summaryrefslogtreecommitdiffabout
authorLeo Koppelkamm <hello@leo-koppelkamm.de>2014-09-02 11:32:01 (GMT)
committer Sergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org>2014-09-02 11:32:01 (GMT)
commitbe1c505aa705430b51ae4c09a54f9e39c02c116b (patch) (side-by-side diff)
treeb7cca755d70ea3c9c9999e3c7e823d9363ee832b
parent33b9503368405faf2ae6308347dafeaeaa663688 (diff)
downloadgcide-be1c505aa705430b51ae4c09a54f9e39c02c116b.tar.gz
gcide-be1c505aa705430b51ae4c09a54f9e39c02c116b.tar.bz2
Fix some markup
Diffstat (more/less context) (ignore whitespace changes)
-rw-r--r--CIDE.A4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.B4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.D2
-rw-r--r--CIDE.H6
-rw-r--r--CIDE.I6
-rw-r--r--CIDE.L2
-rw-r--r--CIDE.M6
-rw-r--r--CIDE.P6
-rw-r--r--CIDE.Q4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.S4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.T4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.W2
12 files changed, 25 insertions, 25 deletions
diff --git a/CIDE.A b/CIDE.A
index 2cd702b..9ee88a4 100644
--- a/CIDE.A
+++ b/CIDE.A
@@ -11872,13 +11872,13 @@ Detain their <qex>adolescent</qex> charge too long.</q> <rj><qau>Cowper.</qau></
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Adonic</ent><br/
<hw>A*don"ic</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[F. <ets>adonique</ets>: cf. L. <ets>Adonius</ets>.]</ety> <def>Relating to Adonis, famed for his beauty.</def> -- <def2><pos>n.</pos> <def>An Adonic verse.</def></def2><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><cs><col><b>Adonic verse</b></col>, <cd>a verse consisting of a dactyl and spondee (-- <ssmile/ <ssmile/ | -- --).</cd></cs><br/
+<p><cs><col><b>Adonic verse</b></col>, <cd>a verse consisting of a dactyl and spondee (-- <cre/ <cre/ | -- --).</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Adonis</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>A*do"nis</hw> <pr>(<adot/*d<omac/"n<icr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., gr. Gr. <grk>'A`dwnis</grk>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Gr. Myth.)</fld> <def>A youth beloved by Venus for his beauty. He was killed in the chase by a wild boar.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -26510,13 +26510,13 @@ The thickest trees.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>If it oracle contrary to our interest or humor, we will create an <qex>amphiboly</qex>, a double meaning where there is none.</q> <rj><qau>Whitlock.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Amphibrach</ent><br/
-<hw>Am"phi*brach</hw> <pr>(<acr/m"f<icr/*br<acr/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <?/, Gr. <?/ short at both ends; <grk>'amfi`</grk> + <grk>brachy`s</grk> short.]</ety> <fld>(Anc. Pros.)</fld> <def>A foot of three syllables, the middle one long, the first and last short (<ssmile/ -- <ssmile/); as, <xex>h<acr/b<emac/r<ecr/</xex>. In modern prosody the accented syllable takes the place of the long and the unaccented of the short; as, <xex>pro-phet<bprime/ic</xex>.</def><br/
+<hw>Am"phi*brach</hw> <pr>(<acr/m"f<icr/*br<acr/k)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <?/, Gr. <?/ short at both ends; <grk>'amfi`</grk> + <grk>brachy`s</grk> short.]</ety> <fld>(Anc. Pros.)</fld> <def>A foot of three syllables, the middle one long, the first and last short (<cre/ -- <cre/); as, <xex>h<acr/b<emac/r<ecr/</xex>. In modern prosody the accented syllable takes the place of the long and the unaccented of the short; as, <xex>pro-phet<bprime/ic</xex>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Amphicarpous</ent><br/
<ent>Amphicarpic</ent><br/
<mhw>{ <hw>Am`phi*car"pic</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <hw>Am`phi*car"pous</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>'amfi`</grk> + <grk>karpo`s</grk> fruit.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>Producing fruit of two kinds, either as to form or time of ripening.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.B b/CIDE.B
index 41ceaf2..7dad676 100644
--- a/CIDE.B
+++ b/CIDE.B
@@ -8938,13 +8938,13 @@ The place its honor for the person's sake.</q> <rj><qau>Herbert.</qau></rj><br/
<p><ent>Baulk</ent><br/
<ent>Bauk</ent><br/
<mhw>{ <hw>Bauk</hw>, <hw>Baulk</hw> }</mhw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n. & v.</pos> <def>See <er>Balk</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Baume</ent><br/
-<hw>Bau`m<eacute/"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Designating or conforming to either of the scales used by the French chemist <person>Antoine <etsep>Baum<eacute/</etsep></person> in the graduation of his hydrometers; of or relating to <persfn>Baum<eacute/'s</persfn> scales or hydrometers. There are two Baum<eacute/ hydrometers. One, which is used with liquids heavier than water, sinks to 0<deg/ in pure water, and to 15<deg/ in a 15 per cent salt solution; the other, for liquids lighter than water, sinks to 0<deg/ in a 10 per cent salt solution and to 10<deg/ in pure water. In both cases the graduation, based on the distance between these fundamental points, is continued along the stem as far as desired.</def> <note>Since all the degrees on a Baum<eacute/ scale are thus equal in length, while those on a specific-gravity scale grow smaller as the density increases, there is no simple relation between degrees Baum<eacute/ and specific gravity. However, readings on Baum<eacute/s scale may be approximately reduced to specific gravities by the following formul<ae/ (<it>x</it> in each case being the reading on Baum<eacute/'s scale): <sd>(a)</sd> for liquids heavier than water, <mathex>sp. gr. = 144 <div/ (144 - <it>x</it>)</mathex>; <sd>(b)</sd> for liquids lighter than water, <mathex>sp. gr. = 144 <div/ (134 + <it>x</it>)</mathex>.</note><br/
+<hw>Bau`m<eacute/"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Designating or conforming to either of the scales used by the French chemist <person>Antoine <etsep>Baum<eacute/</etsep></person> in the graduation of his hydrometers; of or relating to <persfn>Baum<eacute/'s</persfn> scales or hydrometers. There are two Baum<eacute/ hydrometers. One, which is used with liquids heavier than water, sinks to 0<deg/ in pure water, and to 15<deg/ in a 15 per cent salt solution; the other, for liquids lighter than water, sinks to 0<deg/ in a 10 per cent salt solution and to 10<deg/ in pure water. In both cases the graduation, based on the distance between these fundamental points, is continued along the stem as far as desired.</def> <note>Since all the degrees on a Baum<eacute/ scale are thus equal in length, while those on a specific-gravity scale grow smaller as the density increases, there is no simple relation between degrees Baum<eacute/ and specific gravity. However, readings on Baum<eacute/s scale may be approximately reduced to specific gravities by the following formul<ae/ (<it>x</it> in each case being the reading on Baum<eacute/'s scale): <sd>(a)</sd> for liquids heavier than water, <mathex>sp. gr. = 144 <divide/ (144 - <it>x</it>)</mathex>; <sd>(b)</sd> for liquids lighter than water, <mathex>sp. gr. = 144 <divide/ (134 + <it>x</it>)</mathex>.</note><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Baunscheidtism</ent><br/
<hw>Baun"scheidt*ism</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[From the introducer, a German named <persfn><etsep>Baunscheidt</etsep></persfn>.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>A form of acupuncture, followed by the rubbing of the part with a stimulating fluid.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -38219,13 +38219,13 @@ Are excellent in making ladies trip.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><-- p. 179 --></p>
<p><sn>10.</sn> <fld>(Gr. Gram.)</fld> <def>A mark to indicate aspiration or its absence. See <cref>Rough breathing</cref>, <cref>Smooth breathing</cref>, below.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><cs><col><b>Breathing place</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A pause.</cd> <ldquo/That c<ae/sura, or <xex>breathing place</xex>, in the midst of the verse.<rdquo/ <au>Sir P. Sidney.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A vent.</cd> -- <col><b>Breathing time</b></col>, <cd>pause; relaxation.</cd> <au>Bp. Hall.</au> -- <col><b>Breathing while</b></col>, <cd>time sufficient for drawing breath; a short time.</cd> <au>Shak.</au> -- <col><b>Rough breathing</b></col> (<altname>spiritus asper</altname>) (<spasp/). <cd>See 2d <er>Asper</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd> -- <col><b>Smooth breathing</b></col> (<altname>spiritus lenis</altname>), <cd>a mark (') indicating the absence of the sound of <xex>h</xex>, as in <grk>'ie`nai</grk> (<it>ienai</it>).</cd></cs><br/
+<p><cs><col><b>Breathing place</b></col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>A pause.</cd> <ldquo/That c<ae/sura, or <xex>breathing place</xex>, in the midst of the verse.<rdquo/ <au>Sir P. Sidney.</au> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A vent.</cd> -- <col><b>Breathing time</b></col>, <cd>pause; relaxation.</cd> <au>Bp. Hall.</au> -- <col><b>Breathing while</b></col>, <cd>time sufficient for drawing breath; a short time.</cd> <au>Shak.</au> -- <col><b>Rough breathing</b></col> (<altname>spiritus asper</altname>) (<asper/). <cd>See 2d <er>Asper</er>, <pos>n.</pos></cd> -- <col><b>Smooth breathing</b></col> (<altname>spiritus lenis</altname>), <cd>a mark (') indicating the absence of the sound of <xex>h</xex>, as in <grk>'ie`nai</grk> (<it>ienai</it>).</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><-- ##Note: in the Greek transliterations in this dictionary, the <xex>spiritus asper</xex> within Greek words tagged as <grk>...</grk> is indicated by a double-quote (") in front of the letter it modifies (usually, but not always, the first letter of the word). The <ex>spiritus lenis</ex> is indicated by an apostrophe before the letter to be modified. --><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Breathless</ent><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.D b/CIDE.D
index 078edd4..32c4d70 100644
--- a/CIDE.D
+++ b/CIDE.D
@@ -25687,13 +25687,13 @@ Through words and things, a <qex>dim</qex> and perilous way.</q> <rj><qau>Wordsw
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>The degree of manifoldness of a quantity; <as>as, time is quantity having one <ex>dimension</ex>; volume has three <ex>dimensions</ex>, relative to extension.</as></def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>4.</sn> <fld>(Alg.)</fld> <def>A literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term <xex>dimensions</xex> forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to <xex>degree</xex> with the ordinal; thus, <mathex><it>a<exp>2</exp>b<exp>2</exp>c</it></mathex> is a term of five <xex>dimensions</xex>, or of the fifth degree.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><sn>5.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Phys.)</fld> <def>The manifoldness with which the fundamental units of time, length, and mass are involved in determining the units of other physical quantities.</def> <note>Thus, since the unit of velocity varies directly as the unit of length and inversely as the unit of time, the <ex>dimensions</ex> of velocity are said to be <mathex>length <divby/ time</mathex>; the <ex>dimensions</ex> of work are <mathex>mass <times/ (length)<exp>2</exp> <divby/ (time)<exp>2</exp></mathex>; the <ex>dimensions</ex> of density are <mathex>mass <divby/ (length)<exp>3</exp></mathex>.</note></p>
+<p><sn>5.</sn> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <fld>(Phys.)</fld> <def>The manifoldness with which the fundamental units of time, length, and mass are involved in determining the units of other physical quantities.</def> <note>Thus, since the unit of velocity varies directly as the unit of length and inversely as the unit of time, the <ex>dimensions</ex> of velocity are said to be <mathex>length <divide/ time</mathex>; the <ex>dimensions</ex> of work are <mathex>mass <times/ (length)<exp>2</exp> <divide/ (time)<exp>2</exp></mathex>; the <ex>dimensions</ex> of density are <mathex>mass <divide/ (length)<exp>3</exp></mathex>.</note></p>
<p><cs><mcol><col><b>Dimensional lumber</b></col>, <col><b>Dimension lumber</b></col>, <col><b>Dimension scantling</b></col>, <it>or</it> <col><b>Dimension stock</b></col></mcol> <fld>(Carp.)</fld>, <cd>lumber for building, etc., cut to the sizes usually in demand, or to special sizes as ordered.</cd> -- <col><b>Dimension stone</b></col>, <cd>stone delivered from the quarry rough, but brought to such sizes as are requisite for cutting to dimensions given.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Dimensional</ent><br/
<hw>Di*men"sion*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Pertaining to dimension.</def><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.H b/CIDE.H
index d08684d..ed9370d 100644
--- a/CIDE.H
+++ b/CIDE.H
@@ -29221,13 +29221,13 @@ Their tuneful harps.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>Somebody has said of the boldest figure in rhetoric, the <qex>hyperbole</qex>, that it lies without deceiving.</q> <rj><qau>Macaulay.</qau></rj></p>
<p><ent>Hyperbolical</ent><br/
<ent>Hyperbolic</ent><br/
-<mhw>{ <hw>Hy`per*bol"ic</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*b<ocrl/"<icr/k)</pr>, <hw>Hy`per*bol"ic*al</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*b<ocrl/"<icr/*k<ait/l)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>hyperbolicus</ets>, Gr. <grk>"yperboliko`s</grk>: cf. F. <ets>hyperbolique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the hyperbola; having the nature of the hyperbola.</def><br/
+<mhw>{ <hw>Hy`per*bol"ic</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*b<ocr/"<icr/k)</pr>, <hw>Hy`per*bol"ic*al</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*b<ocr/"<icr/*k<ait/l)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>hyperbolicus</ets>, Gr. <grk>"yperboliko`s</grk>: cf. F. <ets>hyperbolique</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Math.)</fld> <def>Belonging to the hyperbola; having the nature of the hyperbola.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Rhet.)</fld> <def>Relating to, containing, or of the nature of, hyperbole; exaggerating or diminishing beyond the fact; exceeding the truth; <as>as, an <ex>hyperbolical</ex> expression</as>.</def> <ldquo/This <xex>hyperbolical</xex> epitaph.<rdquo/ <rj><au>Fuller.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Hyperbolic functions</b></col> <fld>(Math.)</fld>, <cd>certain functions which have relations to the hyperbola corresponding to those which sines, cosines, tangents, etc., have to the circle; and hence, called <stype>hyperbolic sines</stype>, <stype>hyperbolic cosines</stype>, etc.</cd> -- <col><b>Hyperbolic logarithm</b></col>. <cd>See <er>Logarithm</er>.</cd> -- <col><b>Hyperbolic spiral</b></col> <fld>(Math.)</fld>, <cd>a spiral curve, the law of which is, that the distance from the pole to the generating point varies inversely as the angle swept over by the radius vector.</cd></cs><br/
@@ -29359,17 +29359,17 @@ Their tuneful harps.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
<p><ent>Hyperesthesia</ent><br/
<hw>Hy`per*es*the"si*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>Same as <er>Hyper<ae/sthesia</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>hyperegol</ent><br/
-<hw>Hy"per*gol</hw> <pr>(h<imac/"p<etil/r*g<ocrl/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Rocketry)</fld> <def>A substance which can form one of a pair of hypergolic substances. See <er>hypergolic</er>.</def><br/
+<hw>Hy"per*gol</hw> <pr>(h<imac/"p<etil/r*g<ocr/)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Rocketry)</fld> <def>A substance which can form one of a pair of hypergolic substances. See <er>hypergolic</er>.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><ent>hyperegolic</ent><br/
-<hw>Hy`per*gol"ic</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*g<ocrl/"<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Rocketry)</fld> <def>Igniting spontaneously when mixed together; -- used of pairs of substances which react violently with evolution of heat when mixed, as for example hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. Such combinations of substances are convenient for use in liquid-fueled rockets, as they do not require a source of ignition.</def><br/
+<hw>Hy`per*gol"ic</hw> <pr>(h<imac/`p<etil/r*g<ocr/"<icr/k)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <fld>(Rocketry)</fld> <def>Igniting spontaneously when mixed together; -- used of pairs of substances which react violently with evolution of heat when mixed, as for example hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. Such combinations of substances are convenient for use in liquid-fueled rockets, as they do not require a source of ignition.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Hypericum</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>Hy*per"i*cum</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., fr. Gr. <?/, <?/; <?/ under, among + <?/, <?/, heath, heather.]</ety> <fld>(Bot.)</fld> <def>A genus of plants, generally with dotted leaves and yellow flowers; -- called also <altname>St. John's-wort</altname>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.I b/CIDE.I
index 79861ca..0ea7161 100644
--- a/CIDE.I
+++ b/CIDE.I
@@ -1897,17 +1897,17 @@ Assist, <qex>if</qex> <OE/dipus deserve thy care.</q> <rj><qau>Pope.</qau></rj><
<p><ent>Ignis fatuus</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>Ig"nis fat"u*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Ignes fatui</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>fatuus</ets> foolish. So called in allusion to its tendency to mislead travelers.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A phosphorescent light that appears, in the night, over marshy ground, supposed to be occasioned by the decomposition of animal or vegetable substances, or by some inflammable gas; -- popularly called also <altname>Will-with-the-wisp</altname>, or <altname>Will-o'-the-wisp</altname>, and <altname>Jack-with-a-lantern</altname>, or <altname>Jack-o'-lantern</altname>. It is thought by some to be caused by phosphine, <chform>PH3</chform>, a sponaneously combustible gas.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><q>Will o'the Wisp -- which also rejoices in the names of <qex>Ignis Fatuus</qex> or Jack o'Lantern -- is not, as some of you may think, a cartoon character. In mediaeval times this chemical phenomenon struck terror into travellers and, very likely, lured some of them to their deaths in a stinking and marshy grave.<br/
- I have never seen this Will o'the Wisp; nor am I likely to do so. It is a flickering flame seen over marshes; marshes are not now common in London, nor indeed anywhere else in Britain. In any case the ephemeral nature of the phenomenon and the enormous amount of ambient light <ldqo/pollution<rdqo/ found in most areas means that most of us will never see it.<br/
+ I have never seen this Will o'the Wisp; nor am I likely to do so. It is a flickering flame seen over marshes; marshes are not now common in London, nor indeed anywhere else in Britain. In any case the ephemeral nature of the phenomenon and the enormous amount of ambient light <ldquo/pollution<rdquo/ found in most areas means that most of us will never see it.<br/
What is this Will o'the Wisp? Popular chemical lore has it that it is marsh gas, or methane, which catches fire when it hits the air because of the presence of either phosphine (<chform>PH3</chform>) or diphosphine (<chform>P2H4</chform>) in the gas, both of which are spontaneously flammable in air. Methane is certainly formed in marshes, and bubbles up if the mud is disturbed in a pond, say. It is the same reaction that enables organic materials to produce biogas, methane from the decomposition of sewage, which can be profitably used. But is it this that is burning in Will o'the Wisp?<br/
Almost certainly not. At this point I will say that I have thought for some years off and on as to how one might set up an experiment to test the hypotheses, since the sporadic and rare nature of the natural version renders its investigation a highly intractable problem. However: the combustion of methane under the conditions in a marsh would give a yellow flame, and heat.<br/
Will o'the Wisp is not like this, so it is said. Firstly the flame is bluish, not yellow, and it is said to be a cold flame. The colour and the temperature suggests some sort of phosphorescence; since organic material contain phosphorus, the production of phosphine or diphosphine is scarcely impossible, and maybe it does oxidise via a mainly chemiluminescent reaction. The exact nature of the Will o'the Wisp reaction nevertheless remains, to me at any rate, a mystery. Similar phenomena have been reported in graveyards and are known as corpse candles. If anyone knows anything more, I would love to hear of it. A warning that if you look for it on the Web, you will get a great deal of bizarre stuff. You will also get the delightful picture from a Canadian artist which decorates the top of this page (http://www.rod.beavon.clara.net/willo.htm), and a couple of poems at least. One is also by a Canadian, <person>Annie Campbell Huestis</person>, the other by the prolific fantasy poet <person>Walter de la Mare</person>.<br/
- The preparation of phosphine in the laboratory (by the teacher!) is fun, and perfectly safe in a fume cupboard. White phosphorus is boiled with aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in an apparatus from which all air must have been removed by purging with, say, natural gas. The phosphine will form marvellous smoke rings if allowed to bubble up through water in a pneumatic trough. This is an experiment for the teacher, needless to say. The experiment is described in <person>Partington J.R.</person>, <ldqo/A Textbook of Inorganic Chemistry<rdqo/, 6th ed, Macmillan 1957, p 572. (So, inter alia, is a great deal of other interesting chemistry.)</q><br/
+ The preparation of phosphine in the laboratory (by the teacher!) is fun, and perfectly safe in a fume cupboard. White phosphorus is boiled with aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in an apparatus from which all air must have been removed by purging with, say, natural gas. The phosphine will form marvellous smoke rings if allowed to bubble up through water in a pneumatic trough. This is an experiment for the teacher, needless to say. The experiment is described in <person>Partington J.R.</person>, <ldquo/A Textbook of Inorganic Chemistry<rdquo/, 6th ed, Macmillan 1957, p 572. (So, inter alia, is a great deal of other interesting chemistry.)</q><br/
<rj><qau>Dr. Rod Beavon<br/
(17 Dean's Yard London SW1P 3PB;<br/
e-mail: rod.beavon@westminster.org.uk</qau></rj><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Fig.: A misleading influence; a decoy.</def><br/
@@ -5749,13 +5749,13 @@ Without <qex>impeachment</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj></p>
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><q>An <qex>impecunious</qex> creature.</q> <rj><qau>B. Jonson.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Impedance</ent><br/
-<hw>Im*ped"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Impede</ets> + <ets>-ance</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>The apparent resistance in an electric circuit to the flow of an alternating current, analogous to the actual electrical resistance to a direct current, being the ratio of electromotive force to the current. It is equal to <mathex><root>R<exp>2</exp> + X<exp>2</exp></root></mathex>, where <it>R</it> = ohmic resistance, <it>X</it> = reactance. For an inductive circuit, <mathex>X = 2<pi/fL</mathex>, where <it>f</it> = frequency and <it>L</it> = self-inductance; for a circuit with capacity <mathex>X = 1 <div/ 2<pi/fC</mathex>, where <it>C</it> = capacity.</def><br/
+<hw>Im*ped"ance</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[<ets>Impede</ets> + <ets>-ance</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>The apparent resistance in an electric circuit to the flow of an alternating current, analogous to the actual electrical resistance to a direct current, being the ratio of electromotive force to the current. It is equal to <mathex><root>R<exp>2</exp> + X<exp>2</exp></root></mathex>, where <it>R</it> = ohmic resistance, <it>X</it> = reactance. For an inductive circuit, <mathex>X = 2<pi/fL</mathex>, where <it>f</it> = frequency and <it>L</it> = self-inductance; for a circuit with capacity <mathex>X = 1 <divide/ 2<pi/fC</mathex>, where <it>C</it> = capacity.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Impede</ent><br/
<hw>Im*pede"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Impeded</conjf>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Impeding</conjf>.]</vmorph> <ety>[L. <ets>impedire</ets>, lit., to entangle the feet; pref. <ets>im-</ets> in + <ets>pes</ets>, <ets>pedis</ets>, foot. See <er>Foot</er>, and cf. <er>Impeach</er>.]</ety> <def>To hinder; to stop in progress; to obstruct; <as>as, to <ex>impede</ex> the advance of troops</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.L b/CIDE.L
index 3c949ae..7c86d91 100644
--- a/CIDE.L
+++ b/CIDE.L
@@ -13498,13 +13498,13 @@ Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<hw>Libocedrus</hw> <pos>n.</pos> <def>A genus of cedarlike cypresses.</def><br/
<syn><b>Syn. --</b> genus <gen>Libocedrus</gen>.</syn><br/
[<source>WordNet 1.5</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Libra</ent><br/
<ent>Librae</ent><br/
-\'d8<hw>Li"bra</hw> <pr>(l<imac/"br<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Libr<ae/</plw> <pr>(l<imac/"br<emac/)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a balance.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The Balance; the seventh sign in the zodiac, which the sun enters at the autumnal equinox in September, marked thus <libra/ in almanacs, etc.</def> <sd>(b )</sd> <def>A southern constellation between Virgo and Scorpio.</def><br/
+\'d8<hw>Li"bra</hw> <pr>(l<imac/"br<adot/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Libr<ae/</plw> <pr>(l<imac/"br<emac/)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L., a balance.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The Balance; the seventh sign in the zodiac, which the sun enters at the autumnal equinox in September, marked thus <Libra/ in almanacs, etc.</def> <sd>(b )</sd> <def>A southern constellation between Virgo and Scorpio.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Libral</ent><br/
<hw>Li"bral</hw> <pr>(l<imac/"br<ait/l)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>libralis</ets>, fr. <ets>libra</ets> the Roman pound.]</ety> <def>Of a pound weight.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Johnson.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.M b/CIDE.M
index 2bce409..ab501c3 100644
--- a/CIDE.M
+++ b/CIDE.M
@@ -10884,13 +10884,13 @@ With thief or his <qex>marrow</qex>, for fear of ill end.</q> <rj><qau>Tusser.</
<hw>Mars</hw> <pr>(m<aum/rz)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Mars</ets>, gen. <ets>Martis</ets>, archaic <ets>Mavors</ets>, gen. <ets>Mavortis</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Rom. Myth.)</fld> <def>The god of war and husbandry.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>One of the planets of the solar system, the fourth in order from the sun, or the next beyond the earth, having a diameter of about 4,200 miles, a period of 687 days, and a mean distance of 141,000,000 miles. It is conspicuous for the redness of its light.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Alchemy)</fld> <def>The metallic element iron, the symbol of which <male/ was the same as that of the planet Mars.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
+<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Alchemy)</fld> <def>The metallic element iron, the symbol of which <Male/ was the same as that of the planet Mars.</def> <mark>[Archaic]</mark> <rj><au>Chaucer.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Mars brown</b></col>, <cd>a bright, somewhat yellowish, brown.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Marsala</ent><br/
@@ -19188,13 +19188,13 @@ Who fluttered over all things like a fan.</q> <rj><qau>Byron.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Mercury</ent><br/
<hw>Mer"cu*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>Mercurius</ets>; akin to <ets>merx</ets> wares.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Rom. Myth.)</fld> <def>A Latin god of commerce and gain; -- treated by the poets as identical with the Greek <persfn>Hermes</persfn>, messenger of the gods, conductor of souls to the lower world, and god of eloquence.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A metallic element mostly obtained by reduction from cinnabar, one of its ores. It is a heavy, opaque, glistening liquid (commonly called <altname>quicksilver</altname>), and is used in barometers, thermometers, etc. Specific gravity 13.6. Symbol Hg (<it>Hydrargyrum</it>). Atomic weight 199.8. Mercury has a molecule which consists of only one atom. It was named by the alchemists after the god Mercury, and designated by his symbol, <mercury/.</def><br/
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Chem.)</fld> <def>A metallic element mostly obtained by reduction from cinnabar, one of its ores. It is a heavy, opaque, glistening liquid (commonly called <altname>quicksilver</altname>), and is used in barometers, thermometers, etc. Specific gravity 13.6. Symbol Hg (<it>Hydrargyrum</it>). Atomic weight 199.8. Mercury has a molecule which consists of only one atom. It was named by the alchemists after the god Mercury, and designated by his symbol, <Mercury/.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><note><hand/ Mercury forms alloys, called <xex>amalgams</xex>, with many metals, and is thus used in applying tin foil to the backs of mirrors, and in extracting gold and silver from their ores. It is poisonous, and is used in medicine in the free state as in blue pill, and in its compounds as calomel, corrosive sublimate, etc. It is the only metal which is liquid at ordinary temperatures, and it solidifies at about -39<deg/ Centigrade to a soft, malleable, ductile metal.</note><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <def>One of the planets of the solar system, being the one nearest the sun, from which its mean distance is about 36,000,000 miles. Its period is 88 days, and its diameter 3,000 miles.</def><br/
@@ -31537,13 +31537,13 @@ He <qex>modifies</qex> his first severe decree.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><
<p><ent>Moho</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>Mo"ho</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Native name.]</ety> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A gallinule (<spn>Notornis Mantelli</spn>) formerly inhabiting New Zealand, but now supposed to be extinct. It was incapable of flight. See <er>Notornis</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Moho</ent><br/
-<hw>Mo"ho</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Short for <ets>Mohorovicic discontinuity</ets>, from <person>Andrija <etsep>Mohorovi<ccaron/i<cacute/</etsep></person>, a Yugoslavian geologist.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>The boundary between the earth's crust and the semiliquid mantle beneath. It varies in depth from 3 miles beneath the surface at certain points in the ocean to over 25 miles under certain parts of continents.</def><br/
+<hw>Mo"ho</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Short for <ets>Mohorovicic discontinuity</ets>, from <person>Andrija <etsep>Mohorovi<ccar/i<cacute/</etsep></person>, a Yugoslavian geologist.]</ety> <fld>(Geol.)</fld> <def>The boundary between the earth's crust and the semiliquid mantle beneath. It varies in depth from 3 miles beneath the surface at certain points in the ocean to over 25 miles under certain parts of continents.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Mohock</ent><br/
<hw>Mo"hock</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <def>See <er>Mohawk</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.P b/CIDE.P
index d87bf4c..1174f46 100644
--- a/CIDE.P
+++ b/CIDE.P
@@ -24234,13 +24234,13 @@ All huddling into <qex>phalanx</qex>, stood and gazed.</q> <rj><qau>Cowper.</qau
<p><ent>Phasel</ent><br/
<hw>Pha"sel</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>phaselus</ets>, <ets>phaseolus</ets>, Gr. <?/, <?/: cf. F. <ets>phas<eacute/ole</ets>, <ets>fas<eacute/ole</ets>. Cf. <er>Fesels</er>.]</ety> <def>The French bean, or kidney bean.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Phaseless</ent><br/
-<hw>Phase"less</hw> <pr>(f<amac/z"l<ecer/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Without a phase, or visible form.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <ldquo/A <xex>phaseless</xex> and increasing gloom.<rdquo/ <rj><au>Poe.</au></rj><br/
+<hw>Phase"less</hw> <pr>(f<amac/z"l<ecr/s)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <def>Without a phase, or visible form.</def> <mark>[R.]</mark> <ldquo/A <xex>phaseless</xex> and increasing gloom.<rdquo/ <rj><au>Poe.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Phasemeter</ent><br/
<ent>Phase meter</ent><br/
<mhw>{ <hw>Phase meter</hw>, <it>or</it> <hw>Phase"me`ter</hw> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Elec.)</fld> <def>A device for measuring the difference in phase of two alternating currents of electromotive forces.</def><br/
[<source>Webster 1913 Suppl.</source>]</p>
@@ -31361,13 +31361,13 @@ The gilded <qex>pinnacles</qex> of fate.</q> <rj><qau>Cowley.</qau></rj><br/
<p><ent>Piscatory</ent><br/
<ent>Piscatorial</ent><br/
<mhw>{ <hw>Pis`ca*to"ri*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Pis"ca*to*ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>piscatorius</ets>, fr. <ets>piscator</ets> a fisherman, fr. <ets>piscari</ets> to fish, fr. <ets>piscis</ets> a fish. See <er>Fish</er> the animal.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to fishes or fishing.</def> <rj><au>Addison.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Pisces</ent><br/
-\'d8<hw>Pis"ces</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>piscis</ets> a fish.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The twelfth sign of the zodiac, marked <pisces/ in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, including the first point of Aries, which is the vernal equinoctial point; the Fish.</def><br/
+\'d8<hw>Pis"ces</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>piscis</ets> a fish.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The twelfth sign of the zodiac, marked <Pisces/ in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, including the first point of Aries, which is the vernal equinoctial point; the Fish.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>The class of Vertebrata that includes the fishes. The principal divisions are Elasmobranchii, Ganoidei, and Teleostei.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Piscicapture</ent><br/
@@ -60414,13 +60414,13 @@ My journey strange, with clamorous uproar<br/
<p><ent>Prothetic</ent><br/
<hw>Pro*thet"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <?/.]</ety> <def>Of or pertaining to prothesis; <as>as, a <ex>prothetic</ex> apparatus</as>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Protonotary</ent><br/
<ent>Prothonotary</ent><br/
-<mhw>{ <hw>Pro*thon"o*ta*ry</hw> <pr>(pr<osl/*th<ocr/n"<osl/*t<als/*r<ycr/)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Pro*ton"o*ta*ry</hw> <pr>(pr<osl/*t<ocr/n"<osl/*t<als/*r<ycr/)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>-ries</plw> <pr>(pr<osl/*th<ocr/n"<osl/*t<als/*r<icr/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[LL. <ets>protonotarius</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>prw^tos</grk> first + L. <ets>notarius</ets> a shorthand writer, a scribe: cf. F. <ets>protonotaire</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A chief notary or clerk.</def> <ldquo/ My private <xex>prothonotary</xex>.<rdquo/ <rj><au>Herrick.</au></rj><br/
+<mhw>{ <hw>Pro*thon"o*ta*ry</hw> <pr>(pr<osl/*th<ocr/n"<osl/*t<asl/*r<ycr/)</pr>, <it>or</it> <hw>Pro*ton"o*ta*ry</hw> <pr>(pr<osl/*t<ocr/n"<osl/*t<asl/*r<ycr/)</pr> }</mhw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>-ries</plw> <pr>(pr<osl/*th<ocr/n"<osl/*t<asl/*r<icr/z)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[LL. <ets>protonotarius</ets>, fr. Gr. <grk>prw^tos</grk> first + L. <ets>notarius</ets> a shorthand writer, a scribe: cf. F. <ets>protonotaire</ets>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <def>A chief notary or clerk.</def> <ldquo/ My private <xex>prothonotary</xex>.<rdquo/ <rj><au>Herrick.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>Formerly, a chief clerk in the Court of King's Bench and in the Court of Common Pleas, now superseded by the <xex>master</xex>.</def> <mark>[Eng.]</mark> <rj><au>Wharton. Burrill.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>3.</sn> <def>A register or chief clerk of a court in certain States of the United States.</def><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.Q b/CIDE.Q
index 8fe5a6c..72327fd 100644
--- a/CIDE.Q
+++ b/CIDE.Q
@@ -1773,13 +1773,13 @@ Though huge as mountains, are in pieces dashed.</q> <rj><qau>Waller.</qau></rj><
<p><ent>Quasimodo</ent><br/
<hw>Quas`i*mo"do</hw> <pr>(kw<acr/s`<icr/*m<omac/"d<osl/)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[So called from the first words of the Latin introit, <ets>quasi modo geniti infantes</ets> as newborn babes, <au>1 Pet. ii. 2.</au>]</ety> <fld>(R. C. Ch.)</fld> <def>The first Sunday after Easter; Low Sunday.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Quasimodo</ent><br/
-<hw>Quas`i*mo"do</hw> <pr>(kw<adot/z`<esl/*m<omac/"d<osl/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Fiction)</fld> <def>The main character in Victor Hugo's novel <ldquo/The Hunchback of Notre Dame<rdquo/. The novel was first published in French under the title <ldqo/Notre Dame de Paris<rdquo/. Quasimodo is a deformed and ugly hunchback who is bellringer at the cathedral of Notre Dame during the reign of Louis XI. He rescues a gypsy girl Esmeralda, falsely convicted of a crime and about to be excuted, and carries her to sanctuary in the cathedral. Near the end of the book he dies while again rescuing her from an abductor. In a movie made in 1923 Quasimodo was portrayed by the actor Lon Chaney, whose impressive makeup and superb acting drew many plaudits. His shout of <ldquo/Sanctuary! Sanctuary!<rdquo/ when rescuing Esmeralda is still sometimes imitated for humorous or dramatic effect.</def><br/
+<hw>Quas`i*mo"do</hw> <pr>(kw<adot/z`<esl/*m<omac/"d<osl/)</pr>, <pos>prop. n.</pos> <fld>(Fiction)</fld> <def>The main character in Victor Hugo's novel <ldquo/The Hunchback of Notre Dame<rdquo/. The novel was first published in French under the title <ldquo/Notre Dame de Paris<rdquo/. Quasimodo is a deformed and ugly hunchback who is bellringer at the cathedral of Notre Dame during the reign of Louis XI. He rescues a gypsy girl Esmeralda, falsely convicted of a crime and about to be excuted, and carries her to sanctuary in the cathedral. Near the end of the book he dies while again rescuing her from an abductor. In a movie made in 1923 Quasimodo was portrayed by the actor Lon Chaney, whose impressive makeup and superb acting drew many plaudits. His shout of <ldquo/Sanctuary! Sanctuary!<rdquo/ when rescuing Esmeralda is still sometimes imitated for humorous or dramatic effect.</def><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Quass</ent><br/
<hw>Quass</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Russ. <ets>kvas'</ets>.]</ety> <def>A thin, sour beer, made by pouring warm water on rye or barley meal and letting it ferment, -- much used by the Russians. Called also <altname>kvass</altname>.</def> <altsp>[written also <asp>kvass</asp> and <asp>quas</asp>.]</altsp><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source> + <source>PJC</source>]</p>
@@ -1957,13 +1957,13 @@ Though huge as mountains, are in pieces dashed.</q> <rj><qau>Waller.</qau></rj><
<p><ent>Quayd</ent><br/
<hw>Quayd</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <def><pos>p. p.</pos> of <er>Quail</er>.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark> <rj><au>Spenser.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>qubit</ent><br/
-<hw>qu"bit</hw> <pr>(k<umac/"b<icr/t)</pr>, <fld>(Information theory)</fld> <ety>[Shortened from <ets>qu</ets>antum <ets>bit</ets>.]</ety> <def>A measure of information, being the information that can be stored in one object that can take a quantum state of 0 or 1. It differs from the classical <er>bit</er> of information theory in that quantum states may assume many intermediate states that are superpositions of the individual discrete states; the quantum states of multiple quantum systems may also be correlated by a phenomenon called <i>entanglement</i>, increasing the complexity of the information storage and retrieval process. See 4th <er>bit</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def> <au>Michael A. Nielsen, <ldqo/Rules for a Complex Quantum World</rdquo/, Scientific American, Nov. 2002, pp. 67-75.</au><br/
+<hw>qu"bit</hw> <pr>(k<umac/"b<icr/t)</pr>, <fld>(Information theory)</fld> <ety>[Shortened from <ets>qu</ets>antum <ets>bit</ets>.]</ety> <def>A measure of information, being the information that can be stored in one object that can take a quantum state of 0 or 1. It differs from the classical <er>bit</er> of information theory in that quantum states may assume many intermediate states that are superpositions of the individual discrete states; the quantum states of multiple quantum systems may also be correlated by a phenomenon called <i>entanglement</i>, increasing the complexity of the information storage and retrieval process. See 4th <er>bit</er>, <pos>n.</pos></def> <au>Michael A. Nielsen, <ldquo/Rules for a Complex Quantum World</rdquo/, Scientific American, Nov. 2002, pp. 67-75.</au><br/
[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Que</ent><br/
<hw>Que</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Cf. 3d <er>Cue</er>.]</ety> <def>A half farthing.</def> <mark>[Obs.]</mark><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.S b/CIDE.S
index cffa258..5bc65c2 100644
--- a/CIDE.S
+++ b/CIDE.S
@@ -1630,13 +1630,13 @@ And guides the Eastern <qex>sages</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><cs><col><b>Sagittal suture</b></col> <fld>(Anat.)</fld>, <cd>the suture between the two parietal bones in the top of the skull; -- called also <altname>rabdoidal suture</altname>, and <altname>interparietal suture</altname>.</cd></cs><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Sagittarius</ent><br/
-\'d8<hw>Sag`it*ta"ri*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., literally, an archer, fr. <ets>sagittarius</ets> belonging to an arrow, fr. <ets>sagitta</ets> an arrow.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The ninth of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about November 22, marked thus [<sagittarius/] in almanacs; the Archer.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, represented on maps and globes as a centaur shooting an arrow.</def><br/
+\'d8<hw>Sag`it*ta"ri*us</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., literally, an archer, fr. <ets>sagittarius</ets> belonging to an arrow, fr. <ets>sagitta</ets> an arrow.]</ety> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The ninth of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about November 22, marked thus [<Sagittarius/] in almanacs; the Archer.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, represented on maps and globes as a centaur shooting an arrow.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Sagittary</ent><br/
<hw>Sag"it*ta"ry</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[See <er>Sagittarius</er>.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Myth.)</fld> <def>A centaur; a fabulous being, half man, half horse, armed with a bow and quiver.</def> <rj><au>Shak.</au></rj><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
@@ -11192,13 +11192,13 @@ And, now I am remembered, <qex>scorned</qex> at me.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Scorpio</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>Scor"pi*o</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Scorpiones</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A scorpion.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
-<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the twenty-third day of October, marked thus [<scorpio/] in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A constellation of the zodiac containing the bright star Antares. It is drawn on the celestial globe in the figure of a scorpion.</def><br/
+<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the twenty-third day of October, marked thus [<Scorpio/] in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A constellation of the zodiac containing the bright star Antares. It is drawn on the celestial globe in the figure of a scorpion.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Scorpiodea</ent><br/
\'d8<hw>Scor`pi*o"de*a</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n. pl.</pos> <ety>[NL.]</ety> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>Same as <er>Scorpiones</er>.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.T b/CIDE.T
index 7c30906..dfd8ad9 100644
--- a/CIDE.T
+++ b/CIDE.T
@@ -5167,13 +5167,13 @@ Imprints the secret bias of the soul.</q> <rj><qau>Akenside.</qau></rj><br/
<p><ent>Tauromachy</ent><br/
<hw>Tau*rom"a*chy</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>tayromachi`a</grk>; <grk>tay^ros</grk> bull + <grk>ma`chh</grk> fight.]</ety> <def>Bullfighting.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Taurus</ent><br/
-\'d8<hw>Tau"rus</hw> <pr>(t<add/"r<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., akin to Gr. <grk>tay^ros</grk>, and E. <ets>steer</ets>. See <er>Steer</er> a young ox.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The Bull; the second in order of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the 20th of April; -- marked thus [<taurus/] in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, containing the well-known clusters called the Pleiades and the Hyades, in the latter of which is situated the remarkably bright Aldebaran.</def><br/
+\'d8<hw>Tau"rus</hw> <pr>(t<add/"r<ucr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., akin to Gr. <grk>tay^ros</grk>, and E. <ets>steer</ets>. See <er>Steer</er> a young ox.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Astron.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The Bull; the second in order of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the 20th of April; -- marked thus [<Taurus/] in almanacs.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A zodiacal constellation, containing the well-known clusters called the Pleiades and the Hyades, in the latter of which is situated the remarkably bright Aldebaran.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><sn>2.</sn> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A genus of ruminants comprising the common domestic cattle.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Taurylic</ent><br/
@@ -11183,13 +11183,13 @@ Under your <qex>testy</qex> humor?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
<p><ent>Tetel</ent><br/
<hw>Te*tel"</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A large African antelope (<spn>Alcelaphus tora</spn>). It has widely divergent, strongly ringed horns.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Tether</ent><br/
-<hw>Teth"er</hw> <pr>(t<ect/<th/"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Formerly <ets>tedder</ets>, OE. <ets>tedir</ets>; akin to LG. <ets>tider</ets>, <ets>tier</ets>, Icel. <ets>tj<omac/<edh/r</ets>, Sw. <ets>tj<umac/der</ets>, Dan. <ets>t<oum/ir</ets>. <root/64.]</ety> <def>A long rope or chain by which an animal is fastened, as to a stake, so that it can range or feed only within certain limits.</def><br/
+<hw>Teth"er</hw> <pr>(t<ecir/<th/"<etil/r)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[Formerly <ets>tedder</ets>, OE. <ets>tedir</ets>; akin to LG. <ets>tider</ets>, <ets>tier</ets>, Icel. <ets>tj<omac/<edh/r</ets>, Sw. <ets>tj<umac/der</ets>, Dan. <ets>t<oum/ir</ets>. <root/64.]</ety> <def>A long rope or chain by which an animal is fastened, as to a stake, so that it can range or feed only within certain limits.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>Tether</ent><br/
<hw>Teth"er</hw>, <pos>v. t.</pos> <vmorph>[<pos>imp. & p. p.</pos> <conjf>Tethered</conjf> <pr>(?)</pr>; <pos>p. pr. & vb. n.</pos> <conjf>Tethering</conjf>.]</vmorph> <def>To confine, as an animal, with a long rope or chain, as for feeding within certain limits.</def><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
diff --git a/CIDE.W b/CIDE.W
index 3d6659e..201a3f4 100644
--- a/CIDE.W
+++ b/CIDE.W
@@ -14,13 +14,13 @@
GNU General Public License for more details.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this copy of GCIDE. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
-->
-<p><-- p. 1621 --><br/
+<p><-- p. 1621 --></p><br/
<p><centered><point26>W.</point26></centered><br/
[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
<p><ent>W</ent><br/
<hw>W</hw> <pr>(d<ucr/b"'l <umac/)</pr>, <def>the twenty-third letter of the English alphabet, is usually a consonant, but sometimes it is a vowel, forming the second element of certain diphthongs, as in <xex>few</xex>, <xex>how</xex>. It takes its written form and its name from the repetition of a V, this being the original form of the Roman capital letter which we call <xex>U</xex>. Etymologically it is most related to <xex>v</xex> and <xex>u</xex>. See V, and U. Some of the uneducated classes in England, especially in London, confuse <xex>w</xex> and <xex>v</xex>, substituting the one for the other, as <xex>weal</xex> for <xex>veal</xex>, and <xex>veal</xex> for <xex>weal</xex>; <xex>wine</xex> for <xex>vine</xex>, and <xex>vine</xex> for <xex>wine</xex>, etc. See <xex>Guide to Pronunciation</xex>, <sect/<sect/ 266-268.</def><br/

Return to:

Send suggestions and report system problems to the System administrator.