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authorSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-29 21:58:39 (GMT)
committer Sergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2012-01-29 22:22:04 (GMT)
commit69d7f353c3632c798aeec768e6aeac71b7c5545f (patch) (unidiff)
treebd7c3a8ecced643bd1d080bb080b1d8f75bfdb7e
parent6d7ebb4064ae8c3573c2dd8a590b2663cd907079 (diff)
downloadgcide-69d7f353c3632c798aeec768e6aeac71b7c5545f.tar.gz
gcide-69d7f353c3632c798aeec768e6aeac71b7c5545f.tar.bz2
Fix leftover greek transliterations.
Diffstat (more/less context) (ignore whitespace changes)
-rw-r--r--CIDE.A4
-rw-r--r--CIDE.M2
-rw-r--r--CIDE.P8
-rw-r--r--CIDE.X2
4 files changed, 8 insertions, 8 deletions
diff --git a/CIDE.A b/CIDE.A
index 802198a..7012bae 100644
--- a/CIDE.A
+++ b/CIDE.A
@@ -40777,7 +40777,7 @@ In wings of shot a-both sides of the van.</q> <rj><qau>Webster (1607).</qau></rj
40777[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 40777[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
40778 40778
40779<p><ent>Archimedes</ent><br/ 40779<p><ent>Archimedes</ent><br/
40780<hw>Ar*chi*me"des</hw> <pr>(<aum/r*k<icr/*m<emac/"d<emac/z)</pr> <pos>pr. n.</pos>. <ety>[Gr. <grk>'Apchimh`dhs</grk>.]</ety> <def>Born at <city>Syracuse</city> about 287 b. c.: died at Syracuse, 212 b. c. The most celebrated geometrician of antiquity. He is said to have been a relative of <person>King Hiero</person> of <city>Syracuse</city>, to have traveled early in life in <country>Egypt</country>, and to have been the pupil of <person>Conon the Samian</person> at <city>Alexandria</city>. His most important services were rendered to pure geometry, but his popular fame rests chiefly on his application of mathematical theory to mechanics. He invented the water-screw, and discovered the principle of the lever. Concerning the latter the famous saying is attributed to him, "Give me where I may stand and I will move the world " (<grk>do`s pou^ stw^ kai` to`n ko`smos kinh`sw</grk>). By means of military engines which he invented he postponed the fall of <city>Syracuse</city> when besieged by <persfn>Marcellus</persfn> 214-212 b. c., whose fleet he is incorrectly said to have destroyed by mirrors reflecting the sun's rays. He detected the admixture of silver, and determined the proportions of the two metals, in a crown ordered by <persfn>Hiero</persfn> to be made of pure gold. The method of detecting the alloy, without destroying the crown, occurred to him as he stepped in the bath and observed the overflow caused by the displacement of the water. He ran home through the street naked crying <i>heureka</i>, "I have found it." He was killed at the capture of <city>Syracuse</city> by <persfn>Marcellus</persfn>.</def> <au>Century Dict. 1906</au><br/ 40780<hw>Ar*chi*me"des</hw> <pr>(<aum/r*k<icr/*m<emac/"d<emac/z)</pr> <pos>pr. n.</pos>. <ety>[Gr. <grk>'Archimh`dhs</grk>.]</ety> <def>Born at <city>Syracuse</city> about 287 b. c.: died at Syracuse, 212 b. c. The most celebrated geometrician of antiquity. He is said to have been a relative of <person>King Hiero</person> of <city>Syracuse</city>, to have traveled early in life in <country>Egypt</country>, and to have been the pupil of <person>Conon the Samian</person> at <city>Alexandria</city>. His most important services were rendered to pure geometry, but his popular fame rests chiefly on his application of mathematical theory to mechanics. He invented the water-screw, and discovered the principle of the lever. Concerning the latter the famous saying is attributed to him, "Give me where I may stand and I will move the world " (<grk>do`s pou^ stw^ kai` to`n ko`smos kinh`sw</grk>). By means of military engines which he invented he postponed the fall of <city>Syracuse</city> when besieged by <persfn>Marcellus</persfn> 214-212 b. c., whose fleet he is incorrectly said to have destroyed by mirrors reflecting the sun's rays. He detected the admixture of silver, and determined the proportions of the two metals, in a crown ordered by <persfn>Hiero</persfn> to be made of pure gold. The method of detecting the alloy, without destroying the crown, occurred to him as he stepped in the bath and observed the overflow caused by the displacement of the water. He ran home through the street naked crying <i>heureka</i>, "I have found it." He was killed at the capture of <city>Syracuse</city> by <persfn>Marcellus</persfn>.</def> <au>Century Dict. 1906</au><br/
40781[<source>PJC</source>]</p> 40781[<source>PJC</source>]</p>
40782 40782
40783<p><ent>Archimedes</ent><br/ 40783<p><ent>Archimedes</ent><br/
@@ -49590,7 +49590,7 @@ And yet methinks I have <qex>astronomy</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
49590 49590
49591<p><ent>Athenaeum</ent><br/ 49591<p><ent>Athenaeum</ent><br/
49592<ent>Atheneum</ent><br/ 49592<ent>Atheneum</ent><br/
49593<mhw><hw>Ath`e*ne"um</hw>, <hw>Ath`e*n<ae/"um</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Atheneums</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, L. <plw>Athen<ae/a</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>Athenaeum</ets>, Gr. <grk>'Aqhn`aion</grk> a temple of Minerva at Athens, fr. <grk>'Aqhna^</grk>, contr. fr. <grk>'Aqhna`a</grk>, <grk>'Aqhnai`a</grk>, in Homer <grk>'Aqh`nh</grk>, <grk>'Aqhnai`n</grk>, Athene (called <xex>Minerva</xex> by the Romans), the tutelary goddess of Athens.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Gr. Antiq.)</fld> <def>A temple of Athene, at Athens, in which scholars and poets were accustomed to read their works and instruct students.</def><br/ 49593<mhw><hw>Ath`e*ne"um</hw>, <hw>Ath`e*n<ae/"um</hw> <pr>(<?/)</pr></mhw>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> E. <plw>Atheneums</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>, L. <plw>Athen<ae/a</plw> <pr>(<?/)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[L. <ets>Athenaeum</ets>, Gr. <grk>'Aqhnai`on</grk> a temple of Minerva at Athens, fr. <grk>'Aqhna^</grk>, contr. fr. <grk>'Aqhna`a</grk>, <grk>'Aqhnai`a</grk>, in Homer <grk>'Aqh`nh</grk>, <grk>'Aqhnai`n</grk>, Athene (called <xex>Minerva</xex> by the Romans), the tutelary goddess of Athens.]</ety> <sn>1.</sn> <fld>(Gr. Antiq.)</fld> <def>A temple of Athene, at Athens, in which scholars and poets were accustomed to read their works and instruct students.</def><br/
49594[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 49594[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
49595 49595
49596<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A school founded at Rome by Hadrian.</def><br/ 49596<p><sn>2.</sn> <def>A school founded at Rome by Hadrian.</def><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.M b/CIDE.M
index 99f41e0..e8bb805 100644
--- a/CIDE.M
+++ b/CIDE.M
@@ -18560,7 +18560,7 @@ Revenge upon the cardinal.</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
18560[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 18560[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
18561 18561
18562<p><ent>Menostasis</ent><br/ 18562<p><ent>Menostasis</ent><br/
18563||<hw>Me*nos"ta*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>mh`n</grk> month + <grk>'istan`nai</grk> to stop.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Stoppage of the menses.</def><br/ 18563||<hw>Me*nos"ta*sis</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>mh`n</grk> month + <grk>'ista`nai</grk> to stop.]</ety> <fld>(Med.)</fld> <def>Stoppage of the menses.</def><br/
18564[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 18564[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
18565 18565
18566<p><ent>Menostation</ent><br/ 18566<p><ent>Menostation</ent><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.P b/CIDE.P
index d358245..21fc204 100644
--- a/CIDE.P
+++ b/CIDE.P
@@ -4389,12 +4389,12 @@ Nor <qex>paltered</qex> with eternal God for power.</q> <rj><qau>Tennyson.</qau>
4389[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 4389[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
4390 4390
4391<p><ent>Panegyric</ent><br/ 4391<p><ent>Panegyric</ent><br/
4392<hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>panegyricus</ets>, Gr. <grk>panhgyrico`s</grk>: cf. F. <ets>pan<eacute/gyrique</ets>. See <er>Panegyric</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>An oration or eulogy in praise of some person or achievement; a formal or elaborate encomium; a laudatory discourse; laudation. See Synonym of <er>Eulogy</er>.</def><br/ 4392<hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>panegyricus</ets>, Gr. <grk>panhgyriko`s</grk>: cf. F. <ets>pan<eacute/gyrique</ets>. See <er>Panegyric</er>, <pos>a.</pos>]</ety> <def>An oration or eulogy in praise of some person or achievement; a formal or elaborate encomium; a laudatory discourse; laudation. See Synonym of <er>Eulogy</er>.</def><br/
4393[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 4393[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
4394 4394
4395<p><ent>Panegyrical</ent><br/ 4395<p><ent>Panegyrical</ent><br/
4396<ent>Panegyric</ent><br/ 4396<ent>Panegyric</ent><br/
4397<mhw>{ <hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>panegyricus</ets>, Gr. <grk>panhgyrico`s</grk>, from <grk>panh`gyris</grk> an assembly of the people, a high festival; <grk>pa^</grk>, <grk>pa^n</grk> all + <grk>'a`gyris</grk>, <grk>'agora`</grk>, an assembly.]</ety> <def>Containing praise or eulogy; encomiastic; laudatory.</def> <ldquo/<xex>Panegyric</xex> strains.<rdquo/ <au>Pope.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Pan`e*gyr"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/ 4397<mhw>{ <hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <hw>Pan`e*gyr"ic*al</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, }</mhw> <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[L. <ets>panegyricus</ets>, Gr. <grk>panhgyriko`s</grk>, from <grk>panh`gyris</grk> an assembly of the people, a high festival; <grk>pa^</grk>, <grk>pa^n</grk> all + <grk>'a`gyris</grk>, <grk>'agora`</grk>, an assembly.]</ety> <def>Containing praise or eulogy; encomiastic; laudatory.</def> <ldquo/<xex>Panegyric</xex> strains.<rdquo/ <au>Pope.</au> -- <wordforms><wf>Pan`e*gyr"ic*al*ly</wf>, <pos>adv.</pos></wordforms><br/
4398[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 4398[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
4399 4399
4400<p><q>Some of his odes are <qex>panegyrical</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/ 4400<p><q>Some of his odes are <qex>panegyrical</qex>.</q> <rj><qau>Dryden.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -12168,7 +12168,7 @@ Upbore their nimble tread.</q> <rj><qau>Milton.</qau></rj><br/
12168[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 12168[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
12169 12169
12170<p><ent>Pathos</ent><br/ 12170<p><ent>Pathos</ent><br/
12171<hw>Pa"thos</hw> <pr>(p<amac/"th<ocr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <grk>pa`qos</grk> a suffering, passion, fr. <grk>paqei^n</grk>, <grk>pas`chein</grk>, to suffer; cf. <grk>po`nos</grk> toil, L. <ets>pati</ets> to suffer, E. <ets>patient</ets>.]</ety> <def>That quality or property of anything which touches the feelings or excites emotions and passions, esp., that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; <as>as, the <ex>pathos</ex> of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry</as>.</def><br/ 12171<hw>Pa"thos</hw> <pr>(p<amac/"th<ocr/s)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos> <ety>[L., from Gr. <grk>pa`qos</grk> a suffering, passion, fr. <grk>paqei^n</grk>, <grk>pa`schei^n</grk>, to suffer; cf. <grk>po`nos</grk> toil, L. <ets>pati</ets> to suffer, E. <ets>patient</ets>.]</ety> <def>That quality or property of anything which touches the feelings or excites emotions and passions, esp., that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; <as>as, the <ex>pathos</ex> of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry</as>.</def><br/
12172[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 12172[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
12173 12173
12174<p><q>The combination of incident, and the <qex>pathos</qex> of catastrophe.</q> <rj><qau>T. Warton.</qau></rj><br/ 12174<p><q>The combination of incident, and the <qex>pathos</qex> of catastrophe.</q> <rj><qau>T. Warton.</qau></rj><br/
@@ -27506,7 +27506,7 @@ Of the dank morning?</q> <rj><qau>Shak.</qau></rj><br/
27506[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 27506[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
27507 27507
27508<p><ent>Phytozoon</ent><br/ 27508<p><ent>Phytozoon</ent><br/
27509||<hw>Phy`to*zo"<oum/n</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Phytozoa</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>fyto`n</grk> + <grk>zo^,on</grk> an animal.]</ety> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A plantlike animal. The term is sometimes applied to zoophytes.</def><br/ 27509||<hw>Phy`to*zo"<oum/n</hw> <pr>(?)</pr>, <pos>n.</pos>; <plu><it>pl.</it> <plw>Phytozoa</plw> <pr>(#)</pr>.</plu> <ety>[NL., fr. Gr. <grk>fyto`n</grk> + <grk>zw^,on</grk> an animal.]</ety> <fld>(Zool.)</fld> <def>A plantlike animal. The term is sometimes applied to zoophytes.</def><br/
27510[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 27510[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
27511 27511
27512<p><ent>Phyz</ent><br/ 27512<p><ent>Phyz</ent><br/
diff --git a/CIDE.X b/CIDE.X
index 1ebae1d..ee4cf8d 100644
--- a/CIDE.X
+++ b/CIDE.X
@@ -459,7 +459,7 @@ knowledge base should contact:
459[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 459[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
460 460
461<p><ent>Xiphoid</ent><br/ 461<p><ent>Xiphoid</ent><br/
462<hw>Xiph"oid</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>xifoeidh`s</grk> sword-shaped; <grk>xi`fos</grk> a sword + <grk>ei`^dos</grk> form, shape: cf. F. <ets>xiphoide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Like a sword; ensiform.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to the xiphoid process; xiphoidian.</def><br/ 462<hw>Xiph"oid</hw> <pr>(?; 277)</pr>, <pos>a.</pos> <ety>[Gr. <grk>xifoeidh`s</grk> sword-shaped; <grk>xi`fos</grk> a sword + <grk>e`i^dos</grk> form, shape: cf. F. <ets>xiphoide</ets>.]</ety> <fld>(Anat.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Like a sword; ensiform.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>Of or pertaining to the xiphoid process; xiphoidian.</def><br/
463[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p> 463[<source>1913 Webster</source>]</p>
464 464
465<p><ent>Xiphoidian</ent><br/ 465<p><ent>Xiphoidian</ent><br/

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