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authorSergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2011-10-11 20:15:45 (GMT)
committer Sergey Poznyakoff <gray@gnu.org.ua>2011-10-11 20:15:45 (GMT)
commit24a87761b4398c48d554ae44861b33a98c4c39e4 (patch) (side-by-side diff)
treee2c719f29aa2f48afde056c1b1a508738d312520
parent17372c73a7605c1a2815c7389259cab3b8443f3f (diff)
downloadcflow-24a87761b4398c48d554ae44861b33a98c4c39e4.tar.gz
cflow-24a87761b4398c48d554ae44861b33a98c4c39e4.tar.bz2
Final cleanup before the release.release-1_4
* NEWS: Update. * README: Update. * doc/cflow.texi: Update. * src/main.c (symbol_override): pass allocated argument to install. * src/parser.c (yyparse): Return 0.
Diffstat (more/less context) (ignore whitespace changes)
-rw-r--r--NEWS2
-rw-r--r--README16
-rw-r--r--doc/cflow.texi184
-rw-r--r--src/main.c2
-rw-r--r--src/parser.c4
5 files changed, 115 insertions, 93 deletions
diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index 3e334c2..4bfa96b 100644
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ See the end of file for copying conditions.
Please send cflow bug reports to <bug-cflow@gnu.org>.
-Version 1.4 (Git)
+Version 1.4, 2011-10-11
* Symbol aliases
diff --git a/README b/README
index 12adbe7..e4b89ca 100644
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
GNU cflow README
-Copyright (C) 2005, 2010 Sergey Poznyakoff
+Copyright (C) 2005, 2010, 2011 Sergey Poznyakoff
See the end of file for copying conditions.
* Introduction
@@ -10,10 +10,8 @@ documentation, instead it is provided as a brief reference only.
Please be sure to read the accompanuing documentation before using the
utility. See section `Documentation' below.
-Please read *all* sections of this `README' file before starting
-configuration. Also make sure you read `INSTALL' if you are not
-familiar with them already. Refer to file `ABOUT-NLS' for information
-regarding internationalization.
+For the generic configuration options, see the file `INSTALL'.
+Refer to file `ABOUT-NLS' for information regarding internationalization.
* History
@@ -54,6 +52,12 @@ cflow.
After running `./configure' and `make', run `make install'.
+* Configuration File
+
+The file src/cflow.rc provides a working configuration file for use
+with gcc. See the documentation, sections 6.1 "Syntactic classes" and
+6.3 "GCC Initialization", for more information.
+
* Documentation
Complete user manual in texinfo format is provided. After the
@@ -70,7 +74,7 @@ Send bug reports and suggestions to <bug-cflow@gnu.org>.
* Copyright Information:
-Copyright (C) 2005, Sergey Poznyakoff
+Copyright (C) 2005, 2010, 2011 Sergey Poznyakoff
Permission is granted to anyone to make or distribute verbatim copies
of this document as received, in any medium, provided that the
diff --git a/doc/cflow.texi b/doc/cflow.texi
index 82bd028..dfb1fdf 100644
--- a/doc/cflow.texi
+++ b/doc/cflow.texi
@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@
\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@smallbook
@c %**start of header
@setfilename cflow.info
@settitle GNU cflow
@@ -144,14 +143,14 @@ with an example. Suppose you have a simple implementation of
@command{whoami} command and you wish to obtain a graph of function
dependencies. Here is the program:
-@smallexample
+@example
@verbatiminclude whoami.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Running @command{cflow} produces the following output:
@cindex GNU Output Format, an example
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
$ @kbd{cflow whoami.c}
main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at whoami.c:26>:
@@ -163,7 +162,7 @@ main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at whoami.c:26>:
fprintf()
printf()
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex GNU Output Format described
@anchor{GNU Output Format}
@@ -176,9 +175,9 @@ displaying, within a pair of angle brackets, a function
calls another functions, the line ends with a colon. For example, the
line
-@smallexample
+@example
main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at whoami.c:25>:
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
shows that function @code{main} is defined in file @file{whoami.c}
@@ -186,8 +185,8 @@ at line 25, as @code{int main (int argc, char **argv)}. Terminating
colon indicates that @code{main} invokes other functions.
The lines following this one show which functions are called by
-@code{main}. Each such line is indented by fixed amount of white space
-(by default four spaces) for each nesting level.
+@code{main}. Each such line is indented by a fixed amount of white space
+(by default, four spaces) for each nesting level.
@cindex @option{--omit-symbol-names} option introduced
@cindex @option{--omit-arguments} option introduced
@@ -201,9 +200,9 @@ of reasons, one of them being to make the resulting graph more
compact. To illustrate their effect, here is how would the first line of the
above graph look if you had used both @option{--omit-} options:
-@smallexample
+@example
main() <int () at whoami.c:25>:
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex start symbol
@cindex @option{--main} command line option introduced
@@ -217,14 +216,14 @@ the graph starting on particular function. @command{Cflow}
allows to select such function using @option{--main} (@option{-m})
command line option. Thus, running
-@smallexample
+@example
cflow --main who_am_i whoami.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
on the above file will produce following graph:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>:
getpwuid()
@@ -233,7 +232,7 @@ who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>:
fprintf()
printf()
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@node Direct and Reverse
@chapter Two Types of Flow Graphs.
@@ -248,7 +247,7 @@ option. For example, using a sample @file{whoami.c}:
@cindex reverse graph, example
@cindex reverse tree, example
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
$ @kbd{cflow --reverse whoami.c}
fprintf():
@@ -271,7 +270,7 @@ printf():
who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>:
main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at whoami.c:26>
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
This output consists of several subgraphs, each describing callers
for a particular function. Thus, the first subgraph tells that the
@@ -284,11 +283,11 @@ and @code{main}. First of them is, in turn, also called directly by
@anchor{--brief}
The first thing that draws attention in the above output is that
the subgraph starting with @code{who_am_i} function is repeated several
-times. This is @dfn{verbose} output. To make it brief, use
+times. This is a @dfn{verbose} output. To make it brief, use
@option{--brief} (@option{-b}) command line option. For example:
@cindex brief output, an example of
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
$ @kbd{cflow --brief --reverse whoami.c}
fprintf():
@@ -306,7 +305,7 @@ printf():
who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>: [see 2]
who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>: [see 2]
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex brief output described
In brief output, once a subgraph for a given function is written,
@@ -317,7 +316,7 @@ expanded subgraph can be found.
@cindex @option{--number} command line option introduced
@cindex @option{-n} command line option introduced
@anchor{--number}
- If the output graph is large it can be tedious to find out the
+ If the output graph is large, it can be tedious to find out the
required line number (unless you use @dfn{Emacs cflow-mode},
@pxref{Emacs}). For such cases a special option
@option{--number} (@option{-n}) is provided, which makes
@@ -325,7 +324,7 @@ required line number (unless you use @dfn{Emacs cflow-mode},
number}, that is the ordinal number of this line in the output. With
this option, the above output will look like:
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number --brief --reverse whoami.c}
@group
1 fprintf():
@@ -343,7 +342,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --number --brief --reverse whoami.c}
13 who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>: [see 2]
14 who_am_i() <int who_am_i (void) at whoami.c:8>: [see 2]
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Of course, @option{--brief} and @option{--number} options
take effect for both direct and reverse flow graphs.
@@ -378,7 +377,7 @@ environment variable @env{POSIXLY_CORRECT} was set.
The output graph in POSIX format for our sample @file{whoami.c}
file will look as follows:
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --format=posix whoami.c}
1 main: int (int argc,char **argv), <whoami.c 26>
2 fprintf: <>
@@ -388,7 +387,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --format=posix whoami.c}
6 getenv: <>
7 fprintf: <>
8 printf: <>
-@end smallexample
+@end example
It is not clear from the @acronym{POSIX} specification whether
the output should contain argument lists in function declarations, or
@@ -421,18 +420,18 @@ lists in function declaration. So, to produce an output suitable for
follows@footnote{(@xref{ASCII Tree, level-indent}, for the detailed
description of @option{--level-indent} option}:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
@kbd{cflow --format=posix --omit-arguments \
--level-indent='0=\t' --level-indent='1=\t' \
--level-indent=start='\t'}
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
You can use the following script to visualize call graphs using
the three tools:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
#! /bin/sh
@@ -441,7 +440,7 @@ cflow --format=posix --omit-arguments \
--level-indent=start='\t' $* |
cflow2vcg | xvcg -
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@node Recursive Calls
@chapter Handling Recursive Calls.
@@ -459,14 +458,14 @@ displayed.
recursive listing of a directory, allowing to cut off at the arbitrary
nesting level:
-@smallexample
+@example
@verbatiminclude d.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Running @command{cflow} on this program produces the following graph:
@anchor{sample flowchart}
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number d.c}
1 main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at d.c:85>:
2 fprintf()
@@ -489,7 +488,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --number d.c}
<void printdir (int level,char *name) at d.c:42>
(recursive: see 4)
19 closedir()
-@end smallexample
+@end example
The @code{printdir} description in line 4 shows that the function
is recursive. The recursion call is shown in line 18.
@@ -505,7 +504,7 @@ beginning with underscore character. To include these symbols as well,
specify @option{-i _} (or @option{--include _}) command line option.
Continuing our example:
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number -i _ d.c}
1 main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at d.c:85>:
2 fprintf()
@@ -529,7 +528,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --number -i _ d.c}
<void printdir (int level,char *name) at d.c:42>
(recursive: see 4)
20 closedir()
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex @option{-i} introduced
@cindex @option{--include} introduced
@@ -555,7 +554,7 @@ command line option. Our sample program @file{d.c} defines static
function @code{isdir}, running @command{cflow -i ^s}, completely omits
this function and its callees from the resulting graph:
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number -i ^s d.c}
1 main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at d.c:85>:
2 fprintf()
@@ -574,7 +573,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --number -i ^s d.c}
<void printdir (int level,char *name) at d.c:42>
(recursive: see 4)
15 closedir()
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Actually, the exclusion sign (@samp{^} or @samp{-}) can be used
any place in @option{-i} argument, not only at the beginning. Thus,
@@ -590,7 +589,7 @@ symbols}, both global and static, so to include these in the output,
use option @option{-i x}. For example:
@anchor{x flowchart}
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number -i x d.c}
1 main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at d.c:85>:
2 fprintf()
@@ -620,7 +619,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --number -i x d.c}
<void printdir (int level,char *name) at d.c:42>
(recursive: see 6)
26 closedir()
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Now, lines 3, 4, 16 and 23 show data symbols, with their
definitions when available. Notice, however, lines 7 and 8. Why both
@@ -638,9 +637,9 @@ encountering a @code{typedef}, it registers the defined symbol as a
has no way of knowing it is a data type. So, it supposes it is a
variable. But then the input:
-@smallexample
+@example
DIR *dir;
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
is parsed as an @emph{expression}, meaning ``multiply @code{DIR} by
@@ -661,9 +660,9 @@ concentrate on the first method.
@dfn{syntactic class} of the symbol. Its argument consists of two
strings separated by a colon:
-@smallexample
+@example
--symbol @var{sym}:@var{class}
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
The first string, @var{sym} is a @code{C} identifier to be recorded in
@@ -672,9 +671,9 @@ be associated with this symbol. In particular, if @var{class} is
@samp{type}, the symbol @var{sym} will be recorded as a @code{C} type
definition. Thus, to fix the above output, run:
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --number -i x --symbol DIR:type d.c}
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex Parameter wrapper defined
@cindex @code{__P}, special handling using @option{--symbol}
@@ -685,22 +684,22 @@ declarations in function prototypes. For example, in the declaration
below, taken from @file{/usr/include/resolv.h}, @code{__P} is a
parameter wrapper:
-@smallexample
+@example
void res_npquery __P((const res_state, const u_char *, int, FILE *));
-@end smallexample
+@end example
For @command{cflow} to be able to process such declarations,
declare @code{__P} as a wrapper, for example:
-@smallexample
+@example
cflow --symbol __P:wrapper *.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
In both examples above the reason for using the
@option{--symbol} option was that @command{cflow} was unable to
-determine what the given symbol was either because it did not
+determine what the given symbol was, either because it did not
see the type definition, as it was in case with @samp{DIR}, or
-the macro definition was not expanded. Both cases are better
+because the macro definition was not expanded. Both cases are better
solved by using @dfn{preprocess mode}, described in the next
chapter. Nevertheless, even with preprocessor, the
@option{--symbol} option remains useful, as shown in the following
@@ -726,7 +725,7 @@ following classes:
A keyword, like @samp{if}, @samp{when} etc.
@item modifier
-Type modifier, i.e. a symbol appearing after data type to modify its
+Type modifier, i.e. the symbol appearing after a data type to modify its
meaning, like @samp{*}.
@item qualifier
@@ -734,6 +733,7 @@ Declaration qualifier. Can appear both before C declaration (much like
@samp{static} or @samp{extern}) and after a data type (like
modifiers).
+@cindex __extension__
You would usually declare a @command{gcc} keyword @samp{__extension__}
as a qualifier:
@@ -748,6 +748,7 @@ A C identifier.
A C data type, like @samp{int}, @samp{char}, etc.
@item wrapper
+@cindex __attribute__
That has two meanings. First, it can be used to declare parameter
wrappers when running @command{cflow} without preprocessor. This
usage was described above. Second, it indicates any symbol that
@@ -774,6 +775,7 @@ construct:
As a result of this option, the symbol @var{newsym} is declared to be
the equivalent of @var{oldsym}.
+@cindex __restrict
Symbol aliasing can be regarded as defining the symbol class by
example of another symbol. It is useful for some special keywords,
such as @samp{__restrict}:
@@ -784,6 +786,17 @@ such as @samp{__restrict}:
@node GCC Initialization
@section GCC Initialization
+@cindex gcc
+@cindex __inline
+@cindex __inline__
+@cindex __const__
+@cindex __const
+@cindex __restrict
+@cindex __extension__
+@cindex __attribute__
+@cindex __asm__
+@cindex __nonnull
+@cindex __wur
The following is a recommended set of @command{cflow} initialization
options for use with @command{gcc}. We suggest you to put them in your
@file{cflow.rc} file (@pxref{Configuration}).
@@ -818,7 +831,7 @@ preprocessing, run the utility with @option{--cpp}
@cindex @option{--cpp} option, an example
@cindex @option{--preprocess} option, an example
-@smallexample
+@example
$ @kbd{cflow --cpp -n d.c}
1 main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at d.c:85>:
2 fprintf()
@@ -840,7 +853,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --cpp -n d.c}
<void printdir (int level,char *name) at d.c:42>
(recursive: see 4)
18 closedir()
-@end smallexample
+@end example
Compare this graph with the one obtained without @option{--cpp}
option (@pxref{sample flowchart}). As you see, the reference to
@@ -873,9 +886,9 @@ number of columns to indent for each nesting level. For example, the
following command sets the indentation level to 2, which is half of
the default:
-@smallexample
+@example
cflow --level-indent 2 d.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
It can be used, for instance, to keep the graph within the page
@@ -919,11 +932,11 @@ aligned.
To demonstrate this, let's consider following sample program:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
@verbatiminclude foo.c
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
Now, let's represent line elements by the following strings:
@@ -951,14 +964,14 @@ used at the beginning of the string.
This command will produce the following output:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
::+-main() <int main () at foo.c:3>:
:: +-f() <int f () at foo.c:11>:
:: | \-h()
:: \-g()
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@cindex @option{--tree} introduced
@cindex @option{-T} introduced
@@ -971,7 +984,7 @@ example of flow graph produced with this option. The source file
@xref{Source of wc command}.
@anchor{ascii tree}
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
$ @kbd{cflow --tree --brief --cpp wc.c}
+-main() <int main (int argc,char **argv) at wc.c:127>
@@ -1001,7 +1014,7 @@ $ @kbd{cflow --tree --brief --cpp wc.c}
<void report (char *file,count_t ccount,
count_t wcount,count_t lcount) at wc.c:57> [see 17]
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@node Cross-References
@@ -1015,14 +1028,14 @@ command line option. Cross-reference output lists each symbol
occurrence on a separate line. Each line shows the identifier and the
source location where it appears. If this location is where the symbol
is defined, it is additionally marked with an asterisk and followed by
-the definition. For example, here is a fragment of cross-reference
+the definition. For example, here is a fragment of a cross-reference
output for @file{d.c} program:
-@smallexample
+@example
printdir * d.c:42 void printdir (int level,char *name)
printdir d.c:74
printdir d.c:102
-@end smallexample
+@end example
It shows that the function @code{printdir} is defined in line 42
and referenced twice, in lines 74 and 102.
@@ -1080,19 +1093,24 @@ be careful to properly quote its argument. The rule of thumb is:
For example, to run @command{cc -E} as a preprocessor, you can use the
following configuration file:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
--cpp='cc -E'
-DHAVE_CONFIG_H
--DSQUARE\\\(x\\\)=x*x
+-D__extension__\\\(c\\\)=
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
+
+@cindex __extension__()
+ By the way, the above example shows a way of coping
+with the @samp{__extension__()} construct used by @command{gcc}, i.e. by
+defining it to an empty string.
@cindex Option cancellation
It may sometimes be necessary to cancel the effect of a command
line option. For example, you might specify @option{--brief} in your
configuration file, but then occasionally need to obtain verbose
-graph. To cancel effect of any GNU @command{cflow} option that does
+graph. To cancel the effect of any GNU @command{cflow} option that does
not take arguments, prepend @samp{no-} to the corresponding long
option name. Thus, specifying @option{--no-brief} cancels the effect
of the previous @option{--brief} option.
@@ -1121,7 +1139,7 @@ is making it possible to override @command{cflow} options by running
@item For each @var{program} from your @code{@var{dir}_PROGRAMS} list,
for which you want to generate a flow chart, add the following statements:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
@var{program}_CFLOW_INPUT=$(@var{program}_OBJECTS:.$(OBJEXT)=.c)
@var{program}.cflow: @var{program}_CFLOW_INPUT cflow.rc Makefile
@@ -1131,7 +1149,7 @@ for which you want to generate a flow chart, add the following statements:
$(CPPFLAGS) \
$(@var{program}_CFLOW_INPUT)
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@noindent
Replace @var{program} with program name and
@@ -1144,15 +1162,15 @@ variables, except @code{CFLOW_FLAGS}.
you may wish to add a special rule, allowing to create all flow charts
with a single command, for example:
-@smallexample
+@example
flowcharts: @var{prog1}.cflow @var{prog2}.cflow ...
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@end itemize
As an example, here are the relevant statements which we use in
@command{cflow} @file{src/Makefile.am}:
-@smallexample
+@example
@group
EXTRA_DIST=cflow.rc
@@ -1165,7 +1183,7 @@ cflow.cflow: $(cflow_CFLOW_INPUT) cflow.rc Makefile
$(CPPFLAGS) \
$(cflow_CFLOW_INPUT)
@end group
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@node Options
@chapter Complete Listing of @command{cflow} Options.
@@ -1211,7 +1229,7 @@ declarations}. This might speed up the processing in some cases.
@cindex @option{--define}
@item -D @var{name}[=@var{defn}]
@itemx --define=@var{name}[=@var{defn}]
- Predefine @var{name} as a macro. Implies @option{-cpp}
+ Predefine @var{name} as a macro. Implies @option{--cpp}
(@pxref{Preprocessing}).
@cindex @option{-d}
@@ -1224,7 +1242,7 @@ the 5th nesting level.
@cindex @option{--debug}
@item --debug[=@var{number}]
- Set debugging level. Default @var{number} is 1. Use this option
+ Set debugging level. The default @var{number} is 1. Use this option
if you are developing and/or debugging @command{cflow}.
@cindex @option{--emacs}
@@ -1295,7 +1313,7 @@ For more information, @xref{Symbols}.
@cindex @option{-m}
@cindex @option{--main}
@item -m @var{name}
-@item --main=@var{name}
+@itemx --main=@var{name}
Assume main function to be called @var{name}. @xref{start symbol}.
@cindex @option{-n}
@@ -1367,7 +1385,7 @@ use this option.
@itemx --symbol=@var{sym}:@var{class}
@itemx --symbol=@var{newsym}:=@var{oldsym}
@anchor{symbol types}
- In first form, registers symbol @var{sym} in the syntactic class
+ In the first form, registers symbol @var{sym} in the syntactic class
@var{class}. Valid class names are: @samp{keyword} (or @samp{kw}),
@samp{modifier}, @samp{qualifier}, @samp{identifier}, @samp{type},
@samp{wrapper}. Any unambiguous abbreviation of the above is also
@@ -1446,13 +1464,13 @@ installed somewhere in your Emacs @code{load-path}. To load the module
at startup, add the following lines to your @file{.emacs} or
@file{site-start.el} file:
-@smalllisp
+@lisp
@group
(autoload 'cflow-mode "cflow-mode")
(setq auto-mode-alist (append auto-mode-alist
'(("\\.cflow$" . cflow-mode))))
@end group
-@end smalllisp
+@end lisp
@noindent
@cindex @option{--emacs} introduced
@@ -1519,9 +1537,9 @@ input file contents, etc.)
The source file @file{wc.c}, used to produce sample ASCII tree
graph (@pxref{ascii tree}).
-@smallexample
+@example
@verbatiminclude wc.c
-@end smallexample
+@end example
@node Copying This Manual
@appendix GNU Free Documentation License
diff --git a/src/main.c b/src/main.c
index e81c537..6c51033 100644
--- a/src/main.c
+++ b/src/main.c
@@ -270,7 +270,7 @@ symbol_override(const char *str)
if (ptr[1] == '=') {
Symbol *alias = lookup(ptr+2);
if (!alias) {
- alias = install(ptr+2, INSTALL_OVERWRITE);
+ alias = install(xstrdup(ptr+2), INSTALL_OVERWRITE);
alias->type = SymToken;
alias->token_type = 0;
alias->source = NULL;
diff --git a/src/parser.c b/src/parser.c
index b933860..176d9f2 100644
--- a/src/parser.c
+++ b/src/parser.c
@@ -267,7 +267,7 @@ save_token(TOKSTK *tokptr)
}
}
-static Stackpos start_pos; /* Start position in stack for saving tokens *///FIXME: REMOVE
+static Stackpos start_pos; /* Start position in stack for saving tokens */
static int save_end; /* Stack position up to which the tokens are saved */
void
@@ -387,7 +387,7 @@ yyparse()
}
cleanup_stack();
}
- /*NOTREACHED*/
+ return 0;
}
static int

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