. \'fb308. Cf. <er>Dean</er>, <er>Decade</er>, <er>Decimal</er>, <er>December</er>, <er>Eighteen</er>, <er>Eighty</er>, <er>Teens</er>, <er>Tithe</er>.]</ety> <def>One more than nine; twice five.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>With twice <qex>ten</qex> sail I crossed the Phrygian Sea.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><note><hand/ <xex>Ten</xex> is often used, indefinitely, for <xex>several</xex>, <xex>many</xex>, and other like words.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>There 's a proud modesty in merit,<br/
-Averse from begging, and resolved to pay<br/
-<qex>Ten</qex> times the gift it asks.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><-- p. 1484 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/n)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The number greater by one than nine; the sum of five and five; ten units of objects.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I will not destroy it for <qex>ten's</qex> sake.</q> <rj><qau>Gen. xviii. 32.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A symbol representing ten units, as 10, <er>x</er>, or <er>X</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten`a*bil"i*ty</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/n`<adot/*b<icr/l"<icr/*t<ycr/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tenable; tenableness.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"a*ble</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/n"<adot/*b'l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tenable</ets>, fr. <ets>tenir</ets> to hold, L. <ets>tenere</ets>. See <er>Thin</er>, and cf. <er>Continue</er>, <er>Continent</er>, <er>Entertain</er>, <er>Maintain</er>, <er>Tenant</er>, <er>Tent</er>.]</ety> <def>Capable of being held, maintained, or defended, as against an assailant or objector, or against attempts to take or process; <as>as, a <ex>tenable</ex> fortress, a <ex>tenable</ex> argument</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>If you have hitherto concealed his sight,<br/
-Let it be <qex>tenable</qex> in your silence still.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>I would be the last man in the world to give up his cause when it was <qex>tenable</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Sir W. Scott.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten`a*ble*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Tenability</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ace</hw> <pr>(t<ecr/n"<asl/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tenace</ets> tenacious, demeurer <ets>tenace</ets> to hold the best and third best cards and take both tricks, the adversary having to lead. See <er>Tenacious</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Whist)</fld> <def>The holding by the fourth hand of the best and third best cards of a suit led; also, sometimes, the combination of best with third best card of a suit in any hand.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*na"cious</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tenax</ets>, <ets>-acis</ets>, from <ets>tenere</ets> to hold. See <er>Tenable</er>, and cf. <er>Tenace</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Holding fast, or inclined to hold fast; inclined to retain what is in possession; <as>as, men <ex>tenacious</ex> of their just rights</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Apt to retain; retentive; <as>as, a <ex>tenacious</ex> memory</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Having parts apt to adhere to each other; cohesive; tough; <as>as, steel is a <ex>tenacious</ex> metal; tar is more <ex>tenacious</ex> than oil</as>.</def> <rj><au>Sir I. Newton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Apt to adhere to another substance; glutinous; viscous; sticking; adhesive.</def> \'bdFemale feet, too weak to struggle with <xex>tenacious</xex> clay.\'b8 <rj><au>Cowper.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Niggardly; closefisted; miserly.</def> <rj><au>Ainsworth.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>Holding stoutly to one's opinion or purpose; obstinate; stubborn.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>-- <wordforms><wf>Te*na"cious*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Te*na"cious*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*nac"i*ty</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tenacitas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>t\'82nacit\'82</ets>. See <er>Tenacious</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The quality or state of being tenacious; <as>as, <ex>tenacity</ex>, or retentiveness, of memory; <ex>tenacity</ex>, or persistency, of purpose</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>That quality of bodies which keeps them from parting without considerable force; cohesiveness; the effect of attraction; -- as distinguished from <xex>brittleness</xex>, <xex>fragility</xex>, <xex>mobility</xex>, etc.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>That quality of bodies which makes them adhere to other bodies; adhesiveness; viscosity.</def> <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Physics)</fld> <def>The greatest longitudinal stress a substance can bear without tearing asunder, -- usually expressed with reference to a unit area of the cross section of the substance, as the number of pounds per square inch, or kilograms per square centimeter, necessary to produce rupture.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p>\'d8<hw>Te*nac"u*lum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> L. <plw>Tenacula</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>; E. <plw>Tenaculums</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a holder, fr. <ets>tenere</ets> to hold. Cf. <er>Tenaille</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Surg.)</fld> <def>An instrument consisting of a fine, sharp hook attached to a handle, and used mainly for taking up arteries, and the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"a*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tenacia</ets> obstinacy. See <er>Tenacious</er>.]</ety> <def>Tenaciousness; obstinacy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Barrow.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*naille"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., a pair of pincers or tongs, a tenaille, fr. L. <ets>tenaculum</ets>. See <er>Tenaculum</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>An outwork in the main ditch, in front of the curtain, between two bastions. See <xex>Illust.</xex> of <er>Ravelin</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Te*nail"lon</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. See <er>Tenaille</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Fort.)</fld> <def>A work constructed on each side of the ravelins, to increase their strength, procure additional ground beyond the ditch, or cover the shoulders of the bastions.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"an*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tenacies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[Cf. OF. <ets>tenace</ets>, LL. <ets>tenentia</ets>. See <er>Tenant</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>A holding, or a mode of holding, an estate; tenure; the temporary possession of what belongs to another.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>A house for habitation, or place to live in, held of another.</def> <rj><au>Blount. Blackstone. Wharton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tenant</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>tenir</ets> to hold. See <er>Tenable</er>, and cf. <er>Lieutenant</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>One who holds or possesses lands, or other real estate, by any kind of right, whether in fee simple, in common, in severalty, for life, for years, or at will; also, one who has the occupation or temporary possession of lands or tenements the title of which is in another; -- correlative to <xex>landlord</xex>. See Citation from <au>Blackstone</au>, under <er>Tenement</er>, 2.</def> <rj><au>Blount. Wharton.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>One who has possession of any place; a dweller; an occupant.</def> \'bdSweet <xex>tenants</xex> of this grove.\'b8 <rj><au>Cowper.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The hhappy <qex>tenant</qex> of your shade.</q> <rj><qau>Cowley.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The sister <qex>tenants</qex> of the middle deep.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Tenant in capite</b></col> <ety>[L. <ets>in</ets> in + <ets>capite</ets>, abl. of <ets>caput</ets> head, chief.]</ety>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Tenant in chief</b></col></mcol>, <cd>by the laws of England, one who holds immediately of the king. According to the feudal system, all lands in England are considered as held immediately or mediately of the king, who is styled <xex>lord paramount</xex>. Such tenants, however, are considered as having the fee of the lands and permanent possession.</cd> <au>Blackstone.</au> -- <col><b>Tenant in common</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Common</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tenanted</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tenanting</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To hold, occupy, or possess as a tenant.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Sir Roger's estate is <qex>tenanted</qex> by persons who have served him or his ancestors.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant*a*ble</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Fit to be rented; in a condition suitable for a tenant.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ten"ant*a*ble*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant*less</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having no tenants; unoccupied; <as>as, a <ex>tenantless</ex> mansion</as>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The body of tenants; <as>as, the <ex>tenantry</ex> of a manor or a kingdom</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Tenancy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Ridley.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Ten"ant saw`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>. <def>See <cref>Tenon saw</cref>, under <er>Tenon</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tench</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[OF. <ets>tenche</ets>, F. <ets>tanche</ets>, L. <ets>tinca</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>A European fresh-water fish (<spn>Tinca tinca</spn>, or <spn>Tinca vulgaris</spn>) allied to the carp. It is noted for its tenacity of life.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tend</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tender</er> to offer.]</ety> <fld>(O. Eng. Law)</fld> <def>To make a tender of; to offer or tender.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tend</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tended</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tending</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[Aphetic form of <ets>attend</ets>. See <er>Attend</er>, <er>Tend</er> to move, and cf. <er>Tender</er> one that tends or attends.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look after; to watch; to guard; <as>as, shepherds <ex>tend</ex> their flocks</as>.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>And flaming ministers to watch and <qex>tend</qex><br/
-Their earthly charge.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>There 's not a sparrow or a wren,<br/
-There 's not a blade of autumn grain,<br/
-Which the four seasons do not <qex>tend</qex><br/
-And tides of life and increase lend.</q> <rj><qau>Emerson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To be attentive to; to note carefully; to attend to.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Being to descend<br/
-A ladder much in height, I did not <qex>tend</qex><br/
-My way well down.</q> <rj><qau>Chapman.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><cs><col><b>To tend a vessel</b></col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>to manage an anchored vessel when the tide turns, so that in swinging she shall not entangle the cable.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tend</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To wait, as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend; -- with <xex>on</xex> or <xex>upon</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Was he not companion with the riotous knights<br/
-That <qex>tend</qex> upon my father?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <ety>[F. <ets>attendre</ets>.]</ety> <def>To await; to expect.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tend</hw>, <pos>v. i.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>tendre</ets>, L. <ets>tendere</ets>, <ets>tensum</ets> and <ets>tentum</ets>, to stretch, extend, direct one's course, tend; akin to Gr. <?/ to stretch, Skr. <ets>tan</ets>. See <er>Thin</er>, and cf. <er>Tend</er> to attend, <er>Contend</er>, <er>Intense</er>, <er>Ostensible</er>, <er>Portent</er>, <er>Tempt</er>, <er>Tender</er> to offer, <er>Tense</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>To move in a certain direction; -- usually with <xex>to</xex> or <xex>towards</xex>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Two gentlemen <qex>tending</qex> towards that sight.</q> <rj><qau>Sir H. Wotton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>Thus will this latter, as the former world,<br/
-Still <qex>tend</qex> from bad to worse.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The clouds above me to the white Alps <qex>tend</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To be directed, as to any end, object, or purpose; to aim; to have or give a leaning; to exert activity or influence; to serve as a means; to contribute; <as>as, our petitions, if granted, might <ex>tend</ex> to our destruction</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The thoughts of the diligent <qex>tend</qex> only to plenteousness; but of every one that is hasty only to want.</q> <rj><qau>Prov. xxi. 5.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The laws of our religion <qex>tend</qex> to the universal happiness of mankind.</q> <rj><qau>Tillotson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tend"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tend</er> to attend, and cf. <er>Attendance</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>The act of attending or waiting; attendance.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><q>The breath<br/
-Of her sweet <qex>tendance</qex> hovering over him.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Persons in attendance; attendants.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-
-<p><hw>Tend"ence</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Tendency.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tend"en*cy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Tendencies</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>tendents</ets>, <ets>-entis</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>tendere</ets>: cf. F. <ets>tendance</ets>. See <er>Tend</er> to move.]</ety> <def>Direction or course toward any place, object, effect, or result; drift; causal or efficient influence to bring about an effect or result.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Writings of this kind, if conducted with candor, have a more particular <qex>tendency</qex> to the good of their country.</q> <rj><qau>Addison.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>In every experimental science, there is a <qex>tendency</qex> toward perfection.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Disposition; inclination; proneness; drift; scope; aim.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tend"er</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From <er>Tend</er> to attend. Cf. <er>Attender</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One who tends; one who takes care of any person or thing; a nurse.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>A vessel employed to attend other vessels, to supply them with provisions and other stores, to convey intelligence, or the like.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- submarine tender, a ship which provides supplies and logistic support to submarines. A specialization of def. 2. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A car attached to a locomotive, for carrying a supply of fuel and water.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tendered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tendering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[F. <ets>tendre</ets> to stretch, stretch out, reach, L. <ets>tendere</ets>. See <er>Tend</er> to move.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>To offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture; <as>as, to <ex>tender</ex> the amount of rent or debt</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>To offer in words; to present for acceptance.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>You see how all conditions, how all minds, . . . <qex>tender</qex> down<br/
-Their services to Lord Timon.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Law)</fld> <def>An offer, either of money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture, which would be incurred by nonpayment or nonperformance; <as>as, the <ex>tender</ex> of rent due, or of the amount of a note, with interest</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ To constitute a legal tender, such money must be offered as the law prescribes. So also the tender must be at the time and place where the rent or debt ought to be paid, and it must be to the full amount due.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Any offer or proposal made for acceptance; <as>as, a <ex>tender</ex> of a loan, of service, or of friendship; a <ex>tender</ex> of a bid for a contract.</as></def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>A free, unlimited <qex>tender</qex> of the gospel.</q> <rj><qau>South.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>The thing offered; especially, money offered in payment of an obligation.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- 4. (Finance) An offer to buy a certain number of shares of stock of a publicly-traded company at a fixed price, usu. in an attempt to gain control of the company. --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Legal tender</b></col>. <cd>See under <er>Legal</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Tender of issue</b></col> <fld>(Law)</fld>, <cd>a form of words in a pleading, by which a party offers to refer the question raised upon it to the appropriate mode of decision.</cd> <au>Burrill.</au></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der</hw>, <pos>a.</pos> <amorph>[<pos>Compar.</pos> <adjf>Tenderer</adjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>superl.</pos> <adjf>Tenderest</adjf>.]</amorph> <ety>[F. <ets>tendre</ets>, L. <ets>tener</ets>; probably akin to <ets>tenuis</ets> thin. See <er>Thin</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Easily impressed, broken, bruised, or injured; not firm or hard; delicate; <as>as, <ex>tender</ex> plants; <ex>tender</ex> flesh; <ex>tender</ex> fruit</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Sensible to impression and pain; easily pained.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Our bodies are not naturally more <qex>tender</qex> than our faces.</q> <rj><qau>L'Estrange.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>Physically weak; not hardly or able to endure hardship; immature; effeminate.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The <qex>tender</qex> and delicate woman among you.</q> <rj><qau>Deut. xxviii. 56.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>4.</sn> <def>Susceptible of the softer passions, as love, compassion, kindness; compassionate; pitiful; anxious for another's good; easily excited to pity, forgiveness, or favor; sympathetic.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The Lord is very pitiful, and of <qex>tender</qex> mercy.</q> <rj><qau>James v. 11.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I am choleric by my nature, and <qex>tender</qex> by my temper.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>5.</sn> <def>Exciting kind concern; dear; precious.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>I love Valentine,<br/
-Whose life's as <qex>tender</qex> to me as my soul!</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>6.</sn> <def>Careful to save inviolate, or not to injure; -- with <xex>of</xex>.</def> \'bd<xex>Tender</xex> of property.\'b8 <rj><au>Burke.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>The civil authority should be <qex>tender</qex> of the honor of God and religion.</q> <rj><qau>Tillotson.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>7.</sn> <def>Unwilling to cause pain; gentle; mild.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>You, that are thus so <qex>tender</qex> o'er his follies,<br/
-Will never do him good.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>8.</sn> <def>Adapted to excite feeling or sympathy; expressive of the softer passions; pathetic; <as>as, <ex>tender</ex> expressions; <ex>tender</ex> expostulations; a <ex>tender</ex> strain</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>9.</sn> <def>Apt to give pain; causing grief or pain; delicate; <as>as, a <ex>tender</ex> subject</as>.</def> \'bdThings that are <xex>tender</xex> and unpleasing.\'b8 <rj><au>Bacon.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>10.</sn> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <def>Heeling over too easily when under sail; -- said of a vessel.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ <ex>Tender</ex> is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; <as>as, <ex>tender</ex>-footed, <ex>tender</ex>-looking, <ex>tender</ex>-minded, <ex>tender</ex>-mouthed, and the like</as>.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Delicate; effeminate; soft; sensitive; compassionate; kind; humane; merciful; pitiful.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tendre</ets>.]</ety> <def>Regard; care; kind concern.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <def>To have a care of; to be tender toward; hence, to regard; to esteem; to value.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>For first, next after life, he <qex>tendered</qex> her good.</q> <rj><qau>Spenser.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q><qex>Tender</qex> yourself more dearly.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>To see a prince in want would move a miser's charity. Our western princes <qex>tendered</qex> his case, which they counted might be their own.</q> <rj><qau>Fuller.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der*foot`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A delicate person; one not inured to the hardship and rudeness of pioneer life.</def> <mark>[Slang, Western U. S.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>See <er>Boy scout</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der-heart`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having great sensibility; susceptible of impressions or influence; affectionate; pitying; sensitive.</def> -- <wordforms><wf>Ten"der-heart`ed*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos> -- <wf>Ten"der-heart`ed*ness</wf>, <pos>n.</pos></wordforms><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Rehoboam was young and <qex>tender-hearted</qex>, and could not withstand them.</q> <rj><qau>2 Chron. xiii. 7.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><q>Be ye kind one to another, <qex>tender-hearted</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Eph. iv. 32.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der-heft`ed</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Having great tenderness; easily moved.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der*ling</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>One made tender by too much kindness; a fondling.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>W. Harrison (1586).</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>One of the first antlers of a deer.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der*loin`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A strip of tender flesh on either side of the vertebral column under the short ribs, in the hind quarter of beef and pork. It consists of the psoas muscles.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>In New York City, the region which is the center of the night life of fashionable amusement, including the majority of the theaters, etc., centering on Broadway. The term orig. designates the old twenty-ninth police precinct, in this region, which afforded the police great opportunities for profit through conniving at vice and lawbreaking, one captain being reported to have said on being transferred there that whereas he had been eating chuck steak he would now eat tenderlion. Hence, in some other cities, a district largely devoted to night amusement, or, sometimes, to vice.</def><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der*ly</hw>, <pos>adv.</pos> <def>In a tender manner; with tenderness; mildly; gently; softly; in a manner not to injure or give pain; with pity or affection; kindly.</def> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"der*ness</hw>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>The quality or state of being tender (in any sense of the adjective).</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><syn><b>Syn.</b> -- Benignity; humanity; sensibility; benevolence; kindness; pity; clemency; mildness; mercy.</syn><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"di*nous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>tendineux</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>Pertaining to a tendon; of the nature of tendon.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Full of tendons; sinewy; <as>as, nervous and <ex>tendinous</ex> parts of the body</as>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tend"ment</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Attendance; care.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"don</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F., fr. L. <ets>tendere</ets> to stretch, extend. See <er>Tend</er> to move.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <def>A tough insensible cord, bundle, or band of fibrous connective tissue uniting a muscle with some other part; a sinew.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><cs><col><b>Tendon reflex</b></col> <fld>(Physiol.)</fld>, <cd>a kind of reflex act in which a muscle is made to contract by a blow upon its tendon. Its absence is generally a sign of disease. See <cref>Knee jerk</cref>, under <er>Knee</er>.</cd></cs><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"don*ous</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Tendinous.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ten`do*syn`o*vi"tis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL. See <er>Tendon</er>, and <er>Synovitis</er>.]</ety> <def>See <er>Tenosynovitis</er>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"drac</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Tenrec</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Zo\'94l.)</fld> <def>Any one of several species of small insectivores of the family <fam>Centetid\'91</fam>, belonging to <gen>Ericulus</gen>, <gen>Echinope</gen>, and related genera, native of Madagascar. They are more or less spinose and resemble the hedgehog in habits. The rice tendrac (<spn>Oryzorictes hora</spn>) is very injurious to rice crops. Some of the species are called also <stype>tenrec</stype>.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ten"dre</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Tender feeling or fondness; affection.</def></p>
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-<p><q>You poor friendless creatures are always having some foolish <qex>tendre</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Thackeray.</qau></rj><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten*dresse"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F.]</ety> <def>Tender feeling; fondness.</def> <mark>[Obs., except as a French word]</mark><br/
-[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"dril</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Shortened fr. OF. <ets>tendrillon</ets>, fr. F. <ets>tendre</ets> tender; hence, properly, the tender branch or spring of a plant: cf. F. <ets>tendrille</ets>. See <er>Tender</er>, <pos>a.</pos>, and cf. <er>Tendron</er>.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A slender, leafless portion of a plant by which it becomes attached to a supporting body, after which the tendril usually contracts by coiling spirally.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><note><hand/ Tendrils may represent the end of a stem, as in the grapevine; an axillary branch, as in the passion flower; stipules, as in the genus Smilax; or the end of a leaf, as in the pea.</note><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><-- p. 1485 --><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"dril</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Clasping; climbing as a tendril.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <rj><au>Dyer.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><mhw>{ <hw>Ten"driled</hw>, <hw>Ten"drilled</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Furnished with tendrils, or with such or so many, tendrils.</def> \'bdThe <xex>thousand tendriled</xex> vine.\'b8 <rj><au>Southey.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"dron</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[F. Cf. <er>Tendril</er>.]</ety> <def>A tendril.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Holland.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Ten"dry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>A tender; an offer.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Heylin.</au></rj><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Tene</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See 1st and 2d <er>Teen</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>\'d8<hw>Ten"e*br\'91</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., pl., darkness.]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>The matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, commemorating the sufferings and death of Christ, -- usually sung on the afternoon or evening of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, instead of on the following days.</def><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p><hw>Te*neb"ri*cose`</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>tenebricosus</ets>.]</ety> <def>Tenebrous; dark; gloomy.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
-[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
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-<p>&l